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Homeland Security Contracts KBR to Build Detention Centers in the US
projectcensored.org ^ | 2007.12.25 | Editorial Staff

Posted on 12/25/2007 7:06:18 PM PST by B-Chan

Homeland Security Contracts KBR to Build Detention Centers in the US

Sources:
New America Media, January 31, 2006
Title: “Homeland Security Contracts for Vast New Detention Camps”
Author: Peter Dale Scott

New America Media, February 21, 2006
Title: “10-Year US Strategic Plan for Detention Camps Revives Proposals from Oliver North”
Author: Peter Dale Scott

Consortiium [sic], February 21, 2006
Title: “Bush's Mysterious ‘New Programs’”
Author: Nat Parry

Buzzflash
Title: “Detention Camp Jitters”
Author: Maureen Farrell

Community Evaluator: Dr. Gary Evans
Student Researchers: Sean Hurley and Caitlyn Peele

Halliburton’s subsidiary KBR (formerly Kellogg, Brown and Root) announced on January 24, 2006 that it had been awarded a $385 million contingency contract by the Department of Homeland Security to build detention camps in the United States.

According to a press release posted on the Halliburton website, “The contract, which is effective immediately, provides for establishing temporary detention and processing capabilities to augment existing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Detention and Removal Operations (DRO) Program facilities in the event of an emergency influx of immigrants into the U.S., or to support the rapid development of new programs. The contingency support contract provides for planning and, if required, initiation of specific engineering, construction and logistics support tasks to establish, operate and maintain one or more expansion facilities.”

What little coverage the announcement received focused on concerns about Halliburton’s reputation for overcharging U.S. taxpayers for substandard services.

Less attention was focused on the phrase “rapid development of new programs” or what type of programs might require a major expansion of detention centers, capable of holding 5,000 people each. Jamie Zuieback, spokeswoman for ICE, declined to elaborate on what these “new programs” might be.

Only a few independent journalists, such as Peter Dale Scott, Maureen Farrell, and Nat Parry have explored what the Bush administration might actually have in mind.

Scott speculates [emphasis mine — B-chan] that the “detention centers could be used to detain American citizens if the Bush administration were to declare martial law.” He recalled that during the Reagan administration, National Security Council aide Oliver North organized the Rex-84 “readiness exercise,” which contemplated the Federal Emergency Management Agency rounding up and detaining 400,000 “refugees” in the event of “uncontrolled population movements” over the Mexican border into the U.S.

North’s exercise, which reportedly contemplated possible suspension of the Constitution, led to a line of questioning during the Iran-Contra Hearings concerning the idea that plans for expanded internment and detention facilities would not be confined to “refugees” alone.

It is relevant, says Scott, that in 2002 Attorney General John Ashcroft announced his desire to see camps for U.S. citizens deemed to be “enemy combatants.” On February 17, 2006, in a speech to the Council on Foreign Relations, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld spoke of the harm being done to the country’s security, not just by the enemy, but also by what he called “news informers” who needed to be combated in “a contest of wills.”

Since September 11 the Bush administration has implemented a number of interrelated programs that were planned in the 1980s under President Reagan. Continuity of Government (COG) proposals — a classified plan for keeping a secret “government-within-the-government” running during and after a nuclear disaster — included vastly expanded detention capabilities, warrantless eavesdropping, and preparations for greater use of martial law.

Scott points out that, while Oliver North represented a minority element in the Reagan administration, which soon distanced itself from both the man and his proposals, the minority associated with COG planning, which included Cheney and Rumsfeld, appear to be in control of the U.S. government today.

Farrell speculates that, because another terror attack is all but certain, it seems far more likely that the detention centers would be used for post-September 11-type detentions of rounded-up immigrants rather than for a sudden deluge of immigrants flooding across the border.

Vietnam-era whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg ventures, “Almost certainly this is preparation for a roundup after the next September 11 for Mid-Easterners, Muslims and possibly dissenters. They’ve already done this on a smaller scale, with the ‘special registration’ detentions of immigrant men from Muslim countries, and with Guantánamo.”

Parry notes that The Washington Post reported on February 15, 2006 that the National Counterterrorism Center’s (NCTC) central repository holds the names of 325,000 terrorist suspects, a fourfold increase since fall of 2003.

Asked whether the names in the repository were collected through the NSA’s domestic surveillance program, an NCTC official told the Post, “Our database includes names of known and suspected international terrorists provided by all intelligence community organizations, including NSA.”

As the administration scoops up more and more names, members of Congress have questioned the elasticity of Bush’s definitions for words like terrorist “affiliates,” used to justify wiretapping Americans allegedly in contact with such people or entities.

A Defense Department document, entitled the “Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support,” has set out a military strategy against terrorism that envisions an “active, layered defense” both inside and outside U.S. territory. In the document, the Pentagon pledges to “transform U.S. military forces to execute homeland defense missions in the [...] U.S. homeland.” The strategy calls for increased military reconnaissance and surveillance to “defeat potential challengers before they threaten the United States.” The plan “maximizes threat awareness and seizes the initiative from those who would harm us.”

But there are concerns, warns Parry, over how the Pentagon judges “threats” and who falls under the category of “those who would harm us.” A Pentagon official said the Counterintelligence Field Activity’s TALON program has amassed files on antiwar protesters.

In the view of some civil libertarians, a form of martial law already exists in the U.S. and has been in place since shortly after the September 11 attacks when Bush issued Military Order Number One, which empowered him to detain any noncitizen as an international terrorist or enemy combatant. Today that order extends to U.S. citizens as well.

Farrell ends her article with the conclusion that while much speculation has been generated by KBR’s contract to build huge detention centers within the U.S., “The truth is, we won’t know the real purpose of these centers unless ‘contingency plans are needed.’ And by then, it will be too late.”

UPDATE BY PETER DALE SCOTT
The contract of the Halliburton subsidiary KBR to build immigrant detention facilities is part of a longer-term Homeland Security plan titled ENDGAME, which sets as its goal the removal of “all removable aliens” and “potential terrorists.” In the 1980s Richard Cheney and Donald Rumsfeld discussed similar emergency detention powers as part of a super-secret program of planning for what was euphemistically called “Continuity of Government” (COG) in the event of a nuclear disaster. At the time, Cheney was a Wyoming congressman, while Rumsfeld, who had been defense secretary under President Ford, was a businessman and CEO of the drug company G.D. Searle.

These men planned for suspension of the Constitution, not just after nuclear attack, but for any “national security emergency,” which they defined in Executive Order 12656 of 1988 as: “Any occurrence, including natural disaster, military attack, technological or other emergency, that seriously degrades or seriously threatens the national security of the United States.” Clearly September 11 would meet this definition, and did, for COG was instituted on that day. As the Washington Post later explained, the order “dispatched a shadow government of about 100 senior civilian managers to live and work secretly outside Washington, activating for the first time long-standing plans.”

What these managers in this shadow government worked on has never been reported. But it is significant that the group that prepared ENDGAME was, as the Homeland Security document puts it, “chartered in September 2001.” For ENDGAME’s goal of a capacious detention capability is remarkably similar to Oliver North’s controversial Rex-84 “readiness exercise” for COG in 1984. This called for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to round up and detain 400,000 imaginary “refugees,” in the context of “uncontrolled population movements” over the Mexican border into the United States.

UPDATE BY MAUREEN FARRELL
When the story about Kellogg, Brown and Root’s contract for emergency detention centers broke, immigration was not the hot button issue it is today. Given this, the language in Halliburton’s press release, stating that the centers would be built in the event of an “emergency influx of immigrants into the U.S.,” raised eyebrows, especially among those familiar with Rex-84 and other Reagan-era initiatives. FEMA’s former plans ‘for the detention of at least 21 million American Negroes [sic] in assembly centers or relocation camps’ added to the distrust, and the second stated reason for the KBR contract, “to support the rapid development of new programs,” sent imaginations reeling.

While few in the mainstream media made the connection between KBR’s contract and previous programs, Fox News eventually addressed this issue, pooh-poohing concerns as the province of “conspiracy theories” and “unfounded” fears. My article attempted to sift through the speculation, focusing on verifiable information found in declassified and leaked documents which proved that, in addition to drawing up contingency plans for martial law, the government has conducted military readiness exercises designed to round up and detain both illegal aliens and U.S. citizens.

How concerned should Americans be? Recent reports are conflicting and confusing:

• In May, 2006, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) began “Operation Return to Sender,” which involved catching illegal immigrants and deporting them. In June, however, President Bush vowed that there would soon be “new infrastructures” including detention centers designed to put an end to such “catch and release” practices.

• Though Bush said he was “working with Congress to increase the number of detention facilities along our borders,” Rep. Bennie Thompson, ranking member of the House Homeland Security Committee, said he first learned about the KBR contract through newspaper reports.

• Fox News recently quoted Pepperdine University professor Doug Kmiec, who deemed detention camp concerns “more paranoia than reality” and added that KBR’s contract is most likely “something related to (Hurricane) Katrina” or “a bird flu outbreak that could spur a mass quarantine of Americans.” The president’s stated desire for the U.S. military to take a more active role during natural disasters and to enforce quarantines in the event of a bird flu outbreak, however, have been roundly denounced.

Concern over an all-powerful [sic]federal government is not paranoia, but active citizenship. As Thomas Jefferson explained, “even under the best forms of government, those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny.” From John Adams’s Alien and Sedition Acts to FDR’s internment of Japanese Americans, the land of the free has held many contradictions and ironies. Interestingly enough, Halliburton was at the center of another historical controversy, when Lyndon Johnson’s ties to a little-known company named Kellogg, Brown and Root caused a congressional commotion—particularly after the Halliburton subsidiary won enough wartime contracts to become one of the first protested symbols of the military-industrial complex. Back then they were known as the “Vietnam builders.” The question, of course, is what they’ll be known as next.

Additional links:
“Reagan Aides and the Secret Government,” Miami Herald, July 5, 1987

“Foundations are in place for martial law in the US,” July 27, 2002, Sydney Morning Herald

“Halliburton Deals Recall Vietnam-Era Controversy: Cheney’s Ties to Company Reminiscent of LBJ’s Relationships,” NPR, Dec. 24, 2003

“Critics Fear Emergency Centers Could Be Used for Immigration Round-Ups,” Fox News, June 7, 2006

“U.S. officials nab 2,100 illegal immigrants in 3 weeks,” USA Today, June 14, 2006


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government; Unclassified
KEYWORDS: aliens; cuespookymusic; fema; halliburton; homelandsecurity; kbr; tinfoil
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Posted because I found it to be of interest, especially the part about building detention centers “to support the rapid development of new programs”. However, given the piece's obvious editorial slant and dearth of attributed non-speculative evidentiary support, this article does not represent "news". This is an editorial, or perhaps a rant. In any case, even a crazy squirrel occasionally turns up a nut. Use your own judgment regarding how much importance this article deserves.

Please keep in mind that the opinions expressed in any given article posted by me do not necessarily reflect my own opinions on that topic.

1 posted on 12/25/2007 7:06:21 PM PST by B-Chan
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To: B-Chan

Will they be using shackles welded in middle America?


2 posted on 12/25/2007 7:07:51 PM PST by coloradan (Failing to protect the liberties of your enemies establishes precedents that will reach to yourself.)
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To: B-Chan

It’s also interesting that this story comes out so soon after the “Hoover had plans to incarcerate 50,000” just a few days ago.


3 posted on 12/25/2007 7:09:14 PM PST by coloradan (Failing to protect the liberties of your enemies establishes precedents that will reach to yourself.)
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To: B-Chan

Hillary prefers the term “reeducation camp”.


4 posted on 12/25/2007 7:12:01 PM PST by Xenophon450 (They say it's lonely at the top, then I am as lonely as can be.)
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To: coloradan
Been around for a while. KBR awarded Homeland Security contract worth up to $385M By Katherine Hunt Last update: 12:19 p.m. EST Jan. 24, 2006 SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- KBR, the engineering and construction subsidiary of Halliburton Co. (HAL Halliburton Company News, chart, profile, more Delayed quote data Add to portfolio Analyst Create alert Insider Discuss Financials Sponsored by: HAL) , said Tuesday it has been awarded a contingency contract from the Department of Homeland Security to supports its Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities in the event of an emergency. The maximum total value of the contract is $385 million and consists of a 1-year base period with four 1-year options. KBR held the previous ICE contract from 2000 through 2005. The contract, which is effective immediately, provides for establishing temporary detention and processing capabilities to expand existing ICE Detention and Removal Operations Program facilities in the event of an emergency influx of immigrants into the U.S., or to support the rapid development of new programs, KBR said. The contract may also provide migrant detention support to other government organizations in the event of an immigration emergency, as well as the development of a plan to react to a national emergency, such as a natural disaster, the company said. End of Story Halliburton Subsidiary Gets Contract to Add Temporary Immigration Detention Centers
By RACHEL L. SWARNS

WASHINGTON, Feb. 3 — The Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a contract worth up to $385 million for building temporary immigration detention centers to Kellogg Brown & Root, the Halliburton subsidiary that has been criticized for overcharging the Pentagon for its work in Iraq.

KBR would build the centers for the Homeland Security Department for an unexpected influx of immigrants, to house people in the event of a natural disaster or for new programs that require additional detention space, company executives said. KBR, which announced the contract last month, had a similar contract with immigration agencies from 2000 to last year.

The contract with the Corps of Engineers runs one year, with four optional one-year extensions. Officials of the corps said that they had solicited bids and that KBR was the lone responder.

A spokeswoman for Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Jamie Zuieback, said KBR would build the centers only in an emergency like the one when thousands of Cubans floated on rafts to the United States. She emphasized that the centers might never be built if such an emergency did not arise.

"It's the type of contract that could be used in some kind of mass migration," Ms. Zuieback said.

A spokesman for the corps, Clayton Church, said that the centers could be at unused military sites or temporary structures and that each one would hold up to 5,000 people.

"When there's a large influx of people into the United States, how are we going to feed, house and protect them?" Mr. Church asked. "That's why these kinds of contracts are there."

Mr. Church said that KBR did not end up creating immigration centers under its previous contract, but that it did build temporary shelters for Hurricane Katrina evacuees.

Federal auditors rebuked the company for unsubstantiated billing in its Iraq reconstruction contracts, and it has been criticized because of accusations that Halliburton, led by Dick Cheney before he became vice president, was aided by connections in obtaining contracts. Halliburton executives denied that they charged excessively for the work in Iraq.

Mr. Church said concerns about the Iraq contracts did not affect the awarding of the new contract.

Representative Henry A. Waxman, Democrat of California, who has monitored the company, called the contract worrisome.

"With Halliburton's ever expanding track record of overcharging, it's hard to believe that the administration has decided to entrust Halliburton with even more taxpayer dollars," Mr. Waxman said. "With each new contract, the need for real oversight grows."

In recent months, the Homeland Security Department has promised to increase bed space in its detention centers to hold thousands of illegal immigrants awaiting deportation. In the first quarter of the 2006 fiscal year, nearly 60 percent of the illegal immigrants apprehended from countries other than Mexico were released on their own recognizance.

Domestic security officials have promised to end the releases by increasing the number of detention beds. Last week, domestic security officials announced that they would expand detaining and swiftly deporting illegal immigrants to include those seized near the Canadian border.

Advocates for immigrants said they feared that the new contract was another indication that the government planned to expand the detention of illegal immigrants, including those seeking asylum.

"It's pretty obvious that the intent of the government is to detain more and more people and to expedite their removal," said Cheryl Little, executive director of the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center in Miami.

Ms. Zuieback said the KBR contract was not intended for that.

"It's not part of any day-to-day enforcement," she said.

She added that she could not provide additional information about the company's statement that the contract was also meant to support the rapid development of new programs.

Halliburton executives, who announced the contract last week, said they were pleased.

"We are especially gratified to be awarded this contract," an executive vice president, Bruce Stanski, said in a statement, "because it builds on our extremely strong track record in the arena of emergency management support."


5 posted on 12/25/2007 7:14:27 PM PST by BGHater (If Guns Cause Crime Then Matches Cause Arson?)
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To: B-Chan

Well, insane democrats will need some place to live after 2008, for the common good.


6 posted on 12/25/2007 7:15:35 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: B-Chan

I suspect Christians will end up populating such camps more than Muslims . . . for their faith and not for their behavior, BTW.


7 posted on 12/25/2007 7:16:27 PM PST by Quix (GOD ALONE IS GOD; WORTHY; PAID THE PRICE; IS COMING AGAIN; KNOWS ALL; IS LOVING; IS ALTOGETHER GOOD)
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To: BGHater

Good followup. Not only is this not “news”, it’s old non-news.


8 posted on 12/25/2007 7:16:40 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: B-Chan

9 posted on 12/25/2007 7:17:25 PM PST by Travis McGee (---www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com---)
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To: Quix

Oh, that would be a problem... the Christians would keep converting the guards! Imagine, free room and board while you get to study the Bible and pray for others!


10 posted on 12/25/2007 7:17:51 PM PST by GAB-1955 (Kicking and Screaming into the Kingdom of Heaven.)
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To: Travis McGee

Oh please......


11 posted on 12/25/2007 7:19:09 PM PST by shield (A wise man's heart is at his RIGHT hand;but a fool's heart at his LEFT. Ecc 10:2)
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To: shield

Hey, I know the story is bogus, I just like the graphic.


12 posted on 12/25/2007 7:20:32 PM PST by Travis McGee (---www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com---)
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To: Quix

That is my opinion also.


13 posted on 12/25/2007 7:21:40 PM PST by sport
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To: B-Chan
Image hosted by Photobucket.com whats google earth show???
14 posted on 12/25/2007 7:21:43 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist)
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To: B-Chan

This I must study!


15 posted on 12/25/2007 7:21:43 PM PST by AnimalLover ( ((Are there special rules and regulations for the big guys?)))
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To: B-Chan

[1rudeboy wistfully remembers the FEMA boxcar-threads in the FR days of yore]


16 posted on 12/25/2007 7:22:23 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: B-Chan

In the sixties there were rumors going around about old WW2 internment camps (”relocation centers”) being readied for thousands of hippies.


17 posted on 12/25/2007 7:22:43 PM PST by Slump Tester (-What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
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To: B-Chan
Less attention was focused on the phrase “rapid development of new programs” or what type of programs might require a major expansion of detention centers, capable of holding 5,000 people each. Jamie Zuieback, spokeswoman for ICE, declined to elaborate on what these “new programs” might be."

More probably "enforcement of existing laws".

I've always felt that the stability of Mexico is a major driver of illegal immigration policy.

A communist, allied with pineapple head of venezuala, almost won the last Mexican presidential election . If we send 10-20 million indigents back to Mexico and at the same time cut off their major hard currency supply, remissions from the US, the proverbial s#!t will hit the fan.

The border will probably be flooded with refugees heading north and it won't be pretty.

18 posted on 12/25/2007 7:24:08 PM PST by Eagles6
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To: Slump Tester
In the sixties there were rumors going around about old WW2 internment camps (”relocation centers”) being readied for thousands of hippies.

It would have been a fresher-smelling, Brylcreemed world...

19 posted on 12/25/2007 7:24:23 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: 1rudeboy

I’m just hoping they send me to the FEMA detention center at Raco Field in Michigan’s UP. Nice scenery up there.


20 posted on 12/25/2007 7:25:00 PM PST by cripplecreek (Only one consistent conservative in this race and his name is Hunter.)
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To: shield

So back up the truck for some more HAL shares.


21 posted on 12/25/2007 7:25:09 PM PST by spokeshave (Hey GOP...NO money till border closed and criminal illegals deported)
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To: B-Chan
This is paranoid ranting. Humbug. I want to see google earth pictures and locations.
22 posted on 12/25/2007 7:25:33 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: B-Chan
Probably has a black helicopter landing pad as well...LOL..

This is not the first time this has popped up on this site. Smart money has it that it is all overblown BS that stems from the 2004 election

Worse than that, it seems that some conservative types actually believe a Republican administration would devolve to tyranny.

That is not the way it works. It is liberals who devolve to tyranny to serve the masses.

The facts are that Hallibuton does indeed have a contract, but that contract has been extended as far back as WWII. They have always been the go-to contractor for all things military, but this aspect is for overseas construction. The state side stuff goes out for bids as far as I know.

But I think I said the same comments over four to five years ago when this same story but with a slightly different twist was the talk of the day.

23 posted on 12/25/2007 7:27:13 PM PST by Cold Heat (Mitt....2008)
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To: Cold Heat

Good points.


24 posted on 12/25/2007 7:28:30 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: B-Chan

There’s one being built down the road from me now. The construction site has a big sign out front that says it’s a Home Depot, but I asked my local Lowe’s guy and he says.................


25 posted on 12/25/2007 7:31:30 PM PST by davetex (There are no stupid questions, however there does seem to be an abundance of inquisitive idiots.)
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To: B-Chan
If the old data base is still complete, you will find some aerial photo's of the reported construction sites. This story was in 2003 IIRC. It really had the place hopping for a bit.

I guess some folks need a certain medication and are not taking any. It does not matter to me, as I view it like I do Hollywood. I have a brother that eats this stuff up.....Yes....he is indeed a paranoid schizos, not a clairvoyant.

26 posted on 12/25/2007 7:36:29 PM PST by Cold Heat (Mitt....2008)
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To: davetex

27 posted on 12/25/2007 7:36:57 PM PST by null and void (I've always liked Ron Paul, he is not a like a serial rapist. - rovenstinez)
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To: null and void

Hey Nully! Isn’t the helicopter supposed to be black?


28 posted on 12/25/2007 7:38:18 PM PST by REDWOOD99
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To: b

I doubt the veracity of these claims. Seems these claims all come from leftists that hate Halliburton.


29 posted on 12/25/2007 7:42:30 PM PST by KC_Conspirator
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To: null and void

LOL! I love the touch of the “contrails”.


30 posted on 12/25/2007 7:44:42 PM PST by KC_Conspirator
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To: REDWOOD99

That’s the spot where it was...


31 posted on 12/25/2007 7:44:44 PM PST by null and void (I've always liked Ron Paul, he is not a like a serial rapist. - rovenstinez)
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To: KC_Conspirator

Those are chemtrails...


32 posted on 12/25/2007 7:45:16 PM PST by null and void (I've always liked Ron Paul, he is not a like a serial rapist. - rovenstinez)
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To: null and void

LOL!


33 posted on 12/25/2007 7:45:21 PM PST by REDWOOD99
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To: Eagles6

Department of Homeland Insecurity


34 posted on 12/25/2007 7:46:01 PM PST by wastedyears (Merry Christmas, FReepers)
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To: B-Chan

Wait a minute.. What about all the perfectly good camps we already have just sitting there gathering dust *-?


35 posted on 12/25/2007 7:47:06 PM PST by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi ... Godspeed ... ICE’s toll-free tip hotline —1-866-DHS-2-ICE ... 9/11 .. Never FoRGeT)
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To: null and void
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
36 posted on 12/25/2007 7:50:30 PM PST by cripplecreek (Only one consistent conservative in this race and his name is Hunter.)
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To: B-Chan

I remember when the story was that Bill Clinton was building FEMA concentration camps in cahoots with the UN to round up all gun owners and good patriots under cover of the riots and disruption the Y2K crisis would bring. Ahhh the good ol days.


37 posted on 12/25/2007 7:50:48 PM PST by tlb
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To: null and void

That’s what the guy at Lowe’s was talkin about!!


38 posted on 12/25/2007 7:51:47 PM PST by davetex (There are no stupid questions, however there does seem to be an abundance of inquisitive idiots.)
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To: BGHater

So, they’ve had this contract for two years and nothing has been built yet? Yep, moving along as fast as that fence.


39 posted on 12/25/2007 7:52:47 PM PST by mtbopfuyn (I think the border is kind of an artificial barrier - San Antonio councilwoman Patti Radle)
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To: davetex
See!!!
40 posted on 12/25/2007 7:53:12 PM PST by null and void (I've always liked Ron Paul, he is not a like a serial rapist. - rovenstinez)
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To: tlb

“Ahhh the good ol days”

Fond memories of “sars” and what not.


41 posted on 12/25/2007 7:54:21 PM PST by davetex (There are no stupid questions, however there does seem to be an abundance of inquisitive idiots.)
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To: sport

I hope we’re outta here by then. We shall see. Even the birth pangs leading up to such are likely to be less than wonderful.


42 posted on 12/25/2007 7:54:26 PM PST by Quix (GOD ALONE IS GOD; WORTHY; PAID THE PRICE; IS COMING AGAIN; KNOWS ALL; IS LOVING; IS ALTOGETHER GOOD)
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To: GAB-1955

The

WATCHMAN NEE effect?

LOL.

There is that . . . something I have thought of, and prayed about, BTW.


43 posted on 12/25/2007 7:55:06 PM PST by Quix (GOD ALONE IS GOD; WORTHY; PAID THE PRICE; IS COMING AGAIN; KNOWS ALL; IS LOVING; IS ALTOGETHER GOOD)
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To: coloradan

Rumors of large scale Federal detention centers have been circulating on the internet for years.


44 posted on 12/25/2007 7:55:54 PM PST by Rb ver. 2.0 (Global warming is the new Marxism.)
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To: Cold Heat
If you liked the Feds taking power of the Gov’s then I guess you didn’t have a problem with the 2006 Defense Auth bill, nor do you mind the Feds having that power over a mere ‘incident’.

If Clinton tried that crap there would be calls for impeachment, while President Bush wants it, it’s okay.

Sad.

http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h109-5122
H.R. 5122 [109th]: John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007

SEC. 1076. USE OF THE ARMED FORCES IN MAJOR PUBLIC EMERGENCIES.
(a) USE OF THE ARMED FORCES AUTHORIZED.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Section 333 of title 10, United States
Code, is amended to read as follows:
‘‘§ 333. Major public emergencies; interference with State and
Federal law
‘‘(a) USE OF ARMED FORCES IN MAJOR PUBLIC EMERGENCIES.—
(1) The President may employ the armed forces, including the
National Guard in Federal service, to—
‘‘(A) restore public order and enforce the laws of the United
States when, as a result of a natural disaster, epidemic, or
other serious public health emergency, terrorist attack or
incident, or other condition in any State or possession of the
United States, the President determines that—
‘‘(i) domestic violence has occurred to such an extent
that the constituted authorities of the State or possession
are incapable of maintaining public order; and
‘‘(ii) such violence results in a condition described in
paragraph (2); or
‘‘(B) suppress, in a State, any insurrection, domestic
violence, unlawful combination, or conspiracy if such insurrection,
violation, combination, or conspiracy results in a condition
described in paragraph (2).
‘‘(2) A condition described in this paragraph is a condition
that—
‘‘(A) so hinders the execution of the laws of a State or
possession, as applicable, and of the United States within that
State or possession, that any part or class of its people is
deprived of a right, privilege, immunity, or protection named
in the Constitution and secured by law, and the constituted
authorities of that State or possession are unable, fail, or refuse
to protect that right, privilege, or immunity, or to give that
protection; or
H. R. 5122—323
‘‘(B) opposes or obstructs the execution of the laws of the
United States or impedes the course of justice under those
laws.
‘‘(3) In any situation covered by paragraph (1)(B), the State
shall be considered to have denied the equal protection of the
laws secured by the Constitution.
‘‘(b) NOTICE TO CONGRESS.—The President shall notify Congress
of the determination to exercise the authority in subsection (a)(1)(A)
as soon as practicable after the determination and every 14 days
thereafter during the duration of the exercise of that authority.’’.
(2) PROCLAMATION TO DISPERSE.—Section 334 of such title
is amended by inserting ‘‘or those obstructing the enforcement
of the laws’’ after ‘‘insurgents’’.
(3) HEADING AMENDMENT.—The heading of chapter 15 of
such title is amended to read as follows:
‘‘CHAPTER 15—ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS TO
RESTORE PUBLIC ORDER’’.
(4) CLERICAL AMENDMENTS.—(A) The tables of chapters
at the beginning of subtitle A of title 10, United States Code,
and at the beginning of part I of such subtitle, are each
amended by striking the item relating to chapter 15 and
inserting the following new item:
‘‘15 Enforcement of the Laws to Restore Public Order ....................................... 331’’.
(B) The table of sections at the beginning of chapter 15
of such title is amended by striking the item relating to sections
333 and inserting the following new item:
‘‘333. Major public emergencies; interference with State and Federal law.’’.
(b) PROVISION OF SUPPLIES, SERVICES, AND EQUIPMENT.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Chapter 152 of such title is amended
by adding at the end the following new section: See also: http://public.cq.com/docs/hs/hsnews110-000002496845.html
CQ HOMELAND SECURITY – LOCAL RESPONSE
April 24, 2007 – 7:24 p.m.

Governors Back Bill Reclaiming Authority Over National Guard in Emergencies
By Eileen Sullivan, CQ Staff

The nation’s governors and National Guard leaders oppose a provision inserted into the fiscal 2007 defense authorization bill last year redefining when the president can take command of the National Guard during domestic emergencies. No member of the House or Senate is claiming responsibility for the provision, which amends the Insurrection Act of 1807.

Governors are in an uproar because the little-noticed provision was inserted into the authorization bill (PL 109-364) without consulting governors, adjutant generals or law enforcement officials across the country.

As result, all of the nation’s governors are in support of a bill (S 513) introduced Feb. 7 by Sen. Patrick J. Leahy, D-Vt., that would repeal the language inserted into the defense authorization bill.

“This is a serious problem,” Gov. Michael F. Easley, D-N.C., told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. Easley said the new language in the defense authorization measure unnecessarily expands the president’s authority to call up the National Guard and undermines the governors’ abilities to do their jobs. “This should not be a tug of war between the governors and the president,” said Easley, who is the NGA co-lead on National Guard.

But a tug-of-war it’s become.

According to a draft letter from the Department of Defense’s general counsel, obtained by Congressional Quarterly, the department opposes Leahy’s Insurrection Act Rider appeal bill. The draft letter is from William J. Haynes II, Defense general counsel, and it’s addressed to Senate Armed Services Chairman Carl Levin, D-Mich.

“If this legislation is enacted, it would affect the Department detrimentally by revoking a congressionally granted authority for the President to direct the Secretary of Defense to preserve life and property and by limiting the president’s authority to call upon the Reserves to restore order, repel invasions or suppress rebellions,” Haynes wrote in th draft letter.

While there are only eight cosponsors of Leahy’s bill, there has been no apparent opposition, one Senate aide said.

The administration’s alleged insistence that the president’s authority to command the guard be clarified and expanded came after much debate over the response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Leahy, Judiciary Committee chairman, said the way the provision was slipped into the defense authorization bill is not appropriate. “It’s not just bad process, it’s bad policy,” he said. Christopher S. Bond, R-Mo., said the new provision is “ill-conceived, unnecessary and dumb.”

In addition some say the president had all the authority he needed to command the guard during Katrina, and the new language wasn’t necessary to expand authority he already possessed.

“The president’s authority under the law before [the defense authorization bill was enacted] gave the president just as much power as he has under the new law,” said Stephen Dycus, a professor at Vermont Law School who has spent years studying the Insurrection Act. “Under either measure, I think the president has all the statutory power that he wants that he could need to respond to a terrorist attack or to a natural disaster.”

Dycus said the provision “was probably stuck in as a fig leaf to cover the president’s failures in responding to Hurricane Katrina.”

Eugene Fidell, president of the National Institute of Military Justice, agreed that the provision may have been a face-saving move for the administration. But Fidell said someone in Congress should own up to inserting the language. “A provision that no one will defend is a provision that doesn’t belong in the U.S. Code,” Fidell said.

The original language in the Insurrection Act states that the president may use the armed forces to suppress any “insurrection, domestic violence, unlawful combination, or conspiracy” if state and local law enforcement are unable to protect citizens.

Section 1076 of the fiscal 2007 defense authorization bill changes the title of the Insurrection Act to “Enforcement of the Laws to Restore Public Order.” The bill also was expanded by allowing the president to exercise this right to include, “a natural disaster, epidemic, or other serious public health emergency, terrorist attack or incident, or other condition in any State or possession of the United States, the President determines that domestic violence has occurred to such an extent that the constituted authorities of the State or possession are incapable of maintaining public order.” S 513 would repeal those changes.

45 posted on 12/25/2007 7:57:01 PM PST by BGHater (If Guns Cause Crime Then Matches Cause Arson?)
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To: BGHater

See, they are already after me. Just look what they did to my fonts. WTH.


46 posted on 12/25/2007 7:58:32 PM PST by BGHater (If Guns Cause Crime Then Matches Cause Arson?)
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To: B-Chan

Finally someone is taking a fresh approach to ending homelessness in America.


47 posted on 12/25/2007 8:02:32 PM PST by festus (Fred Thompson '08)
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To: festus

A “progressive” approach if you will.


48 posted on 12/25/2007 8:07:36 PM PST by cripplecreek (Only one consistent conservative in this race and his name is Hunter.)
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To: B-Chan
. . . awarded a $385 million contingency contract . . .

If the conversation at our Christmas dinner was anywhere near truth, I wonder what the real cost to the taxpayer might be.

A guest claims that in Iraq KBR operates dining services for which they receive $27.00 per individual meal served, AND the U.S. government provides the food.

49 posted on 12/25/2007 8:09:08 PM PST by Racehorse (Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.)
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To: BGHater
Is that you Paul?

If you think the government does not have the power to protect this country from all enemies and threats both foreign and DOMESTIC......

Read the Constitution.

Secondly, GWB would be the last person on the planet that I would fear.

Hillary is another story.

Certainly, government power can be used for tyranny......No doubt about it. It could happen, but it won't happen for long, and we have guns. In fact, this is why we have guns.

Post 9/11, this country has faced a variety of problems, both internal and external. It is the governments responsibility to make sure they can handle any contingency. If that makes you nervous, it should.

If this makes you angry, you are simply ignorant of the reality that we all expect our government to be ready for anything. In fact, we demand it.

50 posted on 12/25/2007 8:15:22 PM PST by Cold Heat (Mitt....2008)
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