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The Early Church Fathers on the Scriptures: The Four Gospels [Ecumenical]
RC.net ^ | translated 1994 | Irenaeus

Posted on 06/17/2011 9:43:04 PM PDT by Salvation

The Early Church Fathers on the Scriptures
 

The Four Gospels
by Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 2nd century
             
There are four gospels and only four, neither more nor less: four like the points of the compass, four like the chief directions of the wind. The Church, spread all over the world, has in the gospels four pillars and four winds blowing wherever people live.

These four gospels are in actual fact one single Gospel,  a fourfold Gospel inspired by the one Spirit, a Gospel which has four aspects representing the work of the Son of God.

These aspects are like the four cherubs described by Ezekiel. In the prophet's words: `The first had the like ness of a lion,' symbolizing the masterly and kingly role of Christ in priesthood; `the second had the appearance of an ox,' the beast of sacrifice, recalling the perfect sacrifice of Christ; `the third had the face of a man,'  undoubtedly referring to the coming of the Lord in human nature; `and the fourth had the aspect of a flying eagle,' with a clear allusion to the grace of the Spirit hovering over the Church. [cf. Ezek. 1:10; Rev. 4:7]

The four Gospels correspond to these symbols. Christ is at the center of them.

John actually speaks of his kingly and glorious Sonship to the Father in his opening words: `In the beginning was the Word.' [John 1:1] Luke begins with Zaccharias offering sacrifice. Matthew chooses first of all the Lord's human genealogy. And Mark leads off by calling on the prophetic Spirit which invests humanity from on high.

(Translation by Thomas Spidlik, Drinking from the Hidden Fountain: A Patristic Breviary, Cistercian Publications, Kalamazoo, MI - Spencer, MASS, 1994) 



TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: catholic; earlychurchfathers; gospels; scriptures
“Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.” 
Jerome, c. 347-420

1 posted on 06/17/2011 9:43:11 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All; Religion Moderator
Guidelines for Ecumenical Threads
2 posted on 06/17/2011 9:44:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Early Church Fathers and Scripture Ping!


3 posted on 06/17/2011 9:46:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Who Wrote The Gospels? How Do We Know?
Space Crew With The Next Expedition Takes Gospels to ISS

Why So Few Gospels? Inquiring Muslims Want To Know!
Scavenging the Gospels
Radio Replies Second Volume - Gospels Historical
Bauckham: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony
WHO REALLY WROTE THE GOSPELS?
Testimony of the Evangelists - by Simon Greenleaf (1783-1853)
Radio Replies Volume One: Value of the Gospels
What Is Needed for a Bible Comeback (Part 2)
Gospel Authorship
Support for authenticity of book of Matthew comes from an unlikely place

4 posted on 06/17/2011 9:47:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Early Church Fathers on the Scriptures: The Four Gospels [Ecumenical]
The Early Church Fathers on the Scriptures: The Scriptures are one book in Christ [Ecumenical]
The Early Church Fathers on Scripture: The Nourishing Bread of Scripture [Ecumenical]
The Early Church Fathers on the Scriptures: Reading Scripture with the Early Church Fathers [Ecumenical]
Fathers of the Church
Abortion and the Early Church [Fathers] (Catholic & Orthodox Caucus)
Why do Catholics always talk about the Early Church Fathers (Apostolic Fathers)?[Ecumenical]
The Church Fathers' Marian Interpretation of the Old Testament (Catholic Caucus)
Writings of the Fathers of the Church
THE CHURCH FATHERS: A DOOR TO ROME (fundamentalist warns saying they sound too Catholic)

Were the Church Fathers Closer to Protestantism Than to Catholicism?
The Faith of Our Fathers
The Early Church Fathers on the Assumption [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Look to the Church Fathers to Shed Light on Modern Problems, Writes the Pope
Origen: The Privileged Path to Knowing God Is Love
On Origen of Alexandria: He Was a True Teacher (April 25, 2007)
St. Clement of Alexandria: One of the Great Promoters of Dialogue Between Faith and Reason (April 18, 2007)
St. Irenaeus of Lyons: The First Great Theologian of the Church (March 28, 2007)
Early Church Fathers - Worship on Sabbath or Sunday
St. Justin Martyr: He Considered Christianity the “True Philosophy” (March 21, 2007)

Truly a Doctor of Unity (St. Ignatius of Antioch) (March 14, 2007)
On St. Clement of Rome -The Church Has a Sacramental, Not Political Structure (March 7, 2007)
Quotes from the Early Church Fathers
The Early Church Fathers on Baptism - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Contraception - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Justification - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Mary’s Perpetual Virginity - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on the Immaculate Conception - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Confession / Reconciliation - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on The Real Presence - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus

The Early Church Fathers on Intercession of the Saints - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Hell - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on The Primacy of Peter/Rome (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
The Early Church Fathers on The Mother of God - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Mary’s Perpetual Virginity - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Salvation Outside the Church [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Early Church Fathers on Purgatory - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on Apostolic Succession - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Early Church Fathers on (Oral) Tradition - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
The Early Church Fathers on The Church (Catholic Caucus)
The Early Church Fathers

5 posted on 06/17/2011 9:52:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
These aspects are like the four cherubs described by Ezekiel. In the prophet's words: `The first had the like ness of a lion,' symbolizing the masterly and kingly role of Christ in priesthood; `the second had the appearance of an ox,' the beast of sacrifice, recalling the perfect sacrifice of Christ; `the third had the face of a man,' undoubtedly referring to the coming of the Lord in human nature; `and the fourth had the aspect of a flying eagle,' with a clear allusion to the grace of the Spirit hovering over the Church. [cf. Ezek. 1:10; Rev. 4:7]

The four Gospels correspond to these symbols. Christ is at the center of them.

[cf. Ezek. 1:10; Rev. 4:7]

The connection to the Old and New Testaments makes me more in awe of scripture. Thousands of years apart at times yet consistent to the main theme. I just looked it up on my own.

6 posted on 06/17/2011 10:04:44 PM PDT by johngrace (God so loved the world so he gave his only son! Praise Jesus and Hail Mary!)
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To: johngrace

I’ve also heard of the four evangelists being compared to the four creatures. I think it’s on one of the Gospel threads. I know that the Gospel of John, or rather, John is compared to the eagle.


7 posted on 06/17/2011 10:12:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: Invincibly Ignorant; Admin Moderator; Religion Moderator

I’m surprised that you are asking that question. I’m pinging the Religion Moderator and Admin Moderator to explain to you how not to see it.

BTW, it is posted on the Religion Forum.


9 posted on 06/18/2011 11:24:24 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #10 Removed by Moderator

To: Invincibly Ignorant

Dude, grow up just a little.


11 posted on 06/18/2011 12:03:55 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
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To: Salvation

Thank you and God bless all of you. Sorry, my computer was down for a couple of days.


12 posted on 06/18/2011 12:46:00 PM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: Mr. Lucky

Dude, eat my shorts.


13 posted on 06/18/2011 6:04:15 PM PDT by Invincibly Ignorant
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To: Invincibly Ignorant
Dude, eat my shorts.

I see that your level of wit remains unchanged.

14 posted on 06/18/2011 6:11:25 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so..)
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To: MarkBsnr
I see that your level of wit remains unchanged.

Thanx. I learned from the chief CINO. Good to see you again.

15 posted on 06/18/2011 6:15:02 PM PDT by Invincibly Ignorant
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To: Invincibly Ignorant
I see that your level of wit remains unchanged.

Thanx. I learned from the chief CINO. Good to see you again.

Happy to help. How have you been?

16 posted on 06/18/2011 6:18:50 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so..)
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To: MarkBsnr
Happy to help. How have you been?

Very well thanx. Just hoping for a football season.

17 posted on 06/18/2011 6:20:57 PM PDT by Invincibly Ignorant
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To: Invincibly Ignorant
Very well thanx. Just hoping for a football season.

http://www.afl.com.au/

You don't have a lot of fat men that run for five seconds and fall down and resume several minutes later. Repeat as required.

18 posted on 06/18/2011 6:27:48 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so..)
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To: Invincibly Ignorant
This thread was posted in the Religion Forum, it was not moved here.

If you do not wish to see RF posts, do NOT use the "everything" option on the browse. Instead, browse by "News/Activism." When you log back in, the browse will reset to "everything" - so be sure to set it back to "News/Activism."

Also, this RF thread is labeled "Ecumenical" meaning no antagonism is allowed on this thread.

19 posted on 06/18/2011 7:58:37 PM PDT by Religion Moderator
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To: Religion Moderator

Don’t be so judgemental


20 posted on 06/19/2011 6:32:16 AM PDT by Invincibly Ignorant
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To: MarkBsnr

I’ve watched a few Austrailian Rules Football matches on late-night TV. My first reaction was “Liars! There obviously ARE no rules!” But after I figured out a few things it certainly looks like a fun game.

Now, if you want to see a lively American game try checking out lacrosse. The ball is a solid hard rubber ball about the size of a tennis ball. The players have meter or 1.5 meter (depending on position) sticks with small shallow baskets on the end. You can shoot the ball about 160 Km/hour - or more - at a goal that’s a 2 meter square. The goalie has a stick with a basket about 30 cm in diameter that he can use to catch shots. Everyone wears a helmet with a wire mask. The man with the ball can be checked from the front and side, but not from the rear.

The man with the ball can also be struck by an opposing player’s stick anywhere from the shoulder on down as hard as the opposing player can swing it. I’ve seen an arm broken (to the point that it was apparent and somewhat nauseating to every onlooker within 100 feet). If the ball is dropped, any player can knock down any other player with 2 meters of the ball until someone picks the ball up and gains possession. Play only stops on penalties or scores. Balls thrown out of bounds are immediately brought back in, like soccer. Balls that go out of bounds on a missed shot on goal goes to the team with a player nearest to the point that the ball left, which in practice means that the ball goes back to the shooting team and you therefore get lots of shots. Player substitutions are made on the fly, like hockey, and like hockey players can freely leave and re-enter any number of times during the game.

If you manage to figure out how to do something that’s actually forbidden (checking from the back IS a no-no; so is *deliberately* striking someone on the head with a stick) you’ll be sent off for 2 minutes while your team plays short-handed.

So, lots of action, lots of contact, lots of speed and manuevering.


21 posted on 06/27/2011 10:10:00 PM PDT by RonF
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To: RonF
I’ve watched a few Austrailian Rules Football matches on late-night TV. My first reaction was “Liars! There obviously ARE no rules!” But after I figured out a few things it certainly looks like a fun game.

I've tried my hand at rugby a few times. Tough, tough game.

Now, if you want to see a lively American game try checking out lacrosse.

I've played it as a kid. Another rather tough game. And it is manifestly Canadian, derived from the Indians and played in hockey arenas. Yankees are copying Canadians, yet again. :)

I even caught a Little Brown Bat that got into my parents' house some years ago with my old stick.

22 posted on 06/28/2011 5:06:29 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so..)
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To: MarkBsnr

I believe that you’ll find that the Indians (specifically Iroquois) played lacrosse on both sides of the New York/Quebec border. It was the French who gave it the name - at the time they would have not recognized the appellation “Canadian”.


23 posted on 06/29/2011 12:27:47 PM PDT by RonF
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To: MarkBsnr

As a matter of fact there was a diplomatic flap about that. The world championships were held somewhere in Europe a couple of years ago. The Iroquois always attend, even though they don’t often do well, as they are recognized as the originators of the game. They travel on self-administered passports identifying them as members of the Iroquois nation, not as American citizens. This had been accepted practice until the last time, when the State department stepped in and ruled that they couldn’t get on domestic airplanes with anything but a U.S. passport. The Iroquois apparently don’t recognize American sovereignty over their persons to that extent and refused to travel on U.S. passports. Then the State Department relented, only to see the Europeans decide they weren’t going to accept the Iroquois Nation’s passports. They stayed home rather than travel on U.S. passports.


24 posted on 06/29/2011 12:31:37 PM PDT by RonF
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To: RonF
I believe that you’ll find that the Indians (specifically Iroquois) played lacrosse on both sides of the New York/Quebec border. It was the French who gave it the name - at the time they would have not recognized the appellation “Canadian”.

It was concentrated in the St. Lawrence Valley. Actually, while I normally detest Wikipedia, it does treat lacrosse rather well. The legend is that Fr. Brebeuf, the legendary missionary, first named it lacrosse, or a version of it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_lacrosse says that:

In 1856, William George Beers, a Canadian dentist, founded Montreal Lacrosse Club. He codified the game in 1867 to shorten the length of each game, reduce the number of players, use a redesigned stick, and use a rubber ball. The first game played under Beers' rules was at Upper Canada College in 1867. During the 1860s lacrosse became Canada's national game.

So, while it did percolate across the border, it was predominantly Canadian. Interestingly enough, Canadian football preceded American football, in case you didn't know!!!! McGill University played Harvard in the first cross border game.

25 posted on 06/29/2011 3:54:24 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so..)
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