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FAA releases cockpit audio for Flight 1549's Hudson landing
Yahoo ^ | 02/05/09

Posted on 02/05/2009 9:05:40 AM PST by jwparkerjr

A one minute recording of some of the conversations between Capt. Sully and the controllers as he handled the loss of both engines. Also some conversation between the departure controller and the tower(s).

(Excerpt) Read more at cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events; US: New Jersey; US: New York
KEYWORDS: aerospace; aviation; crash; faa; hudson; light1549; sullenberger; sully
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To: jwparkerjr

Danke vielmals!


51 posted on 02/05/2009 10:09:47 AM PST by Domandred (Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.)
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To: jwparkerjr

The cockpit recordings will be the good stuff.


52 posted on 02/05/2009 10:12:52 AM PST by Names Ash Housewares (Refusing to kneel before the socialist messiah. 1-20-13 Freedom Day.)
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To: Hawthorn

Transcript here: http://www.abcnews.go.com/Travel/Story?id=6802512&page=1


53 posted on 02/05/2009 10:12:58 AM PST by bobsatwork
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To: QBFimi

Um, why did you feel the need to include me on that one?


54 posted on 02/05/2009 10:17:22 AM PST by CodeToad
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To: QBFimi

That Constellation was one beautiful looking airplane.


55 posted on 02/05/2009 10:20:49 AM PST by Dixiekraut (Rommel......you magnificent bastard....I READ YOUR BOOK !!!!)
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To: zot

Ping.


56 posted on 02/05/2009 10:20:52 AM PST by Interesting Times (For the truth about "swift boating" see ToSetTheRecordStraight.com)
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To: TonyInOhio

“I flew large airplanes between 1970 and 2004 - DC-3, -6, -7, -8, Connies, B-707, -720, -727, -737, -757, and -767”

Then I am sure you remember this one that didn’t end so well, I remember listening to the transmission shortly after the crash Http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM3TW, it was professional to the very end (though you could detect some stress in their voices). It was very haunting to listen to it, knowing the outcome .... guess you become so forcused on what you are doing that you block everything else out.


57 posted on 02/05/2009 10:24:22 AM PST by Peter Horry (We shouldn't accept things just because somebody says so .... Dixie Lee Ray)
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To: pfflier
No, you wouldn't. I'm not knocking the combat pilot's experience, but he'll tell you that it's all about experience in type. Think of them like two surgeons. One is a neurosurgeon, the other a cardiac surgeon. Both of them do incredible things and both will save your life, but each is best in his specialty.
58 posted on 02/05/2009 10:31:36 AM PST by sig226 (1/21/12 . . . He's not my president . . . Impeach Obama . . . whatever)
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To: jwparkerjr
Always very professional ... all the way through it.


It was only a matter of time until someone noticed it.


The picture says it all

59 posted on 02/05/2009 10:34:34 AM PST by B-Cause (It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived.)
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To: jwparkerjr

I had a friend with the call sign dirty. Some call signs are creative, some are simply descriptive.


60 posted on 02/05/2009 10:35:38 AM PST by dangerdoc (dangerdoc (not actually dangerous any more))
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To: QBFimi
I flew large airplanes between 1970 and 2004 - DC-3, -6, -7, -8, Connies, B-707, -720, -727, -737, -757, and -767

As an aviation buff I can only think of a line from a favorite movie of mine..."there are several thousand questions I'd like to ask you"...

Did you have any favorites among those classics?

Oh, and absolutely, thank you for your service.

61 posted on 02/05/2009 10:38:41 AM PST by RckyRaCoCo (Liberal media gloating makes me feel like reloading)
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To: B-Cause

Regs say enough rafts for everyone on board plus two extra rafts. Where are all of those rafts?


62 posted on 02/05/2009 10:39:49 AM PST by dangerdoc (dangerdoc (not actually dangerous any more))
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To: QBFimi

I can see how this might be read the way you interpreted it, and I can’t write for pfflier, I don’t even know Him/Her, but I don’t think there was any malice intended in this post towards the other service branches you cite by their omission. The comment of ‘Air Force Training’ applies to this situation in particular because Captain Sullenberger is a USAF veteran. I am not a pilot, but I have flown millions of miles as a passenger and it is widely known that most airline pilots are former military pilots from all branches of the armed services and the Coast Guard. All veterans deserve our respect regardless of how they served, BECAUSE they served. Have a great day...


63 posted on 02/05/2009 10:44:24 AM PST by OriginalChristian (If you can't get Life right, nothing else you think or say matters....)
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To: ken5050

>> Question for you. What really struck me was the way the controller at Teterboro stepped in and said they could take the plane, and give him runway #1 immediately. There was litrerally no time...how was that possible?

The recording you hear was everything the LGA departure controller said or listened to, both on the departure control frequency and on the land lines. He talked to the TEB approach controller on the landline, who, since he was controlling TEB traffic, knew “real time” who was where in his airspace (and on the TEB runway). Notice the controllers first give Cactus a landing into the wind (the preferred way), but when Cactus says “no”, give him anything he wants.


64 posted on 02/05/2009 10:44:41 AM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: dangerdoc
Where are all of those rafts?

Under the wing. ;-)

65 posted on 02/05/2009 10:46:54 AM PST by meyer (We are all John Galt)
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To: jwparkerjr

WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
HERO of the Hudson


66 posted on 02/05/2009 10:51:29 AM PST by Tupelo
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To: QBFimi

Many thanks...


67 posted on 02/05/2009 10:55:09 AM PST by ken5050 (Don't blame me, I voted for Palin!!)
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To: jwparkerjr

Everything you said, and then some.

Most don’t have a clue as to what’s going on as they are speaking, either. Sully is looking at air charts, his speed, altitude, slats, flaps, trim, weight & balance, managing his fuel, the distances he might need to glide to, doing the math, coordinating with his 2nd, who was, himself, busy, thoughts of family, and the “souls” on board...he was, I’m sure, extremely busy during those 90 seconds!

And yet, he was calm and focused like a laser beam.


68 posted on 02/05/2009 11:03:25 AM PST by papasmurf (Impeach the illegal bastard!)
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To: meyer

>> Where are all of those rafts?

The escape slides are considered dual use devices - rafts on water and slides on land.


69 posted on 02/05/2009 11:04:40 AM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: jwparkerjr

Thanks! That was much better. The Yahoo site wasn’t working for me.


70 posted on 02/05/2009 11:05:29 AM PST by dead (I've got my eye out for Mullah Omar.)
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To: papasmurf

>> thoughts of family, and the “souls” on board.

Nope - one of the characteristics of a good pilot is the ability to compartmentalize his life. In this situation, the last thing any airline pilot would be thinking about is Momma and little Timmy. Souls on board? Only as a number to be relayed to the controllers.


71 posted on 02/05/2009 11:08:16 AM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: QBFimi

Well, I must not have been a good pilot then. I’m human.


72 posted on 02/05/2009 11:09:40 AM PST by papasmurf (Impeach the illegal bastard!)
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To: OriginalChristian; pfflier

>> I don’t think there was any malice intended in this post towards the other service branches you cite by their omission.

Yes, I think you’re right. Sorry.


73 posted on 02/05/2009 11:12:42 AM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: onedoug; stylecouncilor

ping


74 posted on 02/05/2009 11:46:24 AM PST by windcliff
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To: Interesting Times

Thanks for the ping. The tower operators were also very cool and professional.


75 posted on 02/05/2009 12:31:01 PM PST by zot
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To: jwparkerjr

Thanks! Great audio!

When the captain was asked if he wanted to land in Teterboro, his “Yes” didn’t sound very confident. Thank goodness he kept his presence of mind to reject this idea quickly. If he had made that right turn, there could have been a catastrophe.


76 posted on 02/05/2009 2:14:30 PM PST by Deo volente (High Noon, January 20, 2009: Our long national nightmare begins.)
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To: Deo volente

Some are crediting his glider experience with his ability to realize his choices were the river or disaster. I would sooner think it was his years and years sitting in that left seat, landing thousands of times, with the power all but off and knowing by the seat his pants how far that aircraft could go. It was just another final approach to the seat of his pants, and he could look out the window and know exactly how far he could go. Thank God, literally, it wasn’t his FINAL approach!

I would like to know from someone who has flown both gliders and heavy jets if there’s any similarity between them.

Believe me, I am in no way detracting from the job he did that day! My grandmother used to tell me when I was kid that when it’s your time to go you’re gone, period. I wonder who it was on that flight whose time hadn’t come yet?


77 posted on 02/05/2009 2:34:11 PM PST by jwparkerjr (God Bless America!)
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To: newfreep
Reminds me of Georgia Lass’ final 2 words before she is vaporized by a falling toilet seat from a Soviet space station....”Oh, shite!”

One of the best series to ever hit TV and it is a shame they discontinued it after the second season. It seem as if you need a brain to appreciate a TV series, that the show won't continue!

78 posted on 02/05/2009 3:28:29 PM PST by calex59
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To: jwparkerjr
Believe me, I am in no way detracting from the job he did that day! My grandmother used to tell me when I was kid that when it’s your time to go you’re gone, period. I wonder who it was on that flight whose time hadn’t come yet?

You know I have heard that from a lot of church goers, but there is on quote you very seldom, if ever, hear about the bible, I can't quote chapter and verse but there is a statement in the new testament that says " Don't be a fool and die before your time!". This implies that you can, indeed, die before you are called to your destiny. This brave and cool Captain of this aircraft needs to be commended on saving many souls that might have gone before their time. The old adage about, "When it is you time to go, you will go", is BS, you can die before you are supposed to.

79 posted on 02/05/2009 3:33:24 PM PST by calex59
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To: calex59

If one those crashes has your name on it, then you’re doomed. However, it is the ones that are addressed “to whom it may concern” that I seek to avoid.


80 posted on 02/05/2009 4:00:34 PM PST by Lucky Dog
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To: jwparkerjr
The Controllers were calm and professional because we are trained extensively to be that way. Needless to say the departure controller will relive this in his dreams for the rest of his life. I know fellow controllers where things didn't go as well. They will relive this also. They did everything they could but everyone still died. This is a prime example the of real, and sometimes debilitating, stress involved on both the pilots and controllers. Their careers can be shortened from events such as this and here is another reason for the pay they receive. Oh, by the way were hiring...
81 posted on 02/05/2009 4:24:06 PM PST by PushinTin (NEVER, argue with an idiot, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience!!)
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To: OBXWanderer

I just took my first flight last year. The pilot looked like he was fresh out of high school but he flew that aircraft just fine. I was a little nervous cause he looked so young, though. But I figured they weren’t going to trust him with an expensive peice of machinery and all those people if he didn’t know what he was doing.


82 posted on 02/05/2009 5:33:08 PM PST by beckysueb (Palin/Jindahl in 2012)
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To: ken5050
"Controller was waaay kewl..low key also..

NOT

Any seasoned controller listening to that will cringe.

Mis-Id'ed, poor listening, no "how far can you make it?".

Probably won't be enough to get dinged for, but surely won't earn any kudos for it.

83 posted on 02/05/2009 5:58:45 PM PST by diogenes ghost
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To: ken5050
"....how was that possible?"

Well, he knows where USAir is coming from, he just breaks off all approaches to the west, clears the runways, calls out the trucks & waits.

84 posted on 02/05/2009 6:14:20 PM PST by diogenes ghost
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To: dangerdoc
"Regs say enough rafts for everyone..."

Only if you will be over water for extended periods.

85 posted on 02/05/2009 6:17:24 PM PST by diogenes ghost
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To: calex59
I wasn't vouching for the veracity of the statement, just that my grandmother used to say it all the time. I guess there could be a difference in dying before you're supposed to and getting past your time to go. I'll have to think that one through!
86 posted on 02/05/2009 6:20:30 PM PST by jwparkerjr (God Bless America!)
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To: QBFimi

I think sir you grossly over react. Or you just wanted to post your resume for all to admire.


87 posted on 02/05/2009 6:26:26 PM PST by skateman ("What if the Hokey Pokey really is what it's all about?")
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To: papasmurf

>> Well, I must not have been a good pilot then. I’m human.

So, when the aileron jammed and you were 4+ hours from land you were thinking about your spouse and kids instead of doing what you were both paid for and ethically responsible for doing? When you were on final with an engine failure you were thinking about the nice old grandma and grandpa who chatted with you in the gate area - instead of concentrating on flying Vref+5 to 10 Knots?

I suspect you did just what we all did: “Aviate, Navigate, and Communicate.” In that order. There was plenty of time for all the rest after the passengers were safely off the airplane and you were in the crew van on the way to the hotel (Including a more than occasional “Thanks be to God”.)


88 posted on 02/05/2009 6:57:35 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: skateman

>> I think sir you grossly over react. Or you just wanted to post your resume for all to admire.

Yes, as a matter of fact, I DID overreact - and said so both publicly and directly to the individual who made the post. Please see post #73.

Actually, what was listed is only a small part of my “resume”, and if you think it is worth admiring, I suspect you don’t understand what a successful pilot career looks like. Mine is a resume of one who was hired by a major airline far too late in life (age 34), and one who spent too much of time “picking sh*t with the chickens”. 1-1/2 years flying old airplanes in Africa is not admirable, it is not knowing when to quit.


89 posted on 02/05/2009 7:09:22 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: diogenes ghost

>> Any seasoned controller listening to that will cringe.
Mis-Id’ed, poor listening, no “how far can you make it?”.
Probably won’t be enough to get dinged for, but surely won’t earn any kudos for it.

WRONG. The controller’s “1529/39/49” is meaningless; lots of stuff was thrown at him in a very short time, and they both knew who they were talking to. In an emergency, the controller’s job was to coordinate clearing the way to any runway the aircraft could reach, providing vectors, and having his “D” side (assistant) or supervisor call out the emergency equipment. Other than that, STFU was the best controller policy. Kudos to the controller. Besides that, the FAA will have 50 desk jockeys (who couldn’t make it on the boards) playing Monday morning quarterback soon enough.


90 posted on 02/05/2009 7:37:15 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: diogenes ghost

I’ll take your word for it, I heard the “expert” on NPR the other day, so I am dubious about the source.

Nonsequitor: Has anyone noticed that NPR has stopped 24 hour HIV and gay news and has focused on America being in a depression that we will never recover from? I really need to spring for satellite radio for my commute.


91 posted on 02/05/2009 8:00:13 PM PST by dangerdoc (dangerdoc (not actually dangerous any more))
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To: jwparkerjr

>> Some are crediting his glider experience with his ability to realize his choices were the river or disaster. I would sooner think it was his years and years sitting in that left seat, landing thousands of times, with the power all but off and knowing by the seat his pants how far that aircraft could go. I would like to know from someone who has flown both gliders and heavy jets if there’s any similarity between them.

Well, yes and no. First the jets: 1/ When the engines are at idle power they are still developing thrust. 2/ If the damaged engines RPM reduced toward zero, the engines would turn into giant drag-producing “barn doors” which would greatly decrease the glide distance. 3/ Since it takes so long for a turbine engine to accelerate from idle power, jets are never flown at idle power on approach - flaps are set to approach setting; this adds lots of drag, so you have to push up the throttles to compensate.

Soooo, the pilots would not have much of an idea how far the thing would glide after the bird strikes in the engines until they sat there and watched the descent rate vs. distance flown for a bit. What they do know, however, is what a 3 degree glideslope looks like visually (for every mile flown the airplane looses 319’ of altitude). That is the angle that nearly every instrument approach is flown at. They could look out to LGA and TEB, watch for a bit, and have a pretty good guess.

Here’s where the glider training helps out. Every glider pilot who has either flown cross-country, or has strayed a bit too far from the home field, is acutely aware of “where am I, how fast am I descending, how strong is the wind, how far can I go, will I have to land off-field?, etc.” Glider flying is not a “oh, cool, look at the pretty clouds” but constant hyper-vigilance, and is usually a low-level gut-gnawing experience.

I suspect those tapes were playing in the captain’s mind all the way down. You can hear it: “We’re going back to LGA.” “How far is TEB?” Then, the glider pilot watching the vertical descent rate, comparing it to the aircraft’s forward movement, and finally realizing a water landing in the Hudson was a better choice than landing a mile short of the TEB North-South runway.

Hope that’s a good answer...


92 posted on 02/05/2009 8:07:27 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: jwparkerjr

it sounds like a couple of points had answers from the captain blanked on the longer 3 min version, particularly after the says ‘we’re gonna be in the hudson’ and the controller asks him to say again, there is immediately a blank, then the controller says alright.


93 posted on 02/05/2009 8:22:56 PM PST by WoofDog123
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To: QBFimi
"WRONG"

Nope.

I was enroute controller for 35 years, 13 in Chicago.

I've worked many emergencies, including loss of power. It is IMPERATIVE that you quickly ascertain how far the aircraft can travel, and work with pilot to get an action plan.

As I said, the controller will take some flak, but nothing serious.

94 posted on 02/05/2009 8:43:07 PM PST by diogenes ghost
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To: RaceBannon

return bump, thanks


95 posted on 02/05/2009 9:01:19 PM PST by ELS (Vivat Benedictus XVI!)
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To: QBFimi
Outstanding answer, just the sort of explanation I was looking for! What he was looking for at touchdown was a good ol’ fashioned soft field landing, shallow decent, nose up, minimum airspeed?

I am not instrument rated and did not know offhand the glideslope for an instrument approach, the 319 feet per mile. You say that's for an instrument approach. Would they use the same attitude for a vfr approach?

Thanks for a very informative post.

96 posted on 02/05/2009 10:58:55 PM PST by jwparkerjr (God Bless America!)
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To: jwparkerjr
Many are amazed at his low key responses (Sully's) But put yourself in his place.

He had to be watching his insturments and checking his landing options. He was running the numbers in his head all the while making sure his plane wasn't coming apart and he was working out where to set the damn thing down.

He didn't have time to panic...

Professionals with good training usually all remain calm in emergencies...

Kudos to Sully for preparing all his career for this moment of Truth!

97 posted on 02/05/2009 11:08:37 PM PST by Mad Dawgg ("`Eddies,' said Ford, `in the space-time continuum.' `Ah,' nodded Arthur, `is he? Is he?'")
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To: jwparkerjr
This Youtube of the Audio includes some photos of the plane on approach ...onto the Hudson River:

*ORIGINAL* Air Traffic Control Audio Clip From Flight 1549 As it Crash Lands In Hudson River

98 posted on 02/06/2009 9:28:26 AM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach (No Burkas for my Grandaughters!)
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To: steveo

>> Who voiced ‘idiot’ at 0:57? Or was that something else?

It sounds like it was picked up on the CAM (cockpit area microphone) while 1549 was talking to LGA departure. If this is correct, it comes from the other pilot. Assuming that is the Capt.’s voice telling the controller he wanted to return to LGA, it would be the First Officer (copilot). Insulting the controller? No, not really - the controller would first offer the present runway in use (31) at LGA; when the Capt. said “unable”, the controller suggested runway 4. Insult to the controller? No, not really - I think at this point the pilots were looking at their present sink rate and saying “Hell, we’re loosing altitude so quickly we’ll be lucky to make it “straight in” to runway 13. All this is conjecture on my part, of course. Try here for a better quality audio:

http://www.faa.gov/data_statistics/accident_incident/1549/

Use the first selection (NY Tracon Audio). 1549 checks in at 6+10, the geese hit the fan at 7+55.


99 posted on 02/06/2009 3:04:00 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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To: jwparkerjr

>> What he was looking for at touchdown was a good ol’ fashioned soft field landing, shallow decent, nose up, minimum airspeed?

Yes, you are correct. I’m in Miami now - my old 767 manuals are in Denver. I was hoping my wife (747 Capt.) would email me from her layover; I’d have asked her to quote the 747 manual for comparison. From memory (I retired in late 2004), the ‘67 manual said “ditch at minimum speed and sink”. At his weight, I’d guess he’d be around 120-130 Knots. (138-150 mph), and would flare and touch down at that speed.

A 3 degree instrument glideslope has you descending 319’ per mile, VFR approaches can come down a lot steeper than that. The 727 would come down like a rock. Yahoo! :o)


100 posted on 02/06/2009 3:15:13 PM PST by QBFimi (When gunpowder speaks, beasts listen.)
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