Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

QUESTION: Recommendation For An Old Vehicle.
Me | June 23, 2012 | Yosemitest

Posted on 06/23/2012 1:37:44 AM PDT by Yosemitest



TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Travel
KEYWORDS: car; vehicle
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-71 next last
What are your recommendations?
1 posted on 06/23/2012 1:37:59 AM PDT by Yosemitest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

‘53 Chevy Coup. Straight Shift. 6 cylinder.


2 posted on 06/23/2012 1:41:10 AM PDT by Ecliptic (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I used to have a 4WD ‘53 Willy’s Wagon. I really liked it and it turned a lot of heads. Definitely will pull a small trailer. It had no A/C though.


3 posted on 06/23/2012 1:52:19 AM PDT by rawhide
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ecliptic
I don't really like Chevy vehicles, mostly because I grew up liking Fords,
but I do have some 64 Chevy trucks with 327s and 350s that hold up well on the farm, and in the wooods.
4 posted on 06/23/2012 1:53:34 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: rawhide

What kind of mileage did it get? Could it be expected to get 20 mpg, or is about 15 mpg all one could expect?


5 posted on 06/23/2012 1:55:24 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

My dad always liked the Ford Falcon, he could always find a cheap used one and fix it up fairly cheap and easily, and would use them for every day vehicle and would haul wood with them short distances, mostly just a few miles or so from home.


6 posted on 06/23/2012 2:14:19 AM PDT by ReformedBeckite (1 of 3 I'm only allowing my self each day)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Early to mid '60s Chevy II Sedan or Coupe. 1962 - 1965. Straight 6 (great motor) or small V-8 (260 or 283)..preferably the 6. Power Glide auto or 3 on the tree.
Reliable, easy to find parts, dependable and will pull the small trailer.

Also very easy, and cheap, to work on if the need arises.
7 posted on 06/23/2012 2:19:21 AM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Any of the post-'53 chevy V-8s are relatively simple engines and easy to work on compared to Fords or Chrysler/Dodge. Before '53 they don't have full pressure oiling to the rod bearings and mains, and tend to not last very well. Most can be retrofitted with disc brakes in front, and sheet metal is available for most.

Look back at production numbers--popular vehicles were popular for a reason, and if still so, unfortunately that means the buy-in might be more expensive, but parts should be available. Stay before electronic ignitions and particularly avoid the early (82-85) GM computer cars. If you can find something with points, condenser, and coil instead of the electronic ignitions, it will likely survive doomsday, but the fuel efficiency will not be as good as with HEI ignitions. You can retrofit around that, too, if you want.

Consider, too, that air conditioning was pretty rare until the 60s, and generator electrical systems were no where near as reliable as alternators (about '64).

Seat belts didn't start until about '65, and collapsible steering columns were about the same time. Such safety features, while rudimentary by today's standards, saved a lot of lives.

Just a few things to consider.

In the end, buy a vehicle you can love, because getting it in tip-top shape is a labor of love, and not a good investment in time, labor, parts, and money as a rule.

If towing and not hauling the family is the consideration, look at GM 76-79 pickups. Many 'heavy 1/2 ton' pickups were made with enough suspension to pull a lot more than 1500 lbs, a small-block 350 v-8 (good, basic, cheap horsepower), and with a manual transmission did really well. Parts are available, I'm sure. They had the HEI ignition, but were not computerized, and many had air conditioning as well.

8 posted on 06/23/2012 2:22:05 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
I think it was over 20 mpg. It has been a few years. I do not think I cared about that though.

Mine was a ‘Forest Green’ originally. Very nice looking.

A couple of things I noticed looking at the photos was there is no back seat, which was important to me. Also the back has carpet, whereas mine had the original wood slats on the floor. I like the look of mine better. Maybe your Willy's has them under the carpet. I used my Willy's for work. I also noticed the front seats are not original, but definitely an upgrade. And the engine is not original, but definitely has the power to pull a trailer.

Looking at all the different cars you posted, I do like the looks of the ‘48 Ford the best. That will definitely turns some heads. Not sure you can tow with that?

I would be concerned whether any of the cars could pull a 1500# trailer other than the Willy's?

I like the A/C vent placement on the old Chevy, behind the rear seat. My brother ‘53 Desoto had the same, with the evaporator in the trunk of car.

Looking at the heater box in the old Willy's brings back memories from my old Willy's, as I had the same type of heater box. I was always very toasty though.

9 posted on 06/23/2012 2:22:26 AM PDT by rawhide
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Might not be as easy as it used to be.

Carburetors are more difficult to find and more difficult to find a good mechanic to give a tune-up.

Worse yet, the fuels continue to change favoring newer combustion mechanisms and computer controlled fuel injection.

For a return to the 60s, regarding smog controls, drive across the border into Mexico and one gets a rapid reminder of what it used to be like without all those controls. (IMHO, we could still lose over 50% of those controls and still enjoy a relatively clean environment.)


10 posted on 06/23/2012 2:32:42 AM PDT by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

69 Dodge Dart slant 6.


11 posted on 06/23/2012 2:43:50 AM PDT by ebshumidors ( Marksmanship and YOUR heritage http://www.appleseedinfo.org)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Please don’t get a Falcon.

We got my husband a Falcon as a gift and have been restoring it for the last year for him while he was deployed. The parts are very expensive and some of them are almost impossible to find. The Falcon is considered an endangered car now.

If I had to do it over again, I’d have bought him a Mustang. It would’ve been about half the cost to restore and maintain. You can find junker cars to scavenge easier.


12 posted on 06/23/2012 2:50:53 AM PDT by Marie (Cain 9s Have Teeth)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Personally, that I-6 on the Mercury is a basic engine that's easy to work on and the fundamental design of the I-6 across Chevy, Ford and Jeep hasn't changed in decades.

I had a Mercury Comet with a 200 I-6 in it for several years while going through college and the thing was just a workhorse. Keep the oil changed, good air filter and keep timing in sync and it just kept going, and going, and going.

Years later I had a 1996 Jeep Cherokee Country with a 4.0L I-6 in it and every time I'd pop the hood to change the oil or check something it was like looking at the same motor in my old Mercury Comet. Both were incredibly easy to work on absent all the computer/pollution control b.s. which was exactly what someone like me who's not the most mechanically inclined type of guy needs.

You also cannot beat a small-block Chevy V-8 for reliability, dependability and parts availability, so that Willys Wagon would be a good choice in that regard. That and there's some utility to having all that cargo space in the Willy's.

As for me, I want my old Jeep Cherokee Country back. I-6 High Output, no computer control's. It got almost 20 in the city and 26-27 on the highway. No computer control also meant it'd survive an EMP as long as I have a spare distributor and battery in a faraday cage somewhere (which I have in my basement for spare amateur radio equipment.)

13 posted on 06/23/2012 3:01:31 AM PDT by usconservative (When The Ballot Box No Longer Counts, The Ammunition Box Does. (What's In Your Ammo Box?))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ebshumidors
69 Dodge Dart slant 6.

Great motor.

14 posted on 06/23/2012 3:03:15 AM PDT by usconservative (When The Ballot Box No Longer Counts, The Ammunition Box Does. (What's In Your Ammo Box?))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I really miss my 1967 Chevelle. It was a 4 door,250 engine, straight 6 that was easy to work on. Lots of room. Parts are readily available. Good solid car.


15 posted on 06/23/2012 3:18:08 AM PDT by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I really miss my 1967 Chevelle. It was a 4 door,250 engine, straight 6 that was easy to work on. Lots of room. Parts are readily available. Good solid car.


16 posted on 06/23/2012 3:18:15 AM PDT by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I’d get an early Mustang. They’re fun cars and have a cultish following so there are lots of aftermarket sources for parts. Plus, it’ll be easy to sell should the need arise.


17 posted on 06/23/2012 3:18:38 AM PDT by muir_redwoods (Legalize Freedom!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Marie
I agree with you Marie!

1966 Ford Mustang!


18 posted on 06/23/2012 3:18:47 AM PDT by Errant
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Tainan

The Chevy II was a great vehicle.

Bench seats would seat 6 people,perhaps a little cramped.

Sculpting the seats for 4 turned even big cars into 4 passenger cars.

I had a 62 Chevy II convertible, ran the wheels off it.
The windows were roll up I could work on it myself, and fix anything on it.Got 25 MPG had plenty of power. 6 cylinder just kept running.

If I could have any car from the 60 this would be my car.


19 posted on 06/23/2012 3:22:10 AM PDT by Venturer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Checker Taxi Cab - all the reasons here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Checker_Taxi


20 posted on 06/23/2012 4:01:39 AM PDT by Arlis (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Don’t Nice to think about and maybe have.

But I drove those every day todays vehicles last longer nicer to drive and are a lot safer.


21 posted on 06/23/2012 4:04:08 AM PDT by riverrunner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

1968 Camaro w/327 engine...a beautiful car and would it ever run...just wow!


22 posted on 06/23/2012 4:05:26 AM PDT by jennings2004 (President Hayes, Mount Rushmore, telephone, Dear Leader...what a mix!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Falcons and Mavericks were both supposed to be throw-away cars, but the damned things kept runnin' and runnin'.

I've had 4 Maverick's in my time, all 2 or 300 dollar miracles that died only because of body cancer.

Don't remember the years, maybe early 70's, and it was during a time when gas was about a buck a gallon ... who cared about mileage?

23 posted on 06/23/2012 4:15:08 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

1970-1972 Chevy Nova 6 cylinder coupe.


24 posted on 06/23/2012 4:22:53 AM PDT by equaviator (There's nothing like the universe to bring you down to earth.again.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Arlis

I vote for Checker Marathon too. Direct to you from Kalamazoo!


25 posted on 06/23/2012 4:35:52 AM PDT by wetgundog (" Extremism in the Defense of Liberty is no Vice")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Five more models.

My personal choice would be a 54 Ford with a Thunderbird engine. I drove one for about 200,000 miles.

26 posted on 06/23/2012 4:48:15 AM PDT by Utah Binger (Southern Utah where the world comes to see America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Having had daily drivers from the 30's (36 Ford sedan, 38 Ford panel truck)to the 60's (62 Buick, 64 Triumph & 65 Jaguar), here are a few thoughts regarding fun old car selection in today's market and for today's driving conditions.

1. 60's cars are much better able to keep up with today's traffic flow than those from the 30's, 40's, & even the 50's.

2. Ford and Chevy have the best and most economical parts availability.

3. Buy what you like. One car that currently interests me and seems to be a real value is the second generation Corvair from 1965-1969. Great styling, even looking contemmporary today, good parts availability, inexpensive to buy, and the added satisfaction of telling busybodies like Ralph nader to buzz off every time you turn the key and head out on a drive. Here's a nice example available right now on eBay to copy and paste:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/?cmd=ViewItem&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649&item=290732884806&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWAX%3AIT

Have fun in your search and enjoy your ride!

27 posted on 06/23/2012 5:05:01 AM PDT by Reo (the 4th Estate is a 5th Column)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ebshumidors

I second the Dart with a slant six.


28 posted on 06/23/2012 5:11:59 AM PDT by Poser (Cogito ergo Spam - I think, therefore I ham)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Smokin' Joe
A lot of good information in your post.
That's exactly what I'm looking for, something that you can easily work on, that isn't designed to keep you out from under the hood.
Something that's designed with room to work around the engine and the rest of the vehicle.
I have a few pickups, but they're from the mid to late 70s and they tend to get vapor lock, and 14 mpg is about as good as they get.
But with a goose neck trailer that empty is 6,500 lbs, they can pull and stop a 10,000 lb load.
I want a 4 fat person hauler that can take a load of groceries and pull a 5 by 12 ft trailer with little gas mileage change.
29 posted on 06/23/2012 5:17:51 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: wetgundog
Yup, Checker Marathon....built like a tank, all common Chevy parts - albeit old. Wife had relatives who drove nothing but Marathons! Back in the 50's/60's it was the only car that would go 1/2 million miles or more and not self-destruct before 100,000. And all easy to find/replace parts. My first car was a '51 Ford Crestliner (rare - vinyl top from factory) that was built similarly - 12 ga. steel bodies, etc. My dad gave the car to Mom as her first car in '51, she drove it until '56, gave it to her mom/my grandmother who drove it until '64 when I bought it from her for $100.00. My younger bro totalled it. My '09 CVO Screamin' Eagle Harley Road Glide has two cylinders and is the same cu." as that '51 Ford! Uploaded from the Photobucket Android App
30 posted on 06/23/2012 5:21:56 AM PDT by Arlis (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
1967 Chevy Impala


31 posted on 06/23/2012 5:23:41 AM PDT by Dick Vomer (democrats are like flies, whatever they don't eat they sh#t on.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Marie
I've owned a 66 mustang and it was okay, but the floor panels rust out easily, and 4 fat people in one pony car just isn't a pleasant thing to do.
I like the old mustangs, and 1969 was my favorite body style, and they could still be modified back to points, plugs, and condenser.
But it's just not what I'm looking for.
They're a good investment, if you can keep them from being stolen. And they're fun to drive.
But a similar vehicle that I really liked was the 1967 Galaxie LTD 2 Door fastback, at about 18 mpg.
32 posted on 06/23/2012 5:30:23 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Poser
I've got a slant six engine that was a crate engine, that never been fired up.
It was given to me, from military surplus, and it's still got new oil in it.
We've had it now for about 15 or 20 years, and it's in a shed.
33 posted on 06/23/2012 5:33:54 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Still have the first car I ever owned: 1957 Chevrolet, 2 door sedan. I have a little over 300k miles on mine. Re-manunfactured parts are easy to find. Working on this car is a piece of cake. Many shop manuals are in print. Also nothing turns heads like a 57 Chevy. It is the symbol of life in the 50s.


34 posted on 06/23/2012 5:36:55 AM PDT by Leo58 (Those who cheer you today will curse you tomorrow, the only thing that endures is character.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

[1] 55-57 Chevy

[2] 49 Merc.


35 posted on 06/23/2012 5:39:03 AM PDT by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
1950 Chevy 1 ton truck. Its dirt simple, straight six, 3-speed column shift. No commie pollution controls, no commie seat belts, and a larger straight-six motor can be retro-fitted for more power.
36 posted on 06/23/2012 5:42:38 AM PDT by GenXteacher (You have chosen dishonor to avoid war; you shall have war also.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Question: If you were going to pick a vehicle from the 1940s, 1950s, or 1960s that you wanted to actually use for a daily driver,

you'll last three months, tops, before you're back into the air-conditioned, smooth ride of your "computer controlled box" or whatever. And the last two of those months, nobody will want to be around you. You'll be sleeping in the doghouse.

37 posted on 06/23/2012 5:43:20 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand (they have no god but caesar)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Any 60s Dodge Dart with the Slant Six...


38 posted on 06/23/2012 5:49:33 AM PDT by wtc911 (Amigo - you've been had.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Smokin' Joe
I would go with a Mustang because you can get parts. They still make almost every part you would ever need and old cars need parts.

In 1987, I inherited my grandmother's 1964 Lincoln. It had 37,000 miles on it and it was in beautiful condition. Three years later I gave it to my cousin, because I was tired of fixing it. This was in the days before the Internet and I spent more on long distance phones calls finding parts than I did on the parts. Time destroys mechanical things, because gaskets become brittle; which cause fluids to leak; which causes mechanical failure. For example, the steering wheel came off the steering column while my wife was driving it. She was able to slip it back on before there was an accident. The problem was that there was a leather gasket that held the attachment screws under tension. The leather gasket dry rotted and the screws fell out. Ignoring the danger and upset wife, you cannot imagine how hard it was to get someone to make a new gasket (I was not going to trust a 20 year old replacement gasket).

39 posted on 06/23/2012 6:06:08 AM PDT by fini
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest
Re: the Corvair link in Post #27, I forgot about your towing reqirement. Instead, check out this Falcon wagon on BaT for $8500... Copy & paste here:

http://bringatrailer.com/2012/06/20/bat-exclusive-1965-ford-falcon-squire-wagon/

40 posted on 06/23/2012 6:11:30 AM PDT by Reo (the 4th Estate is a 5th Column)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

Look around and see what’s still on the road. I’m bettin’ it’s going to be a GM product. Parts availability is going to be an issue. I think GM offers you availability and interchangability across its different automobile lines.


41 posted on 06/23/2012 6:19:39 AM PDT by old school
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I haven’t read all the replies, but whatever you get remember the older cars ran on leaded gas. Unleaded will ruin the engine. You have to add lead to the fuel. That may be increasingly difficult to find also.


42 posted on 06/23/2012 6:21:42 AM PDT by bk1000 (A clear conscience is a sure sign of a poor memory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

I would take a more modern vehicle like a Chevy Lumina van which is all fiberglass, remove the engine up front, get a mid sized Perkins diesel from a forklift and mount it amidships. For something a bit bigger I would look for an older Peterbilt cab, make an aluminum frame and build my own Peterbilt pickup, engine can be almost any decent non electronic diesel.

I say that because I happen to have a 1984 Peterbilt conventional cab that I am indeed making into a pickup truck/toy hauler.


43 posted on 06/23/2012 6:23:38 AM PDT by Eye of Unk (Islamoprogressivenists need not reply.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bk1000

Or you can pull the head and have hardened valve seats installed. I did this on my 67 Chevy. Pretty much any auto machine shop can handle this, it’s fairly common.


44 posted on 06/23/2012 6:24:40 AM PDT by nascarnation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Eye of Unk
1984 Peterbilt conventional cab that I am indeed making into a pickup truck/toy hauler.

Now that's impressive. What power, Cummins B series?

45 posted on 06/23/2012 6:26:59 AM PDT by nascarnation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: fini
It doesn't hurt to be part machinist if you are going to work with older vehicles, and to get the shop manuals for the vehicle in question (not just a Chilton's or Haynes' but the factory shop and service manuals). The less common the vehicle, the less common the parts, and salvage yards often have crushed older inventory.

Vehicles which remain ever popular, like the Mustang, the '57 chevy, the Camaro, and others have the benefit of being popular enough that new sheet metal has been made to replace rusted out panels, and a tremendous number of 'New old stock' parts are available. Pickups are the same way. A web search for specific parts for the year and make will turn up suppliers for everything from Model T parts to the latest stuff, but if yours wasn't a popular vehicle, it gets considerably harder.

46 posted on 06/23/2012 6:29:03 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

For all you old school car buffs out there, if you like American muscle, here’s the place to look:

American Dream Machines in Des Moines Iowa:
http://www.admcars.com/inventorymanager.php


47 posted on 06/23/2012 6:43:51 AM PDT by Bshaw (A nefarious deceit is upon us all!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Eye of Unk

I always liked the idea of turning a single axle Mack daycab into a pickup.


48 posted on 06/23/2012 6:49:15 AM PDT by meatloaf (Support Senate S 1863 & House Bill 1380 to eliminate oil slavery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Yosemitest

http://www.carsrotting.com/blog/

I’d get a late 40 thru 50s’ year model.Dennis Carpenter could provide some parts

http://www.dennis-carpenter.com/


49 posted on 06/23/2012 6:55:03 AM PDT by silentreignofheroes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bk1000
You can buy additive that will replace the lead into todays fuel.
Also some of the rebuild kits will have the capability to allow use of unleaded fuels.
50 posted on 06/23/2012 7:16:08 AM PDT by Yosemitest (It's simple, fight or die!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-71 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson