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Keyword: 18thdynasty

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  • Tombs of legendary lovers

    02/15/2014 11:25:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    al-Ahram ^ | February 13, 2014 | Nevine El-Aref
    Queen Nefertari, whose name means “beautiful companion”, was one of Ramses II’s eight royal wives and his most beloved one. Although Nefertari’s family background is unknown, the discovery of an inscription of the cartouche of the pharaoh Ay inside her tomb has led archaeologists to speculate that she was related to him. If any relation exists, she could be his great-granddaughter because of the time between the reign of Ay and Ramses II in Ancient Egyptian history. Until now no decisive archaeological evidence has been found to link Nefertari to the royal family of the 18th Dynasty. Nefertari married Ramses...
  • The Egyptian army headquarters in Sinai during the New Kingdom discovered

    05/04/2015 7:28:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Luxor Times Magazine 'blog ^ | May 3, 2015 | unattributed
    Dr. Mamdouh El Damaty announced the discovery of the remains of the eastern gate of Tharw fortres in Sinai which served as the Egyptian army headquarters in the New Kingdom. The discovery was made by the Egyptian team working at Tell Habwa in the east bank of the Suez Canal. The discovery also include mid brick royal warehouse belong to "Ramses II and Thotmoses III" and 26th Dynasty cemetery most of the graves are mud brick and group tombs of contains human remains showing battles injuries. The discovered part of the eastern gate of Tharw fortress are 3 fragments of...
  • Part of colossus found near Luxor ( Amenhotep III statue )

    02/07/2006 10:27:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 347+ views
    Egypt Online ^ | Tuesday, February 07, 2006 | some online Egyptian
    A German expedition has unearthed part of a colossal statue of an XVIII dynasty pharaoh. Minister of Culture Farouq Hosni said that "the red granite head and shoulders of Amenihotep III (1390-1352 BC) were unearthed in the pharaoh's temple area at Kom el-Hetan on the west bank of the Nile at Luxor." Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), Zahi Hawass said that "The one-metre, high bust is in good condition' except for a slight crack on the right side." For her part, the leader of the German team described the bust as "the best portrait of King...
  • Ancient Egyptian royal head puzzles archaeologists

    01/30/2006 11:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 256+ views
    Mail&Guardian online ^ | 30 January 2006 | Sapa-dpa
    The Sakhmet statues, which date to the New Kingdom's 18th dynasty (circa 1533 to 1292 BC), hail from the same period as most of the finds in the area. The head, believed to date to the 25th dynasty (circa 760 to 656 BC) that is characterised by its Nubian features, seems out of place, however.
  • Ancient Egyptian capital Amarna mapped through satellite imagery system

    03/11/2015 12:23:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | Wednesday, March 11, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The layout of Tell el-Amarna, ancient Egypt's capital during the reign of pharaoh Akhenaten (1353B.C-1336B.C), has been reveled through remote sensing techniques, the Antiquities Ministry stated Wednesday. The discovery is attributed to a spatial high resolution satellite imagery system that was carried out by the archaeology mission of Belgian University of Leuven, currently excavating at Amarna on the east bank of Upper Egypt's governorate of Minya, said Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty. "The team captured and analyzed images from satellites orbiting 450 kilometers above the earth, equipped with advanced cameras," Damaty said in the statement, adding that the images showed "the...
  • Another Tomb Discovered at Al-Qurna [18th Dynasty Egypt]

    03/11/2015 9:56:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 10, 2015 | editors
    Another 18th Dynasty tomb has been discovered by archaeologists from the American Research Center in Egypt at Al-Qurna in Luxor. Paintings on the walls of this New Kingdom (1550-1070 B.C.) tomb "are records of daily life practices that prevailed in that era," according to a statement made by Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty. This tomb, which belonged to Satmut and his wife Ta-kh-at, was also looted in antiquity, and some of the scenes and inscriptions on its walls were erased. "The newly discovered tomb is located to the east of TT110 and they share the same courtyard. The tomb door is...
  • Study Shows Life Was Tough For Ancient Egyptians

    03/28/2008 8:20:26 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 2,383+ views
    Yahoo news ^ | 3-28-2008 | Alaa Shahine
    Study shows life was tough for ancient Egyptians By Alaa Shahine Fri Mar 28, 10:12 AM ETReuters Photo: The Giza pyramids in a file photo. New evidence of a sick, deprived population working... CAIRO (Reuters) - New evidence of a sick, deprived population working under harsh conditions contradicts earlier images of wealth and abundance from the art records of the ancient Egyptian city of Tell el-Amarna, a study has found. Tell el-Amarna was briefly the capital of ancient Egypt during the reign of the pharaoh Akhenaten, who abandoned most of Egypt's old gods in favor of the Aten sun disk...
  • 18th-Dynasty Tomb Discovered in Luxor

    03/04/2015 2:23:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 03, 2015 | editors
    A tomb dating to the 18th Dynasty has been discovered by a team from the American Research Center in the Gorna necropolis on Luxor’s west bank. The t-shaped tomb has two large halls and an unfinished small niche at one end. A side room has a shaft that “could lead to the burial chamber,” Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh el-Damaty told Ahram Online. The walls of the tomb, which was looted and damaged in antiquity, are decorated with paintings of hunting scenes and images of the tomb’s owner, a guard of Amun’s gate, and his wife in front of an offering...
  • Beard on King Tut's burial mask damaged after epoxy gluing

    01/22/2015 8:36:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 29 replies
    AP ^ | January 22, 2014 | Staff
    The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with epoxy, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning, conservators at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo said Wednesday. The museum is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds, mounted on walls, crumble from behind open panels of glass. Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are its top exhibits. Three of the museum's conservators reached by telephone gave...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Danish Bronze Age glass beads traced to Egypt

    12/09/2014 5:22:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | December 8, 2014 | Jeanette Varberg, Flemming Kaul, Bernard Gratuze, tr by Michael de Laine
    ...The analyses revealed that the glass originate from the same glass workshops in Egypt that supplied the glass that the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun took with him to his grave in 1323 BC... Globalisation in the Bronze Age Twenty-three glass beads from Denmark were analysed using plasma-spectrometry. Without destroying the fragile beads, this technique makes it possible to compare the chemical composition of trace elements in the beads with reference material from Amarna in Egypt and Nippur in Mesopotamia, about 50 km south east of Baghdad in Iraq. The comparison showed that the chemical composition of the two sets of trace...
  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered

    07/27/2014 2:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 24, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The panel, carved in Nubian Sandstone, was found recently in a tomb at the site of Sedeinga, in modern-day Sudan. It is about 5.8 feet (1.8 meters) tall by 1.3 feet (0.4 m) wide, and was found in two pieces. Originally, it adorned the walls of a temple at Sedeinga that was dedicated to Queen Tiye (also spelled Tiyi), who died around 1340 B.C. Several centuries after Tiye's death — and after her temple had fallen into ruin — this panel was reused in a tomb as a bench that held a coffin above the floor. Scars of a revolution...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

    07/21/2014 9:34:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, July 17, 2014 | unattributed
    ...the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977. “The puzzle seems now to have been solved,” says Kemp. “ It has come about through the desert GPS survey begun in 2001 and continued in subsequent years. First came the discovery of two cemeteries (clearly robbed) of what must be relatively poor graves on the flat desert not far from tomb no....
  • King Tut's Mummified Erect Penis May Point to Ancient Religious Struggle

    01/06/2014 6:58:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 97 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 02, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The pharaoh was buried in Egypt's Valley of the Kings without a heart (or a replacement artifact known as a heart scarab); his penis was mummified erect; and his mummy and coffins were covered in a thick layer of black liquid that appear to have resulted in the boy-king catching fire... The mummified erect penis and other burial anomalies were not accidents during embalming, Ikram suggests, but rather deliberate attempts to make the king appear as Osiris, the god of the underworld, in as literal a way as possible. The erect penis evokes Osiris' regenerative powers; the black liquid made...
  • King Tut Was Killed In A Gruesome Chariot Accident, Says Science

    11/08/2013 8:09:52 PM PST · by bkopto · 29 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | Nov 3, 2013 | Michael Ballaban
    Tutankhamen was the most famous of all the Egyptian Pharaohs, but it's always been a bit of a mystery how he died. He passed at only 19, and he seemed to have pretty bad injuries at his death, but there was no record of an assassination. Thanks to Science, we now know it was probably due to a chariot accident. King Tut is best known because when his tomb was found in 1922, it was in relatively good condition compared to other, more ransacked pharaonic resting places. The sarcophagus and mummy were still there, which is always a good sign,...
  • Mummy-fried! Tutankhamun's body spontaneously combusted INSIDE his coffin

    11/03/2013 9:31:59 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 62 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 11-3-13 | Claudia Joseeph & Sam Webb
    The mummified body of Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun burst into flames inside his sarcophagus after a botched attempt to embalm him, according to scientists in a new documentary. After his death in 1323 BC, Tutankhamun was rapidly embalmed and buried, but fire investigators believe a chemical reaction caused by embalming oils used on his mummy sparked the blaze. A fragment of flesh from the boy pharaoh, whose tomb was discovered in 1922 by Howard Carter and the Earl of Carnarvon, was tested by researchers who confirmed his body was burnt while sealed in his coffin. Tut has long fired the public imagination....
  • Tutankhamun's replica tomb to be re-erected in Luxor

    10/03/2013 3:50:19 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Tuesday 1 Oct 2013 | Nevine El-Aref
    A committee administering Egypt's antiquities decided Tuesday to re-erect a dismantled replica tomb of King Tutankhamun, placing it beside the former residence of discoverer Howard Carter on Luxor's west bank. Secretary-general of the Ministry of the State of Antiquities (MSA), Mostafa Amin, told Ahram Online that the replica tomb will provide tourists with a better picture of how Carter lived during his excavation work at the Valley of the Kings in the early 1920s. Tourists can already visit the Carter Rest-House in Luxor, which has been restored and developed into a museum displaying the tools and instruments he used during...
  • ARTP Radar Survey of the Valley of the Kings

    06/16/2013 4:39:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Nicholas Reeves dot com ^ | 2 February 2012 | Hirokatsu Watanabe, Masanori Ito and Nicholas Reeves
    The Amarna Royal Tombs Project's GPR (ground-penetrating radar) survey of the Valley of the Kings, undertaken in August 2000 by Hirokatsu Watanabe, was an experimental exercise carried out with the intention that it would be tested in due course by supplementary survey and actual excavation. Since ARTP was denied the opportunity of seeing through that vital second stage, the initial results, though promising, remained unproven. We could responsibly do little beyond keep the data on file, with a view to their eventual publication as an intriguing though sadly speculative annexe to ARTP's final report. In 2005, however, this impasse was...
  • Berlin marks 100 years of discovering Nefertiti

    09/03/2012 7:30:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | August 30, 2012 | Agence France-Presse
    Berlin's Egyptian Museum has said that it will celebrate the centenary of the discovery of the 3,400-year-old fabled bust of Egypt's Queen Nefertiti amid an ongoing feud with Cairo over its ownership. The museum said it would open an exhibition on Dec. 6 honoring the famous sculpture and other jewels of the Amarna period in its collection on the German capital's Museum Island. On the same day in 1912, the bust was unearthed by German archaeologist Ludwig Borchardt. "The exhibition focuses on never-before-seen discoveries from the collections of the Berlin museum, supplemented by loans from other museums abroad," it said,...
  • Archaeology meets politics: Spring comes to ancient Egypt

    12/01/2011 8:25:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, November 23, 2011 | Jo Marchant
    In a secluded stretch of desert about 300 kilometres south of Cairo, hundreds of bodies lie buried in the sand. Wrapped in linen and rolled up in stiff mats made of sticks... their ornate plaited hair styles and simple personal possessions help to reveal details about the individuals in each grave. The bodies date from... when the Pharaoh Akhenaten... moved his capital to remote Amarna, to worship... the Sun disc Aten... Barry Kemp, an archaeologist at the University of Cambridge, UK, and director of the Amarna Project, has been working with his colleagues to excavate the skeletons, and says that...
  • Half of European men share King Tut's DNA

    08/01/2011 10:50:56 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 73 replies
    Reuters ^ | Mon Aug 1, 2011 | Alice Baghdjian
    Up to 70 percent of British men and half of all Western European men are related to the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun, geneticists in Switzerland said. Scientists at Zurich-based DNA genealogy centre, iGENEA, reconstructed the DNA profile of the boy Pharaoh, who ascended the throne at the age of nine, his father Akhenaten and grandfather Amenhotep III, based on a film that was made for the Discovery Channel. The results showed that King Tut belonged to a genetic profile group, known as haplogroup R1b1a2, to which more than 50 percent of all men in Western Europe belong, indicating that they share...
  • King Tut statue looted from Egypt museum

    02/13/2011 12:53:55 PM PST · by fightinJAG · 14 replies
    ABC ^ | Feb. 13, 2011 | Staff
    BREAKING - Looters who raided Egypt's famed museum during the unrest that toppled Hosni Mubarak have hauled off a trove of ancient treasures, including a statue of King Tutankhamun, officials said. The plundered artefacts include a gilded wooden statue showing the boy pharaoh being carried by a goddess, and parts of another statue of him harpooning fish, the minister of state for antiquities, Zahi Hawass, said. Looters broke into the museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square on January 28 when anti-Mubarak protesters drove his despised police from the streets in a series of clashes and torched the adjacent ruling party headquarters....
  • King Tut suffered 'massive' chest injury, new research reveals

    11/12/2010 8:50:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 93 replies · 1+ views
    Heritage Key ^ | Friday, November 5, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    One possibility that Dr. Harer ruled out is that of a chariot accident. "If he fell from a speeding chariot going at top speed you would have what we call a tumbling injury -- he'd go head over heels. He would break his neck. His back. His arms, legs. It wouldn't gouge a chunk out of his chest." Instead, at his Toronto lecture, Harer brought up another, more exotic possibility -- that Tut was killed by a hippo. It's not as far out an idea as it sounds, hippos are aggressive, quick and territorial animals, and there is an artefact...
  • King Tut's Chariots Marvels of Engineering

    11/09/2010 7:10:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Tuesday, August 3, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    King Tutankhamun, the pharaoh who ruled Egypt more than 3,300 years ago, rode full speed over the desert dunes on a Formula One-like chariot, according to new investigations into the technical features of the boy king's vehicle collection. Discovered in pieces by British archaeologist Howard Carter when he entered King Tut's treasure-packed tomb in 1922, the collection consisted of two large ceremonial chariots, a smaller highly decorated one, and three others that were lighter and made for daily use. "They were the Ferrari of antiquity. They boasted an elegant design and an extremely sophisticated and astonishingly modern technology," Alberto Rovetta,...
  • Nefertiti & the Aten in Colour! 16K Amarna Art Talatat blocks in Luxor w/Original Pigment Preserved

    08/10/2010 8:53:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Heritage Key ^ | Mondat, August 9, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    Talatat blocks were used by the pharaoh Akhenaten nearly 3,400 years ago. They were constructed in a standardized size -- 55 cm x 25 cm x 25 cm. This standardization probably would have made it easier for temples to be built. The blocks are in a storage area in Luxor. Almost all of them are decorated. Back in antiquity each block would have been part of a larger scene. Another key find is that the Aten, the sun disc which the pharaoh Akhenaten focussed Egyptian religion around, radiates light in two colours. "We have red sun rays and yellow sun...
  • King Tut's Leftover Bandages Yield New Clues

    05/20/2010 7:29:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 758+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, May 19, 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    King Tutankhamun's mummy was wrapped in custom-made bandages similar to modern first aid gauzes, an exhibit at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art reveals. Running in length from 4.70 meters to 39 cm (15.4 feet to 15.3 inches), the narrow bandages consist of 50 linen pieces especially woven for the boy king. For a century, the narrow linen bandages were contained in a rather overlooked cache of large ceramic jars at the museum's Department of Egyptian Art. The collection was recovered from the Valley of the Kings between 1907-08, more than a decade before Howard Carter discovered King Tut's treasure-packed...
  • Egyptian Official Angry that King Tut is not at the Met Calls Times Square Exhibition Space a 'Hole'

    04/23/2010 9:46:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies · 664+ views
    DNAinfo ^ | April 22, 2010 | Tara Kyle
    Dr. Zahi Hawass, the secretary general for Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities told a press conference Wednesday that hosting the Tutankhamun's tomb at the Discover Time Square Exposition cheapened the exhibition. "This priceless artifact should be at the Met, not at this hole," Hawass said. In an embarassing preview for the exhibition, Hawass called Arts and Exhibitions International President John Norman to the stage and demanded he "answer the question. Why is King Tut not at the Met?" Norman responded by saying then when plans to bring Tut back to New York began over five years ago, he met with...
  • Did King Tut's Discoverer Steal from the Tomb?

    01/19/2010 10:57:55 AM PST · by Palter · 7 replies · 829+ views
    Spiegel Online ^ | 15 Jan 2010 | Matthias Schulz
    Howard Carter, the British explorer who opened the tomb of Tutankhamun in 1922, will forever be associated with the greatest trove of artifacts from ancient Egypt. But was he also a thief? Dawn was breaking as Howard Carter took up a crowbar to pry open the sealed tomb door in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. With shaking hands, he held a candle to the fissure, now wafting out 3,300-year-old air. What did he see, those behind him wanted to know. The archaeologist could do no more than stammer, "Wonderful things!" This scene from Thebes in November, 1922, is considered archaeology's...
  • King Tut explorer’s photos, treasures revealed

    07/16/2009 2:32:35 PM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies · 642+ views
    Discovery ^ | Jul 16, 2009 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Lord Carnarvon, the man who funded the discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun and died five months later in mysterious circumstances before he could actually see the mummy's face, was a superstitious man who wore the same lucky bow tie all his life. > The end of the exhibition also represents the end of the story for Lord Carnarvon: on display the razor which he used in 1923. He cut a mosquito bite while shaving and the wound turned septic. He died of pneumonia brought on by blood poisoning on April 5, 1923, in the "hour of his triumph," as...
  • "Beauty of the Nile" May Have Had Ancient Makeover

    03/30/2009 11:08:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies · 772+ views
    Reuters ^ | Tue Mar 31, 2009
    An ancient Egyptian queen regarded as the Mona Lisa of the ancient world may not have been such a looker after all, German scientists said on Tuesday. A delicately carved face in the limestone core of the famous bust of Nefertiti suggests the royal sculptor at the time may have smoothed creases around the mouth and fixed a bumpy nose to depict the "Beauty of the Nile" in a better light. The bust of Nefertiti was found in Egypt in 1912 at Tell el-Amarna, the short-lived capital of Nefertiti's husband, the Pharaoh Akhenaten. It is now housed in Berlin's Altes...
  • Iraq: Small statue of Egyptian pharaoh found

    03/06/2009 7:51:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 915+ views
    AllNewsWeb.com ^ | Monday, February 16, 2009 | Michael Cohen
    Archaeologists have discovered a small ancient statue of the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamen in Kurdish Northern Iraq. The discovery was made by a team led by noted Iraqi archaeologist Mr Hassan Ahmad in an area known as Dohuq Valley in a place referred to by locals as 'Pharaoh's Palace'. Experts have estimated the age of the statue at around 3500 years old, dating from around 1400 BC. The statue confirms historical data that the ancient Egyptians, during the 'New Kingdom' period, enjoyed warm relations with the Hittite Mitanni Kingdom and often travelled into their territory many hundreds of miles from the...
  • The Trowel vs. the Text: How the Amarna letters challenge archaeology

    12/30/2008 8:35:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 890+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | Jan/Feb 2009 | Nadav Na'aman
    Caught Between A Rock And A Reed's Trace. The Amarna letters are a collection of more than 300 cuneiform tablets discovered at el-Amarna in Egypt in the late 1800s. Dating to the Late Bronze Age (1500-1150 B.C.E.), the archive consists of royal correspondence of Pharaoh Amenophis III (1391-1353 B.C.E.) and his son, Pharaoh Akhenaten (Amenophis IV, 1353-1337 B.C.E.) with local rulers of various Canaanite city-states. This tablet (catalogued as EA 289) and several others were sent to the pharaoh by 'Abdi-Heba, the ruler of Urusalim (Jerusalem), indicating that there was a significant city at the site in the 14th...
  • The Androgynous Pharaoh? Akhenaten had feminine physique

    05/02/2008 10:57:44 AM PDT · by ElkGroveDan · 50 replies · 334+ views
    AP via Yahoo ^ | Fri May 2, 6:23 AM ET | ALEX DOMINGUEZ
    BALTIMORE - Akhenaten wasn't the most manly pharaoh, even though he fathered at least a half-dozen children. In fact, his form was quite feminine. And he was a bit of an egghead. So concludes a Yale University physician who analyzed images of Akhenaten for an annual conference Friday at the University of Maryland School of Medicine on the deaths of historic figures. The female form was due to a genetic mutation that caused the pharaoh's body to convert more male hormones to female hormones than needed, Dr. Irwin Braverman believes. And Akhenaten's head was misshapen because of a condition in...
  • Grim Secrets Of Pharaoh's City

    01/26/2008 10:18:42 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 469+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-26-2008 | John Hayes-Fisher
    Grim secrets of Pharaoh's city By John Hayes-Fisher BBC Timewatch Bones reveal the darker side to building Ancient Egypt Evidence of the brutal lives endured by some ancient Egyptians to build the monuments of the Pharaohs has been uncovered by archaeologists. Skeletal remains from a lost city in the middle of Egypt suggest many ordinary people died in their teenage years and lived a punishing lifestyle. Many suffered from spinal injuries, poor nutrition and stunted growth. The remains were found at Amarna, a new capital built on the orders of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, 3,500 years ago. Hieroglyphs written at the...
  • Ancient Egyptian Glassmaking Recreated

    12/14/2007 7:23:57 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 175+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 12-14-2007 | Dr Paul Nicholson
    Contact: Dr. Paul Nicholson NicholsonPT@cardiff.ac.co.uk 44-292-087-4582 Cardiff University Ancient Egyptian glassmaking recreated 3000-year-old furnace rebuilt by archaeologist The reconstructed kiln built by Dr. Paul Nicholson of Cardiff University and Dr. Caroline Jackson of Sheffield University. A team led by a Cardiff University archaeologist has reconstructed a 3,000-year-old glass furnace, showing that Ancient Egyptian glassmaking methods were much more advanced than previously thought. Dr Paul Nicholson, of the University’s School of History and Archaeology, is leader of an Egypt Exploration Society team working on the earliest fully excavated glassmaking site in the world. The site, at Amarna, on the banks of...
  • Face of King Tut unshrouded to public

    11/04/2007 7:10:10 AM PST · by Aristotelian · 44 replies · 1,368+ views
    AP ^ | November 4, 2007 | ANNA JOHNSON
    LUXOR, Egypt - The face of King Tut was unshrouded in public for the first time on Sunday — 85 years after the 3,000-year-old boy pharaoh's golden enshrined tomb and mummy were discovered in Luxor's famed Valley of the Kings. Archeologists removed the mummy from his stone sarcophagus in his underground tomb, momentarily pulling aside a white linen covering to reveal a shriveled leathery black face and body. The mummy of the 19-year-old pharaoh, whose life and death has captivated people for nearly a century, was placed in a climate-controlled glass box in the tomb, with only the face and...
  • Tutankhamun's True Face To Be Revealed

    10/21/2007 8:41:09 PM PDT · by blam · 61 replies · 1,293+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10-22-2007 | Nigel Reynolds
    Tutankhamun's true face to be revealed By Nigel Reynolds, Arts Correspondent Last Updated: 2:55am BST 22/10/2007 The true face of Tutankhamun, the boy king who ruled Egypt 3,500 years ago, is to be revealed to the public for the first time. Only a handful of experts have ever seen Tutankhamun's true likeness To coincide with the opening of the exhibition of the treasures of Tutankhamun in London next month, Egyptian archaeologists are to put his mummified body on display in Luxor. Only a handful of experts have ever seen the 19-year-old pharaoh's true likeness. Though not the most important of...
  • Tutankhamun was not black: Egypt antiquities chief

    09/26/2007 11:58:41 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 124 replies · 10,667+ views
    AFP ^ | September 25, 2007
    Egyptian antiquities supremo Zahi Hawass insisted Tuesday that Tutankhamun was not black despite calls by US black activists to recognise the boy king's dark skin colour. "Tutankhamun was not black, and the portrayal of ancient Egyptian civilisation as black has no element of truth to it," Hawass told reporters. "Egyptians are not Arabs and are not Africans despite the fact that Egypt is in Africa," he said, quoted by the official MENA news agency. Hawass said he was responding to several demonstrations in Philadelphia after a lecture he gave there on September 6 where he defended his theory. Protestors also...
  • Archaeologists find Akhenaten-era tomb (as a result of Dutch team excavation in the Sakkara area)

    02/14/2007 1:01:18 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 475+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 2/14/07 | Reuters
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Dutch archaeologists have discovered the tomb of the Pharaoh Akhenaten's seal bearer, decorated with paintings including scenes of monkeys picking and eating fruit, Egyptian antiquities officials said on Wednesday. The tomb belonged to the official named Ptahemwi and was discovered during a Dutch team's excavation in the Sakkara area, the burial ground for the city of Memphis, the state news agency MENA said, quoting chief antiquities official Zahi Hawass. Akhenaten, the 18th-dynasty pharaoh who ruled Egypt from 1379 to 1362 BC, abandoned most of the old gods and tried to imposed a monotheistic religion based on worship...
  • 'They Show No Respect for Their Caesars'

    12/18/2006 5:49:10 PM PST · by SJackson · 24 replies · 1,452+ views
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 12-18-06 | Gerald A. Honigman
    'They Show No Respect for Their Caesars'by Gerald A. HonigmanDec 18, '06 / 27 Kislev 5767  E-mail This  Print  Homepage The year was 1887. An Egyptian woman discovered a treasure trove of over three hundred clay cuneiform tablets that would shake the world of religion and the study of ancient history. Named for a local Bedouin tribe, the Tel El-Amarna tablets (which can now be found mostly in the Berlin and British Museums) were mostly the official correspondence between Pharaoh Amenhotep IV - Akhenaten - and his governors and vassals from places such as Canaan, Syria, Babylonia, etc. They date mostly from...
  • Pharaoh's curse or coincidence?[King Tut]

    11/28/2006 12:29:32 PM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 28 replies · 1,433+ views
    Chicago Sun-Times ^ | 28 Nov 2006 | JIM RITTER
    Researchers studying Tut hit by huge storm, CT malfunction Scientists who recently conducted a high-tech examination of King Tut's mummy insist they don't believe in the "Curse of the Pharaohs." Still, some awfully strange things happened when the team X-rayed the boy king's body with a medical CT scanning machine. On the way to the Egyptian site, one researcher's vehicle nearly hit a child. Then a huge storm hit. The CT machine, usually reliable, wouldn't work at first. And when researchers finally began the CT scan, one scientist came down with such a violent coughing attack he had to leave....
  • Neferititi was actually a ‘fascinating' aging beauty

    09/15/2006 3:58:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 779+ views
    New Kerala ^ | September 6, 2006 | unattributed
    Discovered in 1912 at Tel-El-Amarna in what used to be the workshop of the sculptor Thutmose, the bust - depicting a woman with a long neck, elegantly arched brows, high cheekbones, a slender nose and an enigmatic smile played about red lips, has become the international symbol of beauty. However, a new examination of the famous bust has revealed visible wrinkles running down her slender neck, and puffy bags circling, leading experts to now believe that Nefertiti was an aging beauty. Dietrich Wildung, director of Berlin's Egyptian museum, who is part of the investigation, revealed that signs of aging had...
  • Potential Cure Discovered for Marfan Syndrome

    07/10/2006 5:58:40 PM PDT · by wjersey · 19 replies · 783+ views
    WPVI ( Philadelphia) ^ | 7/10/2006 | Anita Brikman
    Hundreds of people with Marfan syndrome came from around the country to the University of Pennsylvania over the weekend to hear good news. Years of genetic research may have yielded a "cure" for the most dangerous complications of this disorder. 13-year-old Westin Corbin from Arkansas has many of the hallmark signs of Marfan Syndrome - a disorder affecting the body's connective tissues. He is tall with unusually long arms, thin legs and flat feet, and a chest wall that seems to cave in. His joints are loose and hyper-flexible, but the real danger of Marfan's lies inside because it also...
  • King Tut returns to Chicago

    05/30/2006 12:50:43 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 17 replies · 333+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 5/30/06 | Tara Burghart - ap
    CHICAGO - You can kick back with a King Tuttini cocktail, learn to decipher hieroglyphs or indulge in an "Egyptian Golden Body Wrap" complete with exfoliating Dead Sea salts and a dusting of golden powder. Yes, King Tut is back, and Chicago is fired up for the pharaoh. The traveling exhibit "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" has opened at The Field Museum, attracting a line of ticket buyers. Organizers believe the show, which opened Friday, could draw 1 million visitors before it closes here on Jan. 1, 2007, and businesses, restaurants and universities are lining up special...
  • Amarna Princess a forgery [Egyptian statue in forgery claim]

    03/27/2006 11:09:33 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 921+ views
    BBC ^ | Monday, 20 March 2006 | staff
    Two men have been bailed by police investigating the alleged forgery of a valuable Egyptian statue. The 3,300-year-old Amarna Princess was bought by Bolton Museum nearly three years ago for £440,000 to add to its existing Egyptology collection. The 52cm-high sculpture is believed to be one of the daughters of the Pharaoh Akhenaten and his queen, Nefertiti. Metropolitan Police Art & Antiques Unit arrested two Bolton men aged 83 and 46 on suspicion of forgery last week. They have been bailed until May pending further inquiries. The statue, which was acquired in September 2003, has been removed from public view....
  • Demonstrators say King Tut exhibit depicts wrong skin color

    12/18/2005 12:08:30 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 150 replies · 33,570+ views
    http://www.centredaily.com ^ | Dec. 17, 2005 | MACOLLVIE JEAN-FRANCOIS
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - A "King Tut is back and he's still black" placard drew the gaze of visitors making their way to view the acclaimed exhibit at the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale Saturday. Across from the entrance, about 25 demonstrators donning T-shirts marked with various pro-black slogans held up the placards. Waving the red, black and green African flag, at times moving to the beat of djembe drums on the sidewalk, they asked drivers in passing cars to honk in support of their goal: reminding people not to take the lighter-skinned portrait of King Tutankhamun on display...
  • King Tut liked Red Wine Best

    10/30/2005 2:38:20 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 16 replies · 753+ views
    LONDON -- A University of Barcelona research team has discovered Egypt's King Tutankhamen was partial to wine, preferring red over white. The mystery of exactly what was kept inside jars found in the tomb of the Egyptian king (1336-1327 BC) was solved by the Spanish scientists who analyzed scrapings from eight jars found in Tutankhamen's tomb. They presented their findings on Wednesday at the British Museum in London, The Times of London reported. "Wine jars were placed in tombs as funerary meals," Maria Rosa Guasch-Jane, a master in Egyptology at the university, told The Independent. "The ... wine jars were...
  • King Tut Drank Red Wine, Researcher Says

    10/26/2005 3:39:02 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 54 replies · 994+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/26/05 | JENN WIANT - ap
    LONDON - King Tutankhamen was a red wine drinker, according to a researcher who analyzed traces of the vintage found in his tomb. Maria Rosa Guasch-Jane told reporters Wednesday at the British Museum that she made her discovery after inventing a process that gave archaeologists a tool to discover the color of ancient wine. "This is the first time someone has found an ancient red wine," she said. Wine bottles from King Tut's time were labeled with the name of the product, the year of harvest, the source and the vine grower, Guasch-Jane said, but did not include the color...
  • King Tut treasure back in U.S. as Egypt seeks gold -Bubba seeks exibit in Arkansas

    06/19/2005 7:42:26 AM PDT · by Tumbleweed_Connection · 8 replies · 1,697+ views
    Reuters ^ | 6/19/05 | Nigel Hunt
    The gilded treasures of Tutankhamun have returned to the United States more than 25 years after the sensational success of their first visit, and this time Egypt intends to cash in on the enduring popularity of the boy king. The comeback museum tour has all of the trappings of a Hollywood blockbuster sequel: a "gold carpet" opening in Los Angeles, a high-powered marketing effort and the potential for a massive box office with tickets as high as $30 each. "I am not going to send any exhibit for free anymore. We took you for a free lunch and dinner a...