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HAPPY HANUKKAH (Chanukah)
CookingWithCarlo.com ^ | Dec. 18, 2003 | Carlo3b Dad, Chef, Author

Posted on 12/18/2003 6:30:28 AM PST by carlo3b

HAPPY  HANUKKAH

". . . and May This Festival of Lights bring Blessings
upon you and All Your Loved Ones for Happiness,
for Health, and for Spiritual and Material Wealth,
and May the Lights of Chanukah Usher in the Light of Moshiach
and a Better World for All of Humankind."

The Victory over Antiochus

More than 2000 years ago, the land of Judea was ruled by Antiochus, a tyrannical Syrian king. Even today, people fight wars over their gods, despite claims to value "religious tolerance." But a couple of thousand years ago, religious tolerance didn't exist at all. Religion was as good an excuse as any to oppress a people.

That's precisely what Antiochus did to the Jews: he forbade them to observe the Sabbath or study their religious text, the Torah, and he erected a statue of Zeus in their sacred temple of Jerusalem. Many Jews followed his decrees, because they had no choice; those who resisted were executed.

In 167 B.C., the Jews -- driven to desperation -- rose up against Antiochus. Mattathias, a well-respected priest, gathered together an army and put his five sons in charge. Judah and his brothers wanted a name for their battalion that would signify force and strength; "Maccabee", meaning "hammer", fit the bill. It took three years of fighting, but eventually the Maccabees drove the Syrians out of Israel and reclaimed the temple in Jerusalem.

Naturally, the Maccabees quickly got rid of the statue of Zeus. Then they cleansed and purified the temple, and rekindled the menorah, a candelabra that symbolized God's Divine Presence. Oddly enough, although it only held enough oil to burn for a single day, the menorah burned for eight. This was the miracle.

 HANUKKAH CUSTOMS: THE MENORAH

About the Menorah
To Jews and non-Jews alike, the menorah, or Hanukkiya, is the most recognizable symbol of Hanukkah. It's usually a nine-branch candelabrum whose candles are lit by a "shamash" or service candle which then takes its own place at the centre of the menorah. The menorah itself is placed in a window or anywhere it can be seen by passers-by.

Lighting the Menorah
On the first night of Hanukkah, a single candle (or oil wick) is lit on the far right side of the menorah. A candle is added, from right to left, each night, and the newest candle is always lit first. Ideally, the candles should be lit as soon as stars become visible in the night sky, but they can be lit late into the night. While the candles are being lit and the blessing given, the whole family and any guests gather to witness the ceremony; everyone is encouraged to participate. By the eighth night, with all eight candles lit, the menorah makes a spectacular sight. And as they did the previous evenings, the candles will continue to shine until they burn themselves out.

The Blessing
The first blessing thanks God for the commandment to "kindle the Hanukkah lights."

  Baruch Atah Adonai Elohenu Melech Ha-olam Asher Kidshanu B'mitzvotav V'tzivanu L'hadlik Ner Shel Hanukkah.
Blessed is Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, by whose Mitzvot we are hallowed, who commands us to kindle the Hanukkah lights.

The second blessing praises God for the miracle the candles symbolize; it's said as the candles are being lit.
  Baruch Atah Adonia Elohenu Melech Ha-olam She-asa Nissim L'votenu Bayamim Ha-hem Ba-ZmanHa-zeh.
Blessed is Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, who performed wonderous deeds for our ancestors in days of old, at this season.
On the first night of Hanukkah the "shehechiyanu" blessing is included, to signify that this is the first time the Hanukkah lights have been lit this season.

 Hanukkah is a "Festival of Lights" to celebrate the victory of the Jewish Maccabees over the Syrians, and the rededication of the Jerusalem Temple. The holiday also commemorates the miracle of the oil that burned for eight days.



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The Secret of the Dreidel
 
by Rabbi Yaakov Asher Sinclair

A Children's Game That Contains the Story of the Jewish People

 

The Dreidel


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A children's game, played in the firelight of a cold winter night, the Chanukah Menorah silently glowing in the window... The dreidel. Its four sides spinning around the still point in the turning circle; spinning so fast that its sides blur into nothingness... The dreidel. So seemingly insignificant - and yet this little dreidel contains the story of the Jewish People; the history of the whole world...



Our story


starts not with the miracle of Chanukah, but 1,437 years earlier with Jacob's ladder. Jacob had a prophetic dream of angels ascending and descending a ladder that reached from the ground to the heavens. These angels weren't Hollywood extras with fluorescent tubes over their heads - they were, in fact, incorporeal spiritual messengers - the protecting forces of four great kingdoms. 

Four kingdoms that would in the future dominate and exile the Jewish People: Babylon, Persia, Greece and Rome

At first, Yaakov saw the angel of Babylon ascend the ladder 70 steps and then he came down: The Jewish People were in the Babylonian exile for 70 years. 

The protecting angel of the Empire of Persia and Media then climbed up the ladder 52 steps before he descended: The Jewish People were in exile in Persia 52 years. 

Then the angel of the Empire of Greece climbed 180 rungs - the domination of Greece lasted 180 years. 

Finally, the protecting angel of the Roman Empire climbed up the ladder, but he didn't come down. Yaakov feared that this final exile would never end, until Hashem promised Yaakov - If he will rise up like an eagle and make his nest among the stars - even from there I will bring him down.

We are still in that final exile, in the softly asphyxiating embrace of Rome's spiritual heirs....


The Four Kingdoms

BABYLON

In the year 3338 (587/6 BCE), the first of our Holy Temples was razed to the ground by the Babylonian Emperor Nabuchadnezer, and the majority of the Jewish People led into exile by the Assyrian Emperor Sancheriv. Why was it such a tragedy that the Beis Hamikdash (Holy Temple) was destroyed? The Beis Hamikdash represents a unique pipeline between Hashem and Man. When it was destroyed, this flow of spiritual energy was severed. The level of this connection is linked to the word "nefesh" - soul ("When a soul will bring an offering"...Vayikra 2:1). Nefesh begins with the letter Nun, and Nun represents the kingdom of Babylon.

PERSIA

As we know from the story of Esther, Haman was interested in finding the final solution of the Jewish problem - genocide. The exile of Persia and Media represents the threat to the "guf" - the body of the Jewish People, the physical threat of annihilation. Guf begins with Gimmel which stands for the kingdom of Persia and Media.

GREECE

Greece, on the other hand, represents the attack on the Torah itself - the sechel - the wisdom of Israel. The Greeks weren't interested in the physical destruction of the Jewish People; rather they wanted to destroy the spiritual core of Judaism - the Torah - and leave a Hellenized hulk that would conform to the Greek norms of aesthetics - drama and the superficial wisdoms. Sechel begins with the letter Sin - that's the letter of the kingdom of Greece.

ROME

The fourth kingdom, Rome, is a summation of all the other exiles. At the beginning of their domination, the Romans, like the Babylonians, stopped the bringing of offerings in the Temple. Then, they destroyed the second Holy Temple and inflicted unthinkable carnage on the "guf", the body of Jewish People: After the massacre of Betar, they used Jewish blood as fertilizer for seven years.

At first, Rome was the intellectual scion of Greece, but with the conversion of the emperor Constantine to Christianity in 313 CE, the Catholic Church became the spiritual heir of the Roman Empire. After the demise of the influence of the Church, the mantle of Rome was subsequently worn by secularism and materialism - the spiritual incarnation of Rome in our own times.
Rome is all the exiles rolled into one and thus it is represented by the Hebrew word "HaKol," meaning "all". Its first letter is the letter Heh.


WHERE is the point at the center of a circle?


Can you define it? And yet it exists. Just like the letter 'yud' in the Hebrew alphabet - a single dot - from which the whole universe was created - the threshold of existence. The still point in the turning circle - and around that dot turns the whole world. The Jewish People are that little dot - so infinitesimally small, and yet around this dot, the world turns.


WHAT is the opposite to that little dot?

What is the opposite of the central point that occupies no space? Direction - North, South, East and West. Expansion in four directions. Four is the antithesis of the One. Four is the number of the Kingdoms who stand eternally opposed to the Jewish People. Eternally opposed to He who is One. And to His reflection in this world - the Jewish People. 


TAKE another look at our dreidel spinning.

What do you see? Four sides. Spinning around a central point that occupies no space. And when those sides spin - they themselves cease to have direction anymore. Now, in the blur of their whirling - they are a circle, a reflection of the still small point at its center.


WHAT is it that is carved on the sides of our dreidel?

Nun, Gimmel, Sin, Heh... On the surface, those letters stand for "Nes Gadol Hayah Sham - A great miracle happened there" - The commemoration of a miraculous victory of a faithful few over the might of the Greek Empire. But on a deeper level, the dreidel is a microcosmic representation of the four kingdoms, Babylon, Persia, Greece and Rome spinning around the center, the Jewish People.


AND The Hand that spins the dreidel comes from above...

Every empire thinks that it will last forever, but The Hand that spins only spins the dreidel of history for predetermined time and then, each Empire, despite its vainglorious boasting, falters on its axis...and finally crashes. 


THE DREIDEL. A children's game,


played in the firelight of a cold winter night, the Chanukah Menorah silently glowing in the window... The dreidel. Its four sides spinning around the still point in the turning circle; spinning so fast that its sides blur into nothingness... The dreidel. So seemingly insignificant - and yet this little dreidel contains the story of the Jewish People; the history of the whole world... 

Happy Chanukah!



Sources: 

  • Ramban Bereishis 28:12

  • Pirkei D'Rebbe Eliezer 35

  • Maharal Ner Mitzvah

  • Bnei Yisasschar, Kislev/Teves, Essay 2:25

  • ibid. Commentary on Bnei Yisasschar; Rav Nachman Bulman.

 


1 posted on 12/18/2003 6:30:28 AM PST by carlo3b
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To: carlo3b
What? No food? You want maybe we should starve?
2 posted on 12/18/2003 6:34:26 AM PST by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Jim Robinson; Bob J; christie; stanz; jellybean; Angelique; Howie; TwoStep; piasa; Exit148; ...
Here is your chance to GET ON or GET OFF this and other Carlo3B, all important..(LOVE AMERICA, This is Your Country), (I'll be Damned), (Bwhahhahahh), (The Hell you say), (Aweeeeeee), (snif) ... PING LISTS.

If you wish to remain* on it, just sit back and enjoy our wonderful exchange of ideas and you will be alerted whenever we start posting, Historic, Patriotic, Family, and Diet, and a wholesome exchange of recipes and other valuable info re: various food management threads.

*If you have been flagged to this thread on this post, you are already on our temporary ping list.. :) Remember, other pings don't count... :(

To be removed** or added to the list, simply respond to this post publicly, on this thread, or Freepmail me with your preference.


3 posted on 12/18/2003 6:38:11 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: AppyPappy
let's see if the jewish holidays get the same shovel of dirt we Christians are getting.
4 posted on 12/18/2003 6:38:47 AM PST by cars for sale
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To: AppyPappy
NEVER STARVE AROUND HERE...:)

KOSHER STYLE CHICKEN SOUP

I grew up on Chicago's near west side, in what was later referred to as a ghetto, with lots of old world Italians, and Jewish folks! The Butcher shops, were almost all Kosher, and the owners spoke Italian as much as we'd  kibitz in yiddish.

This is a recipe that I make almost every other week and use the rich broth for a mess of stuff.  I don't keep a Kosher kitchen, but I still frequent the Kosher bakery, and meat market and freeze the bagels and chicken until I need them.

This is Mrs Levy's recipe our upstairs neighbor, given to my great aunt at least 50 years ago and has been passed around ever since..

  • 1 kosher chicken 3-4 lbs cut into eighths, you can find at a kosher butcher, or some major supermarkets have kosher packaged chickens, they are always plumper and fresher, but a lot more expensive.. :(
  • 3 med. carrots cut into thirds
  • 1 whole medium onion, cut into quarters
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 2 stalks celery (optional, l don't always use it)
  • 1/2 bunch fresh dill (do NOT use dried dill weed)
1) Clean chicken, put into a dutch oven, cover with water up to 1/8th from the top of the pot. Add carrots, onion, and celery.  High heat until water begins to boil, then lower flame to simmer. Cook uncovered for 2 or more hours, add wine and fresh washed dill (including the stalks, I tie the stems together, or wrap them in cheese cloth), continue cooking for 20 minutes.
Take out dill and throw away.  Enjoy!
My youngest son makes the matzo balls following the easy directions on the box of matzo meal and serve them in the soup.
I also cook fine noodles and serve it with the soup as well.  Heaven on earth!!!

5 posted on 12/18/2003 6:40:04 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: cars for sale
Probably, they offend the media's chosen darlings, the muslims.
6 posted on 12/18/2003 6:41:11 AM PST by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: cars for sale
Behave.. eat, you'll feel better..LOL.. :)

HOLIDAY BRICK CORNED BEEF

This is an old traditional Jewish holiday main course, that never disappoints.. enjoy!

  • 4-5 lb. brisket of beef
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt , large grained
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 2 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1/2  tsp. ground cloves
  • 2 lg. bay leaves, crumbled
  • 1 Tbls. brown sugar
  • 1/8  tsp. nutmeg, fresh ground if possible
  • 1/8  tsp. paprika
  • 3 lg. cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbls. saltpeter* (optional)
  • 1/2 cup warm water
Prepare your brisket in a large, nonmetal container, by weight the meat down with a stone or brick and cover it with plastic wrap or aluminum foil.  Refrigerate for 10 days to 2 weeks. Turn the meat every 2 days.
1) Trim, wash and remove most of the fat from the brisket.
2) Mix together all the spices and the garlic and rub well into the brisket.
3)  Dissolve the salt peter in the warm water and pour over the meat.
4) Unwrap and place the meat in a large pot of cold water. Bring to a boil and throw away the water. Repeat 3 times.
5)  Cover with cold water again, bring to a boil, and cook over low heat, covered, for about 2 hours or until tender. Cool, slice thin, and place on a platter. Serve with mustard or horseradish.
Yield: 8 to 10 Servings
*saltpeter, can be found at your local drug store,  careful though, or it could remove some of the Happy, from your Happy Hanukkah.. eyes rolling.. Hahahahaha..

7 posted on 12/18/2003 6:41:58 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: carlo3b
We always make latkes for Hanakkah. Just because we like them.
8 posted on 12/18/2003 6:42:15 AM PST by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Lazamataz
Ping!
9 posted on 12/18/2003 6:42:21 AM PST by cjshapi
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To: cars for sale
Of course not, their 95-98% Democrat!

Pray for W and Merry Christ's Night to Our Jewish Friends

10 posted on 12/18/2003 6:43:03 AM PST by bray (The Wicked Witch of NY is Taking the Rats Down in Flames!)
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To: cjshapi
Fillet Of Sole Garlic Florentine

Here it is, Kosher, as requested, with metric measurements. It doesn't get much better than this!
This elegant dish makes a great dinner and is especially nice for a Shabbat or holiday meal.


1) Melt the 2 T. of butter with the garlic and mix into the spinach. Put aside and keep warm.
2) Poach the fish in the wine over a low heat until tender (around 10-12 minutes).
3) Put the spinach into a rectangular baking dish. Lay the fish on top of the spinach.
4) In a saucepan melt the 1/4 cup (60 ml) butter over medium low heat.
5) Add the salt, pepper and flour. Stirring continuously, add the milk/cream mixture and bring to a boil.
After one minute of boiling, remove from the heat and let cool for another minute.
6) Stir in the cheese and pour over the spinach and fish. Sprinkle with paprika and broil until browned lightly.
serves 6 lucky folks!
 

11 posted on 12/18/2003 6:43:29 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: AppyPappy
You ask.. We deliver.. :)

Chanukah Latkes
By the light of the Chanukah Menorah, young and old enjoy this crisp, holiday treat!

Ingredients:

Yields: 4 to 6 servings
Grate potatoes and onion on the fine side of a grater, or in a food processor; or put in a blender with a little water.
Strain grated potatoes and onion through a colander, pressing out excess water. Add eggs, flour, and seasoning. Mix well.
Heat ½ cup oil in skillet. Lower flame and place 1 large tablespoon batter at a time into hot sizzling oil and fry on one side for approximately 5 minutes until golden brown. Turn over and fry on other side 2 to 3 minutes.
Remove from pan and place on paper towels to drain excess oil. Continue with remaining batter until used up, adding more oil when necessary.
Serve with applesauce on the side.
Variation: Zucchini or Carrot Latkes: Substitute 5 medium zucchini or 5 medium carrots for potatoes.

Excerpted From: Spice and Spirit, The Complete Kosher Cookbook

Happy Holiday my dear friends......

12 posted on 12/18/2003 6:45:13 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: carlo3b
behave ? that's rich...I simply made an observation by comparison and you can bet your wallet I'm watching too.
13 posted on 12/18/2003 6:47:00 AM PST by cars for sale
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To: cars for sale
see what I mean....
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1042744/posts?page=2
14 posted on 12/18/2003 6:50:34 AM PST by cars for sale
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To: carlo3b
Thanks. I'll be celebrating Hanukkah with Ilsa, but I don't know if I'll try the chicken soup again.
15 posted on 12/18/2003 6:51:17 AM PST by christie
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To: carlo3b
Yum!
16 posted on 12/18/2003 6:54:01 AM PST by cjshapi
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To: carlo3b
Morning Carlo!


How are you?
17 posted on 12/18/2003 6:54:41 AM PST by Soaring Feather (I do Poetry.)
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To: carlo3b
Thanks Carlo! I might try and use that latkas recipe! Happy Channukkah to you too!
18 posted on 12/18/2003 6:55:48 AM PST by I_Love_My_Husband (Borders, Language, Culture, Straights - now more than ever)
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To: christie
Try these, and the soup again.. remember to put the Dill in at the very end.. Give Ilsa a big smooch from me.. :) What about Jury Duty? Did they kick you off because of the big BUSH CHENEY button on your hat.. LOLOL
STUFFED PEPPERS ISRAELI

 
19 posted on 12/18/2003 6:56:41 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: cars for sale
So far we Jews have been dodge the bullet (no pun intended) from the libbies, and it may be indeed that many of my fellow tribesmen are misinformed about where there political leanings should be (I sure hope it really isn't 95% lib!). I am slowly finding more and more of my fellow tribesmen to be conservative (my family is entirely conservative, meeting the first liberal Jew was quite a shock -- I couldn't understand why any Jew would be liberal). I am sure, however, that as more and more Jews realize that Liberalism is the antithesis of what we truly believe, and we move more and more to the right, then, too, Jews and Judiasm will become just as much a target as true Christians.
20 posted on 12/18/2003 7:03:36 AM PST by USAF_TSgt (Eyes on MSgt in 2005)
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To: bentfeather
Good Morning Sunshine.. Today is a perfectly sunny chrisp day in the Lone Star State. I hope you are staying warm..

Chanukah Gelt Double Fudge Chocolate Layer Cake

You don't see cakes like this every day. Easy, moist, high, non-dairy, flavorful. Stays fresh for days, can be frozen for months. For a bakery store look, garnish sides with chocolate sprinkles and plant one solitary cherry in the center. If you do not have cola on hand, you may substitute warm mild coffee.

Cake:

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 1/4 cups vegetable oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 cup cocoa - measured then sifted
  • 1 1/2 cups warm, flat, cola
Icing:
  • 1/2 cup chocolate chips - melted and cooled
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening
  • 3/4 cup unsalted butter or unsalted margarine
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3/4 cup cocoa - measured then sifted
  • 3-4 cups confectioner's sugar - measured then sifted
  • 1/2 cup water, cola, or half-and-half
Garnish:
  • Gold chocolate coins (20 to 30)
  • Color jimmies or cake sprinkles
  • Miniature decorative plastic dreidels


Preheat oven to 350*F (175*C). Lightly grease two 9-inch layer pans and line with parchment paper circles.
In a large mixing bowl, blend sugar and oil. Add eggs, vanilla and mix until thick. In a separate bowl, stir together flour, salt, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon and cocoa. Fold dry ingredients into wet and mix, drizzling in cola as mixture blends. If using an electric mixer, use slow speed for about 3 minutes, scraping sides and bottom once to incorporate all ingredients evenly. This is a thin batter.
Bake, on middle rack, 35 to 40 minutes, until cakes spring back when lightly touched.
For Icing: Cream melted chocolate, shortening, butter and vanilla with cocoa and 1 cup of the confectioner's sugar. Add remaining confectioner's sugar and whip on high speed, adding in a bit of water, cola or half-and-half to get a light, fluffy consistency. If not using right away, re-whip before using. Add additional warm water to get correct consistency (a tablespoon at a time).
Decorating: Place one layer on a cardboard circle. Ice this with about 1/2 inch of frosting. Place top layer and ice cake - sides first. Coat sides with colored sprinkles. Garnish bottom edge with coins. Garnish top with coins - placing them either flat on top of cake or standing up (you may cut some of the coins in half to garnish border of top layer). Place a couple of miniature dreidels in center if desired or Chanukah candles (can be lit when menorah is lit).
Serves 12.

The Baker Boulanger - Seasonal Table, by Marcy Goldman.


21 posted on 12/18/2003 7:03:44 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: USAF_TSgt
just look at your tv...be it local stuff or network/cable stuff....over 60 % of the on air hairspray folks and the producers/writers are jewish. Now add that of this group
most are ultra liberal types....you know, the type who told America that a BJ is not sex....
22 posted on 12/18/2003 7:08:46 AM PST by cars for sale
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To: carlo3b; 1bigdictator; 1st-P-In-The-Pod; 2sheep; a_witness; adam_az; af_vet_rr; agrace; ...
Please don't forget the Chanukah classic -- Sufganiyot! (jelly doughnuts)

What recipes do you have for us former chocoholics who are doing the Atkins "recovery" program?

Did you try my low-carb "latkes"?

23 posted on 12/18/2003 7:12:28 AM PST by Alouette (To a bear, a PETA activist is junk food.)
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To: AppyPappy
Thank you for this blessing of a post.
24 posted on 12/18/2003 7:13:23 AM PST by bsaunders
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To: USAF_TSgt
Here's to you Sgt.. Carlo USAF.. :)

Polish Holiday Babka

This is a great Bread Machine Recipe

Get a head start by starting preparation several hours ahead or even the day before.
This traditional bread-like cake originally hails from Poland.

Dough:

  • 1 1/4 cups (3/4 pound) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon rum extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon lemon extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon orange extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 cups bread flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons active dry yeast


Filling:

  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup raisins or currants (or combination of both)
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries or cranberries (optional)
  • 1 cup chopped almonds, pecans or walnuts
  • Egg Wash:
  • 1 large egg beaten with 1 to 2 tablespoons milk

25 posted on 12/18/2003 7:13:38 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: Alouette
url?

what are they, turnip latkes?
26 posted on 12/18/2003 7:14:58 AM PST by adam_az
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To: cars for sale
"just look at your tv...be it local stuff or network/cable stuff....over 60 % of the on air hairspray folks and the producers/writers are jewish. Now add that of this group
most are ultra liberal types....you know, the type who told America that a BJ is not sex...."

That still doesn't mean that 95%+ of all Jews are liberal, it means that a certain liberal profession has an overrepresentation of people who call themselves "Jewish", but most of them are not really Jewish (not by faith, maybe by family). I know a lot of atheist Jews (yes, it is possible), and there are a lot of folks who make decent Jews look bad (George Soros, Joe Leiberman, William Shatner -- and most of the people in Adam Sandler's "Hanukkah Song" -- ha!).
27 posted on 12/18/2003 7:15:57 AM PST by USAF_TSgt (Eyes on MSgt in 2005)
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To: cars for sale
over 60 % of the on air hairspray folks and the producers/writers are jewish

Proof please.

28 posted on 12/18/2003 7:17:02 AM PST by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: carlo3b; OldFriend; Lauratealeaf; Exit148; Coleus
All Jewish holidays in a nutshell.
THEY TRIED TO KILL US. WE WON. LET'S EAT!!!
29 posted on 12/18/2003 7:17:26 AM PST by Betteboop
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To: bray
I predict that Bush will get the biggest percentage of the Jewish vote next year that a Republican has in a long time. Perhaps not a majority, but a far larger percentage than what people have become accustomed to.

Happy Hannukah to all the good Jewish Freepers!

30 posted on 12/18/2003 7:20:54 AM PST by jpl
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To: AppyPappy
Oh, you know there can't be any proof, but it makes for good "Jews control the world" conspiracies. In fact, I saved my "Don't go to work at the Pentagon on Sept 11" fax I got from the Massod, even though they said to destroy it right after it was sent. </sarcasm>

But I'm interested to see what cars for sale has to say.
31 posted on 12/18/2003 7:21:46 AM PST by USAF_TSgt (Eyes on MSgt in 2005)
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To: adam_az
what are they, turnip latkes?

Turnip and rutabaga (rutabaga--you know, that purple and beige wax-covered round thing)

Deep fry in lots of olive oil, drink a little mashka (OK drink a whole lot of mashka) and you'll never be able to tell it from the real thing! ;)

32 posted on 12/18/2003 7:22:19 AM PST by Alouette (To a bear, a PETA activist is junk food.)
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To: Alouette
What recipes do you have for us former chocoholics who are doing the Atkins "recovery" program?

Hahahhahahha, you want LowCarb Chocolate stuff and you want to know where my SUFGANIYOT'S are.. I love my FReepers.. HUG!!

I am going to make your wonderful low-carb "latkes" this weekend. I have a Low Carber visiting my daughters house and I am the chosen cook.. SURPRISE..  LOL

Happy Holiday my dear FReeper FRiend, from my family to yours.. :)

JELLY FILLED SUFGANIYOT

Sufganiyot (plural of "sufganiyah") are an  Israeli jelly-doughnuts traditional for Hanukkah. Fried foods are traditional at Hanukkah to commemorate the provision of the oil in the rededicated temple.

Ingredients:

  • 2 packages active dry yeast
  • 3 eggs (separated)
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 cup of milk or liquid non-dairy creamer
  • 1/2 cup of melted butter or margarine
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup of jelly 
  • 1 1/2 tbsp. (15 ml) grated lemon rind or 1 1/2 tsp. (5 ml) cinnamon (optional)
  • 1 1/2 tsp. of vanilla (optional)
  • vegetable oil for frying
  • Confectioners sugar
1) Prepare dough In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water and stir in 1/3 cup of granulated sugar and a tsp. of salt.  2) Blend in the milk, butter and egg yolks and two cups of flour.
3) Add lemon rind or cinnamon if you like. Beat in the rest of the flour until it forms a soft, smooth dough.
Cover the bowl with a dish towel and let it rise for about an hour and a half or until it has doubled in size. Punch the dough down and knead it about 12 times until it is smooth and elastic.
4) Cut circles  Roll out the dough with a flowered rolling pin until it is about 1/4" thick.  Use a biscuit cutter or drinking glass to cut the dough into circles about 21/2 or 3 inches in diameter.
5) Add filling Drop about one tsp. of jelly into the center of each of half of the circles.
6) Brush the edges of the dough circles with egg white, then lay another dough circle on top.  Pinch the edges together to seal them.
7) Rise Place the filled circles on a lightly flowered cookie sheet and cover with a dish towel.  Leave it for about an hour to rise, or until the circles have doubled in size.
8) Deep fry in oil.  Heat about two inches deep of vegetable oil over medium heat until it reaches 370° F.
Carefully lift a few of the uncooked doughnuts with a spatula and drop them gently, top side down, into the hot oil.  Let them fry for 3 or 5 minutes until uniformly golden brown.  Turn them as necessary to cook evenly.
Remove and drain on paper towels.
9) With a slotted spoon, remove the doughnuts from the oil and place them on paper towels to dry. Repeat steps 5 and 6 as necessary until all doughnuts are done.
Watch that the oil temperature doesn't drop below 350° F.
Dust the sufganiyot with confectioners sugar and serve!
YIELD: 14 to 16 doughnuts

33 posted on 12/18/2003 7:28:09 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: adam_az
Does anyone have a recipe for baked (as opposed to sauteed) latkes? I made them once and they were good and not as oily, but lost the recipe.
34 posted on 12/18/2003 7:28:29 AM PST by SFmom
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To: I_Love_My_Husband
Noodle Kugel with Cinnamon

35 posted on 12/18/2003 7:34:30 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: carlo3b
Happy Chanukah and a Merry Christmas to the many talented Freepers who continue to amaze me daily!
36 posted on 12/18/2003 7:38:46 AM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: Betteboop; carlo3b
All Jewish holidays in a nutshell.
THEY TRIED TO KILL US. WE WON. LET'S EAT!!!


LOL!!! Now that's a doctrine I can understand.

(Carlo: I just remembered that I forgot about you ... temporarily. You mentioned you DID try to find my Mountain Dew recipe -- THANK YOU!!! I read that message and then my ISP went down for awhile, which I chose as a good time to reboot, and I STILL haven't returned to finish reading that thread.) ;)
37 posted on 12/18/2003 7:40:03 AM PST by Fawnn (Official Canteen wOOhOO Consultant and CookingWithPam.com person)
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To: carlo3b
HAPPY HANUKKAH (Chanukah) and thanks for the great history lesson!
38 posted on 12/18/2003 7:42:09 AM PST by Grampa Dave (George $orea$$ has owned and controlled the Rats for decades!)
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To: SFmom
Grated Baked Latkes

39 posted on 12/18/2003 7:42:28 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: Alouette
Hannukah Sufganiot. They're low carb, I promise:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A4413-2003Dec16.html
40 posted on 12/18/2003 7:43:44 AM PST by Catspaw
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To: Grampa Dave
HAPPY HANUKKAH and a MERRY CHRISTMAS my dear FRiend.. :)
41 posted on 12/18/2003 7:47:19 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: Liberty Valance
Happy Chanukah and a Merry Christmas to the many talented Freepers who continue to amaze me daily!

You want amazement, ha! Try this Bad Boy, it'll knock your socks of.. Happy Healthy and Safe Holidays to you and yours.. :)

LowCarb Cauliflower Alfredo

For those following a Low Carb diet, know that cauliflower is one of those veggies lowest in carbohydrates.
Did you know it is high in Vitamin C, a good source of folacin and an excellent source of natural potassium.

  • lg. Cauliflower, prepare in whole or florets
  • 6 Tbs. butter
  • 2/3 Cup heavy cream
  • 1 Cup Parmesan Reggiano cheese, freshly grated
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • ground white pepper
  • dash of ground nutmeg
Prepare Cauliflower:
Wash, drain and remove outer leaves; cut and trim stems. Break cauliflower into small florets, but it can also be cooked whole.
To microwave cauliflower florets, place in microwave-safe baking dish with 1/2 cup of water. Cover with plastic wrap, cook at high (rotating the dish at half-time) for 8 to 10 minutes or until stem ends are tender. Let stand, covered, 2 to 3 minutes before serving.
To microwave whole cauliflower, clean, trim and wrap in plastic wrap. Place, sealed edges down, on microwave-safe serving dish. Cook at high for 3 minutes, turn over, and cook at high for 3 minutes more or until tender. Let stand, covered, 3 minutes before serving.

Alfredo Sauce:
1) Place butter and cream in large skillet over medium-low heat.
2) Cook and stir until butter melts and mixture bubbles; cook and stir 2 minutes more. Stir in salt, pepper and nutmeg.
3) Remove from heat. Gradually stir in cheese until thoroughly blended and smooth.
4) Return briefly to heat to completely blend cheese, but do NOT let sauce bubble or cheese will become lumpy and tough

Buying and Storing Cauliflower:
Select heads that are firm and tightly-flowered, with fine white or creamy white florets and fresh-looking, green leaves. A large head will weigh about three pounds and serve four.
Brown spots on a white cauliflower are most likely only water marks, but yellowish ones may indicate excessive age.Store unwrapped in refrigerator cooler for up to five days.

LowCarb, copyrighted by Morelli Enterprises Inc.


42 posted on 12/18/2003 7:52:13 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: cars for sale; carlo3b
That may be the case, but this is a Happy Hannukah thread. Let's celebrate this holiday with our Jewish FRiends. I for one am enjoying the Kosher recipes. If you want to complain about the problems displaying the nativity start a thread of your own.
43 posted on 12/18/2003 7:53:53 AM PST by CajunConservative
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To: USAF_TSgt
respond completely please..I did not say the 95% quote.That was another poster. I was kicked off FRep.
for saying there are two types of jews in America.Good God loving types like so many here and the 2nd type we see on TV and movies who simply believe the ends justify the means
44 posted on 12/18/2003 7:53:59 AM PST by cars for sale
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To: Betteboop
THEY TRIED TO KILL US. WE WON. LET'S EAT!!!..

LOLOLOL.. I love women with a purpose.. HUGGGGGGGGS.. :)

45 posted on 12/18/2003 7:54:52 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: Fawnn
Happy Holidays Chef.. sigh.. :)
46 posted on 12/18/2003 7:55:55 AM PST by carlo3b (http://www.CookingWithCarlo.com)
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To: carlo3b
LowCarb Cauliflower Alfredo

Will definitely try this one!

As for the rest of my family which seems to have a genetic aversion to broccoli, mushrooms, cauliflower, etc.

THEY CAN'T HAVE ANY!!! IT'S ONLY FOR ME!!! I WILL EAT IT ALL MYSELF!!! HA HA HA HA HA HA!!!!

47 posted on 12/18/2003 7:57:15 AM PST by Alouette (To a bear, a PETA activist is junk food.)
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To: carlo3b; Dennis; SJackson; quidnunc; JohnHuang2; Catspaw; Alouette; hchutch; BenF; Nachum; ...
HAPPY HANUKKAH to you!

And Merry Christmas to all my Christian friends at FR! :)

48 posted on 12/18/2003 7:58:42 AM PST by veronica (Monterey County Film Commission Screenwriting Contest /ATTN:FR writers/FReepmail me)
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To: SFmom
Does anyone have a recipe for baked (as opposed to sauteed) latkes? I made them once and they were good and not as oily, but lost the recipe.

I'm Protestant, so I am definitely not a latke expert; however,...

You should be able to use your favorite latke recipe and adapt it to baking fairly easily. (I've done this!) As for HOW you bake the latkes, you have two choices:

For either method, I line a jelly roll pan with aluminum foil; I now use the non-stick "release" kind.

Method 1 would be to coat the foil with a little olive oil, place the latkes on the foil, and then "spritz" the top of each with a little additional olive oil. (I don't know from Kosher, so I usually use a mixture of olive oil and butter to coat the foil.)

Method 2 would be to use a nonstick spray oil on the pan and on top of the latkes. (I'm soooooooooo sold on Spectrum Naturals [www.spectrumnaturals.com] spray oils over that other nonstick spray that bears my real first name.) Here's a non-Kosher version for baked latkes that will be in my cookbook due out next fall (The Everything Low-Salt Cookbook):

Baked Potato Latkes
Serves 8
Per serving:
Calories: 107.94
Protein: 3.30 g
Carbohydrates: 21.03 g
Total Fat: 1.33 g
Sat. Fat: 0.26 g
Cholesterol: 26.56 mg
Sodium: 141.26 mg
Fiber: 1.44 g

Spectrum Naturals Canola Spray Oil with Butter Flavor or Spectrum Naturals Extra Virgin Olive Spray Oil
4 medium-size potatoes, peeled and grated
1 medium-size red onion, finely chopped
¼ teaspoon sea salt
1/8 teaspoon dried lemon granules, crushed
½ teaspoon freshly grated black pepper
1 teaspoon freeze-dried chives
1 large egg plus 1 large egg white, lightly beaten together
¼ cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon canola or olive oil

1. Preheat oven to 350°. Treat a baking sheet with the spray oil.
2. Mix together the remaining ingredients. Spoon the batter onto the baking sheet in 8 equal-sized portions, flattening them slightly. Spray the tops of the pancakes with a light coating of the spray oil.
3. Bake for 10 minutes or until brown on the bottom. Turn and bake for an additional 5 to 10 minutes, until evenly browned.
49 posted on 12/18/2003 7:59:09 AM PST by Fawnn (Official Canteen wOOhOO Consultant and CookingWithPam.com person)
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To: carlo3b
LowCarb Cauliflower Alfredo...

Ohhh that sounds yummy. I'm gonna try it. :)

50 posted on 12/18/2003 8:01:36 AM PST by veronica (Monterey County Film Commission Screenwriting Contest /ATTN:FR writers/FReepmail me)
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