Keyword: 18thdynasty

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Wealthy 3,600-year-old Trading Hub Found in Gaza

    06/25/2016 6:29:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 20, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The remains of a vast Bronze Age town... has been discovered in Gaza, and has now been shown to be a rich trading hub. The prosperity of its Canaanite inhabitants is evident in discoveries of elaborate gold jewelry, vast amounts of imported pottery and an unprecedented number of scarabs... trade between the seaside Canaanite town and other Mediterranean peoples, notably the ancient Cypriots. Among the clay sherds discovered were over 200 of white slip I type of pottery, a type of ware rarely found outside of Cyprus. Tell el-Ajjul, which lies right on the Gazan coast, was first explored by...
  • 'Ancient Artefacts Brought Over By Egyptians, Not By Traders' (Malta)

    01/13/2007 3:08:47 PM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 597+ views
    Times Of Malta ^ | 1-13-2007 | Natalino Fenech
    'Ancient artefacts brought over by Egyptians, not by traders' Natalino Fenech The triad discovered at an abandoned archaeological site in Gozo in 1713. Two members of the Egyptological Society of Malta are promoting the theory that the many ancient Egyptian artefacts unearthed in Malta were brought over by the Egyptians themselves, and not, as commonly thought, by traders. In an article titled Did The Ancient Egyptians Ever Reach Malta?, published in the Egyptian Egyptological journal, Anton Mifsud and Marta Farrugia analysed Egyptian artefacts found here and went through old and recently published material on which to base their conclusions. Dr...
  • Study aims to uncover mystery of Luxor's tomb KV55

    06/17/2016 11:10:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    al-Ahram (English) ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | Nevine El-Aref
    This week, the Ministry of Antiquities will start the second phase of a study aimed at uncovering the mystery behind an unidentified sarcophagus found in 1906 inside tomb KV55 at the Valley of the Kings on Luxor’s west bank. The study is being operated with a grant of $28,500 from the American Research Centre in Egypt (ARCE) Endowment Fund. This tomb was thought to hold the body of the monotheistic king Akhenaten, though no definitive evidence has been presented to back up this speculation. Elham Salah, head of the ministry’s Museums Department, told Ahram Online that the study is being...
  • Enigmatic Discovery (Granite Nubian Head)

    02/17/2006 10:22:17 AM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 636+ views
    Al-Ahram ^ | 2-17-2006
    Enigmatic discoveryThe discovery of a red granite head of a king with Nubian features in the precinct of Amenhotep III's temple on Luxor's West Bank has puzzled Egyptologists, writes Nevine El-Aref "This really is a very surprising discovery," Hourig Sourouzian, director of the German conservation project for the Colossi of Memnon and Amenhotep III's temple, told Al-Ahram Weekly. She explained that since excavation of the site began in 1998 the mission had consistently stumbled upon homogenous New Kingdom statuaries until last week, when a well-preserved red granite royal head with Kushite features -- full cheeks and bulging lips -- was...
  • Unearthing Egypt's Greatest Temple

    11/01/2007 9:33:14 AM PDT · by BGHater · 42 replies · 57+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | October 2007 | Andew Lawler
    Discovering the grandeur of the monument built 3,400 years ago "Heya hup!" Deep in a muddy pit, a dozen workers wrestle with Egypt's fearsome lion goddess, struggling to raise her into the sunlight for the first time in more than 3,000 years. She is Sekhmet—"the one who is powerful"—the embodiment of the fiery eye of the sun god Ra, but now she is caked in dirt and bound by thick rope. As the workers heave her out of the pit and onto a wooden track, the sand shifts and the six-foot-tall granite statue threatens to topple. A half-dozen men in...
  • King Tut's Blade Made of Meteorite

    06/01/2016 6:10:11 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    space.com ^ | May 31, 2016 03:42pm ET | Rossella Lorenzi
    King Tut was buried with a dagger made of an iron that literally came from space, says a new study into the composition of the iron blade from the sarcophagus of the boy king. Using non-invasive, portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, a team of Italian and Egyptian researchers confirmed that the iron of the dagger placed on the right thigh of King Tut's mummified body a has meteoric origin. ...
  • Radar Finds Secret Chamber in King Tut's Tomb

    11/29/2015 12:18:18 PM PST · by amorphous · 45 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 28 Nov 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    There is a 90 percent chance the tomb of King Tutankhamun contains a hidden chamber, Egypt's antiquities minister said on Saturday at the end of a three-day probe in the boy king's burial. The investigation included for the first time the use of radar scans and focused mainly on the northern wall of the tomb.
  • Scans of King Tut's Tomb Reveal Hidden Rooms, Egypt's Antiquities Ministry Says

    03/17/2016 10:05:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    NBC News ^ | Mar 17 2016, 8:03 am ET | by Charlene Gubash, Cassandra Vinograd and F. Brinley Bruton
    CAIRO — Radar scans of King Tut's tomb have revealed two spaces on the north and east chambers of the pharaonic mausoleum that could contain the "discovery of the century," Egypt's antiquities ministry said Thursday. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty told a press conference that metal and organic masses were revealed by the scans, signaling that the rooms could possibly contain funerary objects. "It could be the discovery of the century. It's very important for Egyptian history and the history of the world," he said, adding that the chambers may well have belonged to a king or queen. Further tests will...
  • Experts Doubt Claims of 'Hidden Chambers' in King Tut's Tomb

    03/30/2016 11:51:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 29, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    Radar experts are casting doubt on claims that King Tutankhamun's tomb contains hidden, undiscovered chambers — and they're calling for more data to be released. At a March 17 newsconference, officials at Egypt's antiquities ministry released radar data that they said showed the presence of hidden cavities inside the tomb of King Tut. The scans, carried out by Japanese radar technologist Hirokatsu Watanabe, "suggest the presence of two empty spaces or cavities beyond the decorated North and West walls of the burial chamber," they said in a statement. The scans also suggest the "presence of metallic and organic substances," and...
  • Scientists Say Egypt is in Denial Over Hidden Rooms in King Tut's Tomb

    05/15/2016 5:22:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | May 12, 2016 | Erik Shilling
    Scientists said earlier this year that they had found some secret rooms in Tutankhamen's tomb. What could they contain? A popular theory was the tomb of Queen Nefertiti. But other scientists later said that there was good reason to doubt the claims, which were based on scans. Now, the situation has gotten a little bit uglier. A team of radar technicians performed a second, more detailed set of scans on the tomb earlier this year, and sent their results off to Egypt's ministry of antiquities. But the government now has refused to release their findings, and scientists are beginning to...
  • Egyptian Amulet Bearing Name of Pharaoh Found in Soil from Temple Mount

    04/21/2016 1:29:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | April 19th, 2016 | JNi.Media
    The amulet was discovered by Neshama Spielman, a twelve year-old girl from Jerusalem who came with her family to participate in the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “While I was sifting, I came across a piece of pottery that was different from others I had seen, and I immediately thought that maybe I had found something special,” said Spielman. “It’s amazing to find something thousands of years old from ancient Egypt all the way here in Jerusalem! Celebrating Passover this year is going to be extra meaningful to me.” The Passover festival, commemorating the Biblical account of the ancient Israelites Exodus...
  • A Dig Into Jerusalem's Past Fuels Present-Day Debates [Palace of King David Found]

    12/02/2005 8:43:25 AM PST · by West Coast Conservative · 25 replies · 1,379+ views
    Washington Post ^ | December 2, 2005 | Scott Wilson
    Down the slope from the Old City's Dung Gate, rows of thick stone walls, shards of pottery and other remains of an expansive ancient building are being exhumed from a dusty pit. The site is on a narrow terrace at the edge of the Kidron Valley, which sheers away from the Old City walls, in a cliffside area the Bible describes as the seat of the kings of ancient Israel. What is taking shape in the rocky earth, marked by centuries of conquest and development, is as contested as the neighborhood of Arabs and Jews encircling the excavation. But the...
  • The Battleground (Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David Or Shishak?)

    10/23/2003 4:49:06 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 1,175+ views
    Bibical Archaeology ^ | 10-23-2003 | Timothy P. Harrison
    The Battleground Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David or Shishak? Timothy P. Harrison Sidebar: Megiddo at A Glance Did King David conquer and destroy Megiddo? Well, that depends partly on the date of Stratum VI. Let me explain why. Most scholars accept David as a historical figure who was an active military ruler in the period portrayed in the Hebrew Bible (the early tenth century B.C.E.). However, there is considerably less agreement on how to interpret the archaeological evidence for this period. That’s where Megiddo Stratum VI figures in. The dispute is over which archaeological material relates to the time...
  • 3,400-Year-Old Necropolis Found in Egypt

    04/02/2016 10:58:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Discovery News ^ | March 30, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A remarkable 3,400-year-old necropolis has been discovered at an Egyptian quarry site, the Ministry of Antiquities announced on Wednesday. Consisting of dozens of rock-cut tombs, the New Kingdom necropolis was found at Gebel el Sisila, a site north of Aswan known for its stone quarries on both sides of the Nile. Blocks used in building almost all of ancient Egypt’s great temples were cut from there... The shrine is a small rock-cut sanctuary featuring two open chambers facing the river and an inner doorway crowned with the winged solar disc. The burials, meanwhile, consist of one to two undecorated rock-cut...
  • DNA studies show a frail King Tut succumbed to malaria and a broken leg

    02/16/2010 7:56:30 AM PST · by cajuncow · 28 replies · 735+ views
    Cox News ^ | 2-16-10 | Paul Schemm, Assoc. Press
    Egypt's famed King Tutankhamun suffered from a cleft palate and club foot, likely forcing him to walk with a cane, and died from complications from a broken leg exacerbated by malaria, according to the most extensive study ever of his mummy. The findings were from two years of DNA testing and CT scans on 16 mummies, including those of Tutankhamun and his family, the team that carried out the study said in an article to be published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  • Setting Ancient Nefertiti Bust on Bronze Nude Touches off a Tussle

    06/17/2003 11:25:16 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 18 replies · 601+ views
    AP Breaking ^ | Jun 17, 2003 | Donna Bryson Associated Press Writer
    CAIRO, Egypt (AP) - They were together only a few hours. But that brief union of a celebrated, 3,000-year-old bust of the Egyptian queen Nefertiti with a modern bronze nude body touched off a furor. Some Egyptians are calling the art project at Berlin's Egyptian Museum an insult to their culture and demanding the return of the ancient bust, charging it isn't safe in German hands. The museum director, Dietrich Wildung, answers that his museum's most famous piece was never at risk and defends the videotaping of Nefertiti's head on a nude torso as a legitimate artistic experiment. The tape...
  • Queen Nefertiti Bust Scan Was Actually a Data Hack

    03/18/2016 2:53:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Mobipicker ^ | March 12, 2016 | Aswin Rajeev
    Jan Nikolai Nelles and Nora Al-Badri, two artists, made headlines last month for announcing that they had sneaked into the Neues Museum in Berlin. They did not make the headlines for just sneaking into the museum. They had with them a hacked Kinect Sensor with which they performed an unauthorized 3D scan of the bust of Queen Nefertiti. If you have never heard about the iconic bust of Queen Nefertiti, you probably should read this. It is the most iconic artifact of the Egyptian Museum in Berlin. It is 3,300 years old and is made of limestone and painted and...
  • New scans of King Tut's tomb may reveal hidden chamber [...again...]

    03/04/2016 12:20:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    CBS News ^ | March 1, 2016 | Owen Jarus, Livescience
    On April 2, a new series of radar scans will be performed on King Tutankhamun's tomb to search for hidden chambers that may contain an undiscovered royal burial, Egypt's antiquities ministry has announced. The announcement comes after stories were published in numerous media outlets last week claiming that Egypt's tourism minister, Hisham Zazou, had told the Spanish news outlet ABC that the chambers had been proven to exist and contain numerous treasures. "The Ministry of Antiquities has not issued any statement concerning the results that have been reached so far," the ministry said in a statement released to Live Science....
  • Egypt Says King Tut Mask Was Scratched, Sends 8 to Trial

    01/25/2016 8:09:30 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 36 replies
    Al Arabiya ^ | Sunday, 24 January 2016
    Eight Egyptians involved in a botched repair of the famed burial mask of King Tut, which was corrected late last year, were referred to a disciplinary court on Sunday for "gross negligence" after prosecutors said that the golden treasure was scratched. The 3,300-year old mask, whose beard was accidentally knocked off and hastily glued on with epoxy in 2014, was scratched and damaged as a result of the amateur repair job, prosecutors said in a Sunday statement, which implicated the then-head of the Egyptian Museum and the chief of the restoration department. "In an attempt to cover up the damage...
  • King Tut and half of European men share DNA

    08/04/2011 7:57:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    http://medicalxpress.com ^ | 08-03-2011 | Staff
    According to a group of geneticists in Switzerland from iGENEA, the DNA genealogy center, as many as half of all European men and 70 percent of British men share the same DNA as the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun, or King Tut. For a film created for the Discovery Channel, scientists worked to reconstruct the DNA of the young male King, his father Akhenaten and his grandfather Amenhotep III. They discovered that King Tut had a DNA profile that belongs to a group called haplogroup R1b1a2. This group can be found in over 50 percent of European men and shows the researchers...
  • Solomon & Sheba, Inc. -- New inscription confirms trade relations between "towns of Judah" and...

    01/24/2010 3:50:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 624+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | January/February 2010 | Andre Lemaire
    Southern Arabia is 1,200 miles south of Israel. Naturally, skepticism about the reality of trade between South Arabia and Israel in ancient times seems justified. Yet the Bible documents this trade quite extensively -- most famously in the supposed affair between King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. And the land of Sheba is referred to two dozen times in the Hebrew Bible. Without addressing the historicity of the personal relations between Solomon and the queen of this South Arabian kingdom (or queendom?), I think it can be shown that the international trade between Judah and southern Arabia very probably...
  • Polish archaeologists discovered an unknown temple of Hatshepsut

    01/01/2016 11:28:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | October 26, 2015 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Cut in the rock and consisting of two rooms, the walls of which are covered with poorly preserved decoration and hieroglyphic inscriptions: a team of archaeologists working under the auspices of the Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology of the University of Warsaw started research in the ancient temple at Gebelein in Upper Egypt. This place was already known to the local authorities, but so far no archaeologist has studied it. Previous researchers could have been discouraged by the poor condition of the decorations. This year's results of Polish research were surprising... Detailed studies of reliefs and inscriptions, made by Daniel...
  • World's Oldest Weather Report Found on 3500-Year-Old Stone in Egypt

    09/04/2014 12:56:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    International Business Times ^ | April 4, 2014 14:51 BST
    A 3,500-year-old inscription on a stone block found in Egypt is what archaeologists say the oldest weather report of the world. The inscription on a six-foot-tall calcite stone, called the Tempest Stela, describes rain, darkness and "the sky being in storm without cessation, louder than the cries of the masses," according to Nadine Moeller and Robert Ritner at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute who have translated the 40-line inscription. The stela's text also describes bodies floating down the Nile like "skiffs of papyrus." "This was clearly a major storm, and different from the kinds of heavy rains that Egypt...
  • A Storm in Egypt during the Reign of Ahmose [The Tempest Stele]

    11/01/2009 8:04:33 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 944+ views
    Thera Foundation ^ | September 1989 (last modified March 26, 2006) | E.N. Davis
    An inscribed stele erected at Thebes by Ahmose, the first Pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty, documents a destructive storm accompanied by flooding during his reign. Fragments of the stele were found in the 3rd Pylon of the temple of Karnak at Thebes between 1947 and 1951 by the French Mission. A restoration of the stele and translation of the text was published by Claude Vandersleyen (1967). In the following year (1968), Vandersleyen added two more fragments, one from the top of the inscription and a small piece from line 10 of the restored text, which had been recovered by Egyptian...
  • First Lion Mummy Found in Tomb of King Tut's Wet Nurse

    01/14/2004 11:07:36 AM PST · by aculeus · 20 replies · 1,438+ views
    Tampa Bay on line ^ | Jan 14, 2004 | Alex Dominguez, Associated Press
    Some had names like "Slayer of his Foes" and accompanied the pharaoh into battle. Thousands more were hunted as a ritual of bravery and strength. But only one apparently served as an eternal guardian. A French archaeologist says his discovery of the first preserved lion skeleton in an ancient Egyptian tomb demonstrates the exalted reputation enjoyed by the King of Beasts more than 3,000 years ago. "It confirms the status of the lion as a sacred animal," Alain Zivie reports in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. Zivie's research team discovered the lion's remains in 2001 as they excavated the...
  • Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun's wet nurse might have been his sister

    12/22/2015 3:12:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Sunday, December20 , 2015 | Staff and agencies; Agence France-Presse contributed to this report
    The identity of his mother has long been a mystery, although she is not believed to be Akhenaten's Queen Nefertiti. Some theories suggest the boy king's mother was one of his aunts. "Maia is none other than princess Meritaten, the sister or half-sister of Tutankhamun and the daughter of Akhenaten and Nefertiti," Zivie said. He said his conclusion was based on the carvings of Tutankhamun and Maia on the walls of Maia's tomb. "The extraordinary thing is that they are very similar. They have the same chin, the eyes, the family traits," he said. "The carvings show Maia sitting on...
  • Tut's Life And Death Unmasked

    10/01/2002 7:53:03 AM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 773+ views
    BBC ^ | 10-01-2002 | Kate Botting
    Monday, 30 September, 2002, 20:30 GMT 21:30 UKTut's life and death unmasked British and NZ experts have reconstructed the faceThis is the face behind the famous golden death mask of King Tutankhamun. He lived in very turbulent times and it does seem likely from what the detectives have found out that he was assassinated Scientists and special effects artists in the UK and in New Zealand employed digital techniques normally reserved for crime investigations to reconstruct what the young pharaoh might have looked like. The fibreglass bust has gone on display at London's Science Museum. It was produced to illustrate...
  • Who Killed King Tut?

    09/11/2002 3:08:55 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 45 replies · 3,932+ views
    Time.com ^ | 9-11-02 | JEFFREY KLUGER AND ANDREA DORFMAN
    The boy King died young and was buried in haste. Now a pair of U.S. gumshoes, armed with modern forensics, is trying to crack an ancient case The tomb of the boy King Tutankhamen created a sensation from the moment it was uncovered in 1922. One of the few royal burial chambers that survived the centuries relatively intact, it was by far the richest — filled with gold, ivory and carved wooden treasures, including what may be the world's most famous funerary mask. But there was also something troubling about the way King Tut was buried — hints and omissions...
  • Tut's gem hints at space impact

    07/20/2006 5:48:59 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies · 272+ views
    bbc ^ | Last Updated: Wednesday, 19 July 2006, 19:09 GMT 20:09 UK
    In 1996 in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Italian mineralogist Vincenzo de Michele spotted an unusual yellow-green gem in the middle of one of Tutankhamun's necklaces. The jewel was tested and found to be glass, but intriguingly it is older than the earliest Egyptian civilisation. Working with Egyptian geologist Aly Barakat, they traced its origins to unexplained chunks of glass found scattered in the sand in a remote region of the Sahara Desert. But the glass is itself a scientific enigma. How did it get to be there and who or what made it? Thursday's BBC Horizon programme reports an...
  • Cray Supercomputer... Discover Origin Of Mysterious Glass Found In King Tut's Tomb

    08/02/2007 10:47:08 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies · 2,416+ views
    Cray Supercomputer at Sandia Helps Researchers Discover Origin of Mysterious Glass Found in King Tut's Tomb Released : Tuesday, July 31, 2007 7:26 AM Global supercomputer leader Cray Inc. (NASDAQ: CRAY) today announced that researchers running simulations on the Cray supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories have re-created what could have happened 29 million years ago when an asteroid explosion turned Saharan sand into glass. The greenish natural glass, which can still be found scattered across remote stretches of the desert, was used by an artisan in ancient Egypt to carve a scarab that decorates one of the bejeweled breastplates buried...
  • Mysterious Egyptian Glass Formed By Meteorite Strike, Study Says

    12/22/2006 11:19:39 AM PST · by blam · 35 replies · 1,558+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 12-21-2006 | Stefan Lovgren
    Mysterious Egyptian Glass Formed by Meteorite Strike, Study Says Stefan Lovgren for National Geographic News December 21, 2006 Strange specimens of natural glass found in the Egyptian desert are products of a meteorite slamming into Earth between 100,000 and 200,000 years ago, scientists have concluded. The glass—known locally as Dakhla glass—represents the first clear evidence of a meteorite striking an area populated by humans. At the time of the impact, the Dakhla Oasis, located in the western part of modern-day Egypt, resembled the African savanna and was inhabited by early humans, according to archaeological evidence (see Egypt map.) "This meteorite...
  • King Tut's Necklace Shaped By Fireball

    06/26/2006 4:32:58 PM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 1,742+ views
    The Australian ^ | 6-26-2006
    King Tut's necklace shaped by fireball June 26, 2006 LONDON: Scientists believe they have solved the mystery surrounding a piece of rare natural glass at the centre of an elaborate necklace found among the treasures of Tutankhamun, the boy pharaoh. They think a fragile meteorite broke up as it entered the atmosphere, producing a fireball with temperatures over 1800C that turned the desert sand and rock into molten lava that became glass when it cooled. Experts have puzzled over the origin of the yellow-green glass -- carved into the shape of a scarab beetle -- since it was excavated in...
  • Tiny 2,700-year-old royal seal of Judah's king Hezekiah found in ancient rubbish dump in Jerusalem

    12/09/2015 8:50:12 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 12/09/2015 | By RICHARD GRAY
    * The oval piece of clay bears the symbol of a winged sun and hieroglyphs * Archaeologists said it was the private seal of the biblical King Hezekiah * During his rule, the Kingdom of Judah saw its power rise dramatically * The seal has provided new clues about Hezekiah's life and politics ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ A 2,700-year-old royal seal bearing the mark of the biblical King Hezekiah has been unearthed in Jerusalem. The tiny oval piece of clay bears the impression of a sun with two wings turned downward, flanked by two ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs that symbolise 'life'. King Hezekiah's rule...
  • EGYPT - NEW TOMBS DISCOVERED

    06/06/2002 8:10:29 AM PDT · by NYer · 24 replies · 1,873+ views
    AP Wire | June 6, 2002 | SARAH EL DEEB
    SAQQARA, Egypt (AP) _ Archaeologists have unearthed six 3,500-year-old tombs they believe reveal important details about the structure of government in a period considered Egypt's golden age, the nation's top archaeologist said Thursday. Zahi Hawass, head of Egypt's Supreme Council of the Antiquities, also discussed an exhibit of Egyptian treasures to tour the United States beginning June 30 at Washington's National Gallery of Art. The exhibit is bigger than the blockbuster King Tut show of the 1970s. Earlier this week, archaeologists working on a dig supervised by Hawass just outside Cairo, found the six tombs at the foot of the...
  • King Tutankhamun's tomb: Evidence grows for hidden chamber

    11/28/2015 11:10:54 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    Archaeologist Nicholas Reeves believes Tutankhamun's remains may have been rushed into an outer chamber of what was originally Queen Nefertiti's tomb. The remains of Tutankhamun, who may have been her son, were found in 1922. He died 3,000 years ago aged 19. ... Dr Reeves developed his theory after the Spanish artistic and preservation specialists, Factum Arte, were commissioned to produce detailed scans of Tutankhamun's tomb. The scans were then used to produce a facsimile of the 3,300-year-old tomb near the site of the original Valley of the Kings in Luxor. While assessing the scans last February, Dr Reeves spotted...
  • Who Made the Bust of Queen Nefertiti? Nefertiti mystery solved

    11/13/2015 4:08:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Two archaeological discoveries led to the identification of the creator of Nefertiti's bust. The first was uncovered at Tell el-Amarna near the artists' workshop where the bust was created. (The bust was unearthed in this workshop during excavations in December 1912.) Outside the workshop, the excavators discovered a horse's blinker -- used to prevent the horse from looking toward the rear and sometimes to the side -- inscribed with the name Thutmose, who was identified by the following titles: "favored by the King," "Chief of Works," and "seankh" (a designation that means "he who gives the final touch of life"2...
  • When Ancient Artifacts Become Political Pawns: Egypt contesting German possession of Nefertiti bust

    10/27/2009 4:22:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 860+ views
    New York Times ^ | October 23, 2009 | Michael Kimmelman
    Egypt's chief archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, announced that his country wanted its queen handed back forthwith, unless Germany could prove that the 3,500-year-old bust of Akhenaten's wife wasn't spirited illegally out of Egypt nearly a century ago... Then he said he was sure the work had been stolen... Mr. Hawass also recently fired a shot at France, demanding the Louvre return five fresco fragments it purchased in 2000 and 2003 from a gallery and at auction. They belonged to a 3,200-year-old tomb near Luxor and had been in storage at the museum. Egypt had made the demand before, but this time...
  • Famed Nefertiti bust a fake: expert

    05/06/2009 6:38:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 1,471+ views
    The Australian ^ | May 05, 2009 | Agence France-Presse
    Swiss art historian Henri Stierlin, author of a dozen works on Egypt, the Middle East and ancient Islam, says in a just-released book that the bust currently in Berlin's Altes Museum was made on the orders of Germany archaeologist Ludwig Borchardt on site at the digs by an artist named Gerardt Marks... He said he believed it was made to test pigments used by the ancient Egyptians. The historian said the archaeologist had hoped to produce a new portrait of the queen wearing a necklace he knew she had owned and also carry out a colour test with ancient pigments...
  • Egyptian Queen In Berlin -- Cairo Demands Clarification on Nefertiti Bust

    04/20/2009 11:10:21 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 512+ views
    Spiegel ^ | 2009 | msm -- with wire reports
    "This time I mean it very seriously," is how Egypt's chief archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, characterized his fresh demand for the bust of Queen Nefertiti, which German archaeologists brought home in 1913... Hawass has long called on Berlin to return the bust of Nefertiti, which sits in the city's Egyptian Museum, but SPIEGEL revealed in this week's edition of the magazine that an obscure document from 1924 charged the German archaeologist Ludwig Borchardt with "cheating" to secure the bust for Germany... The secretary of the German Oriental Institute reported in 1924 on a 1913 meeting between Borchardt and a senior...
  • Queen Nefertiti: More Than A Pretty Face

    08/08/2007 8:02:53 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,570+ views
    Expatica ^ | 8-8-2007
    Queen Nefertiti: More than a pretty face German scientists have discovered that the world's most beautiful woman allowed herself to be sculpted with wrinkles to appear more beautiful. Maybe wrinkles are not so bad, after all, some German scientists have discovered. In ancient times, such laugh lines and wrinkles around the mouth improved the face of Nefertiti, the Egyptian queen acclaimed as the world's most beautiful woman. X-ray pictures of the bust by a computer tomography machine at the nearby Charite Hospital in Berlin revealed that the sculpture is a piece of limestone with details added using four outer layers...
  • 'Hands off my bust' says Egypt prof [If we give this to Egypt for 3 months they won't return it]

    05/11/2007 10:26:39 AM PDT · by bedolido · 25 replies · 1,425+ views
    english.aljazeera.net ^ | 5-10-2007 22:15 MECCA TIME | Staff Writer
    The man responsible for protecting Egypt's antiquities has said he will "fight" for the return of an ancient bust of Nefertiti, an ancient Egyptian queen, now housed in a Berlin museum. Zahi Hawass also requested the temporary return of other ancient Egyptian artifacts, including the Rosetta Stone which is housed in London's British museum. "Some people say, 'If we give this bust to Egypt for three months they will not return it'." Hawass said, regarding the bust of Nefertiti, in an interview on Wednesday.Zahi Hawass is seeking "unique artifacts" from at least 10 museums around the world [AP]Germany says the...
  • Infrared Scans Show Possible Hidden Chamber in King Tut’s Tomb

    11/07/2015 7:55:50 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 43 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 6 Nov 2015 | Mark Strauss
    The Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities has just announced that a scientific team has found initial evidence of what might be a hidden chamber in the tomb of King Tutankhamun. [Update: See video below.] A survey of the tomb was conducted using infrared thermography, which measures temperature distributions on a surface. According to Mamdouh el-Damaty, the Minister of Antiquities, “the preliminary analysis indicates the presence of an area different in its temperature than the other parts of the northern wall.” One possible explanation is that the variation in temperature is, in effect, an infrared shadow of an open area behind the...
  • Fixing Tutankhamun's beard: 'unfortunately they used epoxy'

    10/21/2015 1:26:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Tuesday 20 October 2015, Last modified on Wednesday 21 October 2015 | Associated Press in Cairo
    Restorers have put their work on the famed golden burial mask of King Tutankhamun on display in Cairo, over a year after the beard was accidentally knocked off and hastily glued back on with epoxy. A German-Egyptian team of experts showed off the mask in a laboratory in the Egyptian Museum, detailing plans for how the epoxy will be scraped off and the beard carefully removed before being reattached by a method to be determined by a joint scientific committee. Christian Eckmann, the lead restoration specialist, said the work should take a month or two, depending on how long it...
  • Akhenaten: An Early Egyptian Monotheist

    04/05/2004 8:52:20 PM PDT · by restornu · 30 replies · 796+ views
    M E R I D I A N M A G A Z I N E ^ | By Daniel C. Peterson and William J. Hamblin
    Although monotheism is usually associated with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, there have, in fact, been a number of other monotheistic religions in world history. Iran, in particular, was a center for monotheistic thought, being home to both Zoroastrianism and Manichaeism. At first glance, ancient Egypt, with its hundreds of exotic gods, would seem the last place for a monotheistic revelation. Yet one of the earliest monotheists known to history was Akhenaten, pharaoh of Egypt from 1352-1336 BC, who perhaps lived in the generation before Moses. Akhenaten was born of royal parents, raised and trained in the religious traditions of Egypt...
  • Where Is the Tomb of Queen Nefertiti?

    10/19/2015 10:15:26 PM PDT · by SteveH · 40 replies
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 10/18/2015 | Zahi Hawass
    Any scholar who knows archaeology should discuss his theory in the presence of scholars who know the Valley of the Kings and are working there now. Instead, this theory was analysed by Egyptologists who have never worked in the valley or written a single article on Tutankhamun or his tomb. Reeves has gained a lot of publicity for saying nothing.
  • Egypt approves Radar for Nefertiti Tomb Quest

    09/22/2015 10:03:35 PM PDT · by SteveH · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | 9/22/2015 | Maram Mazen
    CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian official says the Antiquities Ministry has given initial approval for the use of non-invasive radar to verify a theory that Queen Nefertiti's crypt may be hidden behind King Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old tomb in the famous Valley of the Kings.
  • INTERVIEW: Egypt's antiquities minister speaks on the search for Nefertiti in Tutankhamun’s tomb

    10/05/2015 8:03:38 PM PDT · by SteveH · 6 replies
    ahramonline ^ | 2 October 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    Ahram Online spoke with Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty regarding an upcoming radar scan of Tutankhamun’s tomb to determine if Queen Nefertiti is buried in a hidden chamber. The theory that Nefertiti may be buried in Tutankhamun’s tomb was introduced by Egyptologist Nicholas Reeves. Ahram Online (AO): What is your opinion about Reeves' theory, and could it be true? Minister: It is a respectable scientific theory that could prove right or wrong, and when examining the west and north walls of Tutankhamun’s burial chamber, I realised that all the evidence that Reeves mentioned regarding the existence of hidden chambers is...
  • Colossal head discovered in Egypt that could be Queen Nefertari

    03/28/2002 11:57:01 AM PST · by kattracks · 31 replies · 593+ views
    AFP | 3/28/02
    CAIRO, March 28 (AFP) - Egyptian and German archeologists have discovered the head of a colossal statue which could be an image of Nefertari, the queen of Pharaoh Ramses II, a senior antiquities official said Thursday. The head, discovered in the Nile Delta region of Tel Basta, could also belong to her daughter Princess Merit-Amon, the official said. "The head, in granite, stands 3.5 meters (about 11 feet) high and is 3 meters (about 10 feet) wide, and weighs more than 11 tons," the director of antiquities for the Delta, Mohamed Abdel Maqsoud, told AFP. "These measurements mean that the...
  • Researchers to look into Victorian historical 'truths'

    11/27/2005 7:51:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 723+ views
    Guardian ^ | Friday November 25, 2005 | Polly Curtis
    In 1880 when the Victorians discovered Tutankhamun's predecessor Akhenaten, they interpreted their findings to show that the Egyptians were conservative - they emphasised how they rejected the old gods and discovered one god, as well as values of truth and beauty, respectability and honour. It was some contrast to the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb in the 1920s which led to a glamorous reinvention of Egypt as glittery and exotic and brutal, like something out of a Hollywood film.
  • Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

    01/16/2012 11:38:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 1+ views
    PHYSorg ^ | January 16, 2012 | AFP
    Swiss archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a female singer dating back almost 3,000 years in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said on Sunday. The rare find was made accidentally by a team from Switzerland's Basel University headed by Elena Pauline-Grothe and Susanne Bickel in Karnak, near Luxor in Upper Egypt, the minister told the media in Cairo. The woman, Nehmes Bastet, was a singer for the supreme deity Amon Ra during the Twenty-Second Dynasty (945-712 BC), according to an inscription on a wooden plaque found in the tomb. She was the daughter of the High...