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Seeing The Big Picture In Isaiah
A FreeRepublic Exclusive Message ^ | 5/18/14 | Chuck Ness

Posted on 05/18/2014 9:11:18 AM PDT by OneVike

{This message is posted on FR in full for all to read.}

As the most quoted Old Testament Book in the New Testament, Isaiah has always been to me like the book of Revelations: interesting but obscure. I would read it but not truly grasp the true meaning of the whole picture Isaiah was giving us. Oh, I knew about the famous passages that foretold the advent of Christ in Isa 9:6 and his suffering in Isa 53:1-12, but that was only because they are the most famous aspects of the life of Christ. Like many people, I was always more intrigued about his prophecies that coincided with John's Revelations like Isa 13:1-13 or Isa 14:1-22.

My thoughts about the end times made me no different than the unbelievers who dwell on secular aspects of the when, where, who, and how it will all happen. Which world leader would be the antichrist, which countries would be involved in the final war of Armageddon, and would I be alive still when it all goes down? These are just a few of the thoughts I had when discussions of "THE END TIMES" would come up, so I never learned to appreciate the true gift he imparted to us. I must admit I still have many of the same questions that need to be resolved in my mind. However, I now look at Isaiah with a totally different viewpoint than I did before. I now understand not only the many prophecies that have been fulfilled and are yet to be fulfilled, but now I appreciate the life and dedication of the Fifth Evangelist.

From the beginning of time the Lord had a plan of salvation for mankind, Gen 3:15. "And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your seed and her seed; He shall bruise you on the head, and you shall bruise him on the heel." This is the first time the Lord spoke of a savior for mankind and He did so at the very dawning of the gospel day. No sooner was the deadly poisonous wound given than the remedy was provided and revealed. The Lord had planned from the beginning that the one who was first deceived would be the one through whom the guilt of the world would fall. Since sin is handed down through the man, the sin nature of man was not handed down to the Messiah, so He is truly the unblemished Lamb whom the Lord accepted as the perfect sin offering.

One could even surmise from Solomon's writings that the Lord had a plan for salvation before He even spoke the heavens and the earth into existence, Ecc 3:15 "That which is has been already and that which will be has already been, for God seeks what has passed by." However, the first mention of His plan to give us the gift of His Son is in Gen 3:15. The last mention of His plan for our salvation is in the book of Revelations, Rev 22:20: "He who testifies to these things says, 'Yes, I am coming quickly.' Amen. Come, Lord Jesus". A promise that may be truly said to every person in every age; Jesus the Judge is at the door.

So, we have God's plan for the salvation of mankind Isa 53:10 and His plan of judgment for the world and those who would refuse his gift Isa 13:6-13. Isaiah gives us insight into what the Lord revealed to him some 2700 years ago. We can either ignore Isaiah's prophecies like the Jews did or, as Christ taught, we can embrace them.

The late Ray C. Stedman said of the book of Isaiah in his book “ADVENTURING THROUGH THE BIBLE

In many ways Isaiah is like a miniature Bible, it even divides like the Bible. Just as the Bible’s has 66 books, Isaiah has 66 chapters. There are 39 books in the Old Testament, and Isaiah has 39 chapters in the first half. There is a distinct division at chapter 40, so that the remaining twenty-seven chapters constitute the second half of the book, which is exactly the number of books in the New Testament. Isaiah is stuck smack dab in the middle of the Bible, making it almost a miniature Bible on it’s own. The New Testament begins with the history of John the Baptist, the forerunner of Christ, as he came to announce the coming of the Messiah. Chapter 40 of Isaiah, which begins the second half, contains the prophetic passage that predicts the coming of John the Baptist. The last book of the Bible is the Revelation of Jesus Christ, foretelling the end times and the promise of a New Jerusalem. Chapter 66 speaks of the Joy in Jerusalem’s future and it ends with a picture of Gehenna the final death. So you find here in the book of Isaiah a remarkably close analogy that parallels the entire Bible”.
,p>Now, I do not recommend it, but one could ignore all the other Old Testament books and still have all documentation needed from the book of Isaiah to support Jesus as being the Messiah. His birth Isa 9:6, His death Isa 53:8, and His resurrection Isa 53:10 are all foretold within the pages of this book. Taken as a whole the Book of Isaiah could also be looked at as a blueprint of how many Christians have lived their lives and still received the blessing of Gods grace and forgiveness. I have read commentaries where the authors have overanalyzed this great book and used it as an allegory for mankind, and maybe that is what Stedman did in his sermon.

Regardless of one's point of view, it is impossible to miss how Isaiah gave us a complete picture of Gods Love for us by giving us a complete picture of God's love for the Israelites. I believe Isaiah was trying to impress upon the Israelites the need to place their trust in God for their deliverance. He did this by predicting and historically demonstrating the judgment which falls on those who do not trust in God and the blessings which comes to those who do trust in Him. In the preface of his book “CHRIST IN ISAIAH", F. B. Meyer points out the similarities between the Israelite's exodus from Egypt and their exodus from Babylon.

THE EXODUS from Egypt is one of the most conspicuous landmarks of the past; not only because of its historical value, but because it inaugurated a religious movement which is the most important factor in our modem world. The Exodus from Babylon has never succeeded in arousing equal interest, largely because it was more gradual and uneventful. Yet it was a marvelous episode, and bore upon its face the evident interposition of Jehovah on behalf of his people. Its results, which culminated in the advent of the Servant of the Lord, were in the highest degree momentous.

Christians walks are the same in that we each are attempting to exodus from our own Babylon so that we may reach the Promised Land. However just as the Israelites could not accomplish their exodus without God, a Christian can not escape his own Babylon without Christ. As Christians we have the benefit of Isaiah’s Christ in our life. Noah needed an Ark designed by God Himself to survive the Flood that was going to wash clean the world of the rot mankind had brought upon it. As Christians we also need a Noah-type Ark; and for us that Ark is Christ, and Isaiah gave us the blueprints of God's plan for that Ark.

The big difference between Noah’s Ark and Christ is that the work was completely done by God; and we need to do nothing but believe Joh 3:16. In Isaiah's descriptions of what would happen to Christ for our salvation, one would think he had a front row seat at Golgotha. Instead, he received a first hand account from the very One who would suffer on that cross. When you look at the way Isaiah spoke of the events he prophesied as being in the past, it’s easy to see why some have called him the first Apostle of Christ.

Isaiah's first reference to the Messiah is not a prophecy of His birth but a prophecy that the Jews would reject Him Isa 6:9-10. When you look at the traditions of the ancient writers you find that very seldom is the birth or childhood of a famous person mentioned. The Jews were exceptions in that they often mentioned the day of birth, but it was a man's accomplishments as an adult that gave the scribes a reason to write about him. So Isaiah foretells many aspects of what the Messiah's life would entail, like His birth Isa 7:14, His ministry Isa 9:1-2, and even His many miracles Isa 35:5-6. However, Isaiah's first mentioning of His rejection by the Jews being before all else he foretells is understandable when one realizes that it is by His rejection that the gentiles are to be saved. The very One the Jews looked forward to they would reject, just as they rejected the Lord time and time again.

I see in my own life a similar attitude toward Him. I have been given the truth time and time again, only to reject it for my own selfish desires. The Lord gave Isaiah His plan of restoration for the remnant of Israel who would truly rely on Him. This plan also included the redemption for all mankind as Isaiah repeatedly pointed out Isa 11:10, Isa 49:1, Isa 53:10-12, Isa 59:15-16. Isaiah conveyed that the Lord wanted the Jews to know that their Messiah was also going to save the hated gentiles.

As we now know, the Jews would be the first to persecute the Christians; even before they crucified their Messiah, they were already expelling His followers from the sanctuaries John 9:28-34. Isaiah also conveys to us the compassion the Lord has for His chosen people and His desire for their redemption. Isa 65:19 "I will also rejoice in Jerusalem and be glad in My people; and there will no longer be heard in her the voice of weeping and the sound of crying. Isa 65:24 "It will also come to pass that before they call, I will answer; and while they are still speaking, I will hear.” What an amazing prophecy; before I was born God knew I would be knee deep in transgressions against Him, and even before I called on Him he came to my rescue. This blueprint for my restoration and salvation was imparted to Isaiah thousands of years before I was even alive. Truly, only a loving God such as He would do such a thing.

In my study of Isaiah I have learned to look at all the books of the Old Testament with an eye for scriptures that either point to the Messiah’s first coming or His return. Throughout the Bible we have evidence of the Lord's promises, and the life of Christ is proof of His fulfillment of those promises. The evidence is overwhelming as to the historicity of the Scriptures. Not only do we have historical documents like the Dead Sea Scrolls found in the Qumran caves but we also have such recent discoveries as the Pool of Siloam John 9:7. These are just a few of the numerous archaeological discoveries and manuscript evidences that support the Bible. I believe it takes an act of mental ignorance to ignore all the evidence.

As for me, I have no reason to doubt the future fulfillment of the Lord's remaining promises. I have also learned to look at the book of Isaiah and his many prophecies for what they really represent; the Eternal instead of the temporal. The when, where, who, and how are just temporal, but the eternal is what is promised and that is where my hope lies. By His grace I have been washed by the Blood of the Lamb and my parched soul has been renewed by the life-giving water that flows from that Rock. My salvation was paid for by His victory on Calvary and I am assured of eternal life because of His resurrection. I now anxiously await His return so that I may enjoy an eternal rest in His Glory.


TOPICS: General Discusssion; History; Moral Issues; Theology
KEYWORDS: christ; isaiah; prophesy; the5thevangelist
Many scholars have pointed out that Isaiah is like a miniature Bible in the Bible. I would have added this to the message, but it was already long enough, so I decided to add this tidbit as a comment instead. previous authors have acknowledged the relation between Isaiah and the Bible. Consider the following:

Just as the Bible’s is divided by having 66 books, Isaiah also is divided into 66 chapters. There are 39 books in the Old Testament, and Isaiah has 39 chapters in the first half. There is a distinct division at chapter 40, so that the remaining twenty-seven chapters constitute the second half of the book, which is exactly the number of books in the New Testament. The book of Isaiah is also just about in the middle of the Bible, making it almost a miniature Bible on it’s own. The New Testament begins with the history of John th

e Baptist, the forerunner of Christ, as he came to announce the coming of the Messiah. Chapter 40 of Isaiah, which begins the second half of his book, contains the prophetic passage that predicts the coming of John the Baptist.

The last book of the Bible is the Revelation of Jesus Christ, foretelling the end times and the promise of a New Jerusalem. Chapter 66 speaks of the Joy in Jerusalem’s future and it ends with a picture of Gehenna the final death. So you find here in the book of Isaiah a remarkably close analogy that parallels the entire Bible.

Now obviously this analogy does not hold to perfection, because as I stated in my message, Isaiah's first prophetic mention of Christ is in chapter 6:9-10. That would put it in the first section that is supposed to be speaking of the Old testament. Like all analogies this one too is somewhat tepid, but interesting when you consider the way the Cannon of Scriptures were eventually put together.


1 posted on 05/18/2014 9:11:18 AM PDT by OneVike
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2 posted on 05/18/2014 9:28:44 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: OneVike

I thought Noah built the ark.


3 posted on 05/18/2014 9:30:39 AM PDT by hulagirl (Mother Theresa was right)
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To: OneVike
When you look at the way Isaiah spoke of the events he prophesied as being in the past

I'm given to understand that Hebrew has a 'future predictive tense' that is usually translated this way.

I saw... It was...

4 posted on 05/18/2014 9:49:16 AM PDT by null and void (When was the last time you heard anyone say: "It's a free country"?)
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To: OneVike

I will have to reread Isaiah with this in mind.

I always liked it, too. I think it is my favorite OT book.


5 posted on 05/18/2014 10:01:21 AM PDT by metmom (...fixing our eyes on Jesus, the Author and Perfecter of our faith....)
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To: null and void

Thanks, I’ll look into it for future reference.


6 posted on 05/18/2014 10:05:11 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: hulagirl
I thought Noah built the ark.
He did, I wrote,
Noah needed an Ark designed by God Himself to survive the Flood

7 posted on 05/18/2014 10:08:47 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: All

I just realized I did add the miniature Bible in a Bible part to the message.

I meant to leave it out due to the length. Oh well.


8 posted on 05/18/2014 10:11:10 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: OneVike
English doesn't handle it very gracefully.
RIMMER: Lister, it *has* happened. You can't change it, any more than you can change what you had for breakfast yesterday.
LISTER: Hey, it hasn't happened, has it? It has "will have going to have happened" happened, but it hasn't actually "happened" happened yet, actually.
RIMMER: Poppycock! It will be happened; it shall be going to be happening; it will be was an event that could will have been taken place in the future. Simple as that.
(From Red Dwarf Series I Episode 2, "Future Echoes")
9 posted on 05/18/2014 10:14:29 AM PDT by null and void (When was the last time you heard anyone say: "It's a free country"?)
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To: hulagirl

God designed it, and Noah built it.
The second ark is all God (salvation through Christ). Our part is to believe.


10 posted on 05/18/2014 10:21:46 AM PDT by Keflavik76
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To: Keflavik76

Amen


11 posted on 05/18/2014 10:26:23 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: null and void

Dont worry kids. Grammar is like math.

You will never, ever use this in real life.

/s


12 posted on 05/18/2014 10:27:03 AM PDT by Delta 21 (Its my freedom. YES. I will be keeping it.)
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bfl


13 posted on 05/18/2014 11:35:23 AM PDT by Faith65 (Jesus Christ is my Lord and Savior!)
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To: OneVike

In biblical thought, some actions prefigure or anticipate or illustrate other actions.

I don’t believe the good Lord has let there be arrangements so “perfect” that they are airtight to the thought systems of sinful man. That could result in the bible getting idolized. “Bible codes” are an extreme example of this — while intriguing, they are at best witnesses to the omniscient origin of what the bible says on its face. From man’s point of view, God always seems to have a wild hair. Of course to God it isn’t wild — He knows exactly what it’s for and what it’s doing, and it fits into His perfect glory.

But I sure agree the way Isaiah divides into sections, and the way it spells out what was scheduled to take place at Calvary, is notable. Modern non-Christian Judaism overlooks all this, though it takes some effort with Isaiah 53. To me, that was the chapter that cemented the authenticity of Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross and allowed me to believe. People weren’t just speculating about it. It’s documented to happen, right there in black and white.


14 posted on 05/18/2014 11:40:31 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: null and void

And we also have divine vs. human perspective. God sees a completed picture of eternal events. Humans, currently bound to time, see something coming into being.


15 posted on 05/18/2014 11:42:14 AM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Indeed.


16 posted on 05/18/2014 11:58:28 AM PDT by null and void (When was the last time you heard anyone say: "It's a free country"?)
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To: OneVike

Looks good to me.


17 posted on 05/18/2014 12:49:56 PM PDT by stansblugrassgrl (PRAISE THE LORD AND PASS THE AMMUNITION!!! YEEEEEHAW!)
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To: stansblugrassgrl

Thanks


18 posted on 05/18/2014 1:41:02 PM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: WXRGina

ping


19 posted on 05/18/2014 1:57:57 PM PDT by logitech (It is time.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

I tend to agree with you. As much as we study and think we have figured out what God is telling us from the Scriptures, about the time we think we are right, He tosses a curve ball at us.

We can study and study, but in the end more times than not we can do is actually play Johnny come lately in realizing He was telling us about something that happened, not is going to happen.

All the great theologians of the time tried their best to know when Christ was arriving the first time, and yet all those who were alive when it happened missed the boat. Obviously their hearts were not prepared for what He was actually going to come as. A servant, not a King. At least of this world and the first time.

Which tells me what is going to happen when He returns. I see many missing the boat who are sure they know the signs of the times.

The best we can hope for is to have our hearts ready for Him, and not worry so much about when the day is going to be.

Although it is all good for study and preparing our minds and hearts to be approved.


20 posted on 05/18/2014 4:51:53 PM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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To: OneVike

Bookmark


21 posted on 05/18/2014 6:18:16 PM PDT by JDoutrider
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To: OneVike

Bump!


22 posted on 05/18/2014 7:04:31 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: OneVike

Thank you so much for the article, dear OneVike!


23 posted on 05/18/2014 7:13:17 PM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: OneVike; HiTech RedNeck

The men taught by the instructions of the prophet Daniel knew exactly when and where he was to be born by studying the astronomy of the constellation Bethula (Virgo in pagan lingo).

The late professor D. James Kennedy had a theory on how his second coming was going to be foretold by the constellations Large Sheepfold, and Small Sheepfold (Big Dipper, Little Dipper) as they foretold Yeshua’s two “sheep folds” to which he was sent by the Father, rejoining as prophesied by Ezekiel in chapter 37.


24 posted on 05/18/2014 7:14:53 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: editor-surveyor

Trippy, mon. Is there a place for the age of Aquarius in there somehow?


25 posted on 05/18/2014 7:18:37 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

Kind of sounds like it, but Kennedy was definitely no ‘new-ager.’ He was a serious student of Hebrew/Biblical astronomy.

He had once published a dissertation called “The Real Meaning of the Zodiac” that explained the Biblical naming and purpose of the constellations.

One interesting thing is that the meaning of the names of all of the constellations is the same, regardless of what culture or language they hail from.
.


26 posted on 05/18/2014 7:27:13 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: editor-surveyor

Color me heavily skeptical about the actual meaning of it all, although there was historical cross-pollination between mystical Jewish beliefs and Babylonian beliefs. Alfred Edersheim pointed out some ways this was so.

I still say you and your buds are into a cult. Not just a Jewish-flavored take on Christianity, but an actual cult.


27 posted on 05/18/2014 7:30:30 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (Embrace the Lion of Judah and He will roar for you and teach you to roar too. See my page.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

All the “Babylonian” stuff had its foundation in the knowledge infused into their culture by Daniel who literally ran Babylon for over three generations.

Except for the pagan idolatry, most things intellectually “Babylonian” are derived from the knowledge base of the Aaronic priesthood. The same can be said for India. Ayurvedic medicine is mostly that of the Hebrew priests.


28 posted on 05/18/2014 7:44:35 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

BTW, everything I am into is of the plain words of the Bible, without the sweet add-on words of men.
.


29 posted on 05/18/2014 7:46:27 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

One more thing you might ponder:

There is absolutely nothing “Jewish” about Yehova’s revelations to Moses at Mt. Sinai; it is distinctly Hebrew, not Jewish.

The Jewish garbage was all born in the late second temple period, at the hands of the Pharisees.

Removing Phariseeism from the true faith delivered at Sinai was the essence of Yeshua’s ministry.
.


30 posted on 05/18/2014 7:54:37 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: OneVike

bfl


31 posted on 05/18/2014 9:12:12 PM PDT by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: OneVike

“Isaiah has always been to me like the book of Revelations”

Isn’t it Revelation?


32 posted on 05/20/2014 8:03:52 AM PDT by FNU LNU (Nothing runs like a Deere, nothing smells like a john)
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To: FNU LNU

Yes it is, but you could say the same about every OT book. Especially the books of the Prophets.

I meant it more in the way of the Book of Revelation of Jesus Christ.


33 posted on 05/20/2014 11:46:03 AM PDT by OneVike (I'm just a Christian waiting for a ride home)
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