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ALLIES ABANDONING FLANDERS, FLOOD YSER AREA; A RESCUE FLEET AT DUNKERQUE; FOES POUND PORT (5/30/40)
Microfiche-New York Times archives, McHenry Library, U.C. Santa Cruz | 5/30/40 | G.H. Archambault, George Axelsson, William L. Laurence, Hugh Byas, Hanson W. Baldwin

Posted on 05/30/2010 6:07:17 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson

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TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: milhist; realtime; worldwarii
Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
Reading assignment: New York Times articles delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile.
1 posted on 05/30/2010 6:07:18 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
CAMPAIGN IN THE WEST, 1940, Situation 4 June, and Operations Since 21 May
The Far East and the Pacific, 1941 – The Imperial Powers, 1 September 1939
2 posted on 05/30/2010 6:07:56 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
MIRACLE AT DUNKIRK – Part III

Part I (5/24/40, reply #3)
Part II (5/26/40, reply #3)

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To be continued.

William L. Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

3 posted on 05/30/2010 6:10:12 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
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William L. Shirer, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

4 posted on 05/30/2010 6:10:55 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
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Winston S. Churchill, Their Finest Hour

5 posted on 05/30/2010 6:11:40 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; GRRRRR; 2banana; henkster; ...
Coast Fight Rages – 2
Nazis Tighten Trap – 3-4
Berlin Exchange Slumps As Optimism Is Decried – 3
Britain Will Take All Excess Profit – 4
11,000 Times Speedier Way Found To Obtain Atomic Power Element – 5
Japan is Stressing Interest in Indies – 6
A Fight to the Death – 6
Kaiser’s Grandson Buried With Honors – 6
Chungking Raiding to be Daily Affair – 7
Nazi Motor Cycle Troops Harry Allied Rear; 20,000 Sent Out to Disrupt Communications * – 7
Moscow May Act, Yugoslavia Hears – 7
The International Situation – 8
The Texts of the Day’s War Communiques – 9

*That used to happen every year, down the road in Hollister. Marlon Brando and Lee Marvin once played the head disruptors in a movie.

6 posted on 05/30/2010 6:13:05 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1940/may40/f30may40.htm

Dunkirk evacuation continues in lull

Thursday, May 30, 1940 www.onwar.com

On the Western Front... There is something of a lull in the land battle around Dunkirk because of confusion and disagreement in the German command. The panzer forces begin to withdraw from the front line to take up positions to the south for the next stage of the battle of France. The evacuation, of course, continues with 53,823 men being taken off. The small ships over the beaches do most of the lifting but transfer their loads to larger vessels for the trip to England. One destroyer is sunk during the day, the French Bourrasque, three others are hit and at least nine of the smaller ships are also sunk. This total does not include the smallest vessels whose losses are also considerable. General Brooke, who has commanded the British 2nd Corps with distinction, is one of the evacuees.


7 posted on 05/30/2010 6:29:10 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/andrew.etherington/month/thismonth/30.htm

May 30th, 1940

UNITED KINGDOM: Westminster: Winston Churchill is determined that the grim news from France, as the battered BEF retreats towards Dunkirk, should not deflect Britain from its absolute opposition to Germany whatever the cost. But he needed the support of the two Labour Party members of his five-man war cabinet to sustain his position.
At a secret meeting in the Prime Minister’s room at the House of Commons last night the war cabinet is understood to have debated Italy’s offer to mediate towards a negotiated peace. Lord Halifax, the Foreign Secretary, believes that Britain might secure better terms now, before, as seems likely, France is forced to surrender.

Chamberlain, ousted as premier earlier this month, was sympathetic to the Halifax line; Churchill, predictably, was hostile. He turned to the Labour men, for so long his political opponents. Clement Attlee said that if negotiations ever began the morale of the people would suffer a disastrous blow. His deputy, Arthur Greenwood, agreed - and the two-hour meeting ended with Britain still defiantly at war.

RAF Bomber Command: 2 Group. Attacks on the perimeter of the troops at Dunkirk, in the Dixemude, Furnes, Ypres, Thourout region, 67 sorties mounted by 6 squadrons.

Destroyer HMS Wheatland laid down. (Dave Shirlaw)

WESTERN FRONT:

FRANCE:

Operation Dynamo: French destroyer Bourrasque is sunk.

53,820 men are taken off, amongst them Lt-Gen Alan Brooke whose 2 Corps has played a large part in the successful withdrawal to the Channel.
Montgomery describes an emotional scene: “He arrived at my headquarters to say goodbye and I saw at once that he was struggling to hold himself in check, so I took him a little way into the sand hills and then he broke down and wept.”

Brooke arrives at Montgomery’s headquarters at LaPanne to turn over command of 2 Corps to Monty before returning to the UK to reform the army as it returns from France. As Monty describes the scene the two walked into the sand hills where Brooke broke down and wept on Monty’s shoulder. Probably putting on his psychologist hat Monty felt that Brooke’s behavior was more than a momentary lapse of self-control. Monty wrote, “When the reserve of the English heart is broken through, most of us like to be alone. And so when Alanbrooke broke down and wept on my shoulder, I knew it meant his friendship was all mine - and I was glad to have it that way.” (Far better than Monty breaking down on Brooke’s shoulder.) “That scene on the sand-dunes on the Belgian coast is one that will remain with my all my life.”

(Hamilton, Monty’s biographer, doubts that Brooke’s lowering of his impassive mask was the symbol of friendship that Monty took it to mean. In any case, there is no mention of this lowering of the mask in that portion or Brooke’s diary that is in Bryant’s work.) The scene was witnessed by Brian Horrocks, the commander of the machine gun battalion in Monty’s 3rd Division, who had been called to the divisional headquarters to take over a brigade. (Jay Stone)

All the British troops are within the Mardick, Bergues, Colme Canal and Furnes perimeter.

General Alexander’s corps took up positions by the side of the French to defend the perimeter.

Destroyer FS Bourrasque sunk near Nieuport after being mined and finished off by German artillery fire. The ship was participating in the evacuation off Allied soldiers from Dunkirk.
ASW trawler HMS St Ahilleus mined and sunk off Dunkirk. (Dave Shirlaw)

The Wehrmacht High Command announced:-

‘On the afternoon and evening of May 29, strong formations from two air corps under the command of Generals Grauert and von Richtofen, attacked British war and transport vessels in the port and sea territory of Dunkirk and Ostend, as they were trying to evacuate the remains of the British Expeditionary Force.’

GERMANY: U-100 and U-123 commissioned. (Dave Shirlaw)

NORWEGIAN CAMPAIGN: HMS Ark Royal, fully stocked to return to the fight, departs Grennock at 0545, escorted by DDs HMS Acasta, HMS Ardent, and HMS Acheron. Meanwhile, HMS Glorious, escorted by DDs HMS Highlander and HMS Wren, finally enters Scapa at 1515 to refuel. (Mark Horan)

U.S.S.R.: Soviet submarine SC-216 launched. (Dave Shirlaw)

ITALY: Rome: Mussolini decides that Italy will enter the war on June 5, and forewarns Hitler.

U.S.A.: Cordell Hull, the U.S. Secretary of State, responds to William C. Bullitt, the U.S. Ambassador to France, regarding Bullitt’s 28 May request to send the U.S. fleet to the Mediterranean. Hull says, “The presence of the fleet in the Pacific at this time is a very practical contribution to the maintenance of peace in the Pacific.” (Jack McKillop)

ATLANTIC OCEAN: SS Stanhall sunk by U-101 at 48.59N, 05.17W. (Dave Shirlaw)


8 posted on 05/30/2010 6:31:11 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

The turnout for the funeral of the Prince put a real scare into the Nazi leadership. Restrictions were placed on combat roles for the royals, later expanded; the army never fully complied with the directives.


9 posted on 05/30/2010 7:03:38 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

Most enlightening. Thank you, again.


10 posted on 05/30/2010 7:27:17 AM PDT by mick (Central Banker Capitalism is NOT Free Enterprise)
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To: PAR35

Did I read that right? Is Queen Victoria buried in Berlin? If so, I suppose it’s because of her devotion to Prince Albert, but it is a little surprising. You learn something new every day....


11 posted on 05/30/2010 8:46:49 AM PDT by GadareneDemoniac
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To: PAR35

Upon further review, I realize that the Victoria in the article was the daughter and namesake of Queen Victoria. Scared me for a minute, there.


12 posted on 05/30/2010 8:57:48 AM PDT by GadareneDemoniac
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
"11,000 Times Speedier Way Found To Obtain Atomic Power Element – 5"

From their mouths to Uncle Joe Stalin's ears.

It's good to know the NY Times is not revealing any national security secrets here.

No way -- it would never work, too risky...

Wonder what might happen if those neutrons were not slowed down?
Might it cause a rather sudden large release of energy? Hmmmmm... shhhhhhhh (don't tell anyone).

13 posted on 05/30/2010 9:09:22 AM PDT by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective...)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
The small ships over the beaches do most of the lifting

Due to mircomanagement from Dover. Due to losses the day before, the Dunkirk harbor was ordered closed. It took a while to straighten things out and get the ships back to the harbor. There was also the issue of pulling the modern destroyers off the run, and using only expendable assets for the day.

Date

From the beaches

From Dunkirk Harbour

Total

Running Total

Monday 27 May

 

7,699

7,699

7,699

Tuesday 28 May

5,930

11,874

17,804

25,473

Wednesday 29 May

13,752

33,558

47,310

72,783

Thursday 30 May

29,512

24,311

53,823

126,606


14 posted on 05/30/2010 11:14:15 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: BroJoeK

Pinging you to ‘More Citizens for the Reich’ on Panel 4.


15 posted on 05/30/2010 11:18:53 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: BroJoeK

I’m not sure what process of extraction they are discussing here. Most of the original tests used a small amount of Uranium Hexaflouride in a cascading system to extract some small quantities. The article may be describing a plan to use the process on a large industrial scale. We did this at the K-55 separation plant in Oak Ridge. Other techniques were also possible, such as use of large electromagnets. We used that process too, by taking the entire US silver bullion reserve and making giant magnets out of them. To think that the silver mined out of the Comstock Lode was used to make atomic weapons two generations later.

As far as national defense secrets go, the Times didn’t reveal the exact method of extraction. The hexaflouride process was fairly widely known; even the Japanese tinkered with it on a small scale during the war. The problem for most countries was that their industrial resources were already strained to the limit in their war efforts. The United States was the only country with enough spare engineering and industrial resources to pull it off.

Interesting how they are already thinking of powering a submarine with this stuff. And no, ordinary water won’t “moderate” the neutron “reaction.” They need something heavier. A different type of water. Or some pure carbon (don’t tell the Krauts they messed up by using carbon with too much Boron).

I treasure these articles while the Times is printing them. Once we get serious about pursuing the “explosive” potential of this stuff, the Times will go dark on nuclear research.


16 posted on 05/30/2010 7:51:46 PM PDT by henkster (A broken government does not merit full faith and credit.)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Thank you as usual for your wonderful research and course assignments, Professor H.J. Simpson! :)

The other day I was reading a little from "The Gathering Storm" (p.592) and realized in retrospect a great relief that Chamberlain's preference to succeed him as PM, Lord Halifax, had politely declined the position May 30, 1940.




Lord Halifax and Hermann Göring in Schorfheide, Germany, Oct 1937
Source: German Federal Archive

17 posted on 05/30/2010 10:48:25 PM PDT by bd476
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To: PAR35
"Pinging you to ‘More Citizens for the Reich’ on Panel 4."

I saw that. Of course it's Belgium, not France, so your point remains.

But I was simply trying to counter the claim by Buchanan in his book, "The Unnecessary War," that Hitler had no desire for war with the West -- that all Hitler wanted was to restore Germany's pre-Versailles Treaty boundaries.

My point was that such restorations must include France, and though I didn't mention it, Belgium. This article, and others like it, demonstrate that Hitler did indeed have ambitions in the west, imho.

In short, as usual, Buchanan is full of it. ;-)

18 posted on 06/01/2010 3:48:31 AM PDT by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective...)
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To: henkster
"I’m not sure what process of extraction they are discussing here."

Might have something to do with centrifuges?
Wasn't something like that eventually going on at the plant in Washington State?

19 posted on 06/01/2010 3:51:46 AM PDT by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective...)
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To: BroJoeK

It might; I knew there was a third process but I’d forgotten what it was. All three processes, electromagnetic separation, centrifuge and gaseous diffusion, were considered feasible means of separation but the industrial plant necessary for each was simply out of reach of all other nations in the world. So we pursued all three, and built the massive plants for them.

To my knowledge, Oak Ridge did all the Uranium separation and had all three plants. But if building one plant was beyond the reach of the rest of the world, building three giant separation plants wasn’t enough for us. We decided to go yet another route to making an atom bomb, which required yet another giant industrial complex. The Hanford, Washington, facility did no uranium separation. Instead, they built graphite moderated reactors to make Plutonium, which can be chemically separated from the Uranium slugs. The only real difficulty there is that the process had to be done mechanically by remote control since Plutonium is highly toxic.

So not only did we decide to build a Uranium bomb, we decided to make a Plutonium bomb, too. The scientists were pretty sure the Uranium bomb would work, but it just took so long to get enough U235 for it. The actual detonation process for Pu239 was more complex, since it involved carefully timed explosive compression of a Plutonium sphere. That’s what the Los Alamos lab was created for.

I look back at “the American Century” and am saddened by what we have today. At the beginning of the century, we built the Panama Canal through jungles, mountains and swamps were everyone else had failed. In the middle of the century, during the greatest war mankind has ever waged, we took what were just arcane formulae on physicists’ blackboards and built atomic weapons. Near the end of the century, we put men on the moon and returned them to earth.

I look now at the BP tragedy in the Gulf of Mexico and wonder: Where has our competence gone? Where is American excellence? All around us, whether in the headlines in the paper or just dealing with the scheduling secretary at the doctor’s office, we are surrounded by incompetence. I just assume the person I am dealing with is incompetent at what they do now. I don’t even wonder why they are incompetent.


20 posted on 06/01/2010 8:06:42 AM PDT by henkster (A broken government does not merit full faith and credit.)
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To: henkster

A big part of the problem is that BP is NOT American, it is British and Brown actually supported this “one world government” idea. That’s the whole reason that BP has been able to snooker the self-centered, elitist progressives. All BP had to do was brown nose the Democrat politicians and regulators, talk up their Progressive creds and they could get away with anything.

My husband went through this with BP in the eighties. He was the environmental advisor for ARCO Marine. He wrote the only oil spill contingency plan which was approved by the state of Alaska and in force at the time of the Valdez spill. The problem was that Alyeska had nothing to back up the plan, no booms, nothing. He tried to get BP to agree to preparing for a major spill. He told BP execs that their oil spill plans were nothing but a paper tiger and that statistics indicated that they were over due for a human error caused spill in Alaska. The BP exec sat in the meeting with a newspaper in front of his face and then answered that BP had no intention of spending money on oil spill protection in Alaska until the government forced them to do so. He said that BP had already spent more money than they wanted to on oil spill in the North Sea and unless the state of Alaska forced the issue, they had no intention of spending more money. So, my husband ran an oil spill drill with a scenario that closely approximated the actual Valdez spill which happened six months later. It made no difference to BP.


21 posted on 06/01/2010 8:23:05 AM PDT by Eva (Aand)
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To: henkster
"I look now at the BP tragedy in the Gulf of Mexico and wonder: Where has our competence gone?"

Well, for starters, WWII was a hugely successful effort, and so we tend to forget, or minimize, our own many setbacks and failures.

For another, of course it's highly risky to attempt predicting the future, especially from the perspective on 1940 (!), but perhaps I can go out on a limb and suggest we have not yet begun to hear the whole story on this Gulf oil rig accident. We don't know what caused it, we don't know why all the "fail-safes" failed, we don't know why none of the various attempted fixes have worked.

In short, it's still to soon to say (especially here in June of 1940), what may turn out to be all the lessons learned from some future oil disaster. ;-)

Can we even say for sure it will turn out to be a case of massively arrogant stupidity, or were there other as yet unexplained factors involved?

Of course here in June 1940, all this is impossible to predict. But I'm absolutely certain, once our descendents reach June 2010, in their hi-tech age it'll all be simple and straightfordward stuff... ;-)

22 posted on 06/01/2010 12:40:23 PM PDT by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective...)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

http://worldwar2daybyday.blogspot.com/

Day 273 May 30, 1940

Evacuation of Dunkirk (Operation Dynamo). British Admiralty orders all modern H, I, J class destroyers out of Dunkirk due to yesterday’s intensive German bombing, leaving only 18 old destroyers to continue the evacuation. Despite this, 24,311 Allied troops embark from Dunkirk harbour & 29,512 from the beaches, including the first French soldiers to be evacuated. Small craft from Britain ferry troops out to waiting warships or even back to England.

Although Luftwaffe attacks are reduced by poor weather, destroyers HMS Anthony & Sabre, minesweeper HMS Kellet, armed boarding vessel HMS King Orry and steamers St. Julien & Normannia are damaged by German bombs. French destroyer Bourrasque hits a mine & is sunk by German artillery off Ostend (about 660 crew and troops evacuated from Dunkirk are killed or swim to shore and are captured by the Germans). 100 survivors are rescued by French torpedo boat Branlebas and 200 more by other ships.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Memoriale_Dunkerque.jpg “To the glorious memory of the Pilots, Sailors and Soldiers of the French and Allied armies who sacrificed themselves in the Battle of Dunkirk May June 1940”.

Norway. After capturing Narvik, Allied forces begin pushing General Dietl’s mountain troops and sailors back to the Swedish border, only 18 miles East. Dietl, isolated in Narvik since April 10, has been sporadically resupplied and reinforced by airdrops. However, his only real hope of survival is 2nd Gebirgsjäger Division which has been marching North from Trondheim since May 4. Naturally, Hitler does not give Dietl the option to surrender or cross into Sweden to be interned, instructing him instead to fight on.

As part of Operation Fish (the shipment to Canada of British gold and negotiable securities, for storage in the Bank of Canada vault in Ottawa) battleship HMS Revenge (carrying £40 million in gold) and troopships Antonia & Duchess of Richmond (£10 million in gold each) leave Britain. They will arrive in Halifax, Nova Scotia in June. http://rightclickhome.com/Numis/micc/11nov2009/MICC.HTM

U-101 sinks British SS Stanhall carrying sugar and onions 10 miles North of Quessant (1 life lost). 36 survivors are picked up by another British steamer Temple Moat and landed at Weymouth. http://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/ships/331.html


23 posted on 06/02/2010 5:10:01 AM PDT by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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