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Iranian Alert -- August 10, 2004 [EST]-- IRAN LIVE THREAD -- "Americans for Regime Change in Iran"
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.10.2004 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/09/2004 9:00:38 PM PDT by DoctorZIn

The US media still largley ignores news regarding the Islamic Republic of Iran. As Tony Snow of the Fox News Network has put it, “this is probably the most under-reported news story of the year.” Most American’s are unaware that the Islamic Republic of Iran is NOT supported by the masses of Iranians today. Modern Iranians are among the most pro-American in the Middle East.

There is a popular revolt against the Iranian regime brewing in Iran today. I began these daily threads June 10th 2003. On that date Iranians once again began taking to the streets to express their desire for a regime change. Today in Iran, most want to replace the regime with a secular democracy.

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movement in Iran from being reported. Unfortunately, the regime has successfully prohibited western news reporters from covering the demonstrations. The voices of discontent within Iran are sometime murdered, more often imprisoned. Still the people continue to take to the streets to demonstrate against the regime.

In support of this revolt, Iranians in America have been broadcasting news stories by satellite into Iran. This 21st century news link has greatly encouraged these protests. The regime has been attempting to jam the signals, and locate the satellite dishes. Still the people violate the law and listen to these broadcasts. Iranians also use the Internet and the regime attempts to block their access to news against the regime. In spite of this, many Iranians inside of Iran read these posts daily to keep informed of the events in their own country.

This daily thread contains nearly all of the English news reports on Iran. It is thorough. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary. The news stories and commentary will from time to time include material from the regime itself. But if you read the post you will discover for yourself, the real story of what is occurring in Iran and its effects on the war on terror.

I am not of Iranian heritage. I am an American committed to supporting the efforts of those in Iran seeking to replace their government with a secular democracy. I am in contact with leaders of the Iranian community here in the United States and in Iran itself.

If you read the daily posts you will gain a better understanding of the US war on terrorism, the Middle East and why we need to support a change of regime in Iran. Feel free to ask your questions and post news stories you discover in the weeks to come.

If all goes well Iran will be free soon and I am convinced become a major ally in the war on terrorism. The regime will fall. Iran will be free. It is just a matter of time.

DoctorZin


TOPICS:
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Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

1 posted on 08/09/2004 9:00:44 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

2 posted on 08/09/2004 9:02:29 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Diplomacy sidelined as US targets Iran

Simon Tisdall
Tuesday August 10, 2004
The Guardian

The US charge sheet against Iran is lengthening almost by the day, presaging destabilising confrontations this autumn and maybe a pre-election October surprise.
The Bush administration is piling on the pressure over Iran's alleged nuclear weapons programme. It maintains Tehran's decision to resume building uranium centrifuges wrecked a long-running EU-led dialogue and is proof of bad faith.

The US will ask a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency on September 13 to declare Iran in breach of the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, a prelude to seeking punitive UN sanctions.

Iran's insistence that it seeks nuclear power, not weapons, is scoffed at in Washington. John Bolton, the hawkish US under-secretary of state for arms control, says there is no doubt what Tehran is up to. He has hinted at using military force should the UN fail to act. "The US and its allies must be willing to deploy more robust techniques" to halt nuclear proliferation, including "the disruption of procurement networks, sanctions and other means". No option was ruled out, he said last year.

Last month in Tokyo, Mr Bolton upped the ante again, accusing Iran of collaborating with North Korea on ballistic missiles.

Israel, Washington's ally, has also been stoking the fire. It is suggested there that if the west fails to act against Iran in timely fashion, Israel could strike pre-emptively as it did against Iraq's nuclear facilities in 1981, although whether it has the capability to launch effective strikes is uncertain.

The US has been pushing other countries to impose de facto punishment on Iran. Japan has been asked to cancel its $2bn (£1.086bn) investment in the Azadegan oilfield and Washington has urged Russia to halt the construction of a civilian reactor.

Condoleezza Rice, the US national security adviser, said at the weekend there was a new international willingness to confront Tehran, but declined to rule out unilateral action if others did not go along.

That will fuel speculation in Tehran and elsewhere that the Bush administration may resort to force, with or without Israel, ahead of November's election. Options include "surgical strikes" or covert action by special forces.

Such a move would be a high-risk gamble for George Bush. After the WMD fiasco, there would inevitably be questions about the accuracy of US intelligence. In the past Iran has vowed to retaliate. Although it is unclear how it might do so, the mood in Tehran has hardened since the conservatives won fiddled elections last winter.

"I think we've finally got the world community to a place, the IAEA to a place, that it is worried and suspicious," Ms Rice said in one of a string of interviews with CNN, Fox News and NBC television. She vowed to aim some "very tough resolutions" at Iran this autumn. "Iran will either be isolated or it will submit," she said.

Officials in London say she exaggerated the degree of unanimity on what to do next. Britain, France and Germany are the EU troika which has pursued a policy of "critical engagement" with Iran, despite US misgivings.

Jack Straw, the foreign secretary, has invested considerably in resolving the issue, travelling to Tehran on several occasions. A diplomatic collapse would be a blow.

"There has been no such decision at all," a Foreign Office spokesman said yesterday of US efforts to take the dispute to the security council. "The dialogue [with Iran] is ongoing and the government still believes that negotiation is the way forward at this stage." But Britain is in danger of being dragged down a path of confrontation that it does not want to travel.

Nuclear weapons are not Washington's only worry. The US charges include Iran's perceived meddling in Iraq, where the blame for the surge in Shia unrest is laid partly at Tehran's door. It also takes exception to Iran's ambiguous attitude to al-Qaida and Tehran's backing for anti-Israeli groups such as Hizbullah. The recent Kean report on 9/11 detailed unofficial links between some of the al-Qaida hijackers and Iran.

Investigations into other terrorist attacks since 9/11, including this year's Madrid bombings and failed plots in Paris and London, point to an Iran connection, though the extent of any government involvement is obscure.

While the Bush administration is set on a tougher line there is no consensus even in Washington on what to do.

A report by the independent Council on Foreign Relations says since Iran is not likely to implode any time soon, the US should start talking.

"Iran is experiencing a gradual process of internal change," the report says. "The urgency of US concerns about Iran and the region mandate that the US deal with the current regime [through] a compartmentalised process of dialogue, confidence building and incremental engagement."

That suggestion was mocked by a Wall Street Journal editorial as "appeasement". Hawks say the nuclear issue is too urgent to brook further delay. And therein lies the rub. Bringing Iran in from the cold is a time-consuming business. But the Bush administration, as usual, is in a hurry.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/iran/story/0,12858,1279824,00.html


3 posted on 08/09/2004 9:03:40 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Bush Stresses Demands on Iran

August 09, 2004
The Associated Press
AP

President George W. Bush vowed today to keep pressuring Iran to give up its nuclear ambitions, but he tempered his tough words with talk of diplomacy, countering Democrats who say he takes a go-it-alone approach on the world stage.

"Iran must comply with the demands of the free world, and that’s where we sit right now," Bush said at an "Ask the President" campaign event in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Annandale, Va.

"My attitude is that we’ve got to keep pressure on the government and help others keep pressure on the government - so there’s going to be universal condemnation of illegal weapons activities," the president added.

Bush stressed U.S. efforts to work with other nations to make sure the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency asks Iran "hard questions" about its weapons activities. "Foreign ministers of Germany, France and Britain have gone in as a group to send a message on behalf of the free world," he said.

Bush’s national security adviser, Condoleezza Rice, had said yesterday that the world finally is "worried and suspicious" over the Iranians’ intentions and is determined not to let Tehran produce a nuclear weapon.

In appearances on two nationally broadcast interview shows, Rice said the United States would act alone to end the program if the administration could not win international support.

For its part, Iran said today that the international community has no reason to be suspicious about its nuclear ambitions, despite allegations by the United States that it is trying to produce nuclear weapons.

"Iran has not violated any of its commitments to international treaties in its nuclear program," Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi was quoted as saying by the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

Kharrazi announced a week ago that his country had resumed building nuclear centrifuges. He said at the time that his country was retaliating for the West’s failure to force the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency to close its file on possible Iranian violations of nuclear nonproliferation rules.

http://www.columbiatribune.com/2004/Aug/20040809News011.asp


4 posted on 08/09/2004 9:04:07 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran's Bushehr is 90% Ready

August 10, 2004
Middle East Newsline
MENL

MOSCOW -- Russia has completed more than 90 percent of the Bushehr nuclear reactor in Iran. Russian officials said Moscow has accelerated work on the Bushehr power reactor.

They said 1,500 Russian nationals and personnel from the former Soviet Union were sent to Iran to complete the $1 billion nuclear project.

So far, officials said, Russia has completed procurement for Bushehr. They said the remaining work includes the assembly of the equipment, systems integration and preparing for operations.

"By now, the first power unit of the Bushehr nuclear station is 90 percent ready," a Russian Atomic Agency official told the Moscow-based Tass news agency. "All heavy equipment, including the reactor, has been brought and assembled at the station building."

http://www.menewsline.com/stories/2004/august/08_10_1.html


5 posted on 08/09/2004 9:04:35 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

The Mullahs in Iran are running out of allies, and YES.... "It's just a matter of time"


6 posted on 08/09/2004 9:05:16 PM PDT by MJY1288 (John Kerry Says he Would Conduct a More Thoughtful and Sensitive War on Terror)
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To: DoctorZIn

Rice: World Must Stop Iran's Nuclear Intentions [Excerpt]

August 09, 2004
The Associated Press

For 3 1/2 years, the Bush administration has insisted to a largely disbelieving world that Iran was developing a dangerous nuclear capability. The administration is contending now that its doggedness is paying off.

The world finally is "worried and suspicious" over the Iranians' intentions and is determined not to let Tehran produce a nuclear weapon, national security adviser Condoleezza Rice said Sunday.

In appearances on two television talk shows, Rice would not say whether the United States would act alone to end the program if the administration could not win international support.

Iran said Monday the international community has no reason to be suspicious about its nuclear ambitions, despite allegations by the United States that it is trying to produce nuclear weapons.

"Iran has not violated any of its commitments to international treaties in its nuclear program," Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi was quoted as saying by the official Islamic Republic News Agency.

Kharrazi announced a week ago that his country had resumed building nuclear centrifuges. He said Iran was retaliating for the West's failure to force the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency to close its file on possible Iranian violations of nuclear nonproliferation rules.

Kharrazi said at the time that Iran was not resuming enrichment of uranium, which requires a centrifuge. But, he said, it had restarted manufacturing the device because Britain, Germany and France had not stopped the investigation by the International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA.

"The United States was the first to say that Iran was a threat in this way, to try and convince the international community that Iran was trying, under the cover of a civilian nuclear program, to actually bring about a nuclear weapons program," Rice said on CNN's Late Edition.

"I think we've finally now got the world community to a place, and the (IAEA) to a place, that it is worried and suspicious of the Iranian activities," she said. "Iran is facing for the first time real resistance to trying to take these steps."

Bush, in his 2002 State of the Union address, included Iran with North Korea and Iraq in an "axis of evil" dedicated to developing nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction.

Since then, North Korea has publicly resumed its nuclear development program. In Iraq, invading U.S.-led forces have found no such programs after President Saddam Hussein was deposed.

Iran announced in June that it would resume its centrifuge program. Afterward, the U.S. official whose job is to slow the global atomic arms race, Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton, told Congress that Iraq was jabbing "a thumb in the eye of the international community."

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2004-08-09-rice_x.htm


7 posted on 08/09/2004 9:06:16 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian Police Warns Women Not to Dress Up Like "Models"

August 09, 2004
Agence France Presse
TurkishPress.com

TEHRAN -- The chief of Iran's police has told women not to dress up like "models", amid fresh signs Monday of a mounting crackdown on skimpy dressers still defying the Islamic republic's dress code.

"In accordance with the law, the police are confronting people who appear in public in an indecent and inappropriate way, and who are regarded by the law enforcement officials as models," police chief Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf told the official news agency IRNA.

"This is social deviancy and cannot be solved by normal police operations," Ghalibaf added.

Noting that many arrests have taken place in the past two months, he said one of the initiatives in dealing with poorly-veiled women and girls was to invite their parents to meetings organised by the police.

His comments coincided with state television beginning to dedicate a part of its main news programme to "what is fashion?" -- a series of interviews with residents, clerics and "experts" aimed at defining what can and cannot be worn.

For the past several months police have been carrying out a series of operations across the capital Tehran, rounding up large numbers of young women sporting flimsy headscarves, three-quarter length trousers and shape-revealing coats.

Witnesses said the detainees -- picked up in parks, fast food restaurants or from sidewalks -- have been briefly hauled into police stations and subjected to lessons on morality before being freed.

Women ignoring the Islamic dress code can be jailed for up to two months or fined between 50,000 and 500,000 rials (six and 60 dollars).

Pre-summer crackdowns are common at the outset of the hot summer months, but the latest sweep appears to be more determined and is seen as a reflection of the recent shift to the right within the regime.

http://www.turkishpress.com/turkishpress/news.asp?ID=24064


8 posted on 08/09/2004 9:07:17 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

If Iran is not checked, nuclear terror is next

International Herald Tribune - By Brenda Shaffer
Aug 9, 2004

America needs a plan

CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts The keystone of any plan to prevent nuclear terrorism would be to curb the advancing programs of states that aspire to possess nuclear weapons. As was shown by the black-market nuclear network run by Pakistan's Abdul Qadeer Khan, state programs provide a springboard for others who want to develop nuclear capabilities.

Senator John Kerry and President George W. Bush have both committed themselves to preventing nuclear terrorism, but neither has presented a useful policy plan for dealing with such states, especially when, like Iran, they maintain strong cooperation with terrorist elements.

Bush provided four years of tough-sounding, comic book "axis of evil" rhetoric on Iran but no action to halt its nuclear program. Kerry has offered nothing beyond engagement, a policy that Europe has tried without success. In creating a plan for preventing a nuclear Iran, the next U.S. president should bear in mind the following:

First, multilateralism is important but not sufficient. Last autumn, Washington bowed to European wishes to engage Iran through cooperative measures, hoping that it would abandon its nuclear program. The British, German and French foreign ministers signed an agreement with Tehran under which they would prevent Iran from being referred to the United Nations Security Council - where it would face sanctions for its many violations of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty - if Tehran halted uranium enrichment, adopted the treaty's Additional Protocol, and disclosed completely the extent of its nuclear program.

The result: Tehran's failure to declare all of its nuclear activities continued into this year, its Parliament failed to ratify the Additional Protocol, Iran is gearing up to resume uranium enrichment, and inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency faced obstructions several times. Concerned voices in Europe realize that Tehran simply gained a year to advance its program. Some key Europeans are now seeking an effective plan that would rescue their policy of engagement. The United States should lead with concrete policy options.

The next American president should also acknowledge that the United States needs accurate intelligence on the extent and location of Iran's nuclear program, including the layout of facilities. The U.S. intelligence community has blundered several times in assessing countries' capacities for producing weapons of mass destruction - overestimation, in Iraq, underestimation in Libya and Iran. U.S. intelligence agencies must receive adequate resources if they are to determine the extent of the Iranian nuclear program and the potential opportunities for terrorists that it provides.

In addition, centralized control over fissile materials must be maintained during any potential chaos in Iran, and this issue should be addressed by a contingency plan. The Iranians have acknowledged the existence of many installations holding fissile materials - most of which are in highly populated areas. The Iranian public and foreign governments acknowledge that they really don't know just who in Iran controls these facilities.

Iran's president and the Iranian Foreign Ministry, for instance, are not among the inner circle with access to full information on the facilities or knowledge of their command and control structure. It is not clear how this inner circle would act when facing any threat to their power: Some may consider selling off nuclear materials to ensure their future or advance their agendas.

The shoes of the nuclear blackmarketeer Abdul Qadeer Khan should remain empty. The United States and its allies should focus on the personal responsibility of Iranian proliferators. Individuals who are engaged in advancing the Iranian program should be personally deterred and prevented from sharing information or materials with terrorist elements.

The United States should also continue to engage Russia and promote Moscow's positive role in limiting Iran. Because Russia has extensive nuclear cooperation with Iran and is its strategic partner in several other areas, it has considerable leverage over Tehran. Since spring 2003, Moscow has made important efforts toward checking Iran's capacity to produce nuclear weapons. Washington should support these efforts and make sure that they continue, especially upholding the caveat that Russia will not fuel the Bushehr reactor without sufficient safeguards and agreements in place to guarantee the timely return of the reactor's spent fuel to Russia.

Preventing nuclear terrorism will be the defining national security issue of the next administration, and restraining Iran is key. Whoever wins the U.S. presidential election in November must have a solid policy plan.

Brenda Shaffer is a fellow at the International Security Program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_7545.shtml


9 posted on 08/09/2004 9:09:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

The US Presidential Candidates on Iran

Voice of America - Report Section
Aug 9, 2004

Recent developments in Iran have led some political observers to suggest that country may present the main foreign policy challenge for whoever wins the U.S. presidential election in November 2004. The incumbent, President George W. Bush, and his challenger, Senator John Kerry, both have expressed concern over Iran’s plans to develop nuclear weapons, but as VOA’s Serena Parker reports, each man has different views on how the Iran problem should be tackled.

The U.S. State Department has long included Iran on its list of nations that sponsor terrorism. More recently, the commission investigating the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 reported that eight of the 19 hijackers traveled through Iran from Afghanistan without having their passports stamped, something Tehran does not deny.

President Bush says although the Central Intelligence Agency has not discovered any links between Iran and the attacks of September 11, U.S. intelligence agencies will continue to investigate. “As to direct connections to September 11 we’re digging into the facts to determine if there was one,” he says.

The President added that he has long expressed concern about Iran, a country he has accused, along with Iraq and North Korea, of belonging to an “axis of evil.” Mr. Bush said Iran’s government denies basic human rights to its own people while sponsoring terrorism attacks in other parts of the world.

“I have made it clear that if the Iranians would like to have better relations with the United States, there are some things they must do,” he says. “For example, they are harboring Al Qaeda leadership there, and I have indicated that they must be turned over to their respective countries. Secondly, they’ve got a nuclear weapons program that they need to dismantle, and we’re working with other countries to encourage them to do so. And thirdly, they’ve got to stop funding terrorist organizations such as Hezbollah that create great dangers in parts of the world.”

Although President Bush has clearly and repeatedly expressed his concerns about Iran, some analysts say his administration has yet to formulate a coherent policy towards the ruling mullahs. However, Michael Ledeen, resident scholar at American Enterprise Institute, believes that will change if President Bush is re-elected in November.

“They’ve left clues and hints suggesting that they might be much more vigorous toward Iran,” he says. “They’re clearly very angry at the games that Iran has played with their nuclear program. And they’ve given every reason to think that they might even consider doing something dramatic.”

Michael Ledeen says there are two kinds of “dramatic” initiatives President Bush – or any American government – might consider. One would be military action against Iran’s nuclear facilities. Mr. Ledeen says the other would be to dramatically increase support for the democratic opposition in Iran and do what was done for Solidarity in Poland and the anti-Milosevic movement in Yugoslavia.

The Democratic challenger, Senator John Kerry, has also indicated concern about the Iranian atomic program and the country’s links to terrorism.

“Iran presents an obvious and especially difficult challenge,” he says. “Our relations there are burdened by a generation of distrust, by the threat of nuclear proliferation and by reports of al Qaeda forces in that country, including the leadership responsible for the May 13, 2003 bombings in Saudi Arabia.”

Senator Kerry says if he is elected President, his administration’s approach to Iran will be different from that of President Bush. “The Bush administration stubbornly refuses to conduct a realistic, non-confrontational policy with Iran, even where it may be possible, as we witnessed most recently in the British-French-German initiative,” he says. “As president, I will be prepared early on to explore areas of mutual interest with Iran, just as I was prepared to normalize relations with Vietnam a decade ago. Iran has long expressed an interest in cooperating against the Afghan drug trade. That is one starting point.”

Last year, Britain, France and Germany announced they had brokered an agreement with Tehran under which Iran agreed to suspend its uranium enrichment operations and allow inspectors from the U-N’s nuclear watchdog into the country. In spite of that, Iran has failed to fully cooperate and recently announced that it had resumed construction of centrifuges that are capable of producing material for a nuclear bomb.

President Bush and Senator Kerry are adamant that a nuclear-armed Iran is unacceptable, but neither man has yet to explain to the American public what his Administration would do if international pressure fails and Iran continues to develop its nuclear weapons program.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_7550.shtml


10 posted on 08/09/2004 9:11:17 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: MJY1288; faludeh_shirazi; F14 Pilot; Ivan the Terrible; democracy; Cyrus the Great; Persia; ...
What's amusing is that having visited Iran several times i can tell you that virtually everyone talks about England's strong support for Iran's government and involvement in the '79 overthrow of the Shah. The Iranian people who're very pro-US absolutely hate the British [whom they believe was behind the '79 revolution, and who currently cannot be argued supports the Iranian government]. Iranian youth separate us from the Brits - the Iranian government actually thanked the British government for "years of friendship" on their IRIB network recently. It was once quoted that the Mullahs were the biggest weapon the British had/have in Iran. Khomeini was a mere peasant with no money and virtually no following - he received tons of cash from MI5, safe sanctuary in France, and free daily news coverage from BBC, question the question. How is it that virtually all of the demonstrators against the Shah were originally Leftists and Secular Democrats, and Iran ended up with an Islamist government?
11 posted on 08/09/2004 10:42:47 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot; Cyrus the Great; faludeh_shirazi; Persia; RunOnDiesel; democracy; Stefania; ..


Bow to your master...
12 posted on 08/09/2004 10:49:39 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Kidnapped Iranian diplomat "alive and well": FM



Fereydoun Jahani, the Iranian diplomat kidnapped in Iraq last week, is "alive and well", the official IRNA news agency quoted Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi as saying on Monday.

Kharrazi said that Iran would make utmost effort to have Jahani freed.

A video released earlier on Sunday by Arab-language Al-Arabiya TV channel showed Jihani along with nine forms of his identification, his passport and a business card.

Claiming themselves as "Islamic Army in Iraq", the kidnappers accused Jihani of fanning sectarian clashes in Iraq, warning Iran not to interfere in Iraq's affairs, according to Al-Arabiya.

Iran's state television and IRNA later said that the Iranian embassy in Baghdad had confirmed Jahani was kidnapped.

However, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Asefi refused to comment on whether Jahani were kidnapped at a press conference held Sunday night.

He said that Jahani had "disappeared" and there was no reliable information at present about the motives behind this action.

Iran, a Shiite Muslim country with close ties to Iraq's majority Shiite population, is blamed for supporting Iraq's Shiite political parties with money and intelligence, an allegation strongly denied by the Iranian government.

Jihani became the second senior diplomat kidnapped in Iraq inrecent weeks.

An Egyptian diplomat called Mohammed Mamdouh Helmi Qutb was abducted on July 23 and later freed on July 26.

More than 70 foreigners have been seized in Iraq in recent months by insurgents who want to force coalition members to pullout their forces and foreign companies to stop supporting coalition troops.


http://english1.peopledaily.com.cn/200408/10/eng20040810_152374.html


13 posted on 08/09/2004 10:50:42 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran theatre director turned prison boss wins praise

August 10, 2004, 05:18

Putting a former theatre director in charge of a detention centre for hardened young criminals might seem a bold decision. For Iran, where prison directors tend to have military backgrounds and human rights activists say abuse of detainees is rife, it is nothing short of revolutionary.

But the once run-down and violent Tehran Juvenile Correction and Rehabilitation Centre has undergone a sea-change since Mansour Moqarehabed took charge six years ago, winning praise from international observers and local rights groups. Blending unorthodox methods - one involves taking a depressed inmate for a night out in the city - with an emphasis on trust and participation, Moqarehabed has even won over sceptical colleagues accustomed to a more robust approach.

"There was some resistance from the staff here at first and they used to say it had become the kids' kingdom and that I was too kind to them," he told said during a visit to the centre in northwestern Tehran. "(But) the judiciary wanted these changes to happen. That's why they appointed someone with a theatrical background and not a military background."

Grave problems still exist in Iran's prisons system. A June Human Rights Watch report called "Like the Dead in their Coffins" detailed many cases of torture and abuse of students and journalists by their jailors. Last month, one inmate had to have his hands amputated after being bound to a ceiling fan in a prison in southwestern Iran.

Antidote to bad publicity
Iran's hardline judiciary has latched on to the juvenile centre as a potential antidote to the negative publicity. President Mohammad Khatami recently paid a high-profile visit, international delegations are regularly given a tour and now, for the first time with Reuters' visit, the foreign media have been allowed in to have a look.

Inside the sprawling complex - currently home to about 210 boys and 30 girls housed in a separate wing - there is a relaxed, but orderly atmosphere. Security appeared low key with just a handful of uniformed guards and no barred windows. The boys were busy with a range of activities from playing soccer to learning job skills such as hairdressing or computing.

In one workshop a group of boys took a carpentry class, wielding saws and chisels even though many had history of violent crimes, including stabbings and murder. "I want to trust them and they have to trust us," said Moqarehabed, placing his arm around a boy who was holding a chisel in one hand and a mallet in the other. "When the children see that we like them, they like us in return," agreed Madieh Firouzie, who runs the smaller section for girls, most of whom were picked up for prostitution. "When they see that we respect them they never forget it."

Rights worker Mahbubeh Khonsariyeh, who teaches the children "life skills" such as how to avoid arguments, said the centre had revolutionised the handling of juvenile criminals. "The centre has been very successful in developing these children. If only society would be as receptive to them," said Khonsariyeh, a member of the Association for the Defence of Children's Rights run by Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi.

Curtains and flower boxes
Attention has been paid to small details in an effort to make the centre less intimidating for its young inmates. Spotless dormitories have been painted a soothing sky blue and have curtains and flower boxes where there used to be bars.

"Putting children in prison encourages a sense of hostility and revenge," said Moqarehabed. "Here the children don't feel like inmates, they feel more relaxed and integrated." To encourage integration and participation the centre has its own council and mayor elected by the youngsters. Current Mayor Saman Ganji was an angry, 15-year-old convicted murderer when he arrived. Now 17 and just weeks from completing a reduced three-year sentence he smiled shyly when asked if he was ready to leave.

"This place has helped me a lot in getting over my previous situation ... I'll be sad to leave but I want to return to my life outside," he said. Inside Ganji has kept up with his schooling and earned diplomas in computing and electronics. He recently represented the centre at a youth forum with Khatami and personally invited him to pay a visit.

Students also run their own magazine "Our House". A recent issue contained advice on how to remain calm and an interview with a repentant drug dealer. Troublemakers are disciplined, but often in unconventional ways. One boy who was caught smashing windows using a catapult was ordered to make 20 more of the handheld weapons.

"Then I took him and a group of boys into the mountains and we all smashed bottles using the catapults," Moqarehabed said, mimicking the catapult's action. After a few hours of fun the boys wanted to go back to the centre. "They soon grew tired of smashing windows after that." - Reuters

http://www.sabcnews.com/world/the_middle_east/0,2172,85406,00.html


14 posted on 08/09/2004 10:53:58 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Rice says world must stop Iran's nukes

2004/8/10
WASHINGTON, AP

With Iran stepping up its nuclear program, a top White House aide said Sunday the world finally is "worried and suspicious" over the Iranians' intentions and is determined not to let Tehran produce a nuclear weapon.
National security adviser Condoleezza Rice also said the Bush administration sees a new international willingness to act against Iran's nuclear program. She credited the changed attitude to the Americans' insistence that Iran's effort put the world in peril.

She would not say whether the United States would act alone to end the program if the administration could not win international support.

Iran's foreign minister, Kamal Kharrazi, announced a week ago that his country had resumed building nuclear centrifuges. He said Iran was retaliating for the West's failure to force the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency to close its file on possible Iranian violations of nuclear nonproliferation rules.

Kharrazi said Iran was not resuming enrichment of uranium, which requires a centrifuge. But, he said, Iran had restarted manufacturing the device because Britain, Germany and France had not stopped the investigation by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

"The United States was the first to say that Iran was a threat in this way, to try and convince the international community that Iran was trying, under the cover of a civilian nuclear program, to actually bring about a nuclear weapons program," Rice said on CNN's "Late Edition."

"I think we've finally now got the world community to a place, and the International Atomic Energy Agency to a place, that it is worried and suspicious of the Iranian activities," she said. "Iran is facing for the first time real resistance to trying to take these steps."

Bush, in his 2002 State of the Union address, included Iran with North Korea and Iraq in an "axis of evil" dedicated to developing nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction.

Since then, North Korea has publicly resumed its nuclear development program. In Iraq, invading U.S.-led forces have found no such programs after President Saddam Hussein was deposed.

Iran announced in June that it would resume its centrifuge program. Afterward, the U.S. official whose job is to slow the global atomic arms race, Undersecretary of State John R. Bolton, told Congress that Iran was jabbing "a thumb in the eye of the international community."

On NBC's "Meet the Press," Rice reasserted that the world has fallen in line on Iran and said she expects next month to get a very strong statement from the IAEA "that Iran will either be isolated, or it will submit to the will of the international community."

She also said, "We cannot allow the Iranians to develop a nuclear weapon. The international community has got to find a way to come together and to make certain that does not happen."

http://www.chinapost.com.tw/international/detail.asp?ID=51413&GRP=D


15 posted on 08/09/2004 10:54:48 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Bush Sees Joint World Effort to Press Iran on Nuclear Issue
By ELISABETH BUMILLER

Published: August 10, 2004


NNANDALE, Va., Aug. 9 - President Bush said Monday that the United States would maintain pressure on Iran to abandon its nuclear weapons program, emphasizing that his administration was working with other countries and not confronting Iran on its own.

"Iran must comply with the demands of the free world, and that's where we sit right now," Mr. Bush told a Republican crowd at an "Ask President Bush" campaign event in this Washington suburb. "And my attitude is that we've got to keep pressure on the government, and help others keep pressure on the government, so there's kind of a universal condemnation of illegal weapons activities."

The president has come under searing criticism from his Democratic competitor, Senator John Kerry, for what Mr. Kerry calls Mr. Bush's go-it-alone approach to foreign policy, which he says has left the United States isolated in the world. Mr. Kerry has also attacked Mr. Bush for allowing Iran to move forward with its nuclear ambitions while going to war with Iraq, where almost no evidence of a nuclear weapons program was found.

Mr. Bush has not directly answered Mr. Kerry's charges, but on Monday he repeatedly emphasized how much the United States was cooperating with other nations to try to stop the spread of nuclear weapons, particularly in Iran.

"We've relied upon others to send the message for us," he told the crowd in the gymnasium at the Annandale campus of Northern Virginia Community College. "And the foreign ministers of Germany, France and Great Britain have gone in as a group to send a message on behalf of the free world that Iran must comply with the demands of the free world."

He concluded that "good foreign policy works with other countries, and we will."

At the same time, Mr. Bush acknowledged that the United States had exhausted an array of sanctions against Iran, which has felt minimal effect from them because of its robust foreign trade. "We've totally sanctioned them," he said. "In other words, there's no sanctions - you can't - we're out of sanctions."

On Sunday, Condoleezza Rice, the national security adviser, said on the NBC News program "Meet the Press" that she expected that the United Nations' International Atomic Energy Agency would make "a very strong statement" next month forcing Iran to chose between being isolated internationally or abandoning its nuclear weapons ambitions. But she stopped short of saying whether the United States would try to organize its allies to impose sanctions in the Security Council.

So far, major Western European nations and Russia have resisted American efforts to impose sanctions against Iran.

In a sign of continuing difficulties in negotiations with Iran, a European official said in Vienna that the Tehran government had recently presented a list of demands that included its insistence on continuing its program to enrich uranium, according to The Associated Press. Western experts say the program is aimed at producing a nuclear weapon.

The demands were said to have been given to French, German and British negotiators. The A.P. reported that European officials were disappointed that Iran had not been more forthcoming in recent talks.

Mr. Bush made his remarks about Iran in response to a question from an invited audience member, who was one of several in the crowd to ask about foreign policy. His campaign officials said Monday's "Ask President Bush" theme was the United States as an "ownership society," which allowed the president to promote policies that he said would encourage Americans to own their own homes, open health savings accounts, start their own businesses or plan for retirement. The event, in the strongly Republican state of Virginia, was timed to the release of a new Bush campaign advertisement, called "Ownership," that has begun airing in 18 closely fought states as well as nationally on cable channels.

Kerry campaign officials said the fact that Mr. Bush was spending time in Virginia three weeks before the Republican convention showed that his campaign was highly worried about losing a state that he won handily in 2000.

Bush campaign officials countered that the president had business at the White House all day, and that campaigning in suburban Virginia was about proximity, not desperation

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/10/international/middleeast/10bush.html?ex=1092801600&en=df01efbc8691745e&ei=5040&partner=MOREOVER


16 posted on 08/09/2004 10:55:46 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

Pressure stays on Iran, Bush says




Big News Network.com Tuesday 10th August, 2004

U.S. President George Bush Monday said continuing international pressure is necessary to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons.

Britain, France and Germany, which have been leading the way in negotiations with Iran's Islamic government, must make it clear to Iran and to the world that Iran must abandon her nuclear ambitions, he said.

Bush made the remarks during a question-and-answer session at Northern Virginia Community College, where the focus of his remarks were on advancing an ownership society -- part and parcel of his vision for economic recovery and facing new economic challenges.

Bush said Washington was working with the United Nation's International Atomic Energy Agency as well as allies on Iran, but noted U.S. sanctions on Tehran were moot.

The United States has had no diplomatic relations with Iran since militants took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran in 1979 and held U.S. diplomats hostage. U.S. economic sanctions have been in force ever since.

The United States believes Iran is trying to develop nuclear weapons.

The IAEA, which has admonished Tehran for failing to adhere to non-proliferation rules, could ask the U.N. Security Council to impose international sanctions as early as next month.

http://feeds.bignewsnetwork.com/?sid=aeaccd3db19b0ded


17 posted on 08/09/2004 10:57:00 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

New twist in Iran nuclear row
From correspondents in London

10aug04

TRACES of enriched uranium detected in Iran are now believed to have come from equipment provided by a smuggling network headed by Pakistan's disgraced former nuclear chief scientist, according to a report today.

The traces have been at the heart of an ongoing international dispute over whether Tehran has reneged on its obligations to inform the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) of all enrichment activities.

"IAEA inspectors have reached a tentative conclusion that the contamination came from equipment provided by the nuclear smuggling network headed by Pakistani scientist A Q Khan," Jane's Defence Weekly magazine said, quoting "sources close to the agency".

It said inspectors believed they could confirm that a sample of uranium enriched to 54 per cent, found at one Iranian site, had come from Pakistani equipment.

"The confirmation was only possible after Islamabad gave the IAEA data to verify the uranium source and the US provided a simulation of the Pakistani nuclear program that matched the account," Jane's said.

A separate contamination sample, of uranium enriched to 36 per cent, derived from Russian equipment that Moscow had supplied to China, which in turn passed it on to Pakistan as part of a previous nuclear assistance program, it said.

From Pakistan, it was sold by Mr Khan to Iran, it added.

"The sources note that the origins of several other contamination samples are difficult to trace and may never be known," Jane's said.

It had previously been known that inspectors from the Vienna-based IAEA had found traces of highly-enriched uranium inside Iran - leading to suspicions Iran had been trying to produce nuclear bombs and not just atomic energy as it insists.

But Tehran maintained that the traces found their way into the country on equipment bought on an international black market operated by Pakistan's disgraced former nuclear chief, Abdul Qadeer Khan.

Pakistan's foreign minister Khurshid Mahmud Kasuri, on a visit to Tehran, said Islamabad was co-operating with a UN probe into Iran's suspect nuclear program.

But he ruled out allowing inspectors into Pakistan as part of the crucial investigation.

In Washington, US President George W. Bush called on Iran to "abandon her nuclear ambitions" and vowed to stand with European allies to pressure Tehran to do so.


http://townsvillebulletin.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,7034,10399394%255E1702,00.html


18 posted on 08/09/2004 10:58:07 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: DoctorZIn

http://www.guardian.co.uk/iran/story/0,12858,1279824,00.html

Diplomacy sidelined as US targets Iran

Simon Tisdall
Tuesday August 10, 2004
The Guardian

The US charge sheet against Iran is lengthening almost by the day, presaging destabilising confrontations this autumn and maybe a pre-election October surprise.
The Bush administration is piling on the pressure over Iran's alleged nuclear weapons programme. It maintains Tehran's decision to resume building uranium centrifuges wrecked a long-running EU-led dialogue and is proof of bad faith.

The US will ask a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency on September 13 to declare Iran in breach of the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, a prelude to seeking punitive UN sanctions.

Iran's insistence that it seeks nuclear power, not weapons, is scoffed at in Washington. John Bolton, the hawkish US under-secretary of state for arms control, says there is no doubt what Tehran is up to. He has hinted at using military force should the UN fail to act. "The US and its allies must be willing to deploy more robust techniques" to halt nuclear proliferation, including "the disruption of procurement networks, sanctions and other means". No option was ruled out, he said last year.

Last month in Tokyo, Mr Bolton upped the ante again, accusing Iran of collaborating with North Korea on ballistic missiles.

Israel, Washington's ally, has also been stoking the fire. It is suggested there that if the west fails to act against Iran in timely fashion, Israel could strike pre-emptively as it did against Iraq's nuclear facilities in 1981, although whether it has the capability to launch effective strikes is uncertain.

The US has been pushing other countries to impose de facto punishment on Iran. Japan has been asked to cancel its $2bn (£1.086bn) investment in the Azadegan oilfield and Washington has urged Russia to halt the construction of a civilian reactor.

Condoleezza Rice, the US national security adviser, said at the weekend there was a new international willingness to confront Tehran, but declined to rule out unilateral action if others did not go along.

That will fuel speculation in Tehran and elsewhere that the Bush administration may resort to force, with or without Israel, ahead of November's election. Options include "surgical strikes" or covert action by special forces.

Such a move would be a high-risk gamble for George Bush. After the WMD fiasco, there would inevitably be questions about the accuracy of US intelligence. In the past Iran has vowed to retaliate. Although it is unclear how it might do so, the mood in Tehran has hardened since the conservatives won fiddled elections last winter.

"I think we've finally got the world community to a place, the IAEA to a place, that it is worried and suspicious," Ms Rice said in one of a string of interviews with CNN, Fox News and NBC television. She vowed to aim some "very tough resolutions" at Iran this autumn. "Iran will either be isolated or it will submit," she said.

Officials in London say she exaggerated the degree of unanimity on what to do next. Britain, France and Germany are the EU troika which has pursued a policy of "critical engagement" with Iran, despite US misgivings.

Jack Straw, the foreign secretary, has invested considerably in resolving the issue, travelling to Tehran on several occasions. A diplomatic collapse would be a blow.

"There has been no such decision at all," a Foreign Office spokesman said yesterday of US efforts to take the dispute to the security council. "The dialogue [with Iran] is ongoing and the government still believes that negotiation is the way forward at this stage." But Britain is in danger of being dragged down a path of confrontation that it does not want to travel.

Nuclear weapons are not Washington's only worry. The US charges include Iran's perceived meddling in Iraq, where the blame for the surge in Shia unrest is laid partly at Tehran's door. It also takes exception to Iran's ambiguous attitude to al-Qaida and Tehran's backing for anti-Israeli groups such as Hizbullah. The recent Kean report on 9/11 detailed unofficial links between some of the al-Qaida hijackers and Iran.

Investigations into other terrorist attacks since 9/11, including this year's Madrid bombings and failed plots in Paris and London, point to an Iran connection, though the extent of any government involvement is obscure.

While the Bush administration is set on a tougher line there is no consensus even in Washington on what to do.

A report by the independent Council on Foreign Relations says since Iran is not likely to implode any time soon, the US should start talking.

"Iran is experiencing a gradual process of internal change," the report says. "The urgency of US concerns about Iran and the region mandate that the US deal with the current regime [through] a compartmentalised process of dialogue, confidence building and incremental engagement."

That suggestion was mocked by a Wall Street Journal editorial as "appeasement". Hawks say the nuclear issue is too urgent to brook further delay. And therein lies the rub. Bringing Iran in from the cold is a time-consuming business. But the Bush administration, as usual, is in a hurry.



19 posted on 08/09/2004 11:00:17 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

Lashes for loud music in Iran

Aug 9, 2004, 11:57



TEHRAN - The judiciary in the western Iranian province of Hamedan has ordered that anyone caught playing thumping tunes in their cars should be subject to jail terms or lashes, the official news agency IRNA said on Sunday.

"Playing any type of music loud in the vehicles is regarded as a crime and violators will be dealt by legal measures," the agency quoted Hamedan province's judiciary as saying in a statement. "The creation of any noise or racket, or unusual behaviour that disturbs public order and calm are considered crimes which deserve imprisonment from three months to one year with 74 lashes," the statement said.

The playing of loud music, particularly of the pop type, is frowned upon across the Islamic republic and often strictly controlled. But punishments usually amount to no more than a temporary confiscation of a car or a fine. Western music has also been censored here since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

The judiciary in Hamedan is considered particularly hardline.

http://www.iranian.ws/iran_news/publish/printer_3244.shtml


20 posted on 08/09/2004 11:10:48 PM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44

And add this theory to your post:

The British Embassy wasn't occupied during the revolution but US emabbsy seized by Militants. British Embassy is still working while the regime directs its most dirty deeds toward Americans.


21 posted on 08/10/2004 1:30:51 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot

Rub a dub dub go the Mullahs in Tehran Jack's Tub?
22 posted on 08/10/2004 1:35:47 AM PDT by freedom44
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To: freedom44; risk; yonif

IRAN'S BUSHEHR IS 90% READY

MENL
August 10th, 04

MOSCOW [MENL] -- Russia has completed more than 90 percent of the Bushehr nuclear reactor in Iran.

Russian officials said Moscow has accelerated work on the Bushehr power reactor. They said 1,500 Russian nationals and personnel from the former Soviet Union were sent to Iran to complete the $1 billion nuclear project.

So far, officials said, Russia has completed procurement for Bushehr. They said the remaining work includes the assembly of the equipment, systems integration and preparing for operations.

"By now, the first power unit of the Bushehr nuclear station is 90 percent ready," a Russian Atomic Agency official told the Moscow-based Tass news agency. "All heavy equipment, including the reactor, has been brought and assembled at the station building."

http://www.menewsline.com/stories/2004/august/08_10_1.html


23 posted on 08/10/2004 1:38:18 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: freedom44; nuconvert
IRANIAN STATE ENTERPRISES AUDITED.

(RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 8, No. 150, Part III, 9 August 2004) Radio Farda economic commentator Fereidun Khavand reported on 5 August that the national accounting office has audited the 2003-04 books of 1,705 state enterprises. It found that 1,006 were profitable, 583 were losing money, and 116 showed neither profit nor loss, Khavand said. Moreover, according to press reports cited by Radio Farda, more of those enterprises would have a shown losses had the accounting office not used the statements they provided. Details on the profits and losses were not provided, but state enterprises consume 65 percent of the government's budget, according to Radio Farda.

Comment: Why to they have 1,705 state enterprises?
Do the bonyads pay taxes?
24 posted on 08/10/2004 1:55:06 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; freedom44; nuconvert; sionnsar; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; onyx; Pro-Bush; ...

Weighing a strike on Iran

August 10, 2004
The Washington Times (UPI)

On June 7, 1981, Israeli F-15 and F-16 fighter-bombers took off from Etzion Air Base in the Sinai, flew at low altitude across the Iraqi border and zeroed in on Saddam Hussein's Osirak nuclear reactor. One minute and 20 seconds after the first bomb struck, the reactor lay in ruins. All aircraft returned safely.
Today, 23 years later, there is a growing view in Washington and Tel Aviv that a similar pre-emptive strike against Iran's nuclear facilities may be the only way to prevent the fundamentalist mullahs from acquiring a nuclear bomb.

The Iranian threat to Israel, and to Middle Eastern stability, is serious and growing. Ten months of intensive diplomacy by Britain, France and Germany has failed to defuse the crisis.
Since the fall of Saddam Hussein, Israel has considered Iran its No. 1 enemy. On July 21, Israel's intelligence agencies submitted a joint report to the Cabinet that Iran could have a nuclear weapon by 2007. And Iran has made clear its main enemies are the "Zionist state" and its U.S. ally.
Every country that recently developed nuclear weapons has done so by generating highly enriched uranium or plutonium through the fuel cycle used for nuclear power. Tehran's claim it only aims to produce electric power is ridiculous. Iran sits on huge reserves of oil, is the second-largest Middle East petroleum exporter after Saudi Arabia, and has the second-largest natural gas reserves in the world after Russia.

The British, French and Germans brokered a deal with Iran last October under which Tehran would cooperate with international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors, and suspend enrichment of uranium. In exchange, the U.N. Security Council would not take action against Iran.

The IAEA put seals on the centrifuges used to enrich uranium, but now Iran has directly challenged the IAEA and the European nations by removing the seals, and restarting production of new centrifuges. Once enriched, uranium can be used either to produce electric power or make nuclear bombs.

Iran's centrifuges are believed capable of making 20 to 25 nuclear weapons a year. Plutonium, a byproduct of the nuclear reactor, also can be used to make bombs. John Bolton, undersecretary of state for arms control, recently told Congress that in a few years the Bushehr nuclear power plant Russia is building for Iran could produce enough plutonium for more than 80 nuclear weapons. Mr. Bolton also said that, if re-elected, President Bush would make Iran a priority.

India, Pakistan and North Korea have recently developed nuclear weapons, and Iran appears to be next. Israeli intelligence has long been warning Iran intends to produce a bomb, Washington has been calling for U.N. sanctions on Iran, and now even the wishful-thinking Europeans believe Iran is determined to produce nuclear weapons.

The best way to deliver such weapons is by a hard-to-stop ballistic missile, and Iran has an aggressive missile development program. Iran already operates the Shahab-3 missile that can carry a one-ton warhead more than 800 miles, putting Israel and much of the Middle East at risk. The Shahab-3 is a version of North Korea's Nodong missile and was developed from North Korean technology. The U.S. is helping Israel upgrade and test its Arrow missile interceptor, designed to stop slower and shorter-range Scuds, to give it some capability against the much faster Shahab-3.

Last December, Iranian officials denied earlier reports they were developing a longer-range Shahab-4. But Defense Minister Ali Chamkhani subsequently said Iran is upgrading the Shahab-3, and plans to launch its own satellite within 18 months. This is the same cover — calling a missile a satellite launcher — used by North Korea to explain its Taepodong-2 missile with intercontinental range.

Washington wants U.N. sanctions on Iran, but the Europeans are reluctant. And Russia and China, which have vetoes, are suppliers to Iran's nuclear program.

As the danger and Iran's defiance grows, U.S. and Israeli officials have begun talking about a possible strike on Iran's nuclear infrastructure. Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, calling Iran the greatest danger to Israel's existence, has said, "Israel will not allow Iran to be equipped with a nuclear weapon."

This time, a strike by Israel's F-15s is likely to be much broader than the attack on a single plant at Osirak, Iraq. A strike probably would hit the nuclear plant at Bushehr, the centrifuges at Natanz, a reactor being built at Arak and possibly other targets. A pre-emptive strike can be avoided, at least temporarily, if the U.N. agrees to apply meaningful sanctions. If not, Iran may become the second member of the Axis of Evil to learn the folly of its arrogance.

James T. Hackett is a contributing writer to The Washington Times and is based in San Diego.

http://washingtontimes.com/commentary/20040809-091648-8042r.htm


25 posted on 08/10/2004 3:57:02 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot

THANK YOU Pilot and good morning to you.


26 posted on 08/10/2004 4:03:34 AM PDT by Cindy
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; freedom44; nuconvert; sionnsar; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; onyx; Pro-Bush; ...

ABOVE, Iranian Women in Military Forces before 1979 revolution... WOMEN UNDER THE SHAH'S RULE

AND THESE ARE POLICEWOMEN UNDER THE RULE OF ISLAM AND KHOMEINISTS

27 posted on 08/10/2004 5:36:56 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot

Thanks for the ping!


28 posted on 08/10/2004 6:10:42 AM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: F14 Pilot

Thanks for the ping!


29 posted on 08/10/2004 6:18:38 AM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: DoctorZIn

Iran Arming Militia, Says Iraqi Official

August 10, 2004
The Associated Press
Abdul Hussein al-Obeidi

NAJAF, Iraq -- With fighting raging for a fifth day in Najaf, Iraq's interim defense minister yesterday accused Iran of sending weapons to Shi'ite insurgents in the city.

Meanwhile, radical Shi'ite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr vowed, that he would continue the battle "until the last drop of my blood has been spilled."


The uprising by Sheik al-Sadr's militia began to affect Iraq's crucial oil industry, as pumping to the southern port of Basra was halted by threats to infrastructure, an official with the South Oil Co. said.

Clashes also intensified in Basra, where a British soldier was killed and several others wounded in fighting near Sheik al-Sadr's office, the British Defense Ministry said. Iraqi police reported three militants killed and more than 10 wounded.

Defense Minister Hazem Shaalan, who previously had described Iran as Iraq's "first enemy," made the comments about his country's eastern neighbor during an interview broadcast on the Arab-language television network Al Arabiya.

"There are Iranian-made weapons that have been found in the hands of criminals in Najaf who received these weapons from across the Iranian border," Mr. Shaalan said.

Asked whether Iran was still considered the "top enemy" of Iraq, he answered ambiguously.

"From far and near, the facts that we have say that what has happened to the Iraqi people is done by the one who is considered the top enemy," he said.

"For the first time, the Iraqis see the bodies of children, the body parts of children, the bodies of women and the body parts of women on the street. Yes. This is the truth."

Najaf Gov. Adnan al-Zurufi said last week that 80 men who fought U.S. forces at a sprawling cemetery in Najaf were Iranian. "There is Iranian support to al-Sadr's group, and this is no secret," he said on Friday.

Iran has denied interfering in Iraq. It says it does not allow fighters to cross into Iraq, but it does not rule out that such people might cross the long border illegally.

Mahdi's Army, Sheik al-Sadr's militia, has been battling U.S. troops and Iraqi security forces in Najaf since Thursday.

U.S. forces yesterday tried once more to drive the militiamen from the cemetery, and an American tank rattled up to within 400 yards of the revered Imam Ali shrine, which fighters reportedly have been using as a base.

Meanwhile, Sunni Muslim militants attacked targets around Baghdad. A suicide car bombing aimed at a deputy governor killed six persons, and a roadside bomb hit a bus, killing four passengers.

The U.S. military also said a U.S. Marine was killed in action on Sunday in the western province of Anbar. The death brought to at least 927 the number of American troops who have died in Iraq since the start of the war.

An insurgent group warned in a videotaped message that it would conduct attacks on government offices in Baghdad, telling employees to stay away. Sheik al-Sadr's militants kidnapped a top Baghdad police official and demanded that their comrades in detention be set free.

In Nasariyah, 190 miles south of Baghdad, militants raided the local office of interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi's Iraqi National Accord party, set it on fire and warned party members to leave the city. There were no injuries in the Sunday night attack, said police Capt. Haydar Abboud.

Sheik al-Sadr's vow to keep fighting was a defiant challenge to Mr. Allawi, who called on the Shi'ite militants to stop fighting during a visit to Najaf on Sunday.

"I will continue fighting," the firebrand cleric told reporters in Najaf. "I will remain in Najaf city until the last drop of my blood has been spilled."

"Resistance will continue and increase day by day," he said. "Our demand is for the American occupation to get out of Iraq. We want an independent, democratic, free country."

Fighting remained centered on the vast cemetery near the Imam Ali shrine. The U.S. military said Mahdi's Army gunmen were staging attacks from the cemetery and then running to take refuge in the shrine compound, one of the holiest sites in Shi'ite Islam.

Mr. al-Zurufi gave U.S. forces approval to enter the shrine, a senior U.S. military official said yesterday.

"We have elected at this point not to conduct operations there, although we are prepared to do so at a moment's notice," the official said.

Such an offensive would almost certainly outrage the nation's Shi'ite majority and exacerbate the crisis.

The military official estimated that 360 insurgents had been killed between Thursday and Sunday — a figure the militants dispute. Five U.S. troops have been killed, and Najaf police chief Brig. Ghalib al-Jazaari said about 20 policemen had died.

Hospital officials said four persons, including three policemen, were killed yesterday and 19 others injured. In addition, 13 previously unidentified bodies had been brought to the hospital.

http://www.washtimes.com/world/20040810-123446-3839r.htm


30 posted on 08/10/2004 7:18:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: DoctorZIn

Iranian Nuclear Demands Stun Europeans

August 10, 2004
The Billings Gazette
The Associated Press

VIENNA, Austria -- Iran is demanding Europe's leading powers back its right to nuclear technology that could be used to make weapons, dismaying the Europeans and strengthening Washington's push for U.N. sanctions, a European Union official and diplomats said Monday.

Declining to respond to a list of demands presented by Iran last week, the Europeans are urging the Iranian government to instead make good on a pledge to clear up suspicions about its nuclear ambitions.

But diplomats said Iran's demands undermine the effort by France, Germany and Britain to avoid a confrontation. They had hoped to persuade Tehran to give up technology that can produce nuclear arms, but now are closer to the Bush administration's view that Iran should be referred to the U.N. Security Council for violating the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, the diplomats said.

The Iranian list, presented during talks in Paris, includes demands that the three European powers:

* Support Iran's insistence its nuclear program have access to "advanced technology, including those with dual use," which is equipment and know-how that has both peaceful and weapons applications. "Remove impediments" - sales restrictions imposed by nuclear supplier nations - preventing Iran access to such technology.

* Give assurances they will stick by any commitment to Iran even if faced with "legal (or) political ... limitations," an apparent allusion to potential Security Council sanctions.

* Agree to sell Iran conventional weapons.

* Commit to push "rigorously and systematically" for a non-nuclear Middle East and to "provide security assurances" against a nuclear attack on Iran, both allusions to Israel, which is believed to have nuclear arms and which destroyed Iraq's nuclear reactor in a 1981 airstrike to prevent it from making atomic arms.

France, Germany and Britain last year had held out the prospect of supplying Iran with some "dual use" nuclear technology, but only in the distant future and only if all suspicions about the Iranian program were laid to rest.

With Iran still under investigation, the demands stunned senior French, German and British negotiators, said a European Union official familiar with the Paris meeting.

Ignoring the list, the Europeans instead urged Iran to act on its leaders' pledge to clear up suspicions about their nuclear ambitions by Sept. 13, when the International Atomic Energy Agency meets to review Iran's nuclear program, the official said.

http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2004/08/10/build/world/60-iran-nuclear.inc


31 posted on 08/10/2004 7:31:33 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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To: F14 Pilot

.

See Photos:

http://www.RFVN.com

FREEDOM for VIETNAM

.


32 posted on 08/10/2004 8:47:17 AM PDT by ALOHA RONNIE (Vet-Battle of IA DRANG-1965 http://www.LZXRAY.com.c)
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To: freedom44

Freedom Now ~ Bump!


33 posted on 08/10/2004 9:51:08 AM PDT by blackie (Be Well~Be Armed~Be Safe~Molon Labe!)
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To: DoctorZIn

Bump!


34 posted on 08/10/2004 12:08:34 PM PDT by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
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To: F14 Pilot

Bump!


35 posted on 08/10/2004 12:19:55 PM PDT by windchime (Podesta about Bush: "He's got four years to try to undo all the stuff we've done." (TIME-1/22/01))
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To: DoctorZIn

"the Bush administration, as usual, is in a hurry."

It is?


36 posted on 08/10/2004 2:24:19 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: freedom44

That last pic is too disturbing.

"How is it that virtually all of the demonstrators against the Shah were originally Leftists and Secular Democrats, and Iran ended up with an Islamist government?"

Ask Carter


37 posted on 08/10/2004 2:26:19 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: DoctorZIn

"Muqtada al-Sadr vowed, that he would continue the battle "until the last drop of my blood has been spilled."

Oh, Good.


38 posted on 08/10/2004 2:27:55 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: AdmSmith

"Do the bonyads pay taxes?"

Do they? ..and.. Are they supposed to ...? are 2 different questions.


39 posted on 08/10/2004 6:45:12 PM PDT by nuconvert (Everyone has a photographic memory. Some don't have film.)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread – The Most Underreported Story Of The Year!

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail DoctorZin”

40 posted on 08/10/2004 9:03:27 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (Until they are Free, "We shall all be Iranians!")
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