Keyword: adriennemayor

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  • Sick Rams Used As Ancient Bioweapons

    11/29/2007 2:53:57 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 143+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sick Rams Used as Ancient Bioweapons Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Once, a Weapon Nov. 28, 2007 -- Infected rams and donkeys were the earliest bioweapons, according to a new study which dates the use of biological warfare back more than 3,300 years. According to a review published in the Journal of Medical Hypotheses, two ancient populations, the Arzawans and the Hittites, engaged "in mutual use of contaminated animals" during the 1320-1318 B.C. Anatolian war. "The animals were carriers of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia," author Siro Trevisanato, a molecular biologist based in Oakville, Ontario, Canada told Discovery News....
  • Bio Warfare Rears Its Head- The Ancient world USED IT!!!(MUST READ!)

    01/30/2004 7:18:50 AM PST · by vannrox · 32 replies · 1,062+ views
    Newsday ^ | January 13, 2004 | By Bryn Nelson
    The following ARE exerpts... "...From Hercules' poisoned arrows to early germ warfare and attacks with scorpion bombs and red-hot sand, she contends, cultures around the world have grappled with the revulsion and justification of using these unconventional weapons ever since they began creating their own myths and recording their histories. Mayor has compiled a slew of examples in her new book, "Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs: Biological and Chemical Warfare in the Ancient World" (Overlook Press)..." "...The early dilemmas posed in mythic form would be recorded eventually in the annals of historians as combatants put their growing knowledge...
  • Bees, snakes, germs - any weapon in a pinch

    11/30/2003 7:12:18 AM PST · by TrebleRebel · 23 replies · 428+ views
    The Vancouver Sun | 11/29/2003 | Jay Currie
    If you are under Roman siege in the middle of a desert, a scorpion bomb seems like a very good idea. Collect a bunch of lethal scorpions and, very carefully, seal them in clay pots. Hurl the pots at the attackers as needed. That's exactly what the defenders of Hatra, just south of Mosul in today's Iraq, did in 198 AD. The siege was lifted in 20 days. As Adrienne Mayor writes in her intriguing book Greek Fire, Poison Arrows and Scorpion Bombs, scorpions weren't the only stinging animals pressed into service in the ancient world. A clay pot full...
  • Fossil of "Sphinx" discovered in NE China

    01/24/2006 5:42:09 PM PST · by Tyche · 47 replies · 1,893+ views
    People's Daily Online ^ | 24 Jan 2006 | People's Daily Online
    The legendary "Sphinx" eventually found its counterpart version in archeological fossil. Chinese and American paleontologists found two distinct kinds of bone characteristics in the fossil of a sharp-mouthed mammal excavated in China's Liaoning province. The mammal's upper part makes people believe it was viviparous while its lower part looks like oviparous, reports Wen Hui Daily. The latest issue of the British magazine Nature reports the unprecedented discovery. The magazine editor as well as paleontologists marveled at the discovery and believed it might change the traditional theory on mammals evolution. Li Gang, one of the coauthors of the paper, said the...
  • New dinosaur found looking like dragon - named after Harry Potter dragon

    05/28/2006 6:09:41 AM PDT · by S0122017 · 40 replies · 956+ views
    animal discovery ^ | 24 mei | Larry O'Hanlon
    'Hogwarts' Dragon Unveiled By Larry O'Hanlon, Animal Planet News May 24 — A dragon-like dinosaur named after Harry Potter's alma mater has performed a bit of black magic on its own family tree, say paleontologists who unveiled the "Dragon King of Hogwarts" on Monday in Albuquerque. The newly described horny-headed dinosaur Dracorex hogwartsia lived about 66 million years ago in South Dakota, just a million years short of the extinction of all dinosaurs. But its flat, almost storybook-style dragon head has overturned everything paleontologists thought they knew about the dome-head dinos called pachycephalosaurs. "What you knew about pachycephalosaurs — you...
  • Tracking Myth to Geological Reality

    11/05/2005 12:20:12 PM PST · by Lessismore · 25 replies · 1,584+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 11/4/2005 | Kevin Krajick*
    Once dismissed, myths are winning new attention from geologists who find that they may encode valuable data about earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, and other stirrings of the earth SEATTLE, WASHINGTON--James Rasmussen, owner of a funky used-record store called Bud's Jazz, and Ruth Ludwin, a seismologist at the University of Washington, Seattle, make an unlikely professional team. Late last year, they were walking down the beach near the bustling Fauntleroy ferry dock, searching for a reddish sandstone boulder. Native American legends-Rasmussen belongs to the local Duwamish people-say the boulder is haunted by a'yahos, a spirit with the body of a serpent and...
  • Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries

    07/27/2004 11:23:06 AM PDT · by blam · 11 replies · 620+ views
    Inner Mongolia Yields New Discoveries More than 80 leading archeological experts are participating in an international conference in Chifeng, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, to exchange the latest information on Hongshan, a prehistoric relics site. Relics excavated at the Hongshan ("Red Mountain") site originated around 5000 BC to 6500 BC. Now a part of Chifeng City, the site was discovered in 1935. Some of the relics found at Hongshan have led archeologists to conclude that the heads of Chinese dragons may have been inspired by boars in addition to horses and cattle. Primitive people who struggled to survive by fishing and...
  • Chinese villagers eat dinosaur bones

    07/04/2007 5:30:21 AM PDT · by Flavius · 82 replies · 2,164+ views
    ap ^ | 7/4/07 | ap
    BEIJING - Villagers in central China dug up a ton of dinosaur bones and boiled them in soup or ground them into powder for traditional medicine, believing they were from flying dragons and had healing powers. Until last year, the fossils were being sold in Henan province as "dragon bones" at about 4 yuan (50 cents) per kilogram (2.2 pounds), scientist Dong Zhiming told The Associated Press on Wednesday.
  • 'Cyclops'-like remains found on Crete

    02/01/2003 11:07:21 AM PST · by vannrox · 16 replies · 1,135+ views
    CNN ^ | Friday, January 31, 2003 Posted: 2:52 AM HKT (1852 GMT) | Editorial Staff
    <p>IRAKLIO, Greece (AP) -- Researchers on the southern Greek island of Crete have unearthed the fossilized tusk, teeth and bones of a Deinotherium Gigantisimum, a fearsome elephant-like creature that might have given rise to ancient legends of one-eyed cyclops monsters.</p>
  • Why Do Dinosaur Skeletons Look So Weird? (a carcass in a watery grave)

    02/23/2012 12:57:19 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 02/16/2012
    ScienceDaily (Feb. 16, 2012) — Many fossilized dinosaurs have been found in a twisted posture. Scientists have long interpreted this as a sign of death spasms. Two researchers from Basel and Mainz now come to the conclusion that this bizarre deformations occurred only during the decomposition of dead dinosaurs. A syndrome like that as a petrified expression of death throes was discussed for the first time about 100 years ago for some vertebrate fossils, but the acceptance of this interpretation declined during the following decades. In 2007, this "opisthotonus hypothesis" was newly posted by a veterinarian and a palaeontologist....
  • Cyclops Myth Spurred by "One-Eyed" Fossils?

    08/10/2004 10:57:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 2,032+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | February 5, 2003 | Hillary Mayell
    The tusk, several teeth, and some bones of a Deinotherium giganteum, which, loosely translated means really huge terrible beast, have been found on the Greek island Crete. A distant relative to today's elephants, the giant mammal stood 15 feet (4.6 meters) tall at the shoulder, and had tusks that were 4.5 feet (1.3 meters) long. It was one of the largest mammals ever to walk the face of the Earth... To paleontologists today, the large hole in the center of the skull suggests a pronounced trunk. To the ancient Greeks, Deinotherium skulls could well be the foundation for their...
  • Research To Investigate Links Between Ancient Greeks And Modern Science Fiction

    06/08/2005 11:28:49 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies · 737+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 2005-06-08
    New research into the Ancient Greeks shows their knowledge of travel inspired early forms of fantasy and science fiction writing.There is a long tradition of fantasy in Greek literature that begins with Odysseus' fantastic travels in Homer's Odyssey. Dr Karen Ni-Mheallaigh, at the University of Liverpool's School of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, is exploring fantasy in ancient literature, examining theories of modern science fiction writing and how these can be applied to texts from the ancient world. Dr Ni-Mheallaigh is looking at the work of 2nd century AD writer, Lucian of Samosata, who wrote True Histories, a travel narrative that...
  • Archaeologists find 9,000-year-old rhino remains in Urals

    07/28/2008 8:08:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 287+ views
    RIA Novosti ^ | Monday, July 28, 2008 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in the Sverdlovsk Region in Russia's Urals have discovered the 9,000-year-old bones of a rhinoceros, a local museum worker said on Monday. The excavations during which the bones were discovered were carried out at a site on the bank of the Lobva River, said Nikolai Yerokhin from the Russian Academy of Sciences' Institute of Plant And Animal Ecology department. It was generally assumed that rhinoceros last wandered the Urals some 15,000 to 20,000 years ago. However, the latest findings seem to prove that they existed in the area a lot more recently.
  • Cyclops Myth Spurred by One-Eyed Fossils?

    02/08/2003 8:01:23 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 18 replies · 637+ views
    National Geographic NEWS ^ | 02/05/03 | Hillary Mayell
    Cyclops Myth Spurred by One-Eyed Fossils? Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News February 5, 2003 Ever wonder where our worst nightmares come from? For the ancient Greeks, it may have been the fossils of giant prehistoric animals. The tusk, several teeth, and some bones of a Deinotherium giganteum, which, loosely translated means really huge terrible beast, have been found on the Greek island Crete. A distant relative to today's elephants, the giant mammal stood 15 feet (4.6 meters) tall at the shoulder, and had tusks that were 4.5 feet (1.3 meters) long. It was one of the largest mammals ever...
  • The great flood legends - ancient misreadings of the fossil record?

    06/21/2004 7:49:48 AM PDT · by aculeus · 64 replies · 1,338+ views
    Antiquity ^ | June 2004 | Richard K. Jeck
    Over the past two decades there have been renewed attempts to search for remains of Noah's ark and to discover evidence of the biblical Flood itself. In the early 1980s, several expeditions led by an American astronaut and others ascended Mt. Ararat, the legendary resting place of Noah's ark in northern Turkey, in an unsuccessful search for remains of the ark. More recently, evidence has been reported that the Black Sea may have formed suddenly about 7500 years ago by break-through flooding from the Mediterranean Sea (Ryan & Pitman 1998; Ballard 2001). These authors speculate that this natural disaster (for...
  • How Ancient Greeks Named Their Puppies

    07/16/2012 10:00:55 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 46 replies
    Dogs played a special role in ancient Greek society and mythology; Cerberus guarded the gates of Hades, the goddess Artemis used dogs in her hunt, and Greek citizens employed dogs for hunting and protection. To the ancient Greeks, picking your new pup was an important decision, just as it is today. But, according to Stanford University researcher Adrienne Mayor, writing for Wonders & Marvels, the process could have been just a little bit different. Like moderns, the ancients looked for an adventurous and friendly nature, but one test for selecting the pick of the litter seems rather heartless today. Let...