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Warning Labels on Baseball Bats? [death of common sense alert]
Townhall.com ^

Posted on 11/16/2009 1:05:29 PM PST by TruthHound

It's natural to sympathize with the parents of Brandon Patch, the 18-year-old baseball pitcher who died after he was hit by a batted ball in 2003.

Sooner or later, sympathy must yield to logic and reason, so when Brandon's parents sued the bat's manufacturer, Louisville Slugger, and a jury awarded them $850,000, they contributed to the terribly misguided notion that behind every tragedy lies a lawsuit.

I haven't suffered what the Patches have suffered, and I pray that I never do. I understand that pursuing litigation gives them a sense that their son's random, pointless death was not so pointless.

However, the idiocy demonstrated by a Helena, Mont., jury won't bring back Brandon Patch, won't prevent similar accidents in the future, but will lead to more decisions based primarily on lawsuit avoidance rather than common sense...

(Excerpt) Read more at townhall.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Society
KEYWORDS: lawsuit; riskybehavior; tortreform; warninglabels
And I thought this one was silly: Pondscum Lawyers won't be satisfied until we have to tattoo every newborn with warnings. I want my plain car visor back.
1 posted on 11/16/2009 1:05:30 PM PST by TruthHound
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To: TruthHound

“Warning: Kid, this hurts when you get hit in the head with it. Don’t do it!”


2 posted on 11/16/2009 1:06:27 PM PST by wbill
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To: TruthHound
I want my plain car visor back.

I like the "Do not use in bathtub" warning on my wife's hairdryer.

Wouldn't the need for warnings like these eventually become irrelevant as people dumb enough to require them, eliminated themselves from the gene pool?

3 posted on 11/16/2009 1:08:17 PM PST by wbill
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To: wbill

4 posted on 11/16/2009 1:12:53 PM PST by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: TruthHound

WARNING: Do not use this Microwave Oven to dry your hair.


5 posted on 11/16/2009 1:16:51 PM PST by Gator113 (Obamba, Reid, Pelosi, the socialist triad.)
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To: TruthHound
I prefer wooden bats to metal bats — not for safety reasons but because metal bats are a scourge on the game, much like the designated hitter. The "crack" of a wooden bat is as American as apple pie; the "ping" of a metal bat is as hollow as the taste of the $2.99 store-bought substitute.

Actually, metal bats are more dangerous. There's a reason they are banned above the amateur level.

No, I don't think this lawsuit is justified. But I do have a problem with idiots turning a classical American outdoor game into a real-life version of a video game. Juiced up bats, balls and players all need to be banned.

6 posted on 11/16/2009 1:17:43 PM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: TruthHound

What’s worse, this kind of venal gesture disgraces the memory of the dead. And it is logically, legally, and morally unsupportable.

What kind of a jury in its right mind could find a causal connection between the manufacturer of the bat and the kid’s death? And if that connection exists, what other specious connections can be made?

This should be appealed and reversed.


7 posted on 11/16/2009 1:21:04 PM PST by IronJack (=)
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To: TruthHound
Pondscum Lawyers

Correct.

8 posted on 11/16/2009 1:21:21 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: TruthHound
This case will be appealed to the Montana sUPREME cOURT and it, by law, has to be accepted.

We'll see what the MT sUPREMES decide on this.

There are some awful justices - like Leaphart - on the MT SC. Let us all hope this horrendious decision is overturned so it is not forced to be appealed to the (yuck) Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

9 posted on 11/16/2009 1:21:45 PM PST by Leo Farnsworth (I'm not really Leo Farnsworth...)
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To: TruthHound

My straightening iron came with the warning “Do not use this product while sleeping”.


10 posted on 11/16/2009 1:30:21 PM PST by christianhomeschoolmommaof3 (Best thing about Cash for Clunkers is that 90% of the Obama bumper stickers are now off the road.)
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To: IronJack
As someone pointed out on Town Hall, the BALL actually killed the boy, not that bat. Why not sue the ball manufacturer? /sarc

It is tragic that the boy died, but millions of kids play baseball, with metal bats, and such accidents are very rare. They can happen with wooden bats as well. Sometimes a tragedy is nobody's fault.

I think the author makes a great point that it is highly unlikely that a warning label would have prevented the league from using metal bats, or the parents from allowing their son to play in a league with metal bats.

The over saturation of warning labels is actually a danger, IMO. Because we see so many ridiculous, unnecessary warning labels on so many products, we are more likely to ignore the critical warnings along with the frivolous ones.

I'm sure one day, someone will sue on the grounds that a manufacturer put too many warning labels on a product, causing the user to miss the warning of a true danger. Actually, I wonder if this has happened already.

11 posted on 11/16/2009 1:35:46 PM PST by Above My Pay Grade
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To: Above My Pay Grade
that a manufacturer put too many warning labels on a product, causing the user to miss the warning of a true danger

"hmmmmmm......"WARNING.....Failure... to..remove... this... sunshade...may....re- re- (what's that word???) RESULT!...in....a...." CRASH!

12 posted on 11/16/2009 1:41:25 PM PST by wbill
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To: TruthHound

Found a box of Tampax Tampons:
Remove used tampon before inserting a new one.


13 posted on 11/16/2009 1:42:32 PM PST by b4its2late (Before you can control a horse, you have to break it. Sound familiar?)
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To: TruthHound

The reflective screen I put in my windshield when parked is labelled “Do not drive with screen in place.”


14 posted on 11/16/2009 1:45:36 PM PST by Sherman Logan ("The price of freedom is the toleration of imperfections." Thomas Sowell)
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To: TruthHound; LucyT
When Lawyers Write Medical Protocols

The protocol in question is for an intraosseous IV.

15 posted on 11/16/2009 1:53:49 PM PST by Slings and Arrows ("When France chides you for appeasement, you know you're scraping bottom." --Charles Krauthammer)
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To: Vigilanteman
Actually, metal bats are more dangerous.

Wonder if someone will have to be killed before something is done about all the broken bats in MLB. Some of those slivers of wood are like daggers flying around the infield.

16 posted on 11/16/2009 1:56:25 PM PST by Churchillspirit (9/11/01...NEVER FORGET.)
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To: TruthHound

Why don’t they just go ahead and put the following on everything ....

“Warning: You’re too stupid to use this product. Put it down and back away, or use at your own risk.”


17 posted on 11/16/2009 2:24:32 PM PST by al_c (http://www.blowoutcongress.com)
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To: TruthHound

Pathetic for these parents to put a price on their boy’s life. Now the parents can party.


18 posted on 11/16/2009 2:25:46 PM PST by MarineBrat (Better dead than red!)
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To: 60Gunner

Meant to ping you to post #15.


19 posted on 11/16/2009 2:25:50 PM PST by Slings and Arrows ("When France chides you for appeasement, you know you're scraping bottom." --Charles Krauthammer)
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To: TruthHound

20 posted on 11/16/2009 2:27:05 PM PST by Cobra64
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To: Slings and Arrows; CholeraJoe

Thanks, Slings and Arrows. Heh. Hafta’ ping Cholera Joe to this one, ... as well as to the article.


21 posted on 11/16/2009 2:35:19 PM PST by LucyT
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To: LucyT

You’re welcome.

Kind of reminds me of the CPR contraindications: Advanced decomposition, decapitation...


22 posted on 11/16/2009 2:39:24 PM PST by Slings and Arrows ("When France chides you for appeasement, you know you're scraping bottom." --Charles Krauthammer)
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To: TruthHound



23 posted on 11/16/2009 2:46:43 PM PST by Jeff Chandler (:: The government will do for health care what it did for real estate. ::)
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To: Above My Pay Grade
If not the ball, the bases. Or the kid's cleats. Or his glove. How about the absence of a batting helmet? Or a padded suit? How about the networks that showed him his first baseball game and made him want to play to begin with? And what about the irresponsible parents who actually encouraged their child to play a game that involved a high-speed missile hurtling at the unprotected heads of defenseless youngsters?

Wont' SOMEONE pleeeeeeeeze think of the chilllllllllldren.

24 posted on 11/16/2009 3:01:23 PM PST by IronJack (=)
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To: TruthHound

Almost certainly they were solicited to sue by said pondscum lawyers.


25 posted on 11/16/2009 3:34:34 PM PST by JimRed ("Hey, hey, Teddy K., hot enough down there today?" TERM LIMITS, NOW AND FOREVER!)
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To: Slings and Arrows; LucyT

In fairness, that protocol was written by physicians for the use of Emergency Medical Technicians. I strongly suspect the statement about intraosseous infusion being contraindicated in the presence of a prosthetic limb, was added after a real life experience.

I could, but won’t, share multiple similar anecdotes about medical errors by physicians, EMTs and nurses.


26 posted on 11/16/2009 3:39:33 PM PST by CholeraJoe ("Everything's a lie, and that's a fact.")
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To: CholeraJoe; LucyT

Then there must be a similar protocol for a BP cuff, with the added bonus of “Do not use on patient’s neck.”


27 posted on 11/16/2009 5:55:25 PM PST by Slings and Arrows ("When France chides you for appeasement, you know you're scraping bottom." --Charles Krauthammer)
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To: Churchillspirit

They have been playing major league baseball for, what, 140 years now and have produced exactly one fatality who was hit in the head by a pitched ball. It happened in 1920. His team went on to win the World Series. Can you name him? Can you name the guy who threw the ball?


28 posted on 11/16/2009 7:07:34 PM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman
Sorry, I've not been following MLB for that long, but frequently hear the commentators remarking about the new bats being more brittle than they used to be. (different wood?)They are now made of maple, I believe.

It is disturbing to see splinters of wood flying across the infield.

29 posted on 11/17/2009 10:51:10 AM PST by Churchillspirit (9/11/01...NEVER FORGET.)
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To: Churchillspirit
Correct. Maple bats are sort of a bridge between aluminum bats and the traditional bats, mainly ash or hickory. The harder the bat, the greater rebound on the ball when hit. Also, the greater the chances that someone will be seriously hurt when the bat is splintered or thrown.

This is why there were no maple bats until just a few years ago. Most players understood the simple physics and were unwilling to increase their chances of hurting a fellow player for a slight increase in batting performance.

Even players who accidentally ruined the career of another player felt such guilt that their performance often dropped below the performance where they could effectively compete in the major leagues. The best example was pitcher Jack Hamilton who lost control of a pitch which badly injured Tony Conigliaro of the Boston Red Sox. Once it became clear that Tony C. was not going to make a full recovery, Jack Hamilton's own performance dropped to the point that he was no longer able to pitch at the major league level as well.

The notable exception to this rule was Carl Mays, the New York Yankee pitcher who killed Cleveland shortstop Ray Chapman with an errant pitch in 1920. Mays seemed unfazed by the whole affair and went on to produce hall of fame quality statistics the remainder of his career. However, he was never voted into the hall because of lingering questions over his character, including his apparent lack of remorse over the pitch which killed Ray Chapman.

They say baseball is a reflection of American culture and I tend to agree. The me-first and damn the consequences to others attitude is now prevalent in the game because it is so prevalent in our society.

30 posted on 11/17/2009 7:30:21 PM PST by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

Thank you. Most interesting.


31 posted on 11/18/2009 10:48:25 AM PST by Churchillspirit (9/11/01...NEVER FORGET.)
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