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(Scary to contemplate): Are you ready for a world without antibiotics?
guardian.co.uk ^ | 12 August 2010 | Sarah Boseley

Posted on 08/23/2010 12:17:34 PM PDT by Publius804

Just 65 years ago, David Livermore's paternal grandmother died following an operation to remove her appendix. It didn't go well, but it was not the surgery that killed her. She succumbed to a series of infections that the pre-penicillin world had no drugs to treat. Welcome to the future.

The era of antibiotics is coming to a close. In just a couple of generations, what once appeared to be miracle medicines have been beaten into ineffectiveness by the bacteria they were designed to knock out. Once, scientists hailed the end of infectious diseases. Now, the post-antibiotic apocalypse is within sight.

Hyperbole? Unfortunately not. The highly serious journal Lancet Infectious Diseases yesterday posed the question itself over a paper revealing the rapid spread of multi-drug-resistant bacteria. "Is this the end of antibiotics?" it asked.

Doctors and scientists have not been complacent, but the paper by Professor Tim Walsh and colleagues takes the anxiety to a new level. Last September, Walsh published details of a gene he had discovered, called NDM 1, which passes easily between types of bacteria called enterobacteriaceae such as E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and makes them resistant to almost all of the powerful, last-line group of antibiotics called carbapenems. Yesterday's paper revealed that NDM 1 is widespread in India and has arrived here as a result of global travel and medical tourism for, among other things, transplants, pregnancy care and cosmetic surgery.

"In many ways, this is it," Walsh tells me. "This is potentially the end. There are no antibiotics in the pipeline that have activity against NDM 1-producing enterobacteriaceae. We have a bleak window of maybe 10 years, where we are going to have to use the antibiotics we have very wisely...

(Excerpt) Read more at guardian.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine; Science; Society
KEYWORDS: antibiotics; disease; infections
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1 posted on 08/23/2010 12:17:36 PM PDT by Publius804
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To: Publius804

My former roommate is a doctor and he told me years ago that this would happen. Research into antibiotics hasn’t happened in years.


2 posted on 08/23/2010 12:19:28 PM PDT by VA_Gentleman ("Poor Al Gore. Global warming completely debunked via the very internet you invented." -Jon Stewart)
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To: Publius804
we are going to have to use the antibiotics we have very wisely

You can start by not prescribing them for absolutely everything!

3 posted on 08/23/2010 12:21:40 PM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: Publius804

If Obamacare becomes a reality, a great deal of research money will be syphoned off for other projects. The redistribution of money by government to pet projects will be very detrimental to our health.


4 posted on 08/23/2010 12:22:09 PM PDT by mia
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To: Publius804
"Once, scientists hailed the end of infectious diseases. Now, the post-antibiotic apocalypse is within sight. "

Not to worry.

Just put algore on it.

He'll fix the problem right up with the same superior creative intellect he used to invent the Internet and reverse the evil of everyone but him who uses fossil fuels.

5 posted on 08/23/2010 12:23:58 PM PDT by TheClintons-STILLAnti-American
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To: Publius804

Learn how to use garlic, honey, oil of oregano, etc.


6 posted on 08/23/2010 12:25:29 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: Publius804
"The emergence of antibiotic resistance is the most eloquent example of Darwin's principle of evolution that there ever was," says Livermore.

I dont know whether it's the most eloquent, but it certainly provides us with a useful example.

7 posted on 08/23/2010 12:25:29 PM PDT by freespirited
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To: mia

If your QALY score isn’t high enough and you’re not important enough, no antibiotics for you.


8 posted on 08/23/2010 12:26:04 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I'd like to tell you, but then I'd have to kill you.)
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To: Puppage
You can start by not prescribing them for absolutely everything!

If they are not prescribed for everything, then an attorney will sue the non-prescriber for not prescribing.

"Ladies and genetlemen of the jury, all the respondent had to do was simply write out a prescription for an inexpensive, commonly available drug. It would have taken 5 seconds out of his busy schedule. Apparently the respondent simply did not care and now a child is dead."

9 posted on 08/23/2010 12:27:24 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: Publius804

Last year I was hit hard by MRSA. Put me in the hospital for four days. It took several months to get it out of my system.

The drugs that finally took care of it was a combination of older antibiotics.

My doctor told me that many of the new strains have become resistant to the new drugs and have actually left themselves open for attack via the older stuff.

It worked for me.


10 posted on 08/23/2010 12:27:49 PM PDT by OldMissileer (Atlas, Titan, Minuteman, PK. Winners of the Cold War)
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To: Publius804

two thumbs up for anti-biotics. Best medicine ever


11 posted on 08/23/2010 12:27:57 PM PDT by 4rcane
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To: Secret Agent Man

: D


12 posted on 08/23/2010 12:28:02 PM PDT by mia
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To: Publius804
Time to revisit Nature's Antibiotic
13 posted on 08/23/2010 12:28:20 PM PDT by PeaceBeWithYou (De Oppresso Liber! (50 million and counting in Afganistan and Iraq))
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To: freespirited

Or as Jeff Goldblum said in Jurassic Park, “Life finds a way.”


14 posted on 08/23/2010 12:28:24 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Publius804

My wife got a Klebsiella infection a few years ago following surgery. The area that got the infection had to be completley cut out, what was a wound the size of a walnut became the size of an orange. Most antibiotics failed, she had to get a pic line (IV) and administer very potent antibiotics that cost 1000.00 a pop twice a day. It took many months for her to recover. We were told that 50% die.

This is a very serious matter.


15 posted on 08/23/2010 12:28:41 PM PDT by Frenchtown Dan
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To: Secret Agent Man

or green tea. They may have antibiotics properties, but they’re not as strong


16 posted on 08/23/2010 12:29:07 PM PDT by 4rcane
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To: VA_Gentleman

“My former roommate is a doctor and he told me years ago that this would happen.”

Probably cuz he knew he and his colleagues were over prescribing the ecisting drugs to anyone with a cold (which is not helped by antibiotics anyway).

A lot of doctors these days are little more than salesmaen for big Pharma.


17 posted on 08/23/2010 12:29:24 PM PDT by Pessimist
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To: freespirited

“I dont know whether it’s the most eloquent, but it certainly provides us with a useful example”

So is the emergence of weeds which are resistant to Roundup.


18 posted on 08/23/2010 12:30:20 PM PDT by Pessimist
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To: freespirited
Does adaptability equate to created by chance, and evolved from nothing?

I don't think so. This just shows that life forms are adaptable, self-preserving entities.

19 posted on 08/23/2010 12:31:05 PM PDT by J Edgar
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To: Publius804

The problem is NOT ENOUGH antibiotics

they give you so little in an attempt to avoid developing a tolerance and prevent kindy failure... but all that does is allow the strongest bacteria to survive.

They should whack you up with enough to kill everything- so much that you have to eat yogurt and special stomach bacteria so you can digest food again

I was sick for almost 2 years from food poisoning- I finally cured myself by tripling my antiobiotics until it was gone, STARTING with one massive dose, and finishing with one after 3 days to let my body rest.

I dont know if I damaged my kidneys or not but I felt 1000% better for the first time in 2 years. And I would RATHER die than continue to live like that.


20 posted on 08/23/2010 12:31:55 PM PDT by Mr. K (Physically unable to proofreed (<---oops! see?))
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To: wideawake

So on the one hand, Drs would like us to believe they are of the highest ethics and stictly looking our for our good.

But on the other hand, in cases like this they punt and blame the lawyers.

Which is it?


21 posted on 08/23/2010 12:31:55 PM PDT by Pessimist
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To: PeaceBeWithYou

You like blue complexions, eh?

Silver colloids may be useful for some things, but you have to keep the blue color in mind.


22 posted on 08/23/2010 12:35:19 PM PDT by Ole Okie
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To: Publius804

This article completely ignored the greatest impetus to wasteful use of both antibiotics and painkillers: elective plastic surgery.

When someone has had their boobs “redone” for 4 or 5 times, as is not unusual (I think Demi Moore has had several different sizes, for example), or all kinds of other vanity surgeries, they often ahve been given loads of antibiotics to “prevent” or treat infections, along with loads of narcotics for pain.

Also there is loads of antibiotic use associated with follow-on care for tatoos and piercings. It’s not all that uncommon for a person with a tongue piercing to end up taking antibiotics for a year, trying to get an infection under control.

These are some of the kinds of surgeries and procedures that, not only run up healthcare costs, but which are helping to make it impossible for someone to get a life-saving transplant in the future.


23 posted on 08/23/2010 12:37:48 PM PDT by fightinJAG (Step away from the toilet. Let the housing market flush.)
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To: VA_Gentleman

On the other hand, genetic research is really starting to get to the bottom of how the bugs work. They are getting close to being able to find antigen vulnerabilities on a molecular scale and exploiting them. Can’t find a link to this right now but I read about researchers have found handle common to all flu virus, that doesn’t mutate, that can stop them from multiplying.

It really is a race. I couldn’t handicap which


24 posted on 08/23/2010 12:38:04 PM PDT by DManA
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To: DManA

which side was going to win.


25 posted on 08/23/2010 12:38:29 PM PDT by DManA
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To: VA_Gentleman
Research into antibiotics hasn’t happened in years.

Why?

26 posted on 08/23/2010 12:39:18 PM PDT by NonValueAdded ("Obama suffers from decision-deficit disorder." Oliver North 6/25/10)
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To: Publius804
There have now been a couple of interesting papers suggesting a Pigouvian tax – which he defines as one levied on an agent causing an environmental problem as an incentive to mitigate that problem – for antibiotics.

Like oil, he points out, antibiotic usefulness is finite. And the cost of drug resistance is not reflected in the price of the drug. "If you consider antibiotic sensitivity as a resource like oil, you want to maintain that by introducing a tax," he says. It would be worldwide and the proceeds could fund new drug development.

But should you tax life-saving drugs, especially in poor countries? "If you don't do anything, there won't be any antibiotics anyway," says James starkly. "At least it is a suggestion of something that could be done."

27 posted on 08/23/2010 12:39:53 PM PDT by frithguild (Joe Wilson was wrong when he shouted "You lie!" Obama doesn't just lie - he lies all the time.)
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To: Pessimist

But doctors also have the trial lawyers breathing down their neck. Without tort reform, doctors will continue defensive prescribing, especially when the patient gets nasty demanding the drug.


28 posted on 08/23/2010 12:40:08 PM PDT by fightinJAG (Step away from the toilet. Let the housing market flush.)
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To: Publius804
Hyperbole?

Yes.

But everybody who wishes should continue to scream, gibber and run around in small circles. The exercise will do them good.

29 posted on 08/23/2010 12:40:23 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (there are huge chunks of time...at night...where I'm just asleep...for hours...it's ridiculous....)
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To: Publius804

What ever happened to swine flu?

(Just saying.)


30 posted on 08/23/2010 12:43:12 PM PDT by samtheman
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To: Mr. K
The problem is NOT ENOUGH antibiotics

You are quite right.

One of the really terrifying scenarios is drug resistant tuberculosis. It has started to occur in poor environments; inner town ghettos and in Russian jails, where patients either are not given long enough cures, or they are selling the medicine to get money for narcotics.

31 posted on 08/23/2010 12:46:18 PM PDT by ScaniaBoy (Part of the Right Wing Research & Attack Machine)
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To: Pessimist
So on the one hand, Drs would like us to believe they are of the highest ethics and stictly looking our for our good.

But on the other hand, in cases like this they punt and blame the lawyers.

Which is it?

You can have the highest ethics and strictly look out for the good of others while also criticizing people who have the lowest ethics and who look out only for their own good.

It's not an either/or decision.

32 posted on 08/23/2010 12:46:18 PM PDT by wideawake
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To: Secret Agent Man

The oil of oregano thing really works.


33 posted on 08/23/2010 12:47:58 PM PDT by La Lydia
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To: NonValueAdded; VA_Gentleman
'Smart Antibiotics' May Result From UCLA Research
34 posted on 08/23/2010 12:48:07 PM PDT by samtheman
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To: samtheman

K - 12 schools closed and college students were quarantined.

Quarantined.


35 posted on 08/23/2010 12:50:19 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: Secret Agent Man

“Learn how to use garlic, honey, oil of oregano, etc.”

I’ve had mrsa in my spine for 2 years. Don’t think salad dressing is going to work if vanco, bactrim, zyvox, cubicin, etc hasn’t worked.


36 posted on 08/23/2010 12:50:22 PM PDT by goseminoles
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To: NonValueAdded; VA_Gentleman
Promising New Targets For Antibiotics Found
37 posted on 08/23/2010 12:51:14 PM PDT by samtheman
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To: VA_Gentleman

Here’s a link to what I was talking about. Not exactly a peer reviewed journal put points to real research:

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.ee3c200ad5a228b3cd0e2c3db179012f.2a1&show_article=1

Scientists close in on ‘universal’ vaccine for flu: study
Feb 22 01:32 PM US/Eastern
Comments (0) Email to a friend Share on Facebook Tweet this Bookmark and Share

Pedestrians watch as pigeons fly at a shopping area in Hong Kong on Februar...

Clinical Trials on Humans Could Begin Within a Couple of Years

Scientists on Sunday unveiled lab-made human antibodies that can disable several types of influenza, including highly-lethal H5N1 bird flu and the “Spanish Flu” strain that killed tens of millions in 1918.

Tested in mice, the antibodies work by binding to a previously obscure structure in the flu virus which, when blocked, sabotages the pathogen’s ability to enter the cell it is trying to infect, according to the study.

Because this structure — described by one scientist as a “viral Achilles’ heel” — is genetically stable and has resisted mutation over time, the antibodies are effective against many different strains.

The breakthrough “holds considerable promise for further development into a medical tool to treat and prevent seasonal as well as pandemic influenza,” said Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which helped fund the study.


38 posted on 08/23/2010 12:52:23 PM PDT by DManA
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To: Publius804

There are many natural things we can fall back on, I agree, in many cases without anti-biotics many will die, but there is much we know now that we didn’t. And there are very powerful natural anti-biotics, all your ammo might not be as life saving as you think.


39 posted on 08/23/2010 12:52:23 PM PDT by Scythian
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To: ScaniaBoy

The silver lining is that a bacteria that is resistant against all types of antibiotics is probably overburdened with energetically expensive metabolites. In an environment devoid of antibiotics those bacteria will probably lose in competition with wild strain (non-resistant) bacteria.

Unfortuantely hospitals will always run the risk of creating a perfect environment for the resistant agents Therefore one must never save on hospital hygiene.

Something the NHS should note!!


40 posted on 08/23/2010 12:52:52 PM PDT by ScaniaBoy (Part of the Right Wing Research & Attack Machine)
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To: OldMissileer

I just got my picc line removed yesterday after 56 days of cubicin. I’m running out of antibioitics.

The problem is there is no $ incentive to produce antibiotics. No long term monetary benefit to the pharm companies to do so.


41 posted on 08/23/2010 12:53:01 PM PDT by goseminoles
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To: Publius804
Mechanism Behind Delayed Development Of Antibiotic Resistance Explained
42 posted on 08/23/2010 12:53:08 PM PDT by samtheman
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To: Secret Agent Man

and colloidal silver


43 posted on 08/23/2010 12:56:40 PM PDT by muglywump (Seven days without laughter makes one weak.)
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To: goseminoles
Oregano Oil has been proven to be more powerful than vancomyacin, just sayin ... That being said, I think this is a whole lot of hype, probably just to prepare us for the health care cut-backs coming our way.

Sorry, this prescription is 29.95, we can't give it to you, you need to die before you try to collection social security, you're almost due to collect right?
44 posted on 08/23/2010 12:56:52 PM PDT by Scythian
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To: mia

Actually, this is the sort of problem where government support is very important: there is little market incentive to develop antibiotics compared with drugs to treat chronic conditions.


45 posted on 08/23/2010 12:57:11 PM PDT by M. Dodge Thomas
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To: VA_Gentleman

Antimicrobial research goes on.

New antibiotics are very profitable and enter the market every year.

New approaches to fighting infection are proceding and gives the hope that medicines of the fairly near future that will be effective and not elicit resistence like current drugs do.

Forget about saving lives for the moment, there is just too much money on the table to abandon antibiotic research. Your roommate was overly pessimistic.


46 posted on 08/23/2010 12:57:17 PM PDT by dangerdoc
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To: samtheman

“What ever happened to swine flu?”

I took extra vitamin D myself, but I admit, I never knowingly came into contact with someone exhibiting symptoms of it, just contact with those after they said they had had it. The way the cdc quit testing and everyone with any symptom claimed swine flu, who knows how bad or not it really was.


47 posted on 08/23/2010 12:57:55 PM PDT by DonaldC (A nation cannot stand in the absence of religious principle.)
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To: NonValueAdded

“Why”

Because companies want to develop drugs you will be on the rest of your life, not 5 days.


48 posted on 08/23/2010 12:58:16 PM PDT by goseminoles
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To: Publius804

Big mistake is using anti-biotics as a part of feeding cattle. Big mistake !


49 posted on 08/23/2010 12:58:51 PM PDT by CORedneck
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To: Publius804
New Approach Could Lower Antibiotic Requirements By 50 Times

Scientists Pry New Information from Disease-Causing, Shellfish-Borne Bacterium

Ok. I'll stop.

I spent about 5 minutes and came up with the above links in the above few posts.

Point being: we're not freaking cavemen.

We can freaking solve problems.

This is all sky-is-falling talk from the UK.

50 posted on 08/23/2010 12:59:52 PM PDT by samtheman
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