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Iranian Alert -- July 2, 2004 [EST]-- IRAN LIVE THREAD -- "Americans for Regime Change in Iran"
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 7.2.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/01/2004 9:35:41 PM PDT by DoctorZIn

The US media almost entirely ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” Most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. I began these daily threads June 10th 2003. On that date Iranians once again began taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Today in Iran, most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alsadr; armyofmahdi; ayatollah; cleric; hughhewitt; humanrights; iaea; insurgency; iran; iranianalert; iranquake; iraq; islamicrepublic; jayshalmahdi; journalist; kazemi; khamenei; khatami; khatemi; moqtadaalsadr; mullahs; persecution; persia; persian; politicalprisoners; protests; rafsanjani; revolutionaryguard; rumsfeld; satellitetelephones; shiite; southasia; southwestasia; studentmovement; studentprotest; terrorism; terrorists; wot
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 07/01/2004 9:35:43 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 07/01/2004 9:38:43 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Middle East Weapons Proliferation: Lessons From Iraq and Beyond

June 30, 2004
The Washington Institute for Near East Policy
David Albright and Michael Eisenstadt

On June 24, 2004, David Albright and Michael Eisenstadt addressed The Washington Institute's Special Policy Forum. Mr. Albright, president of the Institute for Science and International Security, has served as an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) weapons inspector in Iraq. Mr. Eisenstadt is a senior fellow at The Washington Institute, specializing in military and security affairs. The following is a rapporteur's summary of their remarks.

New Lessons Regarding Proliferation

The culmination of Operation Iraqi Freedom has given rise to much debate concerning the exact nature of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction (WMD) programs. Similarly, ongoing negotiations with Iran regarding its nuclear activities have also been dogged by imprecise intelligence and unclear strategies. Both of these cases have led many to realize that noncompliance with weapons inspections does not automatically indicate the existence of hidden weapons programs. Although the Senate Intelligence Committee has yet to issue its report on Iraqi WMD, one could reasonably argue that the situation in Iraq during the 1990s served as an example of how inspections can provide a powerful deterrent against covert WMD activity. At present, it is too early to establish with any certainty the exact nature of Iraqi WMD prior to the invasion. Just as some prewar analyses were mistaken when they claimed to know precisely where Iraq's weapons stockpiles were, it would now be erroneous to declare that the country possessed no WMD before the war or that such weapons are not present there today. One must remain open to various possibilities until history comes down conclusively on either side.

Iraqi WMD Before and During the War

Recent analysis of why Iraq did not use WMD during the war has raised several different theories as to the state of the country's WMD programs and Saddam Husayn's strategy regarding such weapons. Beginning in 1991, major portions of Iraq's relatively large stockpile of chemical and biological weapons were slowly uncovered and destroyed, due to both UN inspections and internal Iraqi calculations. By 1995-1996, Baghdad decided that it made little sense to maintain large WMD stockpiles, which were far too easy for inspectors to find and destroy. Hence, one could reasonably conclude that Iraq might have retained a small strategic reserve or breakout capability in its biological and, perhaps, chemical weapons programs. Under such a strategy, the former regime could have retained its nonconventional capabilities while still feigning full cooperation with the UN by permitting credible inspections. Such capabilities -- and the specter of their potential use -- could have helped Saddam save face regionally while simultaneously keeping his internal and external enemies at bay.

These possibilities lead to an obvious question: if the former regime possessed WMD prior to the invasion, why did it refrain from using them against coalition forces during the war, as was anticipated by many? Several different answers are plausible:

The prewar prediction that the regime would deploy WMD may have been incorrect; i.e., Iraq either did not have such capabilities or was unable to use them due to technical or time constraints.

The country's WMD programs may have been in disarray due to corruption and the social effects that international sanctions had on Iraqi scientists. In addition, one should not underestimate the effect that Hussein Kamel's defection and death in 1995 had on those programs, as he was an effective manager who had accounted for much of the initiative behind the project. Finally, Saddam's psychological state, especially rumors of his withdrawn nature in the run-up to the war, might have played a factor in the program's lack of initiative or corruption.

The Iraqi political hierarchy might have decided that chemical or biological weapons would simply not be effective against the U.S. military, which was equipped to weather such attacks.

The use of biological or chemical weapons did not fit with Saddam's political strategy for surviving the war. According to this strategy, if Iraqi conventional forces could have held off U.S. forces, especially outside of Baghdad, then Russia or France might have intervened on Iraq's behalf. Such a strategy would not have been politically feasible if Iraq resorted to WMD.

Saddam might have been optimistic about the abilities of his conventional military forces and fully expected them to win the war. Under such a scenario, Iraq might have sent its WMD to Syria before the war with the intention of retrieving them after the invasion was successfully thwarted.

Iranian Intransigence and the Role of Inspections

Recent events in Iran and the nascent status of the country's nuclear weapons program have emphasized the need for a coherent U.S. policy regarding WMD proliferation in the Middle East. The Bush administration's current stance -- that Iran has a secret nuclear weapons program that cannot be proven but must be destroyed -- does not provide many concrete policy options for moving forward. Much of the purported intelligence regarding Iran's nuclear weapons program is distorted and inconclusive, and additional IAEA inspections are needed. Moreover, the United States and European Union (EU) must collaborate on formulating a definitive timeline for Iranian cooperation and action, as well as serious punitive measures if Tehran fails to meet the terms of the agreement.

Inconclusive intelligence aside, one cannot discount Iran's apparent intransigence in October 2003 regarding its nuclear proliferation agreement with the EU. Although Tehran divulged some information about its nuclear activities, it may also have gained the diplomatic and political cover needed to hide more serious developments. Reported inconsistencies in Iran's initial disclosures included not revealing its activities related to the German-made P2 centrifuge, which is more effective at extracting enriched uranium than Iran's declared P1 centrifuge. Subsequently, Tehran admitted to conducting a small research program into the capabilities of the P2. Soon thereafter, however, evidence was uncovered indicating that the country had attempted to import large quantities of components for a working P2 machine. In addition, Tehran is not honoring its most recent commitments to the EU, which included refraining from further uranium enrichment, halting any efforts to build heavy-water reactors, and removing spent fuel rods from Iran. The Iranian nuclear program remains poised to resume centrifuge production for enrichment purposes, and evidence of uranium hexafluoride (used only in heavy-water reactors) has been found. Tensions are high, and the risk of confrontation is very real. Satellite photos of the Natanz nuclear site have shown a substantial hardening against land and air attacks, demonstrating that Iran is indeed worried about a preemptive strike on its WMD capabilities. At the same time, U.S. intelligence has assessed that it would take the Iranians until at least the end of this decade to assemble a working nuclear bomb.

The Worldwide Proliferation Threat

The IAEA has begun to grasp the global nature of WMD proliferation and the need for new measures in addition to inspections. As in the past, foreign aid and technical assistance will play an increasingly integral role in the buildup of viable WMD programs worldwide. The nuclear black market network run by former Pakistani nuclear chief Abdul Qadeer Khan is but the most glaring example of individual entrepreneurship in the global WMD trade. To counteract this growing threat, the IAEA has begun to crack down on dual-use exports to certain countries by promoting a treaty-based export control system. Despite the weak regulations in place in many countries, the agency has had success with tightening controls in certain key nations. Yet, problems remain in other countries that have particularly weak domestic regulations and are new to the proliferation market. Pakistan is a clear example of this problem. The IAEA has taken steps to investigate the Khan network in the context of Iran. Yet, focusing similar attention on Iran's external sources of WMD equipment and expertise would give inspectors a better understanding of the Iranian nuclear program and its attempts at weaponization. One should not underestimate the effects of U.S. and international efforts to curb WMD proliferation. Nevertheless, a clearer understanding of the lessons from Iraq and Iran is imperative if these efforts are to succeed in the Middle East and beyond.

This Special Policy Forum Report was prepared by Neri Zilber.

http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/watch/Policywatch/policywatch2004/880.htm


3 posted on 07/01/2004 9:40:37 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Partial listing of the Worldwide Commemorative Actions of the Students Uprising of July 1999

SMCCDI (Public Announcement)
Jul 14, 2004

Iranians are preparing themselves for another show of rejection of the Islamic regime. Thousands are expected to come into the Iranian streets in order to support the Iranian Student Movement and Secularist forces seeking Regime Change in Iran.

In addition and in their support, the Iranian Diaspora is getting united in order to organize , in addition to special editions planned by most Iranian and Persian speaking satellite TV and radio networks, demos which will take place in most European and N. American cities.

A partial listing of these actions:

Main cities, Iran (On 07/08/2004)
Thousands of Iranians are expected to come into streets and squares of most Iranian cities and to support the planned actions of students and opposition groups. These wide spread protest gatherings will take place in order to commemorate the legacy of the "Epic of the Students Uprising of July 9, 1999" and in order to show the popular rejection of the entire system of the Islamic republic regime.

These demonstrations are estimated to be extremly bloody as the Islamic regime which has increased the repression, intends to smash the popular actions.

On Thursday, July 8th, 2004
In all Iranian streets and squares, especially in the Enghelab, Amir Abad, Azadi, Baharestan, Narmak, Tehran Pars and Madar areas of the Iranian Capital.

Dallas, (TX/US) (On 07/11/2004)
SMCCDI organizes the commemoration of the anniversary of July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy.

Participants will cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

Sunday, July 11, 2004
From 05:00 PM (Local time)
At the "Le Gala" room of the "Intercontinental Hotel" (former Kempenski) located at the junctions of North Dallas Parkway and Arrapaho Rd.

Düsseldorf, Germany (On 07/10/2004)
The Iranian community will march in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the end of the German government's collaboration with the Islamic regime and pressures on the Mullahcracy in order to respect Human Rights in Iran and to step down from political power.

Saturday, July 10, 2004
From 14:00 (Local time)
From Banhoff toward the City Court

Paris, France (On 07/10/2004)
SMCCDI organizes the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising Iran and its legacy. This demonstration will follow the SMCCDI Demo of July 8, 2004, in front of the regime's Embassy.

Participants will cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Saturday, July 10, 2004
From 16:00 till 18:00 (local time)
Place du Trocadero

Heidelberg, Germany (On 07/10/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the end of the German government's collaboration with the Islamic regime and pressures on the Mullahcracy in order to respect Human Rights in Iran and to step down from political power.

Saturday, July 10, 2004
From 15:00 till 17:00 (Local time)
At the Bismark Platz (town center)

Washington (DC/US) (On 07/08/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in the US Capital in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the public moral support of the Iranian secularist movement and the US pressure for free elections in Iran.

Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 11:00 AM (Local time)
At the West side of the US Capitol Building

Göteborg, Sweden (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians and Swedish freedom lovers will gather for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 17:30 (local time)
From the Gustaf Adolfs Torg toward Glatsen
Gotenborg

Paris, France (On 07/08/2004)
SMCCDI organizes for the 3rd consecutive year the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy.

It's to note that this demonstration will take place in the Capital of the Islamic regime's closet ally, in front of the Islamic Republic Embassy.

Participants will show their rejection of the Islamic regime and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 19:00 till 21:00 (local time)
Place de l'Iena

Ottawa, Canada (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians will gather for the 2nd consecutive day in front of the Islamic republic's Embassy in order to condemn the persistent repression in Iran and in order to cherish the legacy of the Students Uprising of 1999.

They will also ask from the Canadian government to pressure the Islamic regime in order to bring to an open court of justice the murderers of Zahra Kazemi the Iranian Canadian journalist killed by agents of the regime

Thursday July 8, 2004
From 10:00 AM (local time)
In front of the Islamic republic Embassy located at 245 metclafe

Helsinki, Finland (On 07/08/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

Thursday, July 08, 2004
From 12:00 PM (Local time)
In front of the main church of Helsinki

Hamburg, Germany (On 07/08/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the end of the German government's collaboration with the Islamic regime and pressures on the Mullahcracy in order to respect Human Rights in Iran and to step down from political power.

Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 12:00 PM (Local time)
At west side of the Central Train Station (Hopt Banhoff)

London, UK (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians will gather, in front of the regime's Embassy, for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

They'll also denounce the support made, by Jack Straw and the Britsh circles, of the Mullahcracy.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 12:00 till 16:00 (local time)
In front of the Islamic republic Embassy

Odense, Danemark (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians will gather for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 16:00 till 18:00 (local time)
In front of the City Hall (Mayor‚ office)

Stockholm, Sweden (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians will gather for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 16:00 till 19:00 (local time)
In Center of Stockholm, Sergels Torg

Den Haag, Netherlands (On 07/08/2004)
Iranians will gather for the 2nd consecutive day for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 13:00 (local time)
In front of the Dutch Parliament

Toronto, Canada (On 07/08/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request for the Canadian government's pressure on the Islamic regime in order to respect Human Rights and to bring to an open justice the murderers of Zahra Kazemi, the Iranian Canadian journalist killed last year by the regime.

Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 06:00 PM (Local time)
At the Mel Lastman Square, (hear of North York, north of Toronto)

München, Germany (On 07/08/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the end of the German government's collaboration with the Islamic regime and pressures on the Mullahcracy in order to respect Human Rights in Iran and to step down from political power.

Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 17:00 till 18:00 (Local time)
At the Stachus square
Munich

Los Angeles, (CA/US) (On 07/07/2004)
The Iranian community of S. California, along with opposition groups such as SMCCDI, will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians. Held a day earlier than inside Iran, in order to show the Diaspora's solidarity, a protest march will also take place at the same occasion.

Wednesday, July 7, 2004
From 05:00 PM (Local time)
In front of the Federal Building located at Wilshire Blvd. in Westwood

Palo Alto, (CA/US) (On 07/07/2004)
The Iranian community of San Francisco will gather near the Stanford University in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

Wednesday, July 7, 2004
From 05:30 PM (Local time)
At the University Ave, near the Burger King Plaza
In Palo Alto.

Brussels, Belgium (On 07/07/2004)
Iranians will gather in front of the European Union's Building in order to condemn the support of the illegitimate Islamic republic regime by main European countries.

The will cherish the memories of all those fallen for the cause of Freedom and Secularity in Iran and especially the students who uprised in July 9, 1999.

On Wedenesday July 7, 2004
From 14:00 till 16:00 (local time)
In front of the EU building in Place Maurice Schumann

Ottawa, Canada (On 07/07/2004)
Iranians will gather in front of the Islamic republic's Embassy in order to condemn the persistent repression in Iran and in order to cherish the legacy of the Students Uprising of 1999.

They will also ask from the Canadian government to pressure the Islamic regime in order to bring to an open court of justice the murderers of Zahra Kazemi the Iranian Canadian journalist killed by agents of the regime

Wednesday July 7, 2004
From 04:00 PM
In front of the Islamic republic Embassy located at 245 metclafe

Den Haag, Netherlands (On 07/07/2004)
Iranians will gather for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

On Wednesday, July 7, 2004
From 12:00 till 14:00 (local time)
In front of the Dutch Parliament

Oslo, Norway (On 07/03/2004)
Iranians will gather for the commemoration of the July 9-14, 1999, Student Uprising of Iran and its legacy. They will show their rejection of the Islamic republic and cherish the memories of those fallen during the bloody governmental crackdown on the 5 glorious days of students protests.

During this advanced action, the protesters will also denounce the deals made between the Statoil company and the clerical regime.

On Saturday, July 3, 2004
From 14:00 till 16:00 (local time)
In front of the Norway's Parliament

Sacramento (CA/US) (On 07/04/2004)
Iranians of N. California will gather in order to condemn the Islamic republic regime and to cherish the legacy of the Students Uprising of July 9-14, 1999.

Sunday July 4, 2004
From 07:00 PM
In Front of Arden Mall

Koln, Germany (On 07/03/2004)
The Iranian community will gather in order to commemorate the Student Uprising of July 9-14, 1999, and to demonstrate their solidarity with enchained Iranians.

The demonstrators will request the end of the German government's collaboration with the Islamic regime and pressures on the Mullahcracy in order to respect Human Rights in Iran and to step down from political power.

Saturday, July 03, 2004
From 14:30 (Local time)
In front of the main church of Koln

Main cities, Iran (On 05/02/2004)
Teachers and their supporters, such as the students, will come into the streets in order to support the "Spiritual Fathers and Mothers of Iranians" (Teachers) in their protest movement and requests.

Many other teachers will start a week long strike that might radicalize if their conditions are not fulfilled.

In most Iranian schools and in front of the offices of the Ministry of Education and the Social offices in main Iranian cities.

from 10:00 AM (local time)

Tehran, Iran (On 04/30/2004)
Workers and their supporters, such as the students, will come into the streets in order to condemn the persistent deterioration of their conditions, the official corruption and looting of Iran's manufacturing assets by questionnable privatizations.

They will mark at this occasion the Int.'l Workers Day, a day sooner than the rest of the World due to this year's difference in Iranian calendar. They will march from the Mokhber-odoleh junction, located in downtown Tehran, toward the offices of welfare.

From 09:00 AM (local time)

Berlin, Germany (On 04/20/2004)
Iranians and German Freedom Lovers will gather, in the German capital, in order to condemn the repressive Islamic republic regime and especially the Mykonos terrorist attack, in the mid 90s, during which several Iranian opponents were killed by the regime's hit squad.

The demonstrators will also protest against the change made, by the Berlin's Mayor, in the writing of the commemorative stone which shall be placed in the famous restaurant. The German government has pressured Berlin's municipal officials in order to avoid jeopardizing the economic relations of this country with the tyrannical and terrorist regime of the mullahs despite the sentence issued, in 1997, by the German judiciary declaring the "highest levels of the Islamic republic as involved in these murders".

On Tuesday, April 20, 2004
From 16:30 (Local Time)
At the Prager Platz of Berlin

Brussels, Belgium (On 03/21/2004)
Iranians and European Freedom lovers will gather in order to protest against the EU's policy of protecting the Clerical regime. The demonstrators will warn the EU, on the eve of its General Affairs Council, on the consequences of supporting an illegitimate and shaky regime.

On Sunday March 21, 2004
From 11:00 AM (local time)
In front of the European Parliament

Main cities, Iran (On 03/16/2004)
Iranians will defy, once again, the Islamic regime by celebrating their banned cultural heritage, "Tchahar Shanbe Soori" (fire Fiest), qualified by the dogmatic Islamic mullahs as a pagan tradition.

They will break the regime's imposed religious taboo by making this celebration during the Shia mourning month of Moharam.

Heavy clashes are expected as Iranians have made themselves ready to resist the brutal attacks of the regime forces.

On Tuesday March 16, 2004
From the begining of the evening.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/article/publish/cat_index_10.shtml


4 posted on 07/01/2004 9:57:57 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran denies abducting sailors and Marines

By Anton La Guardia, Diplomatic Editor
(Filed: 02/07/2004)

Iran has dismissed British accusations that Revolutionary Guards effectively abducted eight British servicemen on the Iraqi side of the Shatt al-Arab waterway last week.

Its foreign ministry expressed "surprise" at a statement by Geoff Hoon, the Defence Secretary, that the six Royal Marines and two Royal Navy sailors had been "operating inside the Iraqi border and were forcibly escorted into Iranian territorial waters".

Hamid Reza Asefi, a ministry spokesman, said the British charge d'affaires in Teheran had "signed a letter confirming that they entered Iranian territorial waters illegally and unintentionally".

Jack Straw, the Foreign Secretary, had done the same in telephone conversations with Kamal Kharrazi, the foreign minister, he said.

The servicemen were detained by Iran for three days and paraded on television wearing blindfolds. They were handed back after making a televised apology.

A British official in London said the apology was conditional. "We said that if they had entered Iranian waters it had been unintentional. All our statements emphasised the 'if'."

Michael Ancram, the Tory foreign affairs spokesman, said that, if Mr Hoon's statement were true, "at the very least we must expect a full apology from the Iranians and a swift return of the equipment" - which included three patrol boats.

Some British officials were playing down the diplomatic significance of Mr Hoon's statement. They said it was more like a situation report than "a definitive assessment".

Even the humiliation of the servicemen on television was played down.

"The men were not prisoners of war so it was not a breach of the Geneva Convention," an official said.

Britain is keen to maintain some cordiality in relations with Iran because of its strategic position on the borders of Iraq and Afghanistan and its influence in both countries.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/07/02/wiran02.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/07/02/ixworld.html


5 posted on 07/01/2004 9:59:34 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: All
Is it appropriate to ask questions here? I'm seeking information about a statement made recently by the Iranian government with regards to "Tariq Al Quds". That was a military exercise conducted in April, 1997.

The statement was made within the last month, I believe.
6 posted on 07/01/2004 11:28:25 PM PDT by HipShot (All of our ammunition should be dipped in pig fat)
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To: DoctorZIn

Bump!


7 posted on 07/02/2004 1:15:03 AM PDT by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
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To: All

Click on the above picture to link to the Second Annual Viking Kitties Lightning Strike / Free Republic Online Independence Day Fireworks Display. It starts July 1 and continues through July 4th!

8 posted on 07/02/2004 4:28:02 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: DoctorZIn; MadIvan; Brit_Guy; McGavin999; Eurotwit; Ragtime Cowgirl; nuconvert; Cindy

NORTH-EAST MARINE SENT SECRET MESSAGE FROM PRISON CELL IN IRAN

LEAH WILLIAMSON
02 July 2004
pressandjournal.co.uk

North-east Royal Marine David Reid was able to send a secret message on his mobile phone from his Iranian prison cell to his base, the Press and Journal can reveal.

He was able to alert his HQ to the trouble that he and his seven comrades were in.

His captors missed the phone when they searched him after he was taken prisoner with five fellow marines and two Royal Navy sailors on the Shatt al Arab waterway dividing Iraq from Iran and held for three days .

But the 24-year-old realised he would be in serious trouble if he was caught with the phone.

Marine Reid disposed of it after removing the sim card.

His father, Graham, revealed more of his son's ordeal after learning that he is due home around August 1.

Speaking from his home in Gordon Road, Kemnay, Mr Reid said the family had received a call from the Ministry of Defence family liaison officer on Wednesday to say David would be due home in around a month's time.

Mr Reid last spoke to his son on Sunday evening and said he was in good spirits.

"We are all looking forward to seeing him. The next four weeks will pass really quickly," said the father.

"But I think it's right for him to be at his base at the moment. He is with people who under-stand what he's experienced."

Mr Reid was heartened to receive a call from a local counsellor, who was once held as a prisoner by the Japanese.

Now in her 70s and a trained counsellor, the woman has offered her support to David when he returns home.

However, Mr Reid said his son, along with his seven comrades and their families, were left furious by the reported comments from rebel MP George Galloway.

It was reported that the Glasgow Kelvin MP had said of their capture: "I just have to laugh.

"We are told we have the best armed forces but they don't even know which country they are in."

David and his comrades may make a statement on their return home.

But in the meantime Mr Reid said the MP was "out of order".

"He showed a complete lack of respect for these men."

Last night it emerged that a new diplomatic row has broken out between Britain and Iran after the Tehran authorities denied forcing the eight UK servicemen into its territorial waters and then arresting them for illegal entry.

Mr Reid said: "I don't know what happened there but I know they are all highly trained and would have been focusing on their job.

"David had only been there two days so he was fresh and would have been concentrating on his job. I don't believe they strayed into waters."

http://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?command=newPage&nodeId=149211&contentPK=10519193


9 posted on 07/02/2004 5:41:37 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (John ''Fedayeen" sKerry - the Mullahs' regime candidate)
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To: HipShot

Try this http://www.google.com/search?q=%22Tariq+Al+Quds%22&

it will give you ref to Road to Jerusalem.


10 posted on 07/02/2004 7:21:18 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn

Ayatollahs and US Presidential Election

July 01, 2004
The US Alliance for Democratic Iran
USADI

Many observers believe the election season in the United States is forcing the administration to refrain from taking firm action against Iran’s increasingly threatening and rouge behavior. The logic: Any such escalation could lead to a crisis the administration would not welcome. If true, this approach could undermine regional stability and our long term security interests.

Tehran, no doubt, is counting on this. The cunning mullahs in Iran are notorious for manipulating the domestic political climate in other countries, and since 1979, the US presidential election has been the focus of their attempts to blackmail our policy makers. This election appears to be no different.

Many in Iran’s leadership believe they have a window of opportunity until November to advance their secret nuclear weapons program beyond the point of no return and make their presence in Iraq irreversible. The mullahs feel the US preoccupation with Iraq’s security will prevent it from doing anything concrete to counter Iran’s nuclear mischief and meddling in Iraq.

The mullahs do not operate on the basis of our election year calendar. They have one of their own and are working hard to get to the end zone before their perceived window of opportunity is closed. The recent announcement that Iran would continue with the uranium enrichment process, the dubious capture of eight British serviceman last week, and photographing sensitive locations of New York city by two Iranian guards of the Iran’s mission to the United Nations are just a few examples of Tehran’ brazenness.

Washington must make it crystal clear to Iran’s ruling tyrants that regional stability and the security concerns of the United States far outweigh any presidential campaign considerations.

The world would face an unprecedented calamity if Iran – the most active state sponsor of terrorism – went nuclear. Iranian meddling in Iraq would be of even greater repercussions given the impact it could have on the security of Iraq and the whole region.

More importantly, the theocratic regime in Iran has never been more isolated among Iranians. The rising influence of the most extreme figures, such as former and current commanders of the revolutionary guards, in the government is an attempt by the mullahs to get a second lease on life. It is not surprising that since February they have cracked down harshly on protests and strikes in different parts of Iran and have stepped up their activities in the nuclear front and in Iraq.

All the parties involved in the election must be unanimous in denouncing Iran’s rouge behavior and pledge their firm stance against Iran’s suppression of its citizens, nuclear weapons program, and export of fundamentalism to Iraq and beyond. They should also unambiguously declare their support for Iran’s anti-fundamentalist opposition movement that is working to unseat the tyrant mullahs. The failure to do so would be seen by Tehran as a sign of weakness.

http://www.usadiran.org/index.html


11 posted on 07/02/2004 8:28:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

12 posted on 07/02/2004 8:30:52 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran Faces Retaliation over Boats

July 02, 2004
The Guardian
Ewen MacAskill and Richard Norton-Taylor

Britain is considering retaliating against Iran unless it "clarifies" the seizure of eight servicemen last week. A government source said that, if the Iranians did admit forcing them into Iranian waters, "they could expect a reaction". The Foreign Office could call in the Iranian ambassador for a reprimand. More drastic retribution is unlikely, since the FO cherishes its diplomatic links with Tehran.

The British chargé d'affaires in Tehran passed on a statement by the defence secretary, Geoff Hoon, saying the three patrol boats had not strayed as had been thought. On Wednesday he told MPs the six marines and two sailors told a debriefing they were "forcibly escorted" into Iranian waters, and he said he was "very concerned" at their being blindfolded.

Britain also wants the return of the boats and navigation devices, which should establish any straying by mistake.

Iran rejected Mr Hoon's account. The foreign ministry's spokesman said: "During the handover of the men in Tehran, the British chargé d'affaires signed the minutes of the meeting with relevant Iranian officials. The minutes acknowledged that the British boats entered the Iranian waters by mistake."

It emerged this week that Iranians set up posts a kilometre inside Iraq last year. The matter was solved through diplomacy, but not before US commanders in Iraq asked British officers to plan an attack on the posts.

http://politics.guardian.co.uk/foreignaffairs/story/0,11538,1252300,00.html


13 posted on 07/02/2004 8:32:29 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran City Pix Blitz Puts FBI on Alert

July 01, 2004
New York Daily News
Jennifer Lebovich and James Gordon Meek

WASHINGTON -- The FBI is more worried about workers at Iran's UN mission in New York when it comes to suspicious photo surveillance of city landmarks than those from any other nation, sources said yesterday.

"The staff of the Iranian mission seems to be the most active in taking photos and video" of potential terror targets, one U.S. law enforcement source said.

While the FBI still assigns roughly half of its several hundred national security division agents in New York to keeping tabs on Russian spies, photography of sensitive sites by Iranian agents is now a major counterterrorism concern.

On Tuesday, the State Department announced the expulsion of two security guards at Iran's United Nations mission. The duo was tailed by G-men in New York last week as they videotaped St. Patrick's Cathedral, Rockefeller Center, Central Park and transit buses, sources said.

The FBI watched the men shooting video from the hip and concealing cameras with clothing, according to the sources.

Iranian agents have been stopped at least six times for similar activity in the past, NYPD and federal officials have said.

"Should [Iranian officials] start sharing these photos with people we don't care for, it may do us harm," said a federal law enforcement source.

Yesterday, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) stood in front of the mission's offices at E. 40th St. and Third Ave. and blasted Iran for "spying and deception" that puts "everyone at risk."

"Time after time Iranian employees have gotten caught red-handed," Schumer said. "If it happens once, you say it's unusual. If it happens three times, something is wrong."

Iran is on America's list of state sponsors of terrorism for its notorious ties to Hamas and Hezbollah and for allegedly protecting Al Qaeda leaders.

Iran's mullahs also have been accused by Washington of allowing Jordanian terror kingpin Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi to freely cross the border with Iraq.

Russian diplos, by comparison, wouldn't draw as much scrutiny for taking photos of New York landmarks because Russian spies are not apt to be involved in target surveillance, sources said.

"If Russians were out taking pictures of St. Patrick's, we probably would think it more likely to be tourist activity," the federal source said.

Three pairs of guards from the Iranian mission have been kicked out of the U.S. since 2002. Cuban diplomats also have been expelled in the past year, and five Iraqi officials at their former UN mission were declared persona non grata and expelled in April 2003.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/local/story/207896p-179255c.html


14 posted on 07/02/2004 8:33:14 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Rafsanjani Wants Bush Tried

July 02, 2004
Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting
IRIB News

Tehran -- Chairman of the Expediency Council (EC) Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani here on Friday called US President George Bush the "real criminal" in the court case against the former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hossein, stressing that Bush must also be put on trial.

"Today, the world's monsters are standing face to face, and the real criminal is US President Bush who must be indicted," Rafsanjani said at a sermon to Tehran Friday Prayers.

He criticized the us for holding the trial of the Iraqi dictator in-camera, and said Saddam must be tried for the crimes that he has perpetrated in the eight-year war against Iran, 1980-88, as well.

"The US always asks others to be transparent. But why have they held the first hearing of the court in-camera?" he asked. "That they show footages of the hearing with no voice indicates that this is not a trial."

Rafsanjani said the weakest point with Saddam's trial is that his crimes against Iran have not been included in his indictment.

"Is the fact that there are currently 100,000 Iranians suffering from chemical wounds ... not the result of Saddam's crimes?," he said."If the Iraqi court refuses to deal with this issue, then this shows that the US has ordered the case to be like so. This is because Saddam's war on Kuwait has been raised while his war on Iran has not been included in his indictment."

Rafsanjani stressed that Saddam's trial must address all the events in the region during his reign, including the war against Iran, stressing that another court should otherwise deal with his case.

The former president expressed regret that certain western states have created a ballyhoo over Iran's nuclear energy plans, but are themselves engaged in a nuclear arms race. Rafsanjani said the west and the UN must address the roots of the proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs), stressing that Israel must also be prevented from developing those weapons.

"They have so far used chemical and nuclear warfare wherever they desired and there was no problem. But now they are saying that the terrorists may develop access to these weapons," he said.

"Of course they are right to be concerned because if irresponsible people have access to these weapons there will be many disasters in man's history."

Rafsanjani recalled Iraq's 1978 gassing of people in Sardasht and Halabja in its war with Iran, and blamed the West for developing the technology of WMDs.

He pointed out to documents that indicate the involvement oF western corporations in providing the former regime of Saddam Hossein with chemical warfare, stressing that the West shares the blame with Saddam for crimes against humanity in gassing the people in the war with Iran.

"Now that the Islamic Republic wants to exploit the nuclear technology for industrial and medical use, they accuse it of what they, themselves, are," Rafsanjani said.

http://www.iribnews.ir/Full_en.asp?news_id=206682


15 posted on 07/02/2004 8:33:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran, Democracy and Human Rights

July 02, 2004
Intellectual Conservative
Roger Howard

The West undermines its own credibility by advocating ‘democracy’ and ‘human rights’ for Iran.

In the wake of a damning report by Human Rights Watch that has detailed the “torture, detention and the crushing of dissent” under the mullahs’ regime, the anguished voices of oppressed Iranians seem to cry out to the watching world. But should the West answer them by taking up the cause of freedom and helping them cast aside the yoke of tyranny?

Because such a cause is so idealistic, its claims so grandiose, and its values so abstract, by championing it we immediately render ourselves highly vulnerable to allegations of hypocrisy and double standards. While an obvious example is provided by the horrors of Abu Ghraib, which cast a very dark shadow over American claims to be ‘liberating’ the Iraqi people, consider too the troubling tension between the two ideals that liberal humanitarians so loudly advocate for others -- ‘democracy’ and ‘human rights.’

There is of course no necessary reason why these should be incompatible: our rulers are clearly much more likely to respect the interests of those to whom they are accountable. But the recent experience of Western countries, where the guardianship of those rights is often entrusted not to democratically elected bodies but to unelected judicial elites, amply demonstrates that an orchestration of ‘democracy’ and ‘human rights’ can easily strike not a natural harmony but a terrible discord.

All the states of Western Europe have, for example, sacrificed some of the powers of their own democratic assemblies to the judges of the European Court of Human Rights, which was established in 1950 “to ensure the collective enforcement of certain rights and freedoms.” This has forced ordinary people to helplessly watch the curtailment of their right to rule themselves by a distant, unelected judiciary that would seem to have nothing to do with their own country.

Britain’s Human Rights Act, which took effect in October 2000, has also given unelected judges new powers to challenge the legislative decrees of its democratically elected parliamentary assembly. If the British courts can’t construe legislation to make its terms fit the demands of the European Convention on Human Rights, then they “may make a declaration of that incompatibility” which prompts the executive power to refer it back to Parliament for revision.

How ironic, then, that Western politicians talk to the Iranians about democracy and human rights with such ease. The diplomats of the European Union have spoken this humanitarian language to the Iranian authorities ever since the beginning of their ‘critical dialogue’ in 1995. And across the Atlantic, President Bush has appealed directly to ordinary Iranians who “in the face of harsh repression…are courageously speaking out for democracy and the rule of law and human rights,” while his deputies, Richard Armitage and Zalmay Khalilzad, also typically speak of their wish to see “a democratic Iran…that respects human rights.”

The natural enemies of liberty are not slow to detect weak points in the arguments pitched by those they confront. The editorials of Iran’s hard-line press, for example, frequently question the right of President Bush to advocate democracy for others when his own democratic mandate in November 2000 was so fragile. And the more we now talk about democracy and human rights for Iran, the more vulnerable we will become to their retorts that our actions are both hypocritical and incoherent: as Britain’s archbishops warned on Wednesday, “the appearance of double standards inevitably diminishes the credibility of western governments” throughout the world.

Of course Western governments are under great pressure from the well-heeled Human Rights Industry to show some concern for the welfare of the oppressed, and any negotiations with Tehran that ignore the plight of ordinary Iranians would for this reason provoke a storm of outrage. How, then, can they meet this pressing need while also keeping their credibility intact?

The solution is, fortunately, very simple. Why not just demand that the mullahs “allow the Iranian people to have the Iran they want to have,” a formula that would also reconcile the West’s need to be seen to care with the right of all Iranians to determine their own future? Let’s hope our politicians can now resist the pressure of the human rights professionals and put forward this new message instead.

Roger Howard is the author of Iran in Crisis? Nuclear Ambitions and the American Response.

http://www.intellectualconservative.com/article3572.html


16 posted on 07/02/2004 8:46:24 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn; CyberCowboy777; LibreOuMort
Seattle

6 -8 PM, July 7th, 2004
Corner of 4th Ave. and Pike St.
Westlake Park (downtown Seattle)
info: (425) 442-0853

17 posted on 07/02/2004 9:21:44 AM PDT by sionnsar (Resource for Traditional Anglicans: trad-anglican.faithweb.com)
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To: DoctorZIn; freedom44; downer911; Pan_Yans Wife; Cyrus the Great; faludeh_shirazi

UNESCO Adds Iran’s Pasargadae To World Heritage List

MNA
July 2nd, 2004

TEHRAN July 2 (MNA) -- The Iranian ancient site of Pasargadae was added to the World Heritage list at the 28th session of the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's World Heritage Committee on Thursday in Suzhoui, a city in eastern China.
Pasargadae is the fifth Iranian site to be registered in the list, after Persepolis, Chogha Zanbil Ziggurat, Takht-e Suleiman, and Naqsh-e Jahan Square.

The UNESCO’s announcement said that Pasargadae was not only a historical and cultural heritage, but also a memorial of a sacred heritage to call different cultures and religions to mutual respect.

Pasargadae, the first dynastic capital of the Achaemenid Empire, founded by Cyrus II, the Great, in Pars, homeland of the Persians, in the 6th century B.C. Its palaces, gardens, and the mausoleum of Cyrus are outstanding examples of the first phase of royal Achaemenid art and architecture and exceptional testimonies of Persian civilization.

“It’s a great day for Iranians and people of the world because the world community respects the human heritage of Cyrus, the Great by adding Pasargadae to the World Heritage List,” said Ahmad Jalali, the ambassador and permanent representative of Islamic Republic of Iran in UNESCO.

“This is a great signal for us that the sound of humanity and kindness will never get lost under the blue sky; today the sound which rose for human rights in Iran 2,500 years ago, is respectable for the world,” he added.

The charter of Cyrus, the Great (known as the Cyrus Cylinder), a baked-clay Aryan language cuneiform cylinder, was discovered in 1878 in excavation of the site of Babylon. Cyrus the Great described in it his human treatment of the inhabitants of Babylonia after its conquest by the Iranians.

UNESCO was also due to vote on Friday about the two other Iranian sites of Bam Citadel and Naqsh-e Jahan Square for inscription of them in the List of World Heritage in Danger.

http://www.mehrnews.com/wfNewsDetails_en.aspx?NewsID=91698&t=Cultural


18 posted on 07/02/2004 9:42:50 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (John ''Fedayeen" sKerry - the Mullahs' regime candidate)
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To: DoctorZIn

VW to Build Production Site in Iran

July 02, 2004
AFX News
Ample

WOLFSBURG, Germany - Volkswagen AG said it will build a production site in Iran, near the city of Bam, which- will assemble over 20,000 vehicles per year.

VW will initially transfer the "completely-knocked-down" form of its Gol 1.8l model from Brazil to Iran, which means shipping pre-assembled modules to Iran for final assembly, it said.

If demand is strong, production direct in Iran is possible in several years time. It is also possible that other VW models will become available, it said.

BAMCo, a unit of Kerman Automotive Industries Co, will assemble the cars, which will then be sold exclusively via the Modiran Pars Co dealer network, which is also a unit of Kerman, VW said.

The four-door compact car Gol is already available in Argentina, China, South Africa, Mexico, and Eastern Europe.

VW said the Iranian automobile market grew by 147 pct between 1999 and 2003.

http://www.iii.co.uk/shares/?type=news&articleid=5015401&action=article


19 posted on 07/02/2004 10:52:42 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

"Muslims Should Reform Religion... Accept Democracy"

July 02, 2004
The Middle East Media Research Institute
MEMRI

Iranian Intellectual: 'Religious Tyranny is Based on a Fascist Interpretation of Faith... Muslims Should Reform Religion... Accept Democracy'

The director of the Association for the Defense of Journalism in Iran, Dr. Mohsen Kedivar, participated in a seminar titled "Towards Democracy" at the Law and Political Science Faculty of the University of Tehran. In a speech, he addressed the issue of tyranny and democracy in Iran, noting that Iranian society had experienced two types of tyranny: secular tyranny under the Shah's regime, and religious tyranny under the regime of the Islamic Revolution.

According to Kedivar, there are two perceptions in Islam. One is a totalitarian perception that maintains that Islam contradicts democracy. The adherents of this perception see the establishment of a religious regime and repression of the people as legitimate. The second perception maintains that Islam promotes freedom and does not contradict democracy.

It should be emphasized that Kedivar, who is a cleric and a prominent intellectual of the reformist stream, does not rule out a religious regime; he only fears that religious tyranny might take over the running of day-to-day affairs, which will bring religious totalitarianism.

Kedivar states that Islam is a religion related to time and location, and that it is the people who must decide how society should be run. He sees democracy as the best way of managing society's affairs, but does not preach secularism, and even opposes secularists who call for separation of religion and state. He has in the past been tried and imprisoned for his writings. The following are excerpts from his speech at the seminar:(1)

Both the 'Constitutional Revolution' and the 'Islamic Revolution' Have Failed to Solve Tyranny

"Since the Constitutional Revolution in Iran, we [Iranians] have had experience with two forms of tyranny, secular and religious.(2) Like the Constitutional Revolution, the Islamic Revolution has failed to solve the problems of tyranny in Iran. The most controversial [political and social] discussions in the past century have erupted between the followers of two different schools of thought and the followers of two different interpretations of Islam.

"According to one interpretation, the social affairs of a country are entrusted to one man, while according to the other, trust is placed in the people and its freedom is respected [i.e. 'Islamic democracy']... The two interpretations have advocates, both among the intellectuals and among the clerics.

"In Iran we have experienced both secular tyranny, based on a fascist interpretation of politics and sociology, and religious tyranny, based on a fascist interpretation of faith. Religious tyranny is undoubtedly the more dangerous, since it uses religion as a means of applying political pressure on the people.

"Both religious tyranny and secular tyranny took shape in Iran after the Constitutional Revolution, and advocates of both strived to ensure their hegemony and political power in Iranian society... Over the past 25 years we have witnessed [these] two interpretations of Islam in Iran. One impeded the Iranian nation's efforts to create a democracy, whereas the other tried to help efforts to promote freedom."

'The Problem in Religious Rule is the Fascist Interpretation that Leads to Totalitarianism'

Kedivar noted that the two interpretations of Islam have always co-existed: "The first is totalitarian and the second emphasizes [the religious support] freedom and democracy. Those who advocate the first [totalitarian] interpretation believe that the only way for religion to attain power is through political rule... This is the populist approach to democracy, and in other words ... tyranny. Authority, according to this interpretation, is not derived from the public, but from Heaven, and it appears in its most lucid form in the ideology of the religious government..."

Kedivar stressed: "Political Islam [in and of itself] has never presented a problem [because the people are religious]. [The problem lies in] the fascist interpretation of political Islam: [the problem lies in] the belief of a specific group of people [i.e. the clerics in power] that they enjoy special rights and [the problem lies in the claim that Islam is a system of] fixed rules and regulations that are unchangeable.

"[There are] two groups which do not support freedom or democracy: [The first group is] those who support the totalitarian interpretation of religion and Islam, and [the second group is] the secular Iranians and foreigners who equate Islam with totalitarianism... The secular view religion as matter for the individual. When the officials of the regime are religious and advocate religious rule, they are permitted to propose [religious rule to the public] as a public matter, but even then [the endorsement of this principle should] be dependent upon its acceptance by the majority..."

Islam Promotes Freedom and Democracy

"[The adherents of the second interpretation, i.e.] democratic Islam, view religion as based upon democratic principles... Islam, [in their opinion,] is - for most - a way of life related to time and place... According to the first interpretation [i.e., the totalitarian interpretation of Islam], Islam is contradictory to democracy and impedes it. But according to the second interpretation, not only is [Islam] not contradictory to democracy, but it is even considered a catalyst in its [implementation].

"In our society, democracy is an [essential] need but it [in itself] is not sufficient... [The Islamic public] does not need to denounce democracy merely because it comes from the West. Democracy is the best method of governing, because it reduces to a minimum the role of the individual and replaces it with the rule of society by public wisdom. The establishment of a democratic order must be based on four main principles: free and fair elections, the establishment of a civil society, respect for human rights, and transparency of governmental actions.

"It is incumbent upon Muslims to reevaluate the existing religious traditions and to reform religious and democratic [values]. They must accept the fact that democracy is the only way to run the social and political affairs [of society]."

Endnotes:
(1) Aftab-e Yazd (Iran), May 11, 2004; IRNA (Persian), May 10, 2004.
(2) The Constitutional Revolution, 1905-1907. Following popular pressure led by intellectuals and clerics, the Shah was forced to adopt a Western-style constitution for Iran.

http://www.memri.org/bin/latestnews.cgi?ID=SD73804


20 posted on 07/02/2004 10:53:25 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

A Proper Policy

July 02, 2004
The Jerusalem Post
Michael Ledeen

Properly understood, the recent little contretemps between Iran and Great Britain tells us a lot, both about Iran's regional strategy and Great Britain's ongoing appeasement of the mullahs.

There was considerable befuddlement among the chattering classes when the Iranians seized some British patrol boats (originally misidentified as "warships") and arrested some sailors and officers in the Shatt al-Arab waterway that divides Iran and Iraq. After all, that would seem to constitute a causus belli, and one wouldn't think that the Iranian regime was looking for a fight with the coalition.

The Iranians complained that the Brits had drifted into Iranian waters, but a British spokesman dryly observed that this was hardly an unusual event; it happens almost every day, due to the narrowness of the waterway. Why, then, had the Iranians suddenly decided to take action?

The Iranians subsequently made dark references to the materiel they had found on board the three boats, calling it "suspicious" and "hi-tech" and the like. I believe that the Brits were in the process of installing an underwater detection network that would alert them to any approaching vessels, and they were doing that because of recent attacks on Iraqi oil facilities in the area.

Thus the explanation for Iran's action: the mullahs are determined to strike at Iraqi oil production, and they don't want an efficient detection system in the area. Why, you might ask, is Iran so interested in stopping the oil flow from Iraq? The answer might surprise you. It's because they are desperate to swing the upcoming American presidential elections against George W. Bush, and they think that if they can get oil prices up to, say, $60 a barrel, that might do the trick.

INDEED, THE American elections are one of the driving issues behind all Iranian actions these days because the ayatollahs believe that if Bush is reelected, he will come after them and try to achieve regime change in Teheran, while they do not think that John Kerry will do the same. Whether or not they are right in their evaluation of the two candidates is beside the point. They believe it. So I think we can expect ongoing sabotage of oil facilities throughout the Middle East and perhaps even in South America, where Iran supports an extensive Hizbullah network.

The Brits have every right to feel annoyed at this latest example of Iranian desperation, for they have shown enormous dedication to appeasing the mullahs. Jack Straw has commuted to Teheran with remarkable energy, constantly praising Iran's presumed willingness to be cooperative on everything from trade to human rights and the ongoing charade of "discussions" about the Iranian nuclear project.

In fairness to Straw and his boss Tony Blair, the Iranians have indeed rewarded Great Britain with several juicy oil and natural gas contracts (although Jacques Chirac is by far the big winner in this competition). But Iran's repression of free speech, random street beatings of democracy advocates, summary executions, and extensive torture is so bad that even Human Rights Watch felt obliged to issue a particularly graphic condemnation of the Islamic Republic. And the toothless International Atomic Energy Agency has repeatedly found Iran lying about its race to build atomic bombs. Yet the Foreign Office lobbies the State Department in Washington to go easy on the mullahs.

It should be clear to all - indeed, it should have been clear a long time ago - that if Iran is left to its own devices, we will shortly face a radical Shi'ite regime, the world's leading supporter of international terrorism (the State Department last week once again gave the blue ribbon to the mullahs), the haven of al-Qaida, the creator of Hizbullah and Islamic Jihad, and the prime mover of Hamas and prime supporter of Abu Musab al-Zarkawi, armed with atomic bombs. One would have thought it inconceivable that we should have arrived at this situation without any Western country having made the slightest effort to bring down the evil regime in Teheran. Yet no one has done anything. Worse yet, leading American officials such as Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage openly call Iran "a democracy."

On occasion, the refusal to see Iran for what it is reaches comic proportions. The Iranian regime recently issued sign-up forms to recruit suicide terrorist volunteers; and with that crackpot realism that sometimes characterizes such undertakings, there was a line where the volunteer could choose where he or she wished to achieve martyrdom: Iraq, Israel, or some other site. Yet this remarkable official document, which tells us most everything we wish to know about the intentions of the Teheran mullahcracy, went virtually without comment in the Western media.

Alas, the West has convinced itself that action against Teheran is too risky. This is an inversion of reality. Doing nothing is the most dangerous policy, especially since regime change in Iran can probably be accomplished without firing a single bullet or dropping a single bomb. It would suffice to support what President Bush has long called "the legitimate desire of the Iranian people to be free."

Anybody want to play?

If so, here's an outline of the game plan:

First, support the Farsi-language broadcasters in southern California. There are several of them, and they carry an authority that no government-operated radio or television station can.

Second, throw the full moral and political support of the West behind the Iranian people. This includes such steps as calling for regime change in Iran (best accomplished by holding a national referendum to select the form of government and then free elections to select the leaders), supporting freedom of speech and press (today Iran is one of the major press "predators" - to use the word favored by "journalists without borders" - in the Middle East, having summarily silenced nearly 100 publications), demanding an end to the long list of violations of human rights (instead of sending European delegations that pretend not to see the widescale use of torture, arbitrary arrest and execution, closed tribunals and the like), supporting workers' rights (major sectors of the Iranian workforce haven't been paid for nine months or more), and so forth.

Third, put some teeth into the IAEA and sanction Iran for its defiance of the nuclear safeguards to which it has already formally agreed.

It is not hard or particularly expensive - certainly not compared to the cost of permitting a fanatical Islamic regime to lay its hands on atomic weapons. These are not acts of war, they are the minimum actions that normal civilized people expect of their leaders. They would be proper even if there were no terror war underway, and even if Iran were not on the verge of becoming a nuclear power.

Given the current circumstances, a proper Iran policy is a life-or-death imperative.

The writer, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, is author of The War Against the Terror Masters.

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1088650987552


21 posted on 07/02/2004 10:54:02 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...

A Proper Policy

July 02, 2004
The Jerusalem Post
Michael Ledeen

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/1164109/posts?page=21#21


22 posted on 07/02/2004 10:55:11 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

A Common Flop - Europe and Iran

July 01, 2004
The Economist
Europe

Europe's deal with Iran falls apart

The Europeans' soft approach to Iran seems to have failed

It was worth a try. But hope is fading in Britain, France and Germany that engagement with Iran might succeed, where America's cold shoulder failed, in coaxing the regime in Tehran into giving up the nuclear experiments and technologies that it has spent 18 years hiding from the world.

Last October, the three European countries were cock-a-hoop over a deal to get Iran to come clean about its nuclear dabblings to inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and to suspend its recently uncovered uranium-enrichment programme. In return, the European trio agreed to resist American pressure to report Iran's transgressions to the UN Security Council. Had “temporary” suspension turned permanent, ridding Iran of technologies that the government insists are for peaceful purposes but which can also make bomb material, the Europeans would have agreed to sell other technologies to the Iranians.

For the Europeans, the deal was the sweeter because it showed a new unity after the bitter divisions over Iraq, argues Steven Everts in a report for the Centre for European Reform, a think-tank. It bolstered the case for non-proliferation-by-inspection rather than force, and showed that multilateral diplomacy and “soft power” could work even on hard problems. And success would have shown that the European Union's common foreign policy (the full EU backed the big three) could make its weight felt beyond its own backyard.

So why has the diplomacy soured? Censured again last month by the IAEA‘s 35-country board for the gaps in its nuclear story, Iran last week wrote to the Europeans, accusing them of failing to keep their side of the October bargain. The Iranians now say they will restart the manufacture and testing of their uranium-enrichment machines at a pilot plant at Natanz.

Inspectors are still at work in Iran: this week they took samples at what the government admits is a military site (though not a nuclear one), called Lavizan, in Tehran, where recent satellite photographs showed that buildings had been demolished and topsoil carted away. They are due to report to the IAEA board in September. Iran insists its case should be dropped. That is unlikely to happen.

If Iran disrupts inspections or pulls out of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the Europeans would have to go to the UN. More likely, though, it will press on with its enrichment preparations, contrary to the IAEA's request and the October deal. Iran is also building a heavy-water reactor that could produce plutonium, another bomb ingredient. Neither technology is outlawed by the NPT, so long as it is for peaceful use. Despite having only a limited nuclear-energy programme, Iran claims an inalienable “right” to both. But past violations and unexplained traces of (potentially militarily useful) highly enriched uranium suggest that Iran is using the cover of electricity generation to acquire nuclear-weapons capability.

The premise of the October deal was that, offered a face-saving way to come clean and find a better relationship with the West, Iran would quietly drop any weapons ambitions. Although the premise appears to have been wrong, the Europeans have, so far, merely held up negotiations on a new trade and co-operation agreement. They have other levers at their disposal: some 40% of Iran's imports come from the EU which, with Japan, is also Iran's best hope for badly needed investment in its oil and gas industries.

Iran and the Europeans seem now to be playing for time, awaiting the outcome of November's presidential election in America. But whoever wins, America is unlikely to tolerate a nuclear-arming Iran. Some Europeans hope that a new administration might try talking to Iran. But, with America tied up in Iraq, the Iranians may calculate that time is on their side and—so long as the IAEA finds nothing new—that the Europeans will never agree among themselves to a tougher line. If so, far from being a success for Europe's common foreign policy, Iran could become a big irritant in relations between America and Europe.

http://www.economist.com/World/europe/displayStory.cfm?story_id=2877961


23 posted on 07/02/2004 10:55:57 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Talking about trials. I guess that Rafsanjani is unable to travel abroad http://www.iricrimes.org/wanted.asp and http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9704/10/germany.iran/


24 posted on 07/02/2004 12:43:10 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert
Thursday, July 8, 2004
From 11:00 AM (Local time)
At the West side of the US Capitol Building

Does anyone know when the ending time will be? I have a meeting until 5 PM about 3 miles away and could join for early evening... (and last night I was given a sun & lion flag for the purpose...)

25 posted on 07/02/2004 12:57:37 PM PDT by sionnsar (Resource for Traditional Anglicans: trad-anglican.faithweb.com)
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To: DoctorZIn; Cyrus the Great; Persia; RunOnDiesel; nuconvert; Pan_Yans Wife; PhilDragoo; ...

The Iron Sheik with the Lion and Sword Flag.
26 posted on 07/02/2004 1:02:11 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Hm. There appear to be a few, ah, discrepancies here. Not the least that the flag is backwards...


27 posted on 07/02/2004 5:33:31 PM PDT by sionnsar (Resource for Traditional Anglicans: trad-anglican.faithweb.com)
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To: freedom44; sionnsar

LoL.
A mixed metaphor?


28 posted on 07/02/2004 7:38:04 PM PDT by nuconvert ( "Let Freedom Reign !" ) ( Azadi baraye Iran)
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To: DoctorZIn

Hey! Rafsanjani stole that line from Saddam.


29 posted on 07/02/2004 7:41:34 PM PDT by nuconvert ( "Let Freedom Reign !" ) ( Azadi baraye Iran)
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To: DoctorZIn

Yikes. Dr. Mohsen Kedivar is a brave man.


30 posted on 07/02/2004 7:58:23 PM PDT by nuconvert ( "Let Freedom Reign !" ) ( Azadi baraye Iran)
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To: sionnsar; nuconvert

and considering Iranians don't wear the Arabic headgear he's got going.

He's just a fantasy character playing out a part that the average american wanted him to play in the 80's.

But, as an individual he's a great guy..


31 posted on 07/02/2004 8:22:33 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Persian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin is a comprehensive program of Persian language and literature at all levels. The Program serves undergraduate students fulfilling university foreign language requirements and majoring and minoring in Persian, Islamic Studies, or Middle Eastern Studies. The University of Texas Persian Program also serves graduate students concentrating or minoring in Persian in degree programs in Comparative Literature, Linguistics, and Middle Eastern Studies. The Department of Middle Eastern Studies offers B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees with a concentration in Persian.

The Texas Persian Studies program has a primary focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with special attention to the post-World War II period. Pre-modern language and literature receive attention as well, for example such classical literary works as Ferdowsi's Shâhnâmeh, Sa'di's Golestân, and Hâfez's Divân, studied as requisite background to the appreciation of contemporary Persian literature and Iranian culture.

http://www.utexas.edu/cola/depts/mes/programs/persian/


32 posted on 07/02/2004 8:23:42 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Wow. I'm surprised.


33 posted on 07/02/2004 8:42:52 PM PDT by nuconvert ( "Let Freedom Reign !" ) ( Azadi baraye Iran)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

34 posted on 07/02/2004 9:01:27 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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