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10 Things That Every Survivalist Needs
http://daily-survival.blogspot.com ^ | 10/17/11 | Code Name Insight

Posted on 10/17/2011 9:25:44 PM PDT by Kartographer

I use the word "survivalist" in the most all-encompassing way, meaning that anyone who wants to/plans to survive a fairly good sized disaster falls into this category. As a survivalist, you need these ten things if you want to have a chance of coming out the other side of a disaster in a rather whole manner.

(Excerpt) Read more at daily-survival.blogspot.com ...


TOPICS: Society
KEYWORDS: beprepared; bhoeconomy; getreadyhereitcomes; preparenow; prepperping; preppers; selfreliance; shtf; survival; survivalism; survivalping; tshtf
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Interesting list I think the #10 "A heightened sense of awareness" goes hand and hand with not being taken unawares by 'Normalcy Bias'. When you have lived in relative peaceful law abiding no shortage of anything world all your life and are suddenly confronted by a SHTF it will be hard for many to come to grips with the fact that the world and rules they have lived with and under their entire lives do not apply.
1 posted on 10/17/2011 9:25:46 PM PDT by Kartographer
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers PING!


2 posted on 10/17/2011 9:28:13 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Are twin Detonics Combat Masters in a dual Alessi shoulder rig on the list?


3 posted on 10/17/2011 9:29:47 PM PDT by real saxophonist (The fact that you play tuba doesn't make you any less lethal. -USMC bandsman in Iraq)
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To: Kartographer
Can you post them here? I don't go to blogs.

/johnny

4 posted on 10/17/2011 9:29:59 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: Kartographer

Could you add me to your ping list? I’m assuming it is regarding survivalist issues?

TIA


5 posted on 10/17/2011 9:31:24 PM PDT by Outlaw Woman (Country Folks can survive....can you? Are you ready?)
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To: Kartographer

Bump for Morning Coffee. (Not to worry; I’ve horded a whole lot of that, LOL!)


6 posted on 10/17/2011 9:31:41 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'Hobbies.' I'm developing a robust Post-Apocalyptic skill set...)
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To: real saxophonist
Are twin Detonics Combat Masters in a dual Alessi shoulder rig on the list?

If you have a steak knife and the proper attitude and spirit, you can get that after TSHTF. Training does help.

/johnny

7 posted on 10/17/2011 9:32:27 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: Kartographer

I truly believe that we are heading for times which we have only seen in apocalyptic movies. AND NO I am not talking about God’s end times I am talking about times that men will make so bad that people will cry out for God to end things.

We are at least in for a fall much like that of that we are in for something like the collapse of Argentina ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yerKMQc7-w&feature=grec_index )but on a global scale. Additionally I think we will see a much more violent version. As recent events show (Flash Mobs, UK riots, etc)we have a larger entitlement minded population and a the US has a much more violent and armed population than Argentina. I see many many small business wiped out by flash mob looting, and see rape, robbery and murder for murder sake. Many of these ‘yutes’ will think no more about killing you than most people think about stepping on a roach. That will be the test of many. Most preppers I know are Christian people and they will hesitate to do what they might have to do to stop the ‘yutes’. On the other hand the ‘yutes’ won’t think twice nor lose a minute of sleep, in fact they will smile and laugh about it. Nothing is sacred to these people Just look at what happened in Rome:

http://www.euronews.net/2011/10/17/12-arrested-after-rome-riots/

Think of this quote which is one of my favorites:

“Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Siege of AR-558 (#7.8)” (1998)
Quark: Let me tell you something about Hew-mons, Nephew. They’re a wonderful, friendly people, as long as their bellies are full and their holosuites are working. But take away their creature comforts, deprive them of food, sleep, sonic showers, put their lives in jeopardy over an extended period of time and those same friendly, intelligent, wonderful people... will become as nasty and as violent as the most bloodthirsty Klingon. You don’t believe me? Look at those faces. Look in their eyes.

Now go look at some of the videos of the riots in the UK and of some of the flash mobs here in the US and look into there eyes.

For those who are just starting or are old hands at prepping you may find my Preparedness Manual helpfull. You can download it at:

http://www.tomeaker.com/kart/preparedness1i.pdf

For those of you who haven’t started already it’s time to prepare almost past time maybe. You needed to be stocking up on food guns, ammo, basic household supplies like soap, papergoods, cleaning supplies, good sturdy clothes including extra socks, underwear and extra shoes and boots, a extra couple changes of oil and filters for your car, tools, things you buy everyday start buying two and put one up.

As the LDS say “When the emergency is upon us the time for preparedness has past.”

Or as the bible says: A prudent man sees danger and takes refuge, but the simple keep going and suffer for it.
NIV Proverbs 22:3

Lastly this for the doubters and the scoffers.

“There is no greater disaster than to underestimate danger.

Underestimation can be fatal.”


8 posted on 10/17/2011 9:37:32 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: JRandomFreeper

No.


9 posted on 10/17/2011 9:46:06 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Kartographer

bfl


10 posted on 10/17/2011 9:47:28 PM PDT by Reddy (B.O. stinks)
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To: TigersEye
Why doesn't the list start with what's really required for survival?

Air (under pressure). 3 minutes, max, without it.

Water. 3 days wihtout it.

Food. 3 weeks without it.

Hope. 3 months without it.

YMMV, but that's what the training says. At least the training I took. Everything else is gravy.

I think you are just pimping a blog site.

/johnny

11 posted on 10/17/2011 9:53:10 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
Hope. 3 months without it.

Nonsense. I've lived without that for years at a stretch. Highly overrated.

I don't pimp anything. It's not my blog anyway.

12 posted on 10/17/2011 9:56:01 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Yeah that’s what I am doing, you caught me. Please don’t turn me into the FR Blog Police.

Man that stuff gets sooooooo old.

What gets me is people who read post they really have no interest in so they can bitch about it.


13 posted on 10/17/2011 9:56:43 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

Everything I learned about survival skills I learned from Mad Max and The Walking Dead!


14 posted on 10/17/2011 9:57:56 PM PDT by Newtoidaho (Fight organized crime. Vote out all incumbent Democrats!)
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To: Kartographer

If the world collapses, the best way to survive is to join a community, where people know how to live simply, have a good supply of food on hand, and stick together.

That’s why I’m cynical about the “survivalist” types: they tend to be loners, or isolated families. They are all fantasy, not relying on how people actually acted in such times of the past.

Your best bet to survive is in a group that has strong ties to each other, either family or church.

If I lived in the US, I’d move to rural Utah.

Just joking, but Orson Scott Card has a couple apocolyptical novels where the LDS state of Deseret kept the peace and remained stable (and even tolerated us gentiles).... They could do it, if for no other reasons that the LDS keep alive the memory when they were on their own in the middle of nowhere and had to stick together to survive.

Similarly, here in the Philippines, the extended family would keep people alive.

My husband said when WWII hit, he and his mom (a teacher and widow) walked out of town to their farm and hid there for a couple of months...presumably we’d do the same.

Most of the ten million people in Manila would head home to their family towns and live off their family’s land, but I shudder to think what would happen if things got bad and the thugs came up the new highway...gun control is strict here...on the other hand, a machete is a frightful weapon in the wrong hands....

Probably if things got bad, someone, probably a person from one of the rich families who run the place would start a new militia/guerilla movement to keep the peace... and of course, if you needed something, everyone would trade/bribe/steal and smuggle things that are needed.


15 posted on 10/17/2011 10:00:28 PM PDT by LadyDoc
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To: Kartographer
I gritch about people posting trash, and begging for blog hits, and only when they post a piece of dreck, without the real basics.

Air, water, shelter, food, hope.

In that frigging order.

Any list that doesn't start with those, doesn't rate.

/johnny

16 posted on 10/17/2011 10:01:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: Newtoidaho
I haven't seen the Walking Dead but Braveheart was good for the people skills.

(Whap!) "Arrrrr, that'll wake ye up in the marnin', laddy!"

17 posted on 10/17/2011 10:02:32 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: LadyDoc

“That’s why I’m cynical about the “survivalist” types: they tend to be loners, or isolated families. They are all fantasy, not relying on how people actually acted in such times of the past.”

It’s sort of like LARPing


18 posted on 10/17/2011 10:05:32 PM PDT by ari-freedom ("Perry: good governor. Romney: Good hair."-Herman Cain)
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To: JRandomFreeper
Original Article (no advertising)

10 Things That Every Survivalist Needs

I use the word "survivalist" in the most all-encompassing way, meaning that anyone who wants to/plans to survive a fairly good sized disaster falls into this category. As a survivalist, you need these ten things if you want to have a chance of coming out the other side of a disaster in a rather whole manner.

  1. An emergency fund. Cash works wonders in most disasters. It can get you a ride out of town, fill up your gas tank, get you some food, buy you an airline ticket to a better place, etc. To do: get your emergency fund together now. I used to recommend $1000 but now I have upped it to $5000.
  2. Basic survival skills. No matter where you are, can you get/make/barter for/steal/hijack/or otherwise acquire: water, food, clothing, shelter, medication? To do: if there were a disaster tomorrow, where would you get water (the most vital of necessities in a disaster), food (second most important), clothing (pretty vital), a place to shelter from the elements (ditto), and critical medication? Make a plan for this and an a back up plan as well.
  3. Material goods. This can be important for your survival comfort (on the other hand, in many disasters you are often left with what you are wearing on your back and no more, anyway...). Once you come through the initial disaster, some basic material good will come in handy. Do you have: a BOB? Basic camping supplies (even if you live in the middle of a city)? Firearms? Booze (actually useful in multiple ways after a disaster)? Tools? To do: start to acquire a small collection of each of these items.
  4. Knowledge. The good thing about knowledge is that once you learn something it is yours to keep. You can't lose/have stolen/have confiscated the things that are in your head. To do: read widely. And conduct experiments as necessary. Reading/studying/practicing should encompass: camping and survival, basic medical care, navigation, how to drive anything that moves, how to grow/forage for/hunt for/fish for your own food, how to process said food, how to make your own electricity, how to make your own medicines, how to defend your home and your person, etc.
  5. Friends. No man is an island and in a crisis situation, some extra pairs of hands will come in mighty handy. Obviously you should still prepare on your own but cultivating a group of people who could band together to help each other before/during/after a disaster is quite useful. To do: help others with general things and expect them to help you in return. This is the fastest way to see who you can count on in an emergency (if they won't help you with simple, everyday tasks, how useful with they be in a disaster?). The more you have in common with said people, the better (ie: those you hunt with, fish with, camp with, participate in shooting/exercising/other survival-related events with, the better).
  6. A prepared home. Did you know that most common survival situation you are statistically likely to encounter is common, every day disasters like a house fire, domestic violence event, health crisis, etc. To do: while it is great to practice with your handy dandy night vision goggles on a scheduled recon mission of the city park, you actually will be better served to spend some time at home getting your home prepared (all safety items should be in place--fire extinguisher, smoke detector, etc), your people prepared (if there are internal issues in the home that could lead to a dangerous situation such as domestic violence, that needs to be rectified ASAP), and your health prepared (exercise and eat right and you may have a chance of hauling your ass out of a crisis on your own. If you don't do this you will most likely be left behind hoping someone will come along to save you).
  7. Advanced survival skills. This is where things get fun. Anyone can forage for food but how many people can go out and bring back a gourmet salad (something like this). Anyone can construct a rudimentary shelter during a storm but how many people can make this? Anyone can point and fire a weapon (well, almost anyone) but how many people have this kind of training? (note: I don't know anything about this particular school, they just had a nifty list of skills to use as an example). To do: get as many practical, advanced, survival skills under your belt as possible.
  8. People skills. Oddly enough, much of survival isn't like you see in action films with the hero single-handedly walking into a situation and fighting his way through a gauntlet of gunfire, physical violence, and high-speed chases. Much of survival has to do with people skills. Can you talk your way into getting help as quickly as possible? Can you size up a person's intent quickly and accurately? Can you talk your way out of a brawl before it starts and diffuse a tense situation? Can you be a physical threat if necessary? Can you lead a team, especially under high stress conditions? To do: brush up on your people skills (if necessary, use books, classes, and actual practice to get this done).
  9. Get the hell out of dodge skills. Sometimes you can do nothing but flee if you want to save your skin and live to fight another day. To do: plan multiple evacuation routes from your home and work, have the means to evacuate if necessary (everything from a car that works, plenty of gas, a place to stay far away from your home, etc), have a BOB or at the last a small "go bag" that you always carry with you, have the foresight to leave BEFORE it becomes impossible to do so (don't even get me started on those people who hang around home until a hurricane is minutes away before they call 911 for help, never mind that the news has been telling them to evacuate for DAYS).
  10. A heightened sense of awareness. Again, much of survival is just being aware of whatever situation you happen to be in. If you live in an earthquake zone, you should know this and be prepared for such an event. If you are heading down to a seedy bar, you should not be surprised if a fight breaks out and someone pulls a gun (why would you want to be there anyway?). If you are in a public building, you shouldn't have to wonder where the emergency exits are if the fire alarm goes off, you should already have ascertained this information as a matter of habit. To do: actually practice being more aware of your surroundings/situation.

19 posted on 10/17/2011 10:06:05 PM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Hope? But we already have Obama.


20 posted on 10/17/2011 10:07:20 PM PDT by ari-freedom ("Perry: good governor. Romney: Good hair."-Herman Cain)
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To: LadyDoc
Amen. If I can breath, I need to think about water, and if I have water, I need to think about staying warm and getting shelter, and if I have shelter, I need to think about food. And my community, and my faith, give me hope.

And I respond to that by helping provide those things to my community.

But if I don't know the basics, I can't be part of a community. And if they don't, they won't be a community.

/johnny

21 posted on 10/17/2011 10:07:20 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I hear ya. The first thing I put in my bug out kit was this...


22 posted on 10/17/2011 10:07:32 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

1. An emergency fund. Cash works wonders in most disasters. It can get you a ride out of town, fill up your gas tank, get you some food, buy you an airline ticket to a better place, etc. To do: get your emergency fund together now. I used to recommend $1000 but now I have upped it to $5000.
2. Basic survival skills. No matter where you are, can you get/make/barter for/steal/hijack/or otherwise acquire: water, food, clothing, shelter, medication? To do: if there were a disaster tomorrow, where would you get water (the most vital of necessities in a disaster), food (second most important), clothing (pretty vital), a place to shelter from the elements (ditto), and critical medication? Make a plan for this and an a back up plan as well.
3. Material goods. This can be important for your survival comfort (on the other hand, in many disasters you are often left with what you are wearing on your back and no more, anyway...). Once you come through the initial disaster, some basic material good will come in handy. Do you have: a BOB? Basic camping supplies (even if you live in the middle of a city)? Firearms? Booze (actually useful in multiple ways after a disaster)? Tools? To do: start to acquire a small collection of each of these items.
4. Knowledge. The good thing about knowledge is that once you learn something it is yours to keep. You can’t lose/have stolen/have confiscated the things that are in your head. To do: read widely. And conduct experiments as necessary. Reading/studying/practicing should encompass: camping and survival, basic medical care, navigation, how to drive anything that moves, how to grow/forage for/hunt for/fish for your own food, how to process said food, how to make your own electricity, how to make your own medicines, how to defend your home and your person, etc.
5. Friends. No man is an island and in a crisis situation, some extra pairs of hands will come in mighty handy. Obviously you should still prepare on your own but cultivating a group of people who could band together to help each other before/during/after a disaster is quite useful. To do: help others with general things and expect them to help you in return. This is the fastest way to see who you can count on in an emergency (if they won’t help you with simple, everyday tasks, how useful with they be in a disaster?). The more you have in common with said people, the better (ie: those you hunt with, fish with, camp with, participate in shooting/exercising/other survival-related events with, the better).
6. A prepared home. Did you know that most common survival situation you are statistically likely to encounter is common, every day disasters like a house fire, domestic violence event, health crisis, etc. To do: while it is great to practice with your handy dandy night vision goggles on a scheduled recon mission of the city park, you actually will be better served to spend some time at home getting your home prepared (all safety items should be in place—fire extinguisher, smoke detector, etc), your people prepared (if there are internal issues in the home that could lead to a dangerous situation such as domestic violence, that needs to be rectified ASAP), and your health prepared (exercise and eat right and you may have a chance of hauling your ass out of a crisis on your own. If you don’t do this you will most likely be left behind hoping someone will come along to save you).
7. Advanced survival skills. This is where things get fun. Anyone can forage for food but how many people can go out and bring back a gourmet salad (something like this). Anyone can construct a rudimentary shelter during a storm but how many people can make this? Anyone can point and fire a weapon (well, almost anyone) but how many people have this kind of training? (note: I don’t know anything about this particular school, they just had a nifty list of skills to use as an example). To do: get as many practical, advanced, survival skills under your belt as possible.
8. People skills. Oddly enough, much of survival isn’t like you see in action films with the hero single-handedly walking into a situation and fighting his way through a gauntlet of gunfire, physical violence, and high-speed chases. Much of survival has to do with people skills. Can you talk your way into getting help as quickly as possible? Can you size up a person’s intent quickly and accurately? Can you talk your way out of a brawl before it starts and diffuse a tense situation? Can you be a physical threat if necessary? Can you lead a team, especially under high stress conditions? To do: brush up on your people skills (if necessary, use books, classes, and actual practice to get this done).
9. Get the hell out of dodge skills. Sometimes you can do nothing but flee if you want to save your skin and live to fight another day. To do: plan multiple evacuation routes from your home and work, have the means to evacuate if necessary (everything from a car that works, plenty of gas, a place to stay far away from your home, etc), have a BOB or at the last a small “go bag” that you always carry with you, have the foresight to leave BEFORE it becomes impossible to do so (don’t even get me started on those people who hang around home until a hurricane is minutes away before they call 911 for help, never mind that the news has been telling them to evacuate for DAYS).
10. A heightened sense of awareness. Again, much of survival is just being aware of whatever situation you happen to be in. If you live in an earthquake zone, you should know this and be prepared for such an event. If you are heading down to a seedy bar, you should not be surprised if a fight breaks out and someone pulls a gun (why would you want to be there anyway?). If you are in a public building, you shouldn’t have to wonder where the emergency exits are if the fire alarm goes off, you should already have ascertained this information as a matter of habit. To do: actually practice being more aware of your surroundings/situation.


23 posted on 10/17/2011 10:09:50 PM PDT by Eyes Unclouded ("The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out." -George Carlin)
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To: TigersEye
I'm happy for you.

After you expire, will you have anything I really want in your GOOD bag?

Because I can't use LPs.

/johnny

24 posted on 10/17/2011 10:11:41 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: Eyes Unclouded

If he’s afraid to go to a blog I don’t think survival tips are going to help much. WEFG


25 posted on 10/17/2011 10:12:19 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

It’s a CD. The rest of my stuff is wired to a self destruct device set to go off then minutes after I expire.


26 posted on 10/17/2011 10:14:28 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Kartographer

Been prepping for years now - I like your manual, and will have to study it in more detail. Thanks for the link to it.

The manual, however, unless I overlooked it, seems light on growing long-term survival food. Using only part of a small plot of land, I’ve been able to make an almost sustainable dent in our food needs by raising survival chickens (http://www.survivalblog.com/2008/02/the_home_chicken_flock_for_sel.html) that lay throughout the year, dry beans that grow and store well in my climate, and potatoes that do the same. Those who live where corn grows well can add a nice grain as well. Heirloom stuff only, of course, and don’t bother with luxuries like lettuce and tomatoes until you’ve got the basics covered (The chickens will destroy those crops anyway!).


27 posted on 10/17/2011 10:15:07 PM PDT by dagogo redux (A whiff of primitive spirits in the air, harbingers of an impending descent into the feral.)
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then = ten (or nine, I forget what I set it at)


28 posted on 10/17/2011 10:16:05 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye
If he’s afraid to go to a blog I don’t think survival tips are going to help much.

Never said I was afraid, boss.

I said I WON'T.

Big diff.

But you do seem supportive of the blog.

/johnny

29 posted on 10/17/2011 10:16:10 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
Oh, yes, I support the blog.

I'm raking in $10k a month from referrals. lol

30 posted on 10/17/2011 10:17:23 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye
Don't have much use for CDs, either, slick.

We play piano and banjo around these parts.

/johnny

31 posted on 10/17/2011 10:17:59 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I bet you do. Especially banjo.


32 posted on 10/17/2011 10:19:28 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye
Then why do you support a blog that doesn't give the very basic requirements of life in the first 10?

Or glosses over them. Some people really don't know what they are, and in what order they need to do them.

And they die.

These days, not in some zombie biker future.

I'm just pointing at the rookie and laughing.

Don't take it personally. Because it's the only way I know to keep idiots from influencing people that really want to know.

And whose live may depend on it.

/johnny

33 posted on 10/17/2011 10:22:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I told you, I support it because I get $10 a month to mis-lead people to it.

I have enjoyed this stimulating conversation but I'm running out of air.
I have to go out to the air pile and bring some more in.

34 posted on 10/17/2011 10:25:07 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye

True.

If he doesn’t already know most of that basic list he’s kind of hopeless. I was taught in first grade about knowing where emergency exits are, plan out of the house for storm, extra canned food for electricity outages. Learned Emergency Prep and First aid from the scouts. Having some cash on hand is always smart.

I posted it for people like me. Who just cant be bothered to read things on poorly designed sites. That is why I love FR no banners, popups, annoying design it is all content and text and quite easy on the eyes.


35 posted on 10/17/2011 10:25:22 PM PDT by Eyes Unclouded ("The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out." -George Carlin)
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To: Eyes Unclouded

There’s not much on that list I haven’t taken care of or done but as far as the website I thought it looked fine. The background color and format are very easy on my eyes compared to the bright white here. To each his own I guess.


36 posted on 10/17/2011 10:30:24 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: Kartographer

I agree. #10 is the most important. BTTT.


37 posted on 10/17/2011 10:31:25 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: TigersEye
There’s not much on that list I haven’t taken care of

Myself. And I know the basics, even damaged. I've proved that, by living through it. Minus some internal organs.

But to purport to be a training site without starting at the beginning....

And to pimp a blog like that without posting that 'lifesaving' information, that lacks some of the lifesaving part....

That smacks of naivete or collusion.

/johnn

38 posted on 10/17/2011 10:38:22 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I actually teach a class in air survival techniques. Just to show how unselfish I can be I will give the instructions here, for free, and won't make anyone go to a blog for it.

Practice until you can do it in your sleep, chief.

39 posted on 10/17/2011 10:42:58 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: real saxophonist
Are twin Detonics Combat Masters in a dual Alessi shoulder rig on the list?

That's just bragging.

40 posted on 10/17/2011 10:42:58 PM PDT by Stentor ("All cults of personality start out as high drama and end up as low comedy.")
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To: Kartographer

This is a Good site,I didn’t realise existed
I am interested in Survival sites
You may contact Me at
RamseyRD@webtv.net or
RD1938@msn.com RD

http://rd1938.envy.nu/RDsSurvivalTips.html


41 posted on 10/17/2011 10:45:25 PM PDT by RDRAMSEY (RDs Survival Tips)
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To: TigersEye
You don't ever answer my questions. You just dance around.

Do you teach a fire-starting class?

Because you would be amazed at how many modern americans can't start a fire without a lighter.

/johnny

42 posted on 10/17/2011 10:46:30 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: LadyDoc
That’s why I’m cynical about the “survivalist” types: they tend to be loners, or isolated families. They are all fantasy, not relying on how people actually acted in such times of the past.

I agree about the lone wolf, but that is not always the case. There are many preppers who do understand. Something from YouTube. Please watch the entire presentation. People do understand. I have learned a great deal from this gentlemen.

My wife (also a physician) and myself have been prepping for a very long time. We are tight with our neighbors. We could not stand alone. There are lone wolves. They will not survive. There are many who understand and they come from many walks of life. With their help you will survive.
43 posted on 10/17/2011 10:48:30 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I don’t teach classes to anyone about anything. I have given some lectures on herbal medicine usage, making, collecting, etc, etc, etc. but that was many years ago. I actually did answer you seriously about one thing. Hope. I meant every word of that.


44 posted on 10/17/2011 10:49:26 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye
Hope. I meant every word of that.

Prayers up, then.

I'm nothing without my community and hope for a better future, and the drive to work toward it.

And that has nothing to do with the hopey-changey dope in the WH.

It has to do with a loving, Christian community, where old farts teach younger ones how to live long enough to continue the tradition.

/johnny

45 posted on 10/17/2011 10:54:35 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (gone Galt)
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To: TigersEye

You can change your browser to be a black background and yellow or green text. Indeed to each his own.

Also this thread totally got derailed...

On the other hand after the DC quake my friend went to get check on his BOB (he thought it might have been a bomb) and realized he didn’t pack any air. So he stopped at the store and bought some. Now he’s prepared!


46 posted on 10/17/2011 10:55:47 PM PDT by Eyes Unclouded ("The word bipartisan means some larger-than-usual deception is being carried out." -George Carlin)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Community is very important to me as is teaching what I know to others. One of the first teachings in the ancient system of living that I practice is “abandon hope and fear.” So all those years of living without hope that I experienced before I began that turned out to be somewhat helpful once I realized that the depression I suffered then was just as empty as the hope. Now I see that I don’t need either and both are/were a choice all along.


47 posted on 10/17/2011 11:00:47 PM PDT by TigersEye (Life is about choices. Your choices. Make good ones.)
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To: TigersEye; JRandomFreeper

“I have enjoyed this stimulating conversation but I’m running out of air.
I have to go out to the air pile and bring some more in.”

I don’t care who ya’are that funny right there. That gave me my laugh of the day.

Anyway, I have no problem with blogs if they are the original writer. If you don’t like them, there’s always the option of asking politely as Johnny did. But I see no moral high ground in refusing to click on the link and see for yourself if you actually want the information. I don’t have that impediment, so I can’t help you to overcome it, other than to say, you’re probably missing out on about 99% (my estimate) of all news in this day and age which is written on a blog.

I don’t care for the opinion of a “journalist” over that of many who are experts in their field but who aren’t going to write an op-ed to the major news corporation of your choice. We have to sift through garbage on any thread, but if you exclude information merely because it comes from someone’s blog, it’s your loss. And that’s exactly the mentality I think was referred to when someone said “afraid of clicking on the link/[won’t survive].” There’s nothing morally superior to limiting you information to that of a mega corporation, but that’s your choice, and I respect it.

P.S. Many people don’t post full articles because they don’t know what can and cannot be posted. I have a hard time finding the list sometimes, too, and It takes all of a half second to click the link and two more to be redirected if you’re actually interested.


48 posted on 10/17/2011 11:01:13 PM PDT by JDW11235 (I think I got it now!)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I'm just pointing at the rookie and laughing.

There is nothing rookie about it. That is a bit harsh.

I having been "prepping" for over 12 years. Prepping is an ongoing process. I found this site useful as I do many others.

Even tonight I learned a valuable lesson. Neighbor had a rabid raccoon. Went over to help. She has a problem we all will have. Presbyopia really stinks. She kept missing with her 22. We were laughing, but it was not funny. I came over with my MP45. It was overkill and we did not want all the neighbors calling the police (good officers, but did not want to draw it out with a police report) after firing off one round. My new A6 Polestar LED flashlight was enough for her to take aim.

The first lesson was the MP was overkill. Will fix that with a smaller caliber revolver. The second was the LED flashlight worked wonders for aging eyes. Those are any eyes 40 plus years in the dark. Finally, my neighbors meant a great deal to me. I was deeply concerned about their well being.

I learned a great deal about prepping. It had nothing to do with the number 3.
49 posted on 10/17/2011 11:03:17 PM PDT by PA Engineer (Time to beat the swords of government tyranny into the plowshares of freedom.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

“Because you would be amazed at how many modern americans can’t start a fire without a lighter.”

I agree. However, the single most useful firestarter is a simple BIC lighter. Unless you lose it, you can use it hundreds to thousands of times worry free. I can make a fire from about a half dozen methods (bows, push boards, bamboo, optics, flint and steel, battery and steel wool) etc, but I can start a fire with a BIC lighter in a matter of seconds. If is gets wet, you just press your lips to the metal portion and blow for 90 seconds (shaking periodically) or sucking air through the metal cover for about 5-15 seconds (2-3 long draws), and it’ll start right up. Better than than foraging for sticks, which i would do if I had to. But the chances of that would first require that I be sans clothing, since I carry a lighter on me at all times, and have one in virtually every room of my house, and vehicle.


50 posted on 10/17/2011 11:06:31 PM PDT by JDW11235 (I think I got it now!)
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