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My screed against 'script kiddies' and what passes for 'IT pros' these days.
My (trying to control my angry) mind. | today | Me, myself and I

Posted on 07/29/2012 3:10:27 PM PDT by Looking4Truth

I'm not as pissed as I sound. Enjoy.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet; Humor; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: it; scriptkiddies
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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To: the invisib1e hand
And I am annoyed by TV advertisements but I just live with them anyway.

BTW, I have never bought anything advertised on a web site or a TV, on a banner, etc. etc.. Wonder how many people are the same. Seems like a huge waste of money.

But companies pay for the number of eyeballs that see their adverts thinking that many will buy their product.

Apparently, the less desirable elements of humanity have made the Internet what it is today... eg. Porn.

51 posted on 07/29/2012 4:18:32 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: Looking4Truth
Oh, and this is what passed for "connectivity" (basically sending batch files to the distant mainframe)


52 posted on 07/29/2012 4:18:57 PM PDT by P.O.E. (Pray for America)
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To: Looking4Truth

The geniuses didn’t even rip out the comment lines that stated who wrote the programs and when and for whom.

That’s funny. We won a huge lawsuit against a (french) competitor. Their programs had our comments, and their electrical and mechanical drawings had our company name on them.


53 posted on 07/29/2012 4:21:20 PM PDT by dsrtsage (One half of all people have below average IQ. In the US the number is 54%)
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To: The Antiyuppie
Also, when I was a kid, I had to walk back and forth to school four miles a day*. And it was uphill both ways. The snow was three feet deep. And then came the winter...

* This part is actually true.

This thread is getting weird. I actually did walk uphill both ways in the snow. I lived on a lake as a kid and the bus came only to the end of the lake at the dam. The road leading to the dam went up and down hills along the shoreline, hence I really did have to do that. Small world.

54 posted on 07/29/2012 4:23:05 PM PDT by Looking4Truth (Leave it to some angry, frustrated liberal do-gooder to screw things up for the rest of us.)
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To: fr_freak

I 100% agree about technology just getting so overwhelming and diverse and people being able to keep up with it. Running into “technical” people who couldn’t think or reason is happening to me more and more.

One of my mass deployments for a gov’t agency sometime back had a fairly simple script to follow. Do a few and there wasn’t much to think about after.

The standard barring network or other anamolies was 14 units per day. That is old backup/breakdown of old with backup made and restored to new and all hardware fully assembled and some admin.

I usually made goal and one other guy was usually there or close. One other fellow seemed permanently baffled. If he had 4 done correctly in a day, it was something.

Half of the ones he did would require the old one to be pulled from the truck and backed up again. I don’t know why. Their backup routine consisted of two icons. One for the old and one for the new.

If there was any kind of problem, the policy was to have an agency IT person to manually move or handle the problem. They were quite strict on that.


55 posted on 07/29/2012 4:23:28 PM PDT by wally_bert (It's sheer elegance in its simplicity! - The Middleman)
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To: fr_freak

Very well said!

Young kids seem to have a knack for it though. Get em a computer early and let them go and include protections because the Internet can be a cold nasty place.


56 posted on 07/29/2012 4:23:28 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: the invisib1e hand

Date: Winter ‘63.
Computer: IBM 1620.
Peripherals: 28K extended core, 1407 card reader/punch, 402 accounting machine.
Translator: Forgo (simplified 2-pass Fortran, all cards)
Program: “Hello world!”


57 posted on 07/29/2012 4:23:35 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: wally_bert

Don’t pay that well, though. Low end jobs tend to treat their employees like dumb slaves.

You’d make several times more as a bit twiddler.

I guess that this goes without saying...


58 posted on 07/29/2012 4:26:43 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: Erasmus
Date: Winter ‘63. Computer: IBM 1620. Peripherals: 28K extended core, 1407 card reader/punch, 402 accounting machine. Translator: Forgo (simplified 2-pass Fortran, all cards) Program: “Hello world!”

You F**king rock!

I remember learning the 'WHOAMI' command in Unix and LMAO.

59 posted on 07/29/2012 4:29:38 PM PDT by Looking4Truth (Leave it to some angry, frustrated liberal do-gooder to screw things up for the rest of us.)
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To: Looking4Truth
Every time I try to rant like this younger people look at me with a puzzled look and I imagine that I look like SNL Angry Old Man.....Flobbldy Flee In my day we used modems that would take 2 days to connect to the internet AND WE LIKED IT! LOL.....
60 posted on 07/29/2012 4:30:24 PM PDT by jakerobins
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To: Erasmus
all cards)

All cards. Yes.

That's what I had to learn on. One syntax error and you had to resubmit the damn cards all over again to the ops people. We 'as students' when I first was learning this stuff were under deadlines, so having to resubmit your deck was almost fatal as far as passing the course (USAF '85). It sucked.

61 posted on 07/29/2012 4:33:20 PM PDT by Looking4Truth (Leave it to some angry, frustrated liberal do-gooder to screw things up for the rest of us.)
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To: cspackler

Lunar Lander was a great game. Simple and fun. Omega Race for the VIC 20 was another good one.


62 posted on 07/29/2012 4:40:38 PM PDT by Yardstick
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To: MarkL; The Invisible Hand
I've heard a much different story regarding "Digital," but it wasn't where MS-DOS originated, but how IBM became involved with Microsoft.

As you go on to explain, Digital Research (another small company like Microsoft) put off IBM, so they went down the street, figuratively, to Gates. Now I had to look this up, but it appears that Bill saw the opportunity and grabbed at it with both hands. He went out and quickly bought a little system called QDOS from another software house called Seattle Computer Products and used this as a basis for MS-DOS, whose Rev 1.0 he was able to deliver pretty quickly.

And not if it's running Linux, in which case quite a bit was was influenced by Andrew Tannenbaum.

Torvalds gives explicit credit to Tannenbaum's Minix project. However, ultimate credit is due to Kernighan and Ritchie of Bell Labs, with their Unix.

One of the chief architects of Windows NT, Dave Cutter, was was hired away from DEC, who was behind the VAX11/780 and VMS.

One of my former colleagues was fond of pointing out what happens when you step the letters of the acronym VMS one letter forward in the alphabet.

63 posted on 07/29/2012 4:42:21 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: the invisib1e hand

You sound like my cousin. I remember those big old things. My beef is not with useless ads on internet; but on tv too. Every two seconds you are interrupted by those pos.


64 posted on 07/29/2012 4:42:55 PM PDT by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
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To: Looking4Truth

I started on a Honeywell 200 in the 6
0’s


65 posted on 07/29/2012 4:45:28 PM PDT by Vietnam Vet From New Mexico (If you don't want to stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.)
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To: Yardstick

I had both and played the daylights out of Omega Race.


66 posted on 07/29/2012 4:46:49 PM PDT by wally_bert (It's sheer elegance in its simplicity! - The Middleman)
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To: dfwgator
Back in my day, we coded in 0’s and 1’s, and sometimes we didn’t even have the 1’s.....and that’s the way it was and we liked it.

You had binary code?

Luxury.

We lived on a planet with a hazy sky, with no sunrise or sunset, no day or night, and we had to hum continuously to prevent any break between sound and no sound.

Try programming in THAT environment.

67 posted on 07/29/2012 4:52:36 PM PDT by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: freekitty

I kept wanting to turn on AdBlock during the Olympics Opening Ceremony the other night (never watch tv otherwise). Finally decided the off button would work just as well. Note to OP: You need Firefox Noscript addon also to lasso and choke those malevolent scripts.


68 posted on 07/29/2012 4:58:08 PM PDT by steve86 (Acerbic by nature not nurture TM)
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To: dfwgator
Back in my day, we coded in 0’s and 1’s, and sometimes we didn’t even have the 1’s.....and that’s the way it was and we liked it.

I couldn't think of a response to this. It's too hardcore.

Also, my remarks about msft...it's funny, I wonder what I'd be doing if it weren't for Bill Gates. I'd probably have gone into the family business...

69 posted on 07/29/2012 5:04:04 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Woe to them...)
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To: Talisker
We lived on a planet with a hazy sky, with no sunrise or sunset, no day or night, and we had to hum continuously to prevent any break between sound and no sound.

I retired from the Ground Observer Corps in 1957.

70 posted on 07/29/2012 5:10:45 PM PDT by Former War Criminal (Who am I? Why am I here?)
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To: Erasmus

wow. you have a golden anniversary coming up!


71 posted on 07/29/2012 5:10:48 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Woe to them...)
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To: P.O.E.

that’s beautiful.


72 posted on 07/29/2012 5:12:22 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (Woe to them...)
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To: wally_bert

It was addictive, especially with game paddles. I think the VIC 20 version was even better than the arcade version.

Now I’m thinking of those early computer magazines that would publish screen shots so readers could prove they had gotten a high score on a game. Just think of that — you would take a picture, take it somewhere to have it developed, pick it up a few days later, snail mail it in, then maybe you’d see it a few weeks later published in a pulp paper magazine. Talk about old school.


73 posted on 07/29/2012 5:18:03 PM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Looking4Truth
Th 7094 computer at one of my undergrad schools was like that. You had a 'routing room' with a service window where you would submit your deck.

Several hours later (depending on your class schedule, often the next day), you'd get the deck back with a printout of your results wrapped around it with a rubberband. The printout would usually be a dump of your program's core when it aborted, and sometimes would be a vague but error-riddled version of the output you intended from the program itself.

The core dump was ordinarily much larger, so the moment the routing monkey brought your results to the window, you could get that sinking feeling right away.

The routing room was in one building and the computer was in another. They had a small computer (a 1401) in the routing room which did nothing but read the submitted card decks onto tape, which would be carried over to the computer building a few times througout the day and night. Then during the next trip, the results tape would be carried back to the routing room and the outputs of the various programs run out to a high-speed printer (a 1403) on the spot. Late-night submissions were handled therefore under sort of a FedEx business model, except that the trip was only across Springfield Avenue, and not to Memphis.

Over in the computer building was another computer with its routing room nearby. This computer was a first-generation solid state machine designed and built at the University--kind of a 1962 supercomputer. In its routing room were three lightbulbs set near the ceiling in a row. They were red, yellow, and green. They were labeled "DOWN," "?," and "UP."

74 posted on 07/29/2012 5:37:19 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: Looking4Truth

There is a program on Unix called “make.” (Windoze systems have versions of it now too.)

Make is designed to automate the invocation of the translator system (e.g., C compiler and linker) of a project consisting of numerous source code modules. Once you write a control script for it for a specific project, make keeps track of what files need to be retranslated in order to do a build of the project, and then invokes the translators accordingly.

It is common to invoke make with a command line parameter consisting of the name of one of the files you want to specifically retranslate. If you specify a file that is not listed in the control script, make will terminate with an error message to you.

In older versions of make (but sadly not newer ones), it was fun to type the following command:

make love

and the program would respond with

Don’t know how to make love. Stop.


75 posted on 07/29/2012 5:46:29 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
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To: Looking4Truth
You old coot! Keep those kids of your lawn!

When I see threads like this, I'm tempted to join in - I've got the bonafides - started in '77 coding a COBOL Accounts Receivable system for Management Science America. Went on to work with some of the folks at IBM's Thomas Watson Research Center, as a tech rep pushing a new-fangled relational database management system and 4GL called Nomad. It was based on the relational model developed by Date and Codd. I was once told that Chris Date actually looked at some of the work I had done when he was visiting the Watson Center and nodded. Helped some friendly folks at the Dept. of the Navy learn another rdbms named Focus. Visited Bell Labs in Princeton in the early 80's where they showed me how they could access and process and print information with an RF network! Magic! Installed an IBM PC LAN in a Fortune 500 company - one of the first ones IBM sold commercially. Met Ozzie when he was at Iris. Met Kapor. Saw Lotus Notes pre-release 1.0 and installed Notes 1.1 at the company I worked for. I've specialized in the Collaborative Software stack ever since and these days work in product development IT for a really really big enterprise software company that eats other companies for breakfast. I'm one of the geeks' geeks. I frackin' love it. Tried management for a few years in the middle of my career, but I'm an engineer - need to keep my hands in it. Half the guys I work with have PhD's and the other half, like me, are ADhDs who just love to tweak things and break things and fix them up, ultimately resulting in production systems that give almost 5 x 9's reliability.

When script kiddies come on my lawn, I use facial recognition, tag them, then post fotos of them to their own FB pages. Damn kids. Heh.

76 posted on 07/29/2012 5:57:03 PM PDT by Ol' Sox
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To: Looking4Truth
My fisrt mainframe: The Philco Ford 1000~~~

NORAD, Cheyenne Mountain Complex, Colorado, circa 1976.

AS a young Airman Basic, I learned to run this all by myself. The tape drives used one inch reel tapes, none of that new-fangled 1/2 inch 9 track! Note the card punch on the lower left.

We called that computer room "Offline", because we loaded jobs via punch card to tape, and the tapes were carried by tape librarians or "tape apes" to the "Online" system.

Online looked like this:

This was used for both Space Track and Missile Warning missions.

All of these were replaced by Honeywell 6080's in 1979 (but the chick did not come with it).

Sigh... The good ole days!

77 posted on 07/29/2012 6:26:15 PM PDT by Alas Babylon!
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To: dfwgator

We had to walk three miles in the snow to get our ones, then it was a bitch to get them home because they kept falling through the holes in our pockets.


78 posted on 07/29/2012 6:38:06 PM PDT by ArmstedFragg (hoaxy dopey changey)
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To: Looking4Truth

Run Ghostery and NoScript on Firefox, and you’ll have a start on getting control again.


79 posted on 07/29/2012 7:45:18 PM PDT by PAR35
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To: the invisib1e hand
Digital Research != Digital Equipment Corporation.
80 posted on 07/29/2012 8:06:58 PM PDT by Vide
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To: arasina; MileHi; Looking4Truth
No, really. Those scripts are horribly frustrating. It's as if a gigantic nest of digital cockroaches has infested the internet.

If you're still looking for a solution, I might suggest Firefox, with two add-ons: Ghostery and AdBlock Plus. All free, and my browser pages are usually pretty clean :) Only issues I have is sometimes Ghostery might block the comments sections on some articles, but I don't really care.
81 posted on 07/29/2012 8:25:40 PM PDT by Svartalfiar
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To: dfwgator
"Back in my day, we coded in 0’s and 1’s, and sometimes we didn’t even have the 1’s.....and that’s the way it was and we liked it."

Did you have to walk uphill in the snow both ways to get them 1s? Back when I was learning FORTRAN we were glad to have 0s, 1s were gravy ;)

I remember when 8" floppy drives were the shiznipples and 1200 baud was a screaming connection.

82 posted on 07/29/2012 8:39:01 PM PDT by West Texas Chuck (Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. That should be a convenience store, not a Government Agency.)
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To: the invisib1e hand
some of my first programs were on punch cards.

Punch cards you lucky! We had paper tape.

83 posted on 07/29/2012 8:50:45 PM PDT by Mike Darancette (Obamaid has to go.)
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To: Chickensoup

“I assure you that no business geets done through facebook, nor through Linkedin.”

Ain’t that the truth. I keep having all these folks tell me how I need to join Linkedin and that will get me more business. I always ask them if it helped them get any new business. They always say “Well no, but you should join anyway!” So, there you have it. I joined and I got no new business. But hey, it was free!

At least on facebook I get the satisfaction of bugging everyone with the best of the factual conservative (and outrageous liberal) stories I find at Free Republic! Not to mention I do get several positive comments about my posts there. Oh, and do I read anything anyone else posts on facebook? Are you kidding me? The level of discourse there is “My dog pooped on the front lawn this morning! Yea!” (I’m not making that up, either. True story. And sadly enough, you realize, this was a relative that posted that.)


84 posted on 07/29/2012 9:12:33 PM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Vote Republican in 2012 and only be called racist one more time!)
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To: wally_bert

“A few times over the years I had seriously entertained other careers such as working in a dog kennel or oil change monkey.”

I still entertain ideas of becoming a car mechanic.


85 posted on 07/29/2012 9:53:56 PM PDT by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: Looking4Truth

Would you happen to have a 30cm piece of wire?


86 posted on 07/29/2012 10:06:12 PM PDT by ThomasThomas
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To: Vide; The Invisible Hand
Digital Research != Digital Equipment Corporation.

The hand is referring to VMS, the system DEC developed to run the VAX series. Gates hired Dave Cutler, who led the development of VMS, to lead the development of Windows NT, from which all modern versions of Windows descend. Windows has an inner core, hidden behind the Win32 API, that bears a resemblance to VMS.

Gates beat out Digital Research much earlier. DR, which had developed the CP/M OS for 8080-based systems, was IBM's first choice to develop the first PC's OS. But they were slow in responding, so IBM went with Microsoft instead. MS didn't actually have what they sold to IBM, but they went across town and bought a nice CP/M work-alike, 86-DOS, aka QDOS, for $50K from Seattle Computer Products and turned it into PC/DOS, the original IBM PC operating system. Naturally, MS forgot to tell SCP the real reason they wanted the system.

87 posted on 07/29/2012 10:28:39 PM PDT by cynwoody
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To: Looking4Truth

“Half the time I get an error about a ‘wayward’ SCRIPT that forces me to restart the browser “

The NoScript plugin for Firefox is excellent at keeping heavy Javascript scripts from slowing down pages. If you want to restore functionality to a page you can select what you want with an easy-to-use button menu.


88 posted on 07/29/2012 11:53:08 PM PDT by PastorBooks
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To: Looking4Truth

Twenty years?

Newbie!!

Jus kiddin (sorta) I started programming in ‘72.

But I agree. Javascript is the most damnable heresy that ever came to computing. And all the things they promised it would not do, like infect or corrupt your computer, it manages to do perfectly well, every day!


89 posted on 07/29/2012 11:58:32 PM PDT by djf (The barbarian hordes will ALWAYS outnumber the clean-shaven. And they vote.)
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To: ICCtheWay

“I had a word processor that ran on a PRE - PC S100 based computer - in a DOS like environment it was astounding in what it could do ... Today’s BLOATED WORD still cannot do what this little Word Processor could do ... “

Was it Emacs, Vi or Vim?

Emacs was released in 1976.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emacs

Vi was released in 1976.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vi

Vim was released in 1991, based off of Vi.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vim_%28text_editor%29

Most Vi users now use Vim, and beginners often use an easy-to-get-started version called Cream for Vim:
http://cream.sourceforge.net/

Emacs and Vim are the two most powerful editors on the planet. No modern editor can come close to what they can do. They can run either in a modern GUI or in a terminal, just like the old DOS days.

I use Emacs and LOVE it. It takes getting used to and the default keystrokes are a little weird, but the power of Emacs is that *everything* can be customized. All settings are held in a file named “.emacs”. You can tweak everything — colors, sidebars, add abilities, shortcuts, have it auto-load often used files at the touch of a key... anything.

I’ve been using Emacs for several months and I’ve got it so customized it fits like a glove. It’s amazing.

Here’s a few sites to get you started:

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/
http://www.emacswiki.org/
http://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/EmacsNewbie

If you’re into personal organization, look into the well-loved Org-Mode module. I don’t use it — I have my own system set up —but many Emacsers rave over it.
http://orgmode.org/

PS. If you find you like a text editor over Word but find you have to go back to Word when you want a document formatted with bold headers, etc., you don’t have to. Look into using LaTeX. LaTeX is FAR more capable than Word and produces letters and documents that look more professional. Many books have been published using LaTeX.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LaTeX

You can use LaTeX right in Emacs or Vim, both have LaTeX plugins available.

If you try either Emacs or Vim you’ll never go back to Word. Enjoy!


90 posted on 07/30/2012 12:26:08 AM PDT by PastorBooks
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To: PastorBooks
Jeez, people.

Okay, I started with paper tape. So there.

But I learned to use whatever technology was "right" for the job. These days it's C# on Windows, PHP on Linux for websites, Objective C for OSX and iOS software, whatever, etc. and etc.

Or anything else the client (or the Boss) insists on...

C would be my language of choice, but companies willing to pay for the extra hours it takes are few and far between. Flexibility gets you clients who come back. VB is okay for some; I never liked it much, but would take on a VB extension or maintenance project in a heartbeat, to put beans on the table. The idea is to get it done.

A shovel is better for detail work, but a Bobcat gets it done faster if the job's big (and they all are, these days), and if it's really big, you use a D9 Caterpillar. Development of software is a lot like developing construction projects.

Look. We could all flop them out on the table and use a yardstick -- or we could just get the job done with what works. We make more money with the latter strategy. I use Emacs for Ruby and Python and PHP and Bash scripts, Vim for quick and dirty edits, VS for C#/VB/ASP.net, and even Text Wrangler for a lot of stuff, but come on, none of that makes me a bigger or smaller or better or worse person. I use a Macbook Pro (yeah, with Parallels) these days, but I won't knock your Windows or Linux box. We're all just making the client happy or stroking the boss for a good review.

But hey -- "script kiddies"? Gimme a break. Do you (OP) really know what that is?

91 posted on 07/30/2012 3:45:48 AM PDT by umbagi (ABO, y'all!)
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To: wally_bert
I had both and played the daylights out of Omega Race.

Oh yeah, I played the snot out of Omega Race too. Went so far as to wire up a 555 circuit with potentiometer inline with the controller for automatic missile firing.

Still only got 4 shots on the screen at any time, but there were ALWAYS 4 shots on the screen with that circuit! The pot allowed me to vary the rate at which the auto fire occurred for either tight grouping or a more spaced out pattern of the missiles.

92 posted on 07/30/2012 4:28:46 AM PDT by whd23 (Every time a link is de-blogged an angel gets its wings.)
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To: Chickensoup

I disagree. I was involved personally in business transactions and hiring decisions where linkedin played a part.


93 posted on 07/30/2012 5:18:21 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: PastorBooks

No - it was not Emacs. But it would not surprise me that it was based on Emacs. It was a proprietary word processor that ran on a Jacquard 500 (a very different device for that era - of late 1970’s) The Jacquard could run in straight Word Processor mode - or is a computer mode where you could run programs in Basic - very sophisticated ones. It had a type of programming environment - Very Advanced for the time ... but it died out in the early 1980’s...


94 posted on 07/30/2012 8:15:01 AM PDT by ICCtheWay
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To: Cronos

I disagree. I was involved personally in business transactions and hiring decisions where linkedin played a part
___________________

I would be interested in the industries. I am on lists for all sorts of insustries and they are all dead. Anyone else have luck using Linkedin in business?


95 posted on 07/30/2012 9:04:10 AM PDT by Chickensoup (STOP The Great O-ppression)
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To: Looking4Truth

Y’know, if you use Firefox, (might want to avoid the current version, though...), you can get plugins to screen out a lot of that stuff.


96 posted on 07/30/2012 9:10:09 AM PDT by Little Ray (AGAINST Obama in the General.)
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To: MarkL; All

Love VMS! In fact, when I was at BBN in the early 1990’s, I wrote a full screen editor for DCL using DCL. Very cool language.

I started before high school with DEC’s RSTS-11 BASIC-PLUS, before picking up Data General COBOL for a summer job in high school. In college, learned FORTRAN and 8080 Assembler.

After college it was VAX VMS COBOL, then APL, and C. By the time OO coding came around, I was doing enterprise app implementations (e.g. Oracle Applications), but 95% of the work was PL/SQL and ODBC for querying databases.

Haven’t done much coding, save the occasional VB Script or Excel macro, in the last 10 years or so. It used to be fun; now PM and org change are more interesting...


97 posted on 07/30/2012 8:10:24 PM PDT by bt_dooftlook (Democrats - the party of Amnesty, Abortion, and Adolescence)
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To: Chickensoup

specifically for datawarehousing and business intelligence.


98 posted on 07/31/2012 4:39:12 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: bt_dooftlook

I only touched VMS, JCL, Cobol etc. when I was filling in time doing some simple mainframe work. It’s a whole different world from my BI/DWH world — and now I’m figuring out SAP B/W — THAT is another world with it’s own terminology!


99 posted on 07/31/2012 4:45:12 AM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Cronos

I should have been more specific; while I did a little JCL and COBOL for an IBM 360 back in the 70’s, the VMS to which I was referring was VAX-11 VMS which later morphed into Open VMS...


100 posted on 07/31/2012 8:36:25 AM PDT by bt_dooftlook (Democrats - the party of Amnesty, Abortion, and Adolescence)
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