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Report says 230,000 unemployed losing benefits over weekend
The Hill ^ | 5/13/12 | Vicki Needham

Posted on 05/14/2012 2:49:57 AM PDT by Libloather

Report says 230,000 unemployed losing benefits over weekend
By Vicki Needham - 05/13/12 06:24 PM ET

More than 230,000 unemployed workers will lose their jobless benefits this weekend as portions of federal programs expire across several states.

All told, 409,300 long-term unemployed Americans in 27 states will have lost upward of 20 weeks of federal unemployment benefits by this past Saturday, even as the many state jobless rates remain high, according to a new analysis by the National Employment Law Project (NELP).

The latest batch of cuts affects 236,300 unemployed people in eight states — California (11%), Texas (7%) Pennsylvania (7.5%), Florida (9%), Illinois (8.8%) North Carolina (9.7%) Colorado (7.8%) and Connecticut (7.7%) — half of which have jobless rates above the 8.1 percent national average posted in April.

"A growing number of long-term unemployed workers are being left behind," said Christine Owens, executive director of the NELP.

"Job openings are not taking the place of these cuts,” Owens said.

A tier of 13 to 20 weeks of federal jobless benefits, used by the long-term unemployed, are expiring because of legislation Congress passed in February that gradually cuts federal benefits to 79 weeks from 99. That figure includes up to 26 weeks of state-level insurance.

"These cuts are coming faster than the economy is improving, which means more workers will have to survive without any jobless assistance and families will have less money to put back into the economy,” Owens said.

Since August, the national unemployment rate has dropped to 8.1 percent from 9.1 percent, but most of that improvement is because discouraged workers have stopped looking for jobs.

There are still 16 states and the District of Columbia with rates above that national average in March, according to an April report from the Labor Department.

Even though rates have been dropping across the country, they are still historically high in some states.

Three states, California, Rhode Island (11.1%) and Nevada (12%), have double-digit levels of unemployment.

More than 100,000 will lose benefits in California, state officials have estimated.

By the end of September, another seven states will lose federal benefits, which will eventually bring the total to 34 states facing reduced federal assistance to the long-term unemployed.

Many Democratic lawmakers, including House Ways and Means ranking member Sandy Levin (D-Mich.), whose state has experienced persistently high levels of unemployment, tried to keep 99 weeks for struggling states but lost the fight.

Republicans have called the continuation of extended jobless benefits a drag on the economy, arguing that they discourage the unemployed from looking for work and they are adding to the federal budget deficit.

Still, the long-term unemployed, and those giving up on looking for work, are bogging down numbers for a longer period of time than during other recoveries.

During the first three months of the year, about 29.5 percent of the unemployed had been out of work for a year or more, about 3.9 million people, according to a recent report from the Pew Fiscal Analysis Initiative.

The percentage has improved somewhat since reaching its peak in the third quarter of 2011, yet it was still more than triple the 9.5 percent rate at the start of the recession in late 2007, the Pew report said.

Older workers were particularly hard hit in the first quarter, but the number of unemployed mostly cut evenly across all education groups, the report showed.

A separate report showed that among the 15 million workers who lost jobs from 2007 to 2009, half received jobless benefits, and about one-fourth exhausted them by January 2010, the General Accounting Office said in February.

That means 2 million displaced workers exhausted benefits by early 2010, and another 3.5 million used up their benefits for the rest of that year and into 2011.

In 2010, approximately 66 percent of jobless workers qualified for either state or federal unemployment benefits.

Last year, that number fell to 54 percent, according to the GAO report.

Many of the displaced workers who exhausted their benefits by January 2010 appear to have faced troubled circumstances.

Most, however, seemed to have worked at some point in 2009 or to have been supported by a spouse who was working, and some had income from assets to help them along.

Nevertheless, their poverty rate ticked up for working-age adults, to 18 percent compared with 13 percent, and more than 40 percent had relatively low incomes, below 200 percent of the federal poverty threshold, the GAO report showed.

Continuing expirations of federal benefits will eventually push the percentage of unemployed receiving some form of unemployment benefit to less than one in two, NELP said in its report.

Job creation has crawled along since the recession ended in July 2009, with only 43 percent of the jobs lost regained 34 months later, according to an Associated Press analysis.

Following the previous recession, which ended in November 2001, the rebound was similarly slow at first. By September 2004, 54 percent of the jobs lost had been regained. But five months later all job losses were recovered, according to AP.

This time around, it will take longer to recover 8.8 million in job losses.

Average unemployment is now 39 weeks, and 41 percent of the unemployed have been out of work for six months or more. Almost one-third have been unemployed for more than a year, NELP said.

“We can’t pull the rug out from under the unemployed before the economy is fixed, and with 8.1 percent unemployment, we still have a long way to go,” Owens said.

"Especially now that these cuts are taking a toll, lawmakers need to pursue aggressive strategies to put the long-term unemployed back to work."


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: benefits; insurance; unemployed
Good times.
1 posted on 05/14/2012 2:50:01 AM PDT by Libloather
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To: Libloather
I wonder how many of them are spoiled “I would rather be a bum than flip burgers?”
2 posted on 05/14/2012 2:55:06 AM PDT by Happy Rain ("Barney and Barry sittin' ina tree...")
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To: Happy Rain

In other news,Obama says more than 230,000 people are no longer unemployed claiming his efforts are working,,,,,


3 posted on 05/14/2012 3:02:14 AM PDT by Craftmore
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To: Libloather

Has the unemployment rate moved down into the 7’s yet? [/s]


4 posted on 05/14/2012 3:03:27 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (Like Emmett Till, Trayvon Martin has become simply a stick with which to beat Whites.)
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To: Libloather

The disability lawyers will have a lot of new business.


5 posted on 05/14/2012 3:06:45 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: Craftmore
“In other news,Obama says more than 230,000 people are no longer unemployed claiming his efforts are working,,,,,”

Exactly. This is precisely how they are going to try to spin it. In addition, I believe they will try to use the potential loss of medical insurance during unemployment as a way to try increasing support for their horrific health care plan.

6 posted on 05/14/2012 3:19:14 AM PDT by pieceofthepuzzle
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To: pieceofthepuzzle

If they lose their unemployment doesn’t that mean they stop counting as unemployed? Obama will say that’s good.Unemployment figures go down.


7 posted on 05/14/2012 3:38:23 AM PDT by Venturer
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To: Happy Rain
I wonder how many of them are spoiled “I would rather be a bum than flip burgers?”

Unemployment is only temporary. Never was a program you could use forever. Don't confuse it with SSI and Welfare. If you didn't work you cannot get unemployment.

There are no jobs in this Obama economy no matter how much you try to sugar coat it. We're in uncharted territory.

250,000 losing benefits means (in the government books) 250,000 "newly employed"

Look for the unemployment rate to go down soon :)

8 posted on 05/14/2012 3:40:34 AM PDT by tsowellfan
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To: Venturer
If they lose their unemployment doesn’t that mean they stop counting as unemployed? Obama will say that’s good.Unemployment figures go down.

Bingo!

9 posted on 05/14/2012 3:41:23 AM PDT by tsowellfan
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To: Happy Rain
True story... and I'm sure it's one of millions. Friend spent 95 weeks “trying” to find a job (minimal effort given). By miracle of miracle, finds one in the 100th week. I could not be happier for my friend, but had her 99 weeks run out earlier, she would have landed on her feet a lot sooner. She will be voting for Obama...
10 posted on 05/14/2012 3:55:27 AM PDT by GizzyGirl
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To: Libloather

Bush’s fault....


11 posted on 05/14/2012 4:04:22 AM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt the Constitution togbtether as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: Happy Rain
I wonder how many of them are spoiled “I would rather be a bum than flip burgers?”

I suspect a fair number of them are two parent families who've realized they can get by on a lot less now that they're not paying for daycare. The income they've been getting from unemployment will either just go away or will be replaced by a part time job. Not saying what they've been doing is honorable, but I can understand how stressed out dual income parents can come to this decision in the best interest of their children who may well be too young or ill informed to realize what their parents are doing.

12 posted on 05/14/2012 4:15:32 AM PDT by old and tired
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To: Venturer

If we abolish unemployment benefits, the unemployment rate will be zero, right?

That’s GOOD. It’s as good as the old Soviet Union.


13 posted on 05/14/2012 4:43:44 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: GizzyGirl

I was joking with someone a couple weeks ago that I’m almost to the point where if my contract ends I could collect unemployment until social security kicks in. ;-)

Not that I would consider that a good way to live...


14 posted on 05/14/2012 4:48:35 AM PDT by cuban leaf (Were doomed! Details at eleven.)
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To: Happy Rain

You arte ABSOLUTELY right!A lot of these people have”learned”to live on un-employment “benefits”They have NO desire to work!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


15 posted on 05/14/2012 4:49:31 AM PDT by bandleader
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To: Libloather

Seems to me that anything over a year should be referred to as what it really is, WELFARE..........


16 posted on 05/14/2012 4:53:24 AM PDT by CMailBag
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To: Libloather
And the lawyers many of those 230,000 will use to get on a lifetime supply of SSI money are laughing all the way to the bank.

Of note from the article:

Add in these 230K and the "unemployment rate" will likely drop below 8%. As I recall the actual rate is somewhere around 11%.
17 posted on 05/14/2012 4:55:49 AM PDT by upchuck (Need is not an acceptable lifestyle choice; dependent is not a career. ~ Dr. Tim Nerenz)
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To: bandleader; Happy Rain

Exactly right...I get dozens of calls a week from people looking for work. But, they’re only interested in getting my name so they can write it down and show it to the UI office so they can keep their benefits rolling. Whenever I actually start to go into what our open positions are, and how they can apply, they end the call quickly.

In our state, they have to report in to a UI caseworker once every 6 weeks and show two company names & numbers that they’ve called looking for work. That’s the only actual work they have to do to collect over $400 a week in ‘free’ money.


18 posted on 05/14/2012 5:18:42 AM PDT by ItsOurTimeNow (Can't afford a ticket back from Suffragette City)
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To: upchuck; Craftmore; ClearCase_guy; pieceofthepuzzle; tsowellfan; cuban leaf; All
There are two sources of information published by the BLS on employment. Figuring out what bits of information goes where can be confusing. The way the media reports on unemployment does not help.

I. Household Survey Data

The unemployment rate is based upon a survey of 60,000 households, not the number of people collecting unemployment.

Many recognize the Household Survey Data are more accurate representation of employment/unemployment than the Payroll Survey, but you have to look past the seasonally adjusted U-3 number to tease out information.

The main sources of 'enhancing' the unemployment rate are moving people out of the civilian work force, and seasonal adjustments. Currently there are 6,366,000 people who are not counted in the civilian labor force, but want a job.

II. Establishment Survey Data / Payroll Data

OTH, the number of jobs created is based upon a survey of employers. The payroll numbers are revised for at least two month after they are published.

The number collecting unemployment is used for the annual benchmark revision of numbers in the payroll survey.

The main sources of 'enhancing' the number of jobs created is the black box through which raw numbers are processed. The black box consists of the birth and death model and seasonal adjustment.

The payroll survey counts the number of jobs, part time and full time, not the number of people working.
19 posted on 05/14/2012 6:04:57 AM PDT by khelus
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To: ItsOurTimeNow

But, they’re only interested in getting my name so they can write it down and show it to the UI
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
I remember the ones that would show up at my Asphalt Plant around 11AM ‘looking for work’.
I would just look at them, notice the lack of work clothes, etc and tell them to ‘Catch the next truck and tell the foreman on the job I sent you’.
Inevitably the answer would be “Oh, I have to ___________ today, I will be here in the morning - Oh, would you mind signing this”?
My response would be “No, I offered you a job, and if you have something to do today, be here in the morning etc”.

Needless to say, I could count the number of takers over a long period on one hand.

My general rule of thumb was/is “If you show up, looking for a job, at 6 AM and you have your lunch with you, I will hire you whether I need you or not”.....
Running an asphalt plant with a bunch trucks and 10 or 11 crews you could find someplace for a person that WANTED a job.


20 posted on 05/14/2012 6:21:38 AM PDT by xrmusn (#6/98# Let's start from scratch by voting ALL incumbents out.)
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To: Libloather

In the madness of current methods of calculating unemployment percentage, the stats will improve marginally!


21 posted on 05/14/2012 7:05:15 AM PDT by JimRed (Excising a cancer before it kills us waters the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW AND FOREVER!)
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