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Watch: “The Global Food Crisis You Need To Prepare For Is Now Imminent”
SHTF Plan ^ | 12-19-2012 | Mac Slavo

Posted on 12/19/2012 6:24:05 AM PST by blam

Watch: “The Global Food Crisis You Need To Prepare For Is Now Imminent”

Mac Slavo
December 19th, 2012

Grocery stores may still be stocked with food and most Americans are still able to keep their family’s fed, but with 50 million Americans requiring government assistance to do so and prices on a seemingly never ending rise, how long will it be before the situation becomes unmanageable?

The global food crisis you need to prepare for is now imminent.

For the past six years the world has consumed more food than it has produced. As a result, global food reserves are at the lowest level since 1974, when the world had 4 billion people. Today we have 7 billion.

Like a person living paycheck-to-paycheck, the world is now living year-to-year when it comes to food supplies.

According to the U.N., world grain reserves are so dangerously low that severe weather in the U.S. or other food exporting countries could trigger a major hunger crisis next year. The U.N. also warns that supplies are so tight and reserves are so low that we literally have no room for an unexpected event in 2013.

We are already seeing prices rise significantly this year, with corn rising 31%, soy beans rising 28%, and red meat rising 20%.

In the west higher food prices are a manageable burden for now.

Americans spend about 10% of their after tax incomes on food… But in the developing world some households are spending up to 50% of their income on food, which is usually the basic essentials like bread.

An increase in food prices can mean riots, revolutions and chaos.

Video excerpts via PeakResources.org

(click to the site to see the video)

Watch: The Global Food Crisis & Bernanke’s Recipe for Disaster: Three Major Disasters That Could Lead to a Food Crisis Around the World

Any number of disasters, natural or man-made, can cause food prices to skyrocket to such levels that the most basic essentials like corn, rice, wheat, and soy beans become almost impossible to acquire for the majority of the population.

Another prolonged drought, a war with Iran that restricts the flow of oil, or a rapid collapse in the US dollar’s purchasing power could all lead to unprecedented worldwide pressure almost immediately.

We’ve seen what happens in countries where the populace is forced to spend 50% or more of their earned income on food. Despite how the media portrays it, the riots we’ve seen in the middle east, Greece and Spain have been largely fueled by cost increases in food and the inability of individuals to provide the basic essentials for their families.

Americans have been, for the most part, immune from these pressures thus far. But the social safety nets are very quickly becoming overburdened and prices at grocery stores are rising consistently and without pause.

With the consumer economy coming to a standstill, continued central bank monetary easing, job losses and wage reductions, and the urbanization of millions of people, it is only a matter of time before Americans are forced to spend 50% or more of their paychecks just to stay alive.

When that happens, look out, because what comes next is something that, up until now, we’ve only experienced on television feeds from the comfort of our living room couches.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: drought; food; prices; shortages
Prices may increase but we'll not have a shortage here.

However...

If I were a younger person...I would be investing in farm land and associated industries.

1 posted on 12/19/2012 6:24:15 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Im sure there is some truth in the article but when I see UN.

I think liars.


2 posted on 12/19/2012 6:39:38 AM PST by Gasshog (Welcome to the United States of Stupidos!)
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To: blam
Grocery stores may still be stocked with food and most Americans are still able to keep their family’s fed, but with 50 million Americans requiring government assistance to do so and prices on a seemingly never ending rise, how long will it be before the situation becomes unmanageable?

50 million Americans do NOT require governemnt assistance to feed their families. That's the number of people on food stamps. It has no correlation to the need of the recipient. Not when we have a government working overtime to develope a constituency of dependence!

3 posted on 12/19/2012 6:47:07 AM PST by pgkdan (We are witnessing the modern sack of Rome. The barbarians have taken over.)
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To: blam
According to the U.N. ...


4 posted on 12/19/2012 6:48:06 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: blam
"And I heard as it were a voice in the midst of the four living creatures, saying: Two pounds of wheat for a penny, and thrice two pounds of barley for a penny, and see thou hurt not the wine and the oil." Revelation 6:6

Not one to normally quote the bible, but it seems pertinent. I think there is more to it--quantitative easing and EPA meddling are going to drive the cost of basic consumables much higher while luxury consumables remain relatively affordable (based on their current price). I am of the school that in this modern era famine is affected more due to man made conditions (case in point: Zimbabwe) than natural phenomena.

5 posted on 12/19/2012 6:51:14 AM PST by Tench_Coxe
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To: blam

Prices are able to rise BECAUSE of the food stamp distribution. The EBT card allowance is close to DOUBLE what it should be. So the supermarket industry has nothing to fear from higher prices.

There is no market conditions within the consumer and supermarkets. The market is drastically skewed by the unlimited source of govt funds thru the EBT waste.


6 posted on 12/19/2012 6:54:54 AM PST by George from New England (escaped CT in 2006, now living north of Tampa)
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To: Kartographer

Ping worthy?


7 posted on 12/19/2012 7:13:20 AM PST by Mich Patriot (PITCH BLACK is the new "transparent")
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!

I don’t foresee shortages here, but higher prices are a given and as pointed out those that work for a live will see more and more of their income going toward feed themselves while the ‘takers’ will just get more ‘gubermint’ money to cover the prices rise.

The trouble is that more wars have been started over resources especially food than any other single thing and there may come a time when when ‘forced shared sacrifice’ in which those nations that can feed themselves are force to share the starvation so the less fortunate won’t live in misery alone.


8 posted on 12/19/2012 7:25:01 AM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: George from New England

The concept of a “Zombie Apocalypse” is currently being popularized in books, movies & TV. IMHO, its really a thinly veiled preview of what will happen when the EBT cards finally get shut off.

The below clip seems almost plausible when looked at from that perspective.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcwTxRuq-uk


9 posted on 12/19/2012 7:25:41 AM PST by rbg81
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To: Gasshog
For the past six years the world has consumed more food than it has produced

There's a UN knee slapper.

The other day I spurged and went through a bbq joint's drive thru (voted "best in the county"). They had a sign, larger than the menu, that they accepted EBTs. The bbq was dry and not very good but that's not the reason I'll never go back. I'll never go back because of the big sign, larger than the menu, that said they accepted EBTs. Excuse me, I can't afford going through a drive thru but my tax dollars can?

10 posted on 12/19/2012 7:34:08 AM PST by bgill (We've passed the point of no return. Welcome to Al Amerika.)
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To: blam

I know you personally have seen this before...

http://rense.com/general67/starve.htm


11 posted on 12/19/2012 7:39:10 AM PST by djf (Conservative values help the poor. Liberal values help them STAY poor!!!)
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To: rbg81

((”The concept of a “Zombie Apocalypse” is currently being popularized in books, movies & TV. “))

It’s also being popularized by the CDC
Centers for Disease Control.
http://blogs.cdc.gov/publichealthmatters/2011/05/preparedness-101-zombie-apocalypse/


12 posted on 12/19/2012 7:47:51 AM PST by libertarian27 (Check my profile page for the FReeper Online Cookbook 2011)
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To: Kartographer

Storing food is not the answer.

Producing your own food is the answer.

As you said, they’ll continue to inflate the costs while subsidizing the takers. Just another wealth transfer there.

Produce your own food, thwart them.


13 posted on 12/19/2012 8:04:42 AM PST by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: blam

This article gets things essentially backwards. Americans currenly spend less than 10 percent of our disposable incomes on food. The USDA figure for 2011 was 5.7 percent of disposable income on food at home, and 4.1 percent on food away from home. Note as well that food at home includes a lot of high convenience heat-and-serve foods. I personally haven’t killed a chicken in 45 years, and I get most of my vegetables in boxes from the freezer section.

The percentage of disposable income spent on food in the U.S. has been trending downward for decades and is now the lowest percentage figure in the world.

It’s also important to note that the commodity value of the foods eaten in the U.S. is about 14 percent. This too has been trending downward for years.

Calories are cheap.

Why then does food seem expensive? Glad you asked. It’s because as incomes rise, people choose to eat higher on the food chain, and we start buying many value added attributes: freshness, convenience, better taste, convenience, higher nutritional content, convenience, indulgence of superstition and food fetishism (organics), convenience, safety (and the perception of safety through branding), convenience, entertainment value and snob appeal (proliferating festival markets that become yuppie meccas on sunny Saturdays).

And did I mention that Americans pay a lot for convenience? I shop mostly in a plain-jane Safeway that has upgraded in recent years, but which is still fairly close to its utilitarian roots in a transitional neighborhood. This is a basic city grocery, not an upscale yuppie food palace (not even the famouss social Safeway in Georgetown...). Even so, I have access to a remarkably international cuisine at a price and quality point my grandparents could not have imagined. This means paying for a global logistics system and armies of clerks to stock the shelves. But I don’t mind this one bit. No siree; I remember canned asperagus, and I don’t begruge the modern grocery one bit.

Calories are cheap. But most of our food dollar is spent on other attributes. The same is true in Western Europe, Japan, and a few other places. But now a huge chunk of the developing world is climbing the food chain as well. That will affect pricing in a big way. It is hard to be a left-behind in a society that is fast developing a high value added food economy. That’s a transitional issue the emerging economies will have to tackle.


14 posted on 12/19/2012 8:13:01 AM PST by sphinx
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To: MrB

No one in the city would be able to raise a crop to maturity during a crisis of that sort. Only those living in a cooperative community way out in the boonies may survive.

Soylent Green, anyone?


15 posted on 12/19/2012 8:18:32 AM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: Tench_Coxe

Yup. I was going to post it, but checked first to see if anyone else had. You are correct. This is where it is going. The haves will have the money for it and those that don’t will starve. One of the judgments of Revelation.


16 posted on 12/19/2012 8:23:43 AM PST by RetiredArmy (1 Cor 15: 50-54 & 1 Thess 4: 13-17. That about covers it.)
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To: TexasRepublic

One thing we know for sure...

The EBT zombies aren’t interested in brains.


17 posted on 12/19/2012 8:24:37 AM PST by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: Tench_Coxe
I am of the school that in this modern era famine is affected more due to man made conditions (case in point: Zimbabwe) than natural phenomena.

I agree with you and would normally blame famine on political disruption, however other factors are in play. The media has been somewhat silent on the drought situation in the US. There was a recent blurb about winter wheat but very little else. The following drought map links to the US Drought Monitor web site. The 12 week animation is a bit unnerving and can be found at the link under the map.



2013 is continuing to develop into an interesting year.
18 posted on 12/19/2012 11:27:43 AM PST by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: PA Engineer

The 12 week drought map is an improvement over the previous summer and spring.


19 posted on 12/19/2012 11:35:09 AM PST by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: Kartographer
(This doesn't apply to you if you grow ALL your food and have chickens and cows and food animals, and you never need anything at the grocery.)

It doesn't matter how much food is grown in this county, IF TRUCKS STOP THERE IS NO FOOD AT THE GROCERY. If there is no power, trucks stop. If the economy crashes, trucks stop. If the sun sends out a huge solar flare which hits this country, trucks stop. If a nuclear bomb explodes over the US, trucks stop. Hurricanes take out power but that is regional and recovers, earthquakes are regional, not covering the entire US.

No trucks = no food (unless you store beforehand).

20 posted on 12/19/2012 12:01:13 PM PST by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Galt is freedom.)
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To: George from New England
Prices are able to rise BECAUSE of the food stamp distribution. The EBT card allowance is close to DOUBLE what it should be. So the supermarket industry has nothing to fear from higher prices.

I'm sure that when Nobel Prize winner Paul Krugman is done talking about why the federal debt and deficit are actually good for the country, he'll explain why you're wrong. Your statement is no doubt, at least to him, as absurd as saying that federal subsidies for college tuition will cause tuition to rise much faster than inflation. What happens to the intersection point on a supply and demand curve when purchases are subsidized does not (to modern economists) reflect real-world changes in supply, demand, and prices.

21 posted on 12/19/2012 12:22:00 PM PST by Pollster1 (Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. - Ronald Reagan)
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To: Kartographer
Re: "The trouble is that more wars have been started over resources especially food than any other single thing"

Had you said "riots" or "insurrections," I would agree, but I can't think of any war being fought because of food shortages. Wars are fought over "power" and "control of land mass and the subjects who occupy it." Except for the Islamic followers. They fight for their Allah.

22 posted on 12/19/2012 12:32:25 PM PST by rw4site (Little men want Big Government!)
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To: PA Engineer

That’s why I keep praying for snow, even though most folks around here are praying for no snow.

I’ve noticed that the amount of snow in winter tends to indicate the amount of rain we’ll get the following summer. Thus, the winter we had 100+inches of heavy, wet snow was followed by a summer of floods, and it was so rainy that people were surfing down the sidewalks in some places. Last winter we had very little snow, with some areas going weeks at a time without any. As expected, we then had record droughts, with some places going weeks at a time between rainfalls.

19 inches predicted from this next storm. Hurray for snow!


23 posted on 12/19/2012 3:03:56 PM PST by Ellendra (http://www.ustrendy.com/ellendra-nauriel/portfolio/18423/concealed-couture/)
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To: Ellendra
That’s why I keep praying for snow, even though most folks around here are praying for no snow.

We have escaped most of the drought in the US. I have been following it since last May. It is the entire midwest, from south to north. I blame the media for not reporting this.

It is not just crop damage, but barge traffic is suffering immensely now. The blame there is squarely on the shoulders of the Federal Government for holding back water release. Barges now have to move much smaller loads. This will have a ripple effect on transport costs for all bulk items. I suspect, but have no evidence this is being intentionally done as part of Obama's war on coal.

I would rather have rain, but will take the snow. Western PA is very hilly and a pain driving with the wintry mixes.
24 posted on 12/19/2012 3:26:02 PM PST by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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To: George from New England
Prices are able to rise BECAUSE of the food stamp distribution. The EBT card allowance is close to DOUBLE what it should be. So the supermarket industry has nothing to fear from higher prices.

There is no market conditions within the consumer and supermarkets. The market is drastically skewed by the unlimited source of govt funds thru the EBT waste.


Good points. Just how the cost of prescriptions and other medical care has risen drastically since medical insurance.
25 posted on 12/19/2012 3:26:59 PM PST by yorkiemom
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To: Dream Warrior

Preppers ping.


26 posted on 12/19/2012 3:30:57 PM PST by Phx_RC
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To: George from New England
The market is drastically skewed by the unlimited source of govt funds thru the EBT waste.

Very good point. The poor, who once ate beans and rice, are in a bidding war with the middle class. As a result, the middle class are not only paying higher prices for what's in their grocery carts, but then picking up the tab for the same food in the poor's carts.
27 posted on 12/19/2012 4:27:04 PM PST by LearsFool ("Thou shouldst not have been old, till thou hadst been wise.")
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To: Kartographer

The prices of the goods that I purchase on a weekly basis have gone up approximately 30% on average since 2009. Some of the must have items like peanut butter have gone up even more. It is up 125% over the same time period.

Fortunately, In late 2008, I backed up the truck, and loaded up on all the favorites up to and sometimes a little more than the expiration date for every sale. When I finished off 1 item, I would purchase 1 for replacement, and 1 for increasing the amount in the pantry.

That and the garden I started has allowed me to so far continue with the same meals with out any increase in my grocery budget.

I am thinking that I need to plant some peanuts this spring, It’s supposed to be easy to make peanut butter.


28 posted on 12/19/2012 4:33:48 PM PST by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: blam

Maybe we will all be better off once the world ends on Friday.

Geesh, who ain’t sick of this crap?


29 posted on 12/19/2012 4:37:40 PM PST by dforest
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To: blam

Want to turn a large fortune into a small one?

Bet against the American farmer being able to over-produce any given commodity!


30 posted on 12/19/2012 4:42:10 PM PST by jjotto ("Ya could look it up!")
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To: rw4site

Food is power.”riots” or “insurrections,” caused by lack of food usually lead to war either in an effort to fill the bellies or in an effort to blame the empty bellies on others.


31 posted on 12/19/2012 6:15:18 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: PA Engineer

Do you have a link on the winter wheat? Based on that map, it seems stupid to have the EPA demanding more ethanol in gasoline (I won’t even get into the risk on engines that aren’t built to handle the increased mixture). If the barge traffic is affected this coming year, I’ll bet Warren Buffett is poised to make a fortune on his railroads shipping stuff.


32 posted on 12/20/2012 7:39:39 AM PST by Tench_Coxe
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To: Tench_Coxe
Do you have a link on the winter wheat? Based on that map, it seems stupid to have the EPA demanding more ethanol in gasoline (I won’t even get into the risk on engines that aren’t built to handle the increased mixture). If the barge traffic is affected this coming year, I’ll bet Warren Buffett is poised to make a fortune on his railroads shipping stuff.

I had to do some digging. There is a great deal of static out there. It looks like the Fox radio blurb was about the current planting for winter wheat but not early 2012, however corn and beans have been hammered this year. You were very correct about Midwest Drought and Barge Traffic. The author is comparing it to the 1988 water levels:

Basically, in 1988 the barge industry lost about $1 billion due to low flows on the Mississippi as well as the Missouri and Illinois Rivers. The winner turned out to be the railroad industry as shippers scrambled to find alternative transportation for grain and raw materials.

Here is an article on the current situation.

Drought Worsens, Winter Wheat the Current Victim
33 posted on 12/20/2012 10:11:52 AM PST by PA Engineer (Liberate America from the Occupation Media.)
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