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Keyword: 3dprinters

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  • A $77 3D Printer is Unveiled! Say Hello to the Lewihe Play

    05/22/2015 8:37:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    3DPrint ^ | May 21, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    With all technology, prices tend to come down as time goes on. This was seen within the personal computer market and the 2-dimensional printer market, and now we are starting to really see this happen within the 3D printing space as well. Whether you are a consumer and you love the fact that prices continue to drop, or if you are a manufacturer and you hate it, we can probably expect this trend to continue at least a little bit longer. Just 2 years ago, if you wanted a desktop 3D printer, you were looking at spending four figures. There...
  • The Time to Think About the 3D-Printed Future Is Now

    05/09/2015 3:16:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The Harvard Business Review ^ | May 6, 2015 | Professor Richard D’Aveni
    3-D printing, or additive manufacturing, is likely to revolutionize business in the next several years. Often dismissed in the popular mindset as a tool for home-based “makers” of toys and trinkets, the technology is gaining momentum in large-scale industry. Already it has moved well beyond prototyping and, as I explain in a new HBR article, it will increasingly be used to produce high-volume parts and products in several industries. Since I prepared that article, new developments have only strengthened the case for a 3-D future – and heightened the urgency for management teams to adjust their strategies. Impressive next-generation technologies...
  • 3D printers are churning out made-to-order bones and rudimentary organs

    05/04/2015 4:15:07 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | April 20, 2015 | Brian Wang
    The advent of three-dimensional (3D) printing has generated a swell of interest in artificial organs meant to replace, or even enhance, human machinery. Printed organs, such as a proto­type outer ear developed by researchers at Princeton University in New Jersey and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, was on the agenda at the Inside 3D Printing conference in New York on 15–17 April. The ear is printed from a range of materials: a hydrogel to form an ear-shaped scaffold, cells that will grow to form cartilage, and silver nanoparticles to form an antenna. Printed body parts brought in US$537 million...
  • New 3D Printable Hydrogel Composites Created — Possible Breakthrough in Human Body Part Replacement

    05/01/2015 11:22:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    3DPrint ^ | April 29, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    There is tremendous progress being made within the area of 3D bioprinting. In fact, there are companies working to print human organs as we speak, and within the next decade such organs may, if we are lucky, be available for human transplantation. With that said we still are a ways away from such an accomplishment. There are multiple obstacles researchers must first overcome. When considering the organ printing space in general, the printing of complicated vascular networks is the main obstacle currently preventing progress. On the other hand, when printing cellular musculoskeletal tissues the main obstacle in this space is...
  • Graphene 3D Lab Announces Water-Soluble 3D Printer Filament

    05/01/2015 3:06:18 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    TenLinks ^ | April 29, 2015
    NEW YORK, NY, Apr 29, 2015 – Graphene 3D Lab Inc. will announce details of a newly-developed water-soluble 3D filament at the Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters’ (CME) Canada Makes: Additive Manufacturing Forum at Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario on April 30, 2015. The water-soluble filament is the latest in a line of specialty-functional filaments that Graphene 3D is introducing to the 3D printing industry. Elena Polyakova, chief operating officer of Graphene 3D, will present details on the new water-soluble filament and discuss the effect of graphene-enhanced materials for the 3D printing industry. Water-soluble filaments are primarily used to occupy negative...
  • A 4D Printed Valve That Actuates According to Water Temperature

    04/23/2015 11:12:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    3DPrint ^ | April 23, 2015 | T.E. Edwards
    It may seem a touch misleading in name, but scientists at the University of Wollongong say they’re creating what they call 4D printing. The fourth dimension they refer to is time and shape shifting as the researchers have begun to develop 3D printed materials capable of morphing into new structures – post production – as those materials are influenced by the addition of external stimuli such as water or heat. The team at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science say these new materials are able to transform themselves from one shape into another, and they see applications for...
  • How will 3D printing alter the building industry?

    04/08/2015 1:29:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Construction DIVE ^ | April 6, 2015 | Sharon O'Malley
    A Chinese engineering firm that claims it built 10 houses in less than 24 hours last year using a 3D printer has unveiled the world’s tallest “printed” building. The five-story apartment building is on display next to a 1,100-square-foot mansion—also created on a 3D printer—in Suzhou Industrial Park in Jiangsu province. The mansion’s furniture and decorations also were made on a 6.6- by-10-meter tall printer, which uses an "ink" composed of glass fibers, steel, cement, hardening agents, and recycled construction waste to build one layer at a time for builders to assemble. The apartment building took a day to print...
  • This next-gen 3D printer spits out fully assembled products

    04/07/2015 8:02:46 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    inhabit ^ | April 7, 2015 | Charley Cameron
    The not-especially-modestly titled Industrial Revolution III (IR3) is a next-gen 3D printer that will not only print out your designs, but will assemble them with your non-printable components to create fully functional, sophisticated products in one streamlined process. Creator Buzz Technology claims that this will encourage the reuse of neglected household items and electronics into new, useful items while advancing the development of 3D printing in professional and at-home maker scenes. According to the IR3′s creators, UK-based Buzz Technology, the 3D printer features a pick and place head that “enables it to produce fully assembled, working products incorporating electronics, motors,...
  • New York Congressman Steve Israel to Propose New Bill to Ban 3D Printed Firearms

    04/06/2015 8:11:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 45 replies
    3D Print ^ | April 6, 2015 | T.E. Edwards
    New York Congressman Steve Israel and a photo of an AR-15 which includes 3D printed parts.Gun rights groups from Defense Distributed to the NRA to Come and Take It Texas will not be pleased with the latest piece of proposed legislation from Congressman Steve Israel. Israel, a representative from New York state, first called for legislation to ban 3D printed guns. Israel’s bill has gotten little traction at this point, but he says he’s not about to give up the fight.In fact, Israel says he’ll be reintroducing legislation aimed at banning 3D printed, or for that matter, all fully-plastic firearms....
  • 3D printing will have a bigger economic impact than the internet, technology specialist says

    04/01/2015 3:11:38 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 49 replies
    The Australian Broadcating Company's The World Today ^ | April 1, 2015 | Sarah Sedghi and Eleanor Hall
    Manufacturing industries need to embrace 3D printing, which will have an even bigger impact on economies and society than the internet, an Australian technology specialist says. Steve Sammartino is a digital entrepreneur and venture capitalist who advises business on how to adjust to disruptive technologies and the digital revolution. While most of us have heard about 3D printing and its potential to improve medical treatments and manufacturing processes, Mr Sammartino says 3D printing will be far more than a niche tool. He says it will transform everything about the way we live within a matter of years. Speaking to The...
  • Designer Creates a DIY SLA 3D Printer for Under $30 (Minus the Projector)

    03/27/2015 9:59:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 25, 2015 | Bridget Butler Millsaps
    Most of us are aware of the KISS principle: Keep it simple, stupid! And while simplicity is certainly a theme in many 3D printers, they are anything but stupid—and created by those who are the polar opposite—with ingenuity in abundance—which they use to share new innovations with the world. One quite simply has to give up with wondering what the collective ‘they’ will come up with next and just roll with the idea that the possibilities in 3D printing are infinite. And as progress in the industry and the community of makers marches on daily and hourly, it’s hard not...
  • Some Guys Just Made a Heavier-Caliber 3D-Printed Gun

    03/27/2015 12:34:36 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    War Is Boring ^ | March 26, 2015 | Kyle Mizokami
    In March, a Website dedicated to 3D-printing firearms announced one of its members had developed a lower receiver for a Colt CM901 rifle. It’s a small — but evolutionary — step toward the development of firearms that pretty much anyone can download off the Internet. The CM901 is the bigger, badder brother of the ubiquitous AR-15. The CM901 has a similar design, but fires the heavier and more powerful 7.62-millimeter bullet, resulting in greater range and killing power. A group of gunsmiths associated with PrintedFirearm.com developed the CM901 lower receiver and uploaded an animated gif of a live-fire test. The clip is five seconds...
  • Italian Researchers Expect 3D Printed Eyes by 2027, Providing Enhanced Vision & WiFi Connection

    03/21/2015 8:34:15 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 20, 2015 | Bridget Butler Millsaps
    There’s one thing you may have begun to notice about digital design and 3D printing: whatever you think might happen in the future is probably going to advance far beyond whatever you envisioned or thought might be a cool idea. And literally, one day you may be envisioning your entire world, and recording it as well, through completely artificially constructed, 3D printed eyeballs. You may be able to say goodbye to prescription glasses and contact lenses — and even your camera, as your original retina is replaced by a new and digital network contained inside your head, and even able...
  • How Will 3D Printing Affect Trucking?

    03/19/2015 12:35:02 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    HDT's TruckingInfo ^ | March 18, 2015 | Deborah Lockridge, Editor in Chief
    Business is booming, fuel prices are down. So it’s time to start thinking about the next threat to the industry: 3D printing. Advocates of 3D printing have said it can transform manufacturing. This week, a new startup company announced a new 3D printing technique it says may actually deliver on that promise. In traditional 3D printing, the machine "prints" layers of material to create a 3D object. This takes time and leaves ripples showing where those layers were laid down. But what if you could "grow" an object out of a pool of liquid, much like the T-1000 rising from...
  • Answers to Some of the Biggest 3D Printing Skeptics

    03/16/2015 8:48:22 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 16, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    If you’ve been reading our site for longer than a couple of weeks, then you likely have figured out that we are obsessed with 3D printing. Why are we so obsessed with this technology? Because we truly believe that 3D printing will change the world we all live in, mostly for the better, and the quicker this happens the better off we all will be. Although I, personally, became aware of 3D printing about half a decade ago, I didn’t really understand it or venture to explore the various applications of the technology until only about two years ago. Soon...
  • Alphaseed Project Looks to 3D Print Entire Ocean Cities in International Waters (Sovereign States)

    03/15/2015 1:55:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 11, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    In the short amount time that we have been covering this industry, we have reported on many amazing 3D printing related projects being undertaken by various individuals and companies around the globe. There have been 3D printed cars, 3D printed apartment buildings, and even an entire 3D printed estate that is expected to be erected in New York sometime this year. However, when we were contacted by a man named Tops Nicol, the research founder of the Alphaseed project, we were truly blown away.  “Science is fascinating and its latest growth in all branches of scientific research has helped...
  • Making 3 D Weapons at Home, a Serious Security Risk! (To the fainting couch, Robin!)

    03/14/2015 10:11:14 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    The New Delhi Times ^ | March 14, 2015
    The wonders of 3D printing, and the technology’s potential to revolutionize the world of manufacturing, have thrilled entrepreneurs, tinkerers, government officials and the business community. However, the 3D technology has a potential dark side too in the form of 3D printing of weapons, not only is there a threat of fanatic element making use of the technology to procure 3D weapons, but on a more concerning note, there are strong chances that such weapons may easily escape the various security detection tests and could be used to devastating effect in public places. In 2013, a United States Department of Homeland...
  • Breakthrough Molecular 3D Printer Can Print Billions of Possible Compounds

    03/14/2015 9:58:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    3D Print ^ | March 13, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    What will 3D printers ultimately evolve into? No one has a functioning crystal ball in front of them I assume, but a good guess would be a machine which can practically build anything its user desire, all on the molecular, and eventually atomic levels. Sure we are likely multiple decades away from widespread molecular manufacturing, but a group of chemists led by medical doctor Martin D. Burke at the University of Illinois may have already taken a major step in that direction. Burke, who joined the Department of Chemistry at the university in 2005, heads up Burke Laboratories where he...
  • This Chemistry 3D Printer Can Synthesize Molecules From Scratch

    03/13/2015 5:55:35 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | March 12, 2015 | William Herkewitz
    Need an obscure medicinal compound found only in a jungle plant? Just print it.Say you're a medical researcher interested in a rare chemical produced in the roots of a little-known Peruvian flower. It's called ratanhine, and it's valuable because it has some fascinating anti-fungal properties that might make for great medicines. Getting your hands on the rare plant is hard, and no chemical supplier is or has ever sold it. But maybe, thanks to the work of University of Illinois chemist Martin Burke, you could print it right in the lab. In a new study published in the journal Science...
  • Video: 3D-printed Lower Receiver for a Škorpion vz. 61

    03/11/2015 5:17:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    OutdoorHub ^ | March 11, 2015 | Daniel Xu
    The Škorpion vz. 61 is a very recognizable submachine gun that garnered a following due to its representation in video games and movies. First designed in 1959, this Czechoslovak firearm is also available in semiautomatic versions. However, the semiautomatic variants can be a bit hard to find, and unless you are capable of milling your own lower receiver for one, many fans will have a difficult time getting their hands on a working Škorpion. That is, unless you know how to work a 3D printer. The enthusiasts in this video used a demilled receiver to design their blueprint for this...
  • Inside the Weird World of 3D Printed Body Parts

    03/09/2015 7:11:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Back Channel ^ | March 4, 2015 | Andrew Leonard
    Laura Bosworth wants to 3D print breast nipples on demand. The CEO of the Texas startup TeVido Biodevices is betting on a future in which survivors of breast cancer who have undergone mastectomies will be able to order up new breasts printed from their own living cells. “Everyone,” she says, “knows a woman who has had breast cancer.” Right now their options are limited. Reconstructed nipples using state-of-the-art plastic surgery techniques, she says, “tend to flatten and fade and don’t last very long.” A living nipple built from the patient’s own fat cells, and reconstructed to the precise specification of...
  • Students design plastic recycler to make 3D-printing super cheap

    03/07/2015 12:44:10 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    VR-Zone ^ | March 7, 2015 | Kenny Doan
    A couple of forward-thinking engineering students from the University of British Columbia have put together a little machine that grinds up used plastics and turn them into usable filaments for 3D-printing. It’s called the ProtoCycler, and it’ll generate a kilogram spool of filament for free (negating the cost of electricity of course) if you have some soda pop bottles lying around. The concept behind the 3D-printer add-on was simple—combine a filament extruder and plastic grinder into one contraption. (COMPARISON-CHART-AT-LINK)The ProtoCycler can churn out 10 feet of filament a minute, which makes it the fastest extruder on the market according to...
  • The CIA Is Investing In 3D Printers That Can Build Electronics

    03/06/2015 1:10:10 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | March 5, 2015 | Matt Novak
    The 3D printing industry is still very much in its infancy. But that could change if the CIA has its way. The intelligence agency's venture capital firm just invested in Voxel8, the company behind the first multi-material, 3D electronics printer. What does the CIA want with 3D printing? We can only guess at this point, but we may hear stories one day of how some futuristic James Bond 3D-printed his own gadgets in the field. What's the potential impact for consumers? The move might just jumpstart a field that has so far been struggling to find its footing. Voxel8 says...
  • How 3D Printing Could End The Deadly Shortage Of Donor Organs

    03/04/2015 6:05:13 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The Huffington Post ^ | March 2, 2015 | Macrina Cooper-White
    Three-dimensional printing has been used to make everything from pizza to prostheses, and now researchers are working on using the emerging technology to fabricate hearts, kidneys, and other vital human organs. That would be very big news, as the number of people who desperately need an organ transplant far outstrips the number of donor organs available. On average, about 21 Americans die every day because a needed organ was unavailable. What exactly is the promise of 3D printing organs and tissues, or "bioprinting?" How does the technology work, and when might it start saving lives? For answers to these and...
  • Engineer Creates a Unique 3D Metal Printer for Just $2 — Prints in Gold, Platinum, Iron & More

    02/28/2015 11:00:16 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    3D Print ^ | February 26, 2015 | Eddie Krassenstein
    It isnÂ’t often that you come across new 3D printers that utilize an entirely new concept which hasnÂ’t been seen within this industry as of yet. With todayÂ’s technology, we are able to 3D print objects in hundreds of different materials, but when it comes to printing with metals, most of these machines are out our price ranges. 3D metal printers are mainly reserved for large corporations, as they come with price tags in excess of $250,000. However, as technology advances, we may one day soon be able to 3D print metal objects from the comfort of our own homes,...
  • A Room-Sized 3D Printer Will Make Freeform Concrete Design Easy

    02/28/2015 12:24:24 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | February 26, 2015 | Jamie Condliffie
    Concrete is an amazing building material: cheap to create, strong when used correctly, and hard-wearing, too. But turning it into exotic and shapely forms can be prohibitively complex and expensive. Now, a 3D printer capable of producing one-off moulds as large as a phone booth could help turn architectural dreamw into affordable reality. The Engineer reports that a collaboration between 3Dealise, a 3D engineering company, and Bruil, a construction company, has spawned the new device. The pair claim that the machine—pictured below—can "create irregularly curved surfaces, lightweight half-open mesh or honeycomb structures, and even ornamental craftwork." The printer is used...
  • Australian researchers 3-D print two jet engines

    02/26/2015 1:47:29 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 8 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | 02/26/2015 | UPI
    MELBOURNE, Feb. 26 (UPI) — Researchers have 3-D printed everything from animal prosthetics and human teeth to whole cars, but now a university in Australia has tackled printing two jet engines. A group of researchers at Melbourne’s Monash University, in conjunction with Deakin University and Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), used a large 3-D printer to manufacture the two engines.
  • How 3D printing has advanced from product prototyping to making human organs

    02/22/2015 8:20:39 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    The International Business Times ^ | January 12, 2015 | Jayalakshmi K
    A printer was once just a printer, dispensing paper sheets with printed material made from the ink stored within. But today, a printer has evolved to becoming a small-scale manufacturer that 'prints' out anything from human organs to affordable meals to guns. For instance, the XYZPrinting 3D Food Printer, exhibited at the recent CES 2015 in Las Vegas, is expected to print any style of uncooked cookies and other dough-based pastries in minutes. Not exactly as affordable as any other food processor, the printer ranges between $500 and $1,900 and prints food that measures around 5000 cubic cm by volume....
  • 3HTi Signs Deal with MarkForged to Sell the Mark One 3D Printer (Carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass)

    02/22/2015 1:19:58 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    3D Printing ^ | February 19, 2015 | TE Edwards
    The Mark One 3D printer from MarkForged caused a bit of a sensation last January when it was announced that it could extrude continuous fiber using the FFF process.The Mark One 3D printer, featuring a build volume of 320 x 132 x 160 mm, can print using carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass, and nylon, and in doing so creates very strong parts. Now 3 HTi has announced they’ll be offering, through a partnership with the Cambridge, MA-based MarkForged, the Mark One 3D printer as one of the first companies authorized to sell the revolutionary technology. 3 HTi is a technology solutions...
  • ICL Researchers Figure out How to 3D Print Pure Graphene

    02/18/2015 6:04:28 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    3D Printing ^ | February 13, 2015 | Brian Krassenstein
    We’ve seen an incredible amount of research hours and dollars being poured into an area where the ‘miracle material’ graphene converges with what some may call a ‘miracle technology’ in 3D printing. In this space, a whole slew of groundbreaking applications and processes may emerge as a better understanding of graphene, and how to 3D print it come about. We’ve discussed a company called Graphene 3D Lab in the past. They have been producing a graphene nanocomposite filament for typical FDM/FFF 3d printers. The problem with this filament, however, is the fact that most of the desirable properties of graphene,...
  • Houses hot off the 3D printer

    02/14/2015 4:46:48 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Yahoo! Homes ^ | February 11, 2015 | Ilyce R. Glink
    Robotic building by Contour Crafting won the grand prize in a NASA magazine's Create the Future contest.In the not-too-distant future, building a new home may be as simple as printing it out. The process of wielding 3D printers to make homes is in its infancy today, but someday soon you may look out your window at a large-scale printer, swiftly spitting out a whole home under the instruction of just one operator. "Generally, they'll be much cheaper, much faster, much safer and with much nicer architectural features [than traditional homes]," says Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis, creator of and lead researcher for...
  • 5000 times more conductive 3D printer ink for parts with embedded functional electronics and wiring

    02/06/2015 2:13:19 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | January 13, 2015 | Brian Wang
    Voxel8, creator of the world’s first multi-material 3D electronics printer and backed by Braemar Energy Ventures, announced pre-order availability of its initial product – the Voxel8 Developer’s Kit. Voxel8 also announced its partnership with Autodesk to develop a new design tool called Project Wire for creating 3D electronic devices printed on Voxel8’s platform. Together, Voxel8 and Autodesk are enabling designers and engineers to create three-dimensional parts with embedded circuitry for the first time. Rapidly design novel devices, such as 3D printed antennas, electromagnetic coils, or stack ICs in ways that were previously impossible. Eliminate wire harnesses by combining them with...
  • NTU develops Singapore's first 3D-printed urban solar electric car

    02/02/2015 9:58:47 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Channel News Asia ^ | February 2, 2015
    By pushing existing technology to the limits, undergraduates from NTU have assembled a 3D-printed body shell for an electric car, says Associate Professor Ng Heong Wah.SINGAPORE: Students from the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) have built the first urban solar electric car with a 3D-printed body in Singapore, said the university in a news release on Monday (Feb 2). The car – named NTU Venture 8 (NV8) – is mounted on a carbon fibre single shell chassis. “We are extremely proud to have designed and assembled a 3D-printed body shell for the electric car,” Associate Professor Ng Heong Wah said. “The...
  • 3D printers to make human body parts? It's happening

    01/28/2015 6:54:27 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The San Jose Mercury News Business ^ | January 28, 2015 | Steve Johnson
    It sounds like something from a science fiction plot: so-called three-dimensional printers are being used to fashion prosthetic arms and hands, jaw bones, spinal-cord implants -- and one day perhaps even living human body parts. While the parts printed for humans so far have been fashioned from plastic, metal and other inorganic materials, researchers in California and elsewhere also have begun printing living tissue, with the goal of eventually employing these "bioprinters" to create customized kidneys, livers and other organs for people needing transplants. What's particularly attractive about the technology, according to its proponents, is that 3D printers can produce...
  • World's first 3D-printed apartment building constructed in China

    01/21/2015 6:45:39 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    CNet ^ | January 20, 2015 | Michelle Starr
    A Chinese company has successfully 3D printed a five-storey apartment building and a 1,100 square metre villa from a special print material.While architectural firms compete with their designs for 3D-printed dwellings, one company in China has quietly been setting about getting the job done. In March of last year, company WinSun claimed to have printed 10 houses in 24 hours, using a proprietary 3D printer that uses a mixture of ground construction and industrial waste, such as glass and tailings, around a base of quick-drying cement mixed with a special hardening agent. Now, WinSun has further demonstrated the efficacy of...
  • TNO is Developing a Racetrack 3D Printing System That is ’10 Times Faster Than Current Technology’

    01/17/2015 7:11:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    3D Print ^ | January 14, 2015 | Whitney Hipolite
    Perhaps you read the title of this article, and automatically assumed that we made a typo. After all, it sounds awfully similar to a story we did in the past about 3D Systems. If you have been following the 3D printing space for the past several months, then you know that 3D Systems has been working on creating a new 3D printing system that they say is based on a “racetrack architecture”. It is an assembly line of sorts, and is said to be able to fabricate objects up to 50 times faster than other printers currently available today. Now...
  • Impossible Objects Receives $2.8m Investment to 3D Print with Kevlar, Fiberglass & Carbon Fiber

    01/02/2015 3:06:04 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    3D Print ^ | December 16, 2014 | Sarah Anderson
    Impossible Objects is, even for the 3D printing world, apparently doing the impossible. The focus of the company is to create the world’s first composite 3D printed objects, using an impressive variety of materials, to revolutionize the already-revolutionary 3D printing space. Larry Kaplan heads up the Impossible Objects team as the CEO. The former CEO of Navteq, Kaplan is leading the five-employee firm’s chaimpossible objects logorge in developing novel 3D manufacturing machines to enhance upon the presently available capabilities. “Current technologies are 20 or so years old,” said Kaplan. “They are great for prototyping but too slow compared to volume...
  • 3D Printing May Lead to the Creation of Superhuman Organs Providing Humans with New Abilities

    01/01/2015 4:00:29 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    3D Print ^ | December 5, 2014 | Eddie Krassenstein ·
    Evolution is what got us here today, if you accept the scientific approach to our creation. It was processes such as ‘survival of the fittest’ which led us, as well as other earthly creatures, to develop some of the traits, senses, and abilities that we possess today. For superhero fans, especially those who love the X-Men, you know that these superhuman characters acquired their powers through the process of evolution. Little mutations in genes led to them become the recipient of more than simple human-like abilities. Wouldn’t we all like to have the ability to see through objects, climb walls,...
  • Future food dilemma

    01/01/2015 11:50:05 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    Feedstuffs ^ | December 31, 2014 | Cheryl Day
    The future is always filled with uncertainty, especially for individuals involved in growing and producing safe, nutritional food for the world. As the agriculture community, spends a great deal of time and effort in pondering the “what ifs”, consumers still sit in the driver seat. One thing futuristic minds can agree on is the world population clock is clicking away at much quicker rate than the U.S. population. Recent estimates show a global population will not slow down its pace even after it reaches the United Nation’s projection of 9.2 billion in 2050. For now, the drop in global population...
  • 4 Amazing Things You Can Do With 3-D Printers Very Soon

    12/31/2014 4:21:05 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    Wall Street Cheat Sheet ^ | December 31, 2014 | Rakesh Sharma
    2014 was the year of 3-D printers. According to the 2014 edition of the Wohlers Associates annual report (via The Motley Fool), which is considered the industry’s bible on 3-D printing, there are approximately 400 to 600 3-D printer brands available in the $200 to $5,000 price range. That number is not surprising: With its focus on customized products and innovative materials and technology, 3-D printing is poised to transform our world. Yet not much is known about 3-D printers. This is due to two reasons. First, 3-D printing still has a long way to go to become consumer-friendly. The...
  • US Army Looks To 3D Print Food For Soldiers

    12/31/2014 2:39:55 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    Forbes ^ | December 31, 2014 | Jennifer Hicks
    Food researchers in the US Army are looking into ways to 3D print food for soldiers. According to a press release, Army food technologists say that 3D printed food could produce meals on demand for soldiers in the battlefield. With 3D technology, food can be tailored to a soldier’s nutritional needs. Because the Army’s Meal Ready-to-Eat (MRE) standard for food has a shelf life of three years, 3D printing creates new options that could make meals have longer and more stable shelf lives according to Lauren Oleksyk, Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC). Earlier this month in December...
  • Research group creates first LED 3D printer (Also "Bionic Ear" from bovine cells)

    12/31/2014 1:55:15 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    After more than two years and an estimated $20,000, a research group in the mechanical engineering department has created the first 3D printer capable of printing LED lights. The venture was led by researcher Yong Lin Kong and Ian Tamargo '14, and was sponsored by the Air Force of Scientific Research and the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency. The research group McAlpine, led by mechanical and aerospace engineering professor Michael McAlpine, made a breakthrough more than a year ago after it successfully printed 3D bionic ears, devices that can hear sound frequencies beyond the capacity of a human ear, out...
  • 8 Unbelievable Ideas 3D Printing is Already Being Used For

    12/28/2014 4:04:52 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    Tech Cocktail ^ | December 28, 2014 | Hilary Smith
    If 3D printers don’t already fall somewhere on your list of the top ten coolest things ever, then you really need to take some time to rethink your priorities. The following list of eight unbelievably awesome things that 3D printing is already being used for should help to convince you (if you need convincing) that 3D printers are science fiction come true. 1) Prosthetic Legs for Dogs With a prosthetic leg created by designers at 3D printing company 3D systems, Derby the disabled rescue dog (warning: if you’re pregnant, menstruating, or a passionate animal lover the aforementioned link will probably...
  • Researchers 3 Years Away from Commercializing Pure Graphene 3D Printers

    12/24/2014 8:36:43 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    3D Print ^ | December 24, 2014 | Heidi Milkert
    As we’ve mentioned so many times in past articles, the convergence of additive manufacturing and the ‘miracle material’ graphene could have major ramifications for dozens of industries over the next several years. Because of this, researchers and companies are spending a great deal of time and money figuring out the best methods to 3D print graphene. A group of researchers, led by Seol Seung-kwon at the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute’s Nano Hybrid Technology Research Center (KERI) are at the forefront of this research. As we mentioned last month, KERI, a unit under the Ministry of Finance in South Korea, recently...
  • Is this the future of fashion? First-ever 4D dress created using a printer is unveiled

    12/14/2014 11:18:46 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | December 14, 2014 | Bianca London
    As many women know only too well, finding a dress that fits like a glove is no easy task. But a new dress, created using a 3D printer, may be the answer to every woman's style woes. A design studio have used 3D printing technology to create an innovative dress customised to a woman’s body. The dress, which costs a staggering Ł1,900 ($3,000) to print, features 2,279 printed panels interconnected by 3,316 hinges. Creators Nervous System call it a ‘4D dress’ as, like fabric, the printed garment can go from a compressed object to its intended shape. Jessica Rosenkrantz, co-founder...
  • exVive3D 3D Printed Human Liver Tissue Now Commercially Available by Organovo

    12/13/2014 8:13:28 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    3D Print ^ | November 18, 2014 | Brian Krassenstein
    New technologies such as 3D bioprinting promise to offer a laundry list of new treatments, drug discovery, and cures within the medical industry. With that said, we have been hearing promises for years that 3D printing will change the face of medicine. Despite these promises, bioprinting has yet to make any major impact within the market. Today things may have just changed! San Diego-based 3D bioprinting company Organovo (NYSE MKT: ONVO) has today announced the full commercial availability of their exVive3D Human Liver Tissue for preclinical drug discovery testing. The tissue, which is created via an in-house 3D printer, could...
  • Make Your Own 3D Printer for Under $60 Using Recycled Electronic Components

    12/02/2014 8:26:58 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    3D Print ^ | November 6, 2014 | Debra Thimmesch ·
    One of the obstacles to jumping headlong into the additive manufacturing milieu for many people is often the expense of the 3D printer itself. Further, for those intrepid, budding engineers, designers, makers, and artists, an initial foray might more reasonably and affordably involve logo-instructables-01using a less expensive and complex machine. Enter one Instructables contributor, “mikelllc,” who has designed a make-it-yourself 3D printer that is constructed largely from recycled electronic components. Currently, only about 12.5% of all electronic waste, or “e-waste,” is recycled. Instead, the majority of cast-off electronic products — around 20 to 50 million metric tons per year worldwide...
  • UPS Store’s 3D Printing Service Rules Say ‘Make Love, Not War’ – Sex Toys Permitted, Guns Not

    11/29/2014 8:53:43 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    3D Print ^ | November 29, 2014 | Michelle Matisons
    “Makers, make love, not war.” This appears to be the best way to summarize UPS’s 3D printing service guidelines. UPS has been offering 3D printing services for a little while, but of course, these services come with a strict set of guidelines about what they will and won’t print for you. Naturally, just like going through airport security, weapons are at the top of the list of no-no’s. Anything gun or gun part related and anything that can be used in the “design, development, manufacture, testing, construction, operation, or maintenance” of nuclear weapons, missile or rocket systems, unmanned air vehicles,...
  • 3D printing technique will put electronics into just about everything

    11/24/2014 9:14:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    Engadget ^ | November 23, 2014 | Jon Fingas
    You can use 3D printing to make a handful of electronics, such as antennas and batteries, but LEDs and semiconductors have been elusive; you usually need some other manufacturing technique to make them work, which limits what they can do and where they'll fit. A team of Princeton researchers recently solved this problem, however. They've found a way to make quantum dot LEDs (and thus semiconductors) using only a 3D printer. The scientists choose printable electrodes, polymers and semiconductors, which are dissolved in solvents to keep them from damaging underlying layers during the printing process; after that, the team uses...
  • This bullet makes 3D printed guns genuinely dangerous weapons (but don't panic just yet)

    11/08/2014 12:02:43 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    Tech Times ^ | November 6, 2014 | Nicole Arce
    One of the things that have prevented 3D printed guns from gaining popularity with the mainstream is the fact that they can't fire more than several rounds without wearing out. The plastic used to make the body of the gun is simply too fragile to accommodate the force of firing. A 25-year-old machinist has found an easy, although time-consuming, way to solve this problem. Michael Crumling has developed ammunition he calls .314 Atlas, after the .314-inch caliber and the Atlas lathe he used to make his bullets. Each bullet designed by Crumling is buried deep inside and reinforced with a...