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America's Military: How Did Your Father Dream?
Townhall.com ^ | August 3, 2014 | Lee Culpepper

Posted on 08/03/2014 2:45:51 PM PDT by Kaslin

In a suburb of our nation’s capitol, I learned that most kids’ fathers were not Marine Corps fighter pilots, but mine was. My dad told me that when I was born, he was deployed overseas to hunt down communist aviators and to rain down terror on America’s enemies by lighting Ho Chi Minh’s soldiers on fire. My dad had this patented-daring side that often made light of dark subjects and traumatized morally superior Americans like Jane Fonda. But my dad’s equally austere side taught me to respect the danger, sacrifices, and valor of warriors who have served our country honorably. Ultimately, my dad’s courage inspired my older brother and me to become Marines, as well, yet we were never sent to the hell of war.

Today, my appreciation for what America’s warriors voluntarily sacrifice for others makes it hard for me to watch the nation’s commander in chief pursue a delusional fantasy of creating some Utopian society by decimating national security and replacing it with social welfare. Anyone who thinks that the size of our entitlement state is not already a counterproductive disaster has an unabashed ability to ignore reality. Certainly, our military has areas that could be eliminated, but it remains one of the few successful and essential government institutions.

Meanwhile, only 0.5 percent of the country’s population is currently serving in our armed forces. Generally, Democrats treat other minorities as victims in need of special privileges. Of course, noble characters repudiate pity and special treatment. Our veterans would simply like to be treated with dignity. Instead, Obama’s administration is so eager to increase entitlements and to cleanse the world of our military’s intimidating power that it is shamelessly willing to notify combat leaders now serving in Afghanistan that they will be terminated from the army when they come home. What sort of commander in chief permits such despicable treatment of his most loyal warriors? Next week, even more combat leaders will receive these separation notices.

The president never served one day in the military; he appears to have little to no genuine appreciation for what these men, women, and their families endure. Likewise, 81 percent of Congress has no military experience. And not surprisingly, Democrats comprise the smaller percentage of that meager 19 percent of Congress that has served. With dilettantes like this meddling in military engagements, is there any wonder why it often takes longer than necessary for America to win a war, or why many of our troops die unnecessarily as a result of hand-wringing rules of engagement that these sanctimonious public servants impose?

Nevertheless, the world’s stability is unravelling before our eyes, and these egotistical elitists press forward, stretching the duties and sacrifices to the limit for those few Americans who will continue to serve in our military. By doing so, the left aims to reward a mass of idle and dependent supporters trained to accept abysmal lives in exchange for the left’s addictive handouts.

Basically, America has a new inverted kind of indentured servitude of hardworking, productive people. And within that group is an incredibly small percentage of selfless citizens that are willing to put their lives on the line to protect what remaining freedoms the rest of us still have, but frequently take for granted.

The president and his comrades in Congress emphatically declare that they value our troops as much as anyone else. But the president has made an art form out of saying things that are blatantly untrue and then later denying that he said them. His obedient and loyal supporters quickly fall inline and back him up. Even his media provides him cover. When was the last time you heard the body count of America’s troops who have died or been wounded in Afghanistan? At this point, how can any decent American believe him? Our enemies, as well as allies, certainly do not.

Islamic terrorists and Vladimir Putin are flaunting their resurgence of power through elevating acts of violence. Undoubtedly, our own president inspires them through his determined effort to lessen the daunting reputation America’s military has earned around the world. However, sanctions will most likely never replace the fear of death. Face it, as the president continues to demoralize our own troops by firing the best trained and most dedicated among them, normal people should naturally wonder what side the president is on.

History clearly shows that the progressives’ obsession to take from the military in order to give to entitlements comes at an incredibly dangerous price -- global instability. Yet when it comes to pay that price in blood, the nation will call on a shrinking portion of society who is willing to pay it. At some point, the left’s gamble for buying votes over protecting the nation is sure to fail. Of course, that will absolutely accomplish the president’s quest to change America -- but it definitely does not provide much hope.

Of course, as Americans become more disenchanted with the President’s performance, it might help to keep in mind, that he too had a far different kind of father than most of us.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government
KEYWORDS: 0bamaadmin; armedforces; barack0bama; congress; marines; military; resident0bama

1 posted on 08/03/2014 2:45:51 PM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

I think my father’s dream was to get over malaria.


2 posted on 08/03/2014 2:53:46 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: Kaslin

Daddy was in a fairly dangerous job during WWII. From letters he wrote to Mother, I know he missed his family.

I think he was very proud of his outfit and generally liked being in the Army. I recall him saying several times how good Army food was.

They had a job to do and did it well.


3 posted on 08/03/2014 2:59:57 PM PDT by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Kaslin
During WWII, my Dad was in the Army Corp of Engineers. He worked building the Alcan Highway.

Afterwords he dreamed of a wife, family, and a better way of life.

He got all of it.

He died in 1978 at the age of 59.

I'm his age now. I still miss him.

He was an obedient, tho somewhat complicated Officer in the Jersey City Fire Department.

4 posted on 08/03/2014 3:05:22 PM PDT by Focault's Pendulum (I live in NJ....' Nuff said!)
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To: Kaslin
Dad fought in North Africa, Italy and then mainland Europe.

We recently compiled two volumes of my fathers letter V Mail, back home to his parents, and his future wife, my mom

Most of the letters are filled with tellin' his parents it won't be long until it is over. Thanking them for the packages sent to him, which apparently were very popular with his entire platoon. His dreams about settling down and raising kids with my mom once the war was over.

A couple letters sent while he was in hospital (trench foot, at Casino) tried to calm their fears. Truth was he came close to losing both feet, good thing for penicillin.

After V-E Day, he mentioned that he thought he might be able to come home to visit before shipping out to Japan.

He eventually got home in late October of 45, and married my mom in Dec of 45.

5 posted on 08/03/2014 3:11:23 PM PDT by mware
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To: Focault's Pendulum

My dad passed in 1976, at the age of 55. I think the war took it toll on them, but he hardly ever spoke of it. He did spend those extra 30 years given him, raising 7 children.


6 posted on 08/03/2014 3:14:47 PM PDT by mware
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To: mware
My dad passed in 1976, at the age of 55. I think the war took it toll on them, but he hardly ever spoke of it. He did spend those extra 30 years given him, raising 7 children.

Mom and Dad raised five. My Dad worked two jobs. He was a Captain in the JCFD and painted houses. He became an expert at striping brick.

Benefits back then sucked.

7 posted on 08/03/2014 3:28:48 PM PDT by Focault's Pendulum (I live in NJ....' Nuff said!)
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To: Focault's Pendulum
My dad worked two jobs also. Foreman on Atlantic City Expressway. One of the seasonal jobs that us kids liked that he had was when he worked at a cookie factory.

The only job I remember him quitting was when he became dog catcher. They told him he would have to put down a dog. He quit and brought the dog home to us. His name was PUPS, and he lived a long and happy life.

8 posted on 08/03/2014 3:35:32 PM PDT by mware
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To: Kaslin

Communications Chief (Gunnery Sergeant) in World War II, Korea and early Vietnam. Passed away less than a year after 9/11 so I had a hard time getting a Marine detail for his funeral. Finally did and they came out about a week after the funeral and did the three volleys, taps and presented the flag to my mother. I’m almost glad he didn’t live to see the Obama period.


9 posted on 08/03/2014 3:39:02 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (The most dangerous man to any government is the man who is able to think things out for himself.)
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To: Kaslin
I'm proud to say that my father fought with Gen Claire Chennault and the Flying Tigers against the Japanese, PRIOR to WWII, served with the Army Air Corps during WWII, fought commies in Korea and the Cold War.

Suffice to say that I would be ashamed if he could see our Country is now, but we will reclaim it!

10 posted on 08/03/2014 3:44:02 PM PDT by The Sons of Liberty (Deliver us, oh LORD, from the EVIL that has befallen our once Great GOD fearing land!)
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To: mware
The dreams of my father are not that are not Our Father’s Dreams.
11 posted on 08/03/2014 3:49:13 PM PDT by Focault's Pendulum (I live in NJ....' Nuff said!)
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To: Focault's Pendulum

Seems all they wanted was to care for their families, raise their children up, and live in peace.


12 posted on 08/03/2014 3:51:14 PM PDT by mware
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To: Kaslin

My Dad was in the Navy in WW2. He got a medal at Leyte for jumping in the drink to rescue a sailor knocked off the ship. He died when he was 42. I was 16, the oldest of 5. Never talked about the Philippines or the Navy. What I know is what I saw when I went through his papers.


13 posted on 08/03/2014 3:58:30 PM PDT by jwalsh07
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"..only Spartan women give birth to real men"




Thank God for the real men who founded this country,
and for the real men who continue to sustain it

Please join the 300 by donating $100

14 posted on 08/03/2014 3:59:07 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Kaslin

Military service is the best “Americanization” program we have. I don’t believe that every man should serve. I do believe there is something wrong with a family who has been here for generations and has not put a man in the military.


15 posted on 08/03/2014 4:03:53 PM PDT by MSF BU (Support the troops: Join Them.)
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To: Kaslin

My grandfather served as a bomb loader in Italy. His best friend lived next door. Kind of a recluse. He just up and shot himself in 1985. I found out after that he was on the Arizona. He NEVER talked about it.


16 posted on 08/03/2014 4:22:37 PM PDT by wyowolf
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Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

To: Kaslin

My dad was in long enough to see his first action with Patton’s Third Army in the crossing of the Rhine river.
After they linked up with the Russians, dad almost gave Patton his desired war with the Russians.

He met an officer with a nice brace of pistols. he insulted the officer by offering cigarettes for the guns.
The officer demanded a salute and dad would not comply and sulled up like an old toad frog! Finally one of the soldiers with him yelled to dad...”SHOOT THAT SOB!”
Dad did not shoot him but Patton almost got his desired war at that time.

Dad returned to the USA to begin training for the invasion of Japan when THE BOMB fell on Hiroshima. Everyone breathed a sigh of relief as they then knew the war was almost over.

Dad died in 1987 after a long life of alcoholism. But then he was an alcoholic in 1932 when he was 16. He was 27 years old when he was ordered to join the military.


18 posted on 08/03/2014 4:34:34 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need more than seven rounds, Much more.)
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Comment #19 Removed by Moderator

To: Kaslin

my Dad was USN out of Hawaii. my godfather was USAF for 26 yrs.

they’re both gone now... and part of me is glad they’re not here to see what’s been done to their country


20 posted on 08/03/2014 5:18:58 PM PDT by sten (fighting tyranny never goes out of style)
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To: Kaslin

My dad said that the start of WWII ruined the good life that he was living as a sailor in the Philippines with his Filipino girlfriend, banana trees, and a thatch hut.


21 posted on 08/03/2014 6:41:48 PM PDT by ansel12 (LEGAL immigrants, 30 million 1980-2012, continues to remake the nation's electorate for democrats)
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To: Kaslin
My dad just passed recently. He served '41-46. Mainly on Okinawa in the Army.
I know he was tired, and tired of seeing the news every day. As a very religious man, he couldn't stand the last few years of gay marriage, Obama, the immigration crisis, etc. I think he felt everything his generation sacrificed for was just given away in the last ten years. This wasn't his dream, what this country has become.
22 posted on 08/03/2014 9:15:49 PM PDT by Aut Pax Aut Bellum (It's only a matter of time now before SHTF.....)
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To: Kaslin

Dad passed in 1999, did his duty (and then some, according to some of his old buddies), fathered three boys who wound up trying to do theirs during ‘Nam but never breathed a word about his dreams.

And I don’t think I’d have dared ask him.

Only dreams I know of right now are ones that I and my brothers have been having and talking about....

Our family’s had people in the military/militia since before the Revolution, and I/we keep dreaming about these stern-faced old soldiers who don’t do much but look and ask, “Why ain’t you up and armed, boy?”

Stuff needs squared away, and posting about it don’t do sh**.


23 posted on 08/03/2014 11:50:35 PM PDT by Unrepentant VN Vet (Needs but one foe to breed a war, and those who have not swords can still die upon them.)
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To: Kaslin

My dad served in Vietnam, both grandfathers in WWII, and my great grandfather in WWI. I’ll regrettably be the first male in my immediate family not to serve, but I honestly don’t I’d want to even if I could enlist. The military is not what it was meant to be anymore.


24 posted on 08/04/2014 4:18:19 AM PDT by RWB Patriot ("My ability is a value that must be earned and I don't recognize anyone's need as a claim on me.")
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To: yarddog

They had a job to do and did it well.

Yes they did! But they didn’t have limitations placed on them such as in today’s world. Our military should simply be told what the mission is and then left to do it as they see fit.


25 posted on 08/25/2014 9:19:13 AM PDT by rfreedom4u (Your feelings don't trump my free speech!)
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To: Kaslin

My grandfather served in WWI. I had two uncles in WWII. My dad served during Korea and Vietnam. Out of me and my six siblings, five of us have served. Out of my five kids one has served and one is currently serving.

My uncles never speak of the war other than to express their hatred for the Japanese. One was in the Marine Corps and the other was army on Iwo Jima.


26 posted on 08/25/2014 9:29:03 AM PDT by rfreedom4u (Your feelings don't trump my free speech!)
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