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This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe
TBI ^ | 12-30-3011 | John Donnelly

Posted on 12/30/2011 3:33:45 PM PST by blam

This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe

John Donnelly, GlobalPost
Dec. 30, 2011, 12:53 PM

GENEVA, Switzerland – On the sidelines of a conference in Baku, Azerbaijan, just three months ago, a senior health official from Belarus met privately with Mario Raviglione, whose job here at the World Health Organization’s headquarters is to control the spread of tuberculosis around the world.

Belarus needed help. It had just confirmed a study that found 35 percent of all TB cases in the capital of Minsk were multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) – the highest rate in the world ever recorded for a deadly disease, which takes up to two years to treat and is cured in Western Europe only one third of the time.

“It’s a real tragic situation,” Raviglione, director of WHO’s Stop TB Department, said, looking back at that moment with the Belarus official. “But they came out openly about this and they wanted help, which is very positive. For a long time, several countries have been hiding their realities about multi-drug resistant TB.”

The WHO's Regional Office for Europe recently released a report that warned about the spread of the hard-to-treat MDR-TB into all of Europe, making the case that the relatively wealthy capitals of the West faced the grave danger of a much higher number of cases if the entire region did not move quickly to put in place effective control measures.

The report, which was released in September and which now poses a great challenge to global-health experts in Europe, concluded that “MDR-TB is spreading at an alarming rate” in Europe and Central Asia, a region that includes the top nine countries in the world in rates of drug-resistant TB among newly diagnosed patients. TB, a global pandemic

(snip)

(Excerpt) Read more at businessinsider.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: disease; epidemics; europe; godsgravesglyphs; mdrtb; pandemics; plagues; tb; thesniffles; tuberclosis; tuberculosis; vitamind
It's Always Something
(Got Vitamin D?)

Vitamin D Is Essential To The Modern Indoor Lifestyle

The power Of (Vitamin) D

1 posted on 12/30/2011 3:33:50 PM PST by blam
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To: decimon; Smokin' Joe
The Antibiotic Vitamin
2 posted on 12/30/2011 3:37:42 PM PST by blam
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To: 2ndreconmarine; Fitzcarraldo; Covenantor; Mother Abigail; EBH; Dog Gone; ...

Ping... (Thanks, blam!)


3 posted on 12/30/2011 3:41:56 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: 2ndreconmarine; Fitzcarraldo; Covenantor; Mother Abigail; EBH; Dog Gone; ...

Ping... (Thanks, blam!)


4 posted on 12/30/2011 3:43:08 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: Smokin' Joe; neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl; Silentgypsy; ...

TB or not TB ping.

Thanks, Joe.


5 posted on 12/30/2011 4:03:44 PM PST by decimon
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To: decimon
TB or not TB ping.

Ouch!

You're welcome, decimon!

6 posted on 12/30/2011 4:05:23 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing)
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To: blam

When I saw the headline, I thought this article was about communism.


7 posted on 12/30/2011 4:09:41 PM PST by thesharkboy (poet, know it.)
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To: blam; SunkenCiv

Thanks, blam.

Some history, some catastrophe...gotta ping the Civ.


8 posted on 12/30/2011 4:11:03 PM PST by decimon
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To: blam
Driving people into crowded cities and use of crowded "public" transportation increases the probability of spreading between infected individuals. Misuse of antibiotics expands the probability of multiple drug resistant strains.

My great great grandparents in Ysbty Ystwyth, Wales both succumbed to TB. My great grandfather and his sisters were too young to retain legal ownership of the family home. They were taken in by "Uncle Dave" in Lllanfihangel-y-Creuddyn until they opted to emigrate to the U.S. at their own expense. My great grandfather signed on as "ship's company" on a vessel leaving Liverpool. On arrival to the USA, he reconnected with his future wife in Pittsburgh and served in the Union army from 1863 to 1865.

9 posted on 12/30/2011 4:20:58 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Myrddin

So....TB caused you to be an American?


10 posted on 12/30/2011 4:28:10 PM PST by blam
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To: blam; Myrddin
So....TB caused you to be an American?

Or because words are a lot easier to spell here.

11 posted on 12/30/2011 4:46:38 PM PST by decimon
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To: decimon; Myrddin; SunkenCiv
SunkenCiv and I have signed the petition to have our Prince Madoc plaque re-installed at Fort Morgan.

"We the undersigned are petitioning the Alabama Parks Department to return the commemorative plaque for the Welsh Prince Madoc (Madog) to the original spot on Mobile Bay. The plaque was erected in 1953 by the Daughters of the American Revolution commemorating the theory that a Welsh prince and his followers were the first Europeans to set foot on the North American continent. The plaque reads In memory of Prince Madog, a Welsh explorer, who landed on the shores of Mobile Bay in 1170 and left behind, with the Indians, the Welsh language. Plaques have been erected at the ancient port of Aber-Kerrik at Rhos-on-Sea in North Wales where Prince Madog was to have departed on his expedition. Shouldn't there be one where he was to have landed?"

12 posted on 12/30/2011 4:58:38 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Flu too? Many other findings also suggested to Cannell's team that flu vulnerability might be tempered by adequate vitamin D intake. The researchers have marshaled data, gleaned from 120 or so reports over the past 70 years, suggesting a link between vitamin D and resistance to infections.

By trade, I am an analytical person, and noticed the connection myself.

Perhaps you read my earlier post that supports these views:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2821504/posts?page=8#8

13 posted on 12/30/2011 4:59:19 PM PST by Does so
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To: Does so
"Perhaps you read my earlier post that supports these views: "

Nah.(Does not)

Read the article I linked in post #2 that I posted in 2006...that was my first hint.

I take 50,000 IU of vitamin D a week...doctors orders.

14 posted on 12/30/2011 5:06:21 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Tuberculosis - How effective is cod liver oil?

Snip: 1,077 individuals with consumption (tuberculosis) were enrolled to participate in the study conducted by physicians at the Hospital for Consumption, Chelsea…

Results from the study revealed that between the two groups, improvement rates were similar, the disease was stabilized in 18% of participants who received cod liver oil, in comparison with only 6% of participants in the control group. In the control group deterioration or death occurred in 33% of patients compared with 19% of patients given cod liver oil.

Majority of new HIV,TB, hepatitis B cases found in immigrants (Britain)

Snip: And, almost two-thirds of newly diagnosed cases of HIV and 80 per cent of hepatitis B infected blood donors in 2010 were born abroad, says the report which adds that 12 per cent of people living in Britain in 2010 were born abroad -- up from 8 per cent in 2001.


15 posted on 12/30/2011 5:08:24 PM PST by MamaDearest
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To: blam
Looks like it has been successful - Congrats!

Prince Madoc Plaque Information
16 posted on 12/30/2011 5:12:54 PM PST by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum)
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To: blam
My great grandparents were late to the table in forming the USA. My paternal grandmother's family arrived on the Mayflower. My maternal grandparents trace all the way back to Jamestown...Priscilla Mullins and John Alden. The Welsh members of the family arrived in the USA because TB essentially ravaged the family. There were better opportunities in the USA.
17 posted on 12/30/2011 6:19:10 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: blam
Thanks for the link. Blwydden Newydd Dda! Cyru am Bydd! It's a wonderful country. Too bad that it is so steeped in socialism that I could never consider living there. I'm thankful that my great grandfather had to foresight to escape the wicked English landlords and mine owners. My family made a living making shoes, tending sheep, butchering sheep, selling wool and mining lead. My great great grandmother urged my great grandfather to "avoid the evil shoe business". He followed her recommendation and made a fine living in the US as a metallurgist assisting the railroads and mining businesses.
18 posted on 12/30/2011 6:26:17 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Tainan
Excellent.

I didn't know what had happened.

19 posted on 12/30/2011 6:27:17 PM PST by blam
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To: Myrddin
Wales has the hightest concentration of type 'O' blood than anywhere else in the world.

And just so that you don't get to (ahem) uppity about your English heritage....my dad's mother was related to this guy.

20 posted on 12/30/2011 6:36:45 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

This is a picture of my great grandparents in 1915. My great grandfather was born in 1842. He emigrated to the US in 1863 and served in the Union army before marrying my great grandmother in 1865 at the end of the war. My grandfather and his twin brother were born in 1887, the last of 19 children.

21 posted on 12/30/2011 6:54:17 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: blam
Cute thread. Folks had lots of fun with the Cheddar references.
22 posted on 12/30/2011 6:57:40 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: thesharkboy

Ha I thought Of syphilis ;)


23 posted on 12/30/2011 7:05:47 PM PST by reed13k (For evil to triumph it is only necessary for good men to do nothing.)
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To: Smokin' Joe

Thanks for the ping.

Tuberculosis took my father in 1938. He was 32.

I still test positive with the tine test.


24 posted on 12/30/2011 7:34:15 PM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: Mears

You shouldn’t be taking the tine test.

You will always test positive and you could get a bad reaction.

But if you’ve lived this long with no bad reaction you’re probably going to live forever!

Seriously, check with a good physician about taking that test again.


25 posted on 12/30/2011 7:38:40 PM PST by ladyjane
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To: ladyjane

.

I only have taken the tine test once,about 17 years ago.

I was still working and someone in our building contracted TB so we were all tested,

When I did the follow up visit to the MD she told me not to bother with it again,as you suggested.

Fortunately I never had a reaction.


26 posted on 12/30/2011 7:47:30 PM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: ladyjane

In my earlier post I neglected to mention that my brother and I had to have annual chest X-rays until we were 18. That was 13 years for me and 15 for him.

I still remember what that clinic looked like and we both were negative every time,thank God.


27 posted on 12/30/2011 7:56:14 PM PST by Mears (Alcohol. Tobacco. Firearms. What's not to like?)
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To: blam; decimon; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ..

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks blam and decimon.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


28 posted on 12/30/2011 9:23:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: blam; SunkenCiv; no-to-illegals; All

Another important vitamin to protect against illness is Vitamin C. It needs to be taken 3 or 4 times a day as it is burned up or excreted in 5 or 6 hours. It is antihistaminic, anti-inflamatory, and helps production of white blood cells. Thanks for the link, and Happy New Year.


29 posted on 12/30/2011 10:46:40 PM PST by gleeaikin
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To: blam
My quote was taken from the 2006 article you linked in post #2.

Thank you for these articles.

It was in 2006 I moved to an even sunnier Florida location. My skin is getting wrinkled by the sun, but risking serious diseases is far worse. Two small skin lesions were removed last year, but were found to be non-cancerous. Science News said those risks didn't compare to avoiding serious disease.

30 posted on 12/31/2011 2:11:47 AM PST by Does so ("What elephant?")
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To: blam

D3- 10,00 daily. My wife and I have been doing that for two and a half years. She is an elementary school teacher and used to bring home flu and colds 5-6 times a school year. We have had none of that since we started on the D3. I have started some of my friends to taking it and they all have ceased having the “normal” seasonal viruses. My daughter started it when she had a miserable flu and expected to be out of circ for a week. She megadosed once in the morning with the formula of 900 units per pound of body weight. She was fine by evening.


31 posted on 12/31/2011 3:42:56 AM PST by arthurus (Read Hazlitt's "Economics In One Lesson.")
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To: Does so
"My quote was taken from the 2006 article you linked in post #2. "

Oh okay.

I started taking elevated doses of vitamin D at that time...I haven't been sick since.

32 posted on 12/31/2011 6:29:17 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Is that pic from a TB ward? Because it reminds me of a photo I’ve seen from a story on the 1918 influenza. Just curious :-)


33 posted on 12/31/2011 6:33:18 AM PST by mewzilla (Santelli 2012)
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To: mewzilla
I don't know the source of the photo.

Probably a 'file' photo, I'd guess.

34 posted on 12/31/2011 7:56:39 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Trends in Tuberculosis, United States:

http://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/factsheets/statistics/TBTrends.htm

World TB country index:

http://www.who.int/tb/country/data/profiles/en/index.html

I live fairly near a (still) isolated building that used to be a TB sanitarium way back when. It has a smokestack for the furnace used to burn all linens, mattresses and all other medical waste. And this was for “normal” TB.

Eventually it was converted to a children’s hospital, but before they did so, they gutted the building, leaving only a shell.

I’ll also note that it has special zoning, so that nothing can be built anywhere near it. I’m not even sure that the county (county island) is able to change its zoning. They did not kid around back then.

As far as MDR-TB goes, in western Europe it has a 60% mortality rate, with treatment that is not easy.

XDR-TB is a death sentence. The last major outbreak of that was in South Africa, with 51 of 52 dead within 25 days. If someone in the US is diagnosed with it, they will be put in a negative pressure isolation room, involuntarily, and when they die, all furniture in the room will be burned and every surface strongly bleached.

Likely with industrial strength sodium hypochlorite, that is dangerously caustic.


35 posted on 12/31/2011 8:07:04 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: mewzilla

“Is that pic from a TB ward? Because it reminds me of a photo I’ve seen from a story on the 1918 influenza.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CampFunstonKS-InfluenzaHospital.jpg
Historical photo of the 1918 Spanish influenza ward at Camp Funston, Kansas, showing the many patients ill with the flu


36 posted on 12/31/2011 10:07:42 AM PST by Viiksitimali
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To: blam; SunkenCiv

There were a lot of TB sanitariums out here in the days before effective drug therapies. National Jewish Health, probably the best respiratory hospital in the world, started as a TB sanitarium for indigents.


37 posted on 01/03/2012 2:10:03 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Richard Nixon had a brother die of TB, in a sanitarium, I think in Arizona.


38 posted on 01/03/2012 7:06:08 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Merry Christmas, Happy New Year! May 2013 be even Happier!)
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To: decimon

Thanks decimon


39 posted on 01/08/2012 4:54:46 PM PST by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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