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Keyword: 18thdynasty

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  • Are We Close to Finding the Tomb of Queen Nefertiti in the Valley of the Kings?

    10/16/2019 8:20:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    YouTube ^ | July 9, 2019 | Ancient Architects
    In May 2018, media outlets around the world ran the headline: “Secret Chamber Does Not Exist”, referring to the possible burial chamber of Queen Nefertiti behind the walls of the tomb of King Tutankhamun in the Valley of the King's in Egypt. So you’ll image my surprise when this week I see that the major media outlets across the world are once again reporting that Nefertiti could be hiding behind a wall in King Tutankhamen’s tomb. The story was ran by a number of well known publications, including The Sun, New York Post, Fox News and more, but why have...
  • Rare clay sarcophagus found in Israel alongside Seti I scarab seal ring

    04/09/2014 9:02:37 PM PDT · by blueplum · 22 replies
    The Guardian ^ | April 9, 2014 14:53 EDT | AP none stated
    Archaeologists unearth 3,300-year-old coffin at Tel Shadud thought to hold Canaanite official in service of Egyptian pharaoh :snip: Found alongside the new sarcophagus was a scarab seal ring encased in gold, carved with the name of Pharaoh Seti I, who ruled ancient Egypt in the 13th century BC. Seti I conquered the region of today's Israel in the first year of his reign in order to secure Egyptian trade routes and collect taxes for Egypt, said Ron Beeri, an archaeologist who participated in the dig. The man buried in the sarcophagus might have been a tax collector for the pharaoh,...
  • Ancient Egyptians Built This 4-Towered Fortress More Than 2,600 Years Ago

    05/26/2019 10:32:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 20, 2019 | Laura Geggel, Associate Editor
    Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered the ruins of an ancient fortress dating to the 26th Dynasty, the last dynasty in which native Egyptians ruled before the Persians conquered the country in 525 B.C., according to the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities. Researchers uncovered parts of the mud-brick stronghold -- including the northeastern and southeastern towers -- at the Tell El-Kedwa site in North Sinai. Previously, in 2008, archaeologists had excavated the military citadel's eastern wall, but the fortress is so large, it took until now to unearth more of its remains... Curiously, the old citadel also has chambers full of sand,...
  • 3,600-yr-old Shipwreck Uncovered Could be Oldest Ever Found in the Mediterranean [Antalya, Turkey]

    05/17/2019 10:59:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | April 20, 2019 | Helen Flatley
    A team of marine archaeologists has uncovered a 3,600-year-old shipwreck in the Mediterranean, just off the coast of Antalya, Turkey. The ship, believed to have been a merchant vessel sailing from Cyprus, may be the oldest ever discovered, according to Haaretz... Based on its position and the large cargo of copper ingots found inside and around the wreck, it is likely to have been a trading ship, ferrying goods from Cyprus to the Aegean region. Although the ship is in very poor condition, and the hull has been almost completely destroyed, the bulk of the ship, together with its precious...
  • Archaeologists in Egypt discover ancient mummification workshop

    07/15/2018 10:09:58 AM PDT · by ETL · 44 replies
    FoxNews/Science ^ | July 15, 2018
    Archaeologists in Egypt made a surprising discovery dating back more 2,500 years near the country's famed pyramids south of Cairo. Their findings, which include a mummification workshop and a shaft, used as a communal burial place, are located at the vast Saqqara necropolis part of the Memphis, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Memphis was the first capital of ancient Egypt and its large necropolis houses a wide range of temples and tombs as well as the three pyramids of Giza. The latest find, announced at a press conference Saturday, belongs to the Saite-Persian Period, from 664-404 B.C. The site, which...
  • Searching for the Lost City of Copper [Enkomi, Cyprus]

    10/31/2017 4:25:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    National Geographic History magazine ^ | March/April 2017 | unattributed
    "To the King of Egypt, my brother. Thus says the King of Alashiya, your brother: ... Send your messenger along with my messenger quickly and all the copper that you desire I will send you." ...these words are from the collection of tablets known as the Amarna Correspondence, a cache of diplomatic exchanges discovered in the late 19th century. Historians identify the king of Egypt as Akhenaten, but who was writing to him? And where was Alashiya? Many historians feel that the most likely candidate for copper-rich Alashiya is in Cyprus. But the story of identifying the lost city near...
  • Rare sarcophagus, Egyptian scarab found in Israel

    04/17/2014 11:05:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Apr 09, 2014 | by Daniel Estrin
    Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a rare sarcophagus featuring a slender face and a scarab ring inscribed with the name of an Egyptian pharaoh, Israel's Antiquities Authority said Wednesday. The mystery man whose skeleton was found inside the sarcophagus was most likely a local Canaanite official in the service of ancient Egypt, Israeli archaeologists believe, shining a light on a period when pharaohs governed the region. "This is a really beautiful face, very serene," said Edwin van den Brink, an Egyptologist and archaeologist with Israel's government antiquities authority. "It's very appealing." Van den Brink said archaeologists dug at Tel Shadud, an...
  • Ancient fortress city unearthed in Egypt

    07/14/2009 7:00:27 PM PDT · by decimon · 40 replies · 791+ views
    Discovery ^ | Jul 14 2009 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Egyptian archaeologists digging near the Suez Canal have discovered the remains of what is believed to be the largest fortress in the eastern Delta, Egyptian Minister of Culture Farouk Hosni announced. Located at the site of Tell Dafna, between El-Manzala Lake and the Suez Canal, the remains reveal the foundation of a military town about 9 miles (15 kilometers) northeast of the city of western Qantara. "The fortress covers an area of about 380 by 625 meters (1,247 by 2,051 feet), while the enclosure wall is about 13 meters (43 feet) in width," Mohamed Abdel Maqsoud, head of the Central...
  • Ancient military town dating back to 26th Dynasty discovered in Ismailiya

    06/30/2009 3:16:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 518+ views
    Egypt State Information Service ^ | Tuesday, June 30, 2009 | unattributed
    Minister of Culture Farouk Hosni said an archeological mission discovered the remnants of an ancient military town in the governorate of Ismailiya. The discovered military town dates back to the 26th Dynasty (664-625 BC). It was found in Tel Defna between Al-Manzala Lake and the Suez Canal. The area had been chosen by king Rameses II to avoid attacks from the eastern borders. In addition, the area was used as crossing point by trade convoys coming from east. The discovered military city belongs to king Ibsemalik I.
  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 1,040+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...
  • King Tut died of blood disorder: German researchers [ sickle cell disease ]

    06/25/2010 7:24:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 2+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Wednesday, June 23, 2010 | AFP
    Legendary pharaoh Tutankhamun was probably killed by the genetic blood disorder sickle cell disease, German scientists said Wednesday, rejecting earlier research that suggested he died of malaria. The team at the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in the northern city of Hamburg questioned the conclusions of a major Egyptian study released in February on the enigmatic boy-king's early demise. That examination, involving DNA tests and computerised tomography (CT) scans on Tutankhamun's mummy, said he died of malaria after suffering a fall, putting to rest the theory that he was murdered. But the German researchers said in a letter published...
  • King of the Wild Frontier (Hyksos art and architecture in the Sinai)

    08/15/2005 7:33:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1,093+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | 2005 | Nevine El-Aref
    A team of archaeologists digging at Tel-Habuwa, near the town of Qantara East and three kilometres east of the Suez Canal... chanced upon a cachet of limestone reliefs bearing names of two royal personalities and two seated statues of differing sizes. The larger statue is made of limestone and belongs to a yet unidentified personage, but from its size and features archaeologists believe that it could be a statue of Horus, the god of the city. In 2001 archaeologists unearthed remains of a mud-brick temple dedicated to this deity. The second is a headless limestone statue inscribed on the back...
  • 3,000-year-old arms storehouse uncovered in Sinai

    04/25/2009 2:48:45 PM PDT · by forkinsocket · 31 replies · 1,449+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | 23/04/2009 | Ran Shapira/AP
    Archaeologists exploring an old military road in the Sinai have unearthed four new temples amidst the 3,000-year-old remains of an ancient fortified city that could have been used as a stronghold during the Egyptian occupation of Mesopotamia and Canaan, and to impress foreign delegations visiting Egypt, antiquities authorities announced Tuesday. Archaeological findings have determined that a series of fortresses were built in the area and were used as weapons storehouses for soldiers traveling northwards. One source, a wall painting found in the Karnak temple in Luxor, depicts 11 strongholds built in northern Sinai Among the discoveries was the largest mud...
  • Headquarters of pharaohs' army found

    05/29/2008 8:48:44 AM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 17 replies · 125+ views
    REUTERS via. The Times of India ^ | 29 May 2008, 0023 hrs IST | REUTERS
    CAIRO: Egyptian archaeologists have discovered what they say was the ancient headquarters of the pharaonic army guarding the northeastern borders of Egypt for more than 1,500 years, the government said on Wednesday. The fortress and adjoining town, which they identify with the ancient place name Tharu, lies in the Sinai peninsula about 3km northeast of the modern town of Qantara, Egyptian archaeologist Mohamed Abdel Maksoud said. The town sat at the start of a military road joining the Nile Valley to the Levant, parts of which were under Egyptian control for much of the period, the government's Supreme Council for...
  • Joseph and The Exodus

    02/17/2019 4:04:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    YouTube ^ | January 27, 2016 | Dr. David Neiman
    Dr. David Neiman explores the historicity of the Biblical accounts of Joseph and the Exodus from Egypt. Joseph rises to the position of "Tzafnat Pa'aneakh" after successfully helping the Pharaoh of Egypt with his economic plans. Under Joseph's guidance all land became the property of Pharaoh. A new Pharaoh comes to power who does not favor the Israelites. They are enslaved and forced to build the storage cities of Pithom and Ramses. These cities were arsenals for the armies of Egypt. Under Seti I and Ramses the II, Egypt was on the warpath. Ramses II was defeated at the battle...
  • Archaeologists discover ancient tools that actually came from space

    12/06/2017 5:41:45 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 34 replies
    BGR ^ | December 5th, 2017 | Mike Wehner
    We may still be looking for proof that aliens exist, but new research into some very curious ancient tools now reveals that humans were using extraterrestrial material long before mankind even dreamed of flying out of Earth’s atmosphere. The findings, which were published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, reveal that some incredibly old iron artifacts date to a time well before humans had the technological wit to smelt iron ore, and as it turns out, the iron used in their construction actually fell from the sky. Archaeologists have long suspected that the iron occasionally found amongst Bronze Age artifacts...
  • Epilepsy, Tutankhamun and Monotheism: A theory on inherited disease in the Egyptian New Kingdom

    08/28/2018 9:28:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Bible History Daily ^ | September 14, 2012 | Noah Wiener
    Tutankhamun died at a young age with a feminine physique. His closest relatives, including his father Akhenaten, his uncle or brother Smenkhkare and preceding 18th dynasty pharaohs Amenhotep III and Tuthmosis IV, all shared similar features and fates. While scholars tend to relate the deaths of these pharaohs to separate circumstances, Hutan Ashrafian suggests that the royal family may have had an inherited disorder: temporal lobe epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy is known to affect the release of hormones and sexual development. Tutankhamun was depicted with a feminine physique. Due to his short life, his representations are far less common than...
  • Tests show no hidden Tutankhamun chambers: ministry

    05/07/2018 8:26:19 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    phys.org ^ | 05/06/2018
    Experts used ground penetrating radar (GPR) which provided "conclusive evidence of the non-existence of hidden chambers adjacent to or inside Tutankhamun's tomb," the ministry said in a statement. ... It said Porcelli had submitted a report that "concluded, with a very high degree of confidence... the hypothesis concerning the existence of hidden chambers or corridors adjacent to Tutankhamun's tomb is not supported by GPR data." Previous scans had suggested the possibility of hidden chambers, although experts disagreed on the results.
  • Mysterious head of a pharaoh discovered by Swansea Egyptologist [Hatshepsut]

    03/25/2018 11:24:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Friday, March 23, 2018 | Swansea University
    Consisting of two irregularly shaped limestone fragments that have been glued together, the object had been kept in storage for over twenty years and was requested for the handling session based only on an old black and white photograph. The front side depicts the head of a figure whose face is unfortunately missing, with the remains of a fan directly behind. Traces of hieroglyphs are also present above the head. The iconography of the piece indicates that it represents a ruler of Egypt, particularly with the presence of the uraeus (cobra) on the forehead of the figure. Who is this...
  • In Ancient Mass Graves, Archaeologists Find Child Slaves of Biblical Egypt

    02/05/2018 9:24:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | June 9, 2017 | Amanda Borschel-Dan
    Archaeologist Mary Shepperson, who previously dug with the Amarna Project, reported in The Guardian this week on the discovery of "the simple desert graves of the ordinary Egyptians who lived and worked in Akhenaten's city and never got to leave." "They paint a picture of poverty, hard work, poor diet, ill-health, frequent injury and relatively early death," ... "As we started to get the first skeletons out of the ground it was immediately clear that the burials were even simpler than at the South Tombs Cemetery, with almost no grave goods provided for the dead and only rough matting used...