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Keyword: ancientgreece

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  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics? Reason 9: THE HUMAN CONDITION

    05/20/2020 2:45:45 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 5 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2014 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #9: HUMAN CONDITION When it comes to the human condition, we may think that Scripture is all we need. After all, Scripture does show us our true human condition in a way that the Greeks did not and could not: our relationship to God, that we are sinners, that we are a fallen race in need of redemption, that sin separates us from God, that God loves us and offers us grace and salvation. This is the good news that has been revealed by God in Scripture and in the person of Jesus Christ and nowhere else. Indeed, the...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics Reason 7: RELIGION

    05/15/2020 3:08:48 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 3 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Dec 2013 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #7: RELIGION Saint Augustine in his Confessions tells us that after many years of wandering in the desert of indecision, it was Cicero who led him to Christ. Cicero’s Hortensius set him on the path to Christian conversion by implanting in him a longing for the immortality of wisdom. The text of Hortensius did not make it to the modern world and thus is probably the most famous lost treatise in world literature. Wouldn’t we all love to read this work that St. Augustine praises so highly? Well, I have read a lot of Cicero and, like most writers,...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics - Reason 5: NATURAL LAW

    05/13/2020 2:31:18 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 6 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #5: NATURAL LAW What did the first Continental Congress mean when it appealed to “the immutable laws of nature,” or Thomas Jefferson when he referred to the “Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God and the unalienable rights of man”? Natural law. The principle of natural law is embedded in Western civilization, the Declaration of Independence, and our whole history as a nation. The concept of natural law was first articulated by Aristotle in Rhetoric, where Aristotle notes that, aside from the “particular” laws that each people has set up for itself, there is a “common” law that is...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics? – Reason 4: EDUCATION

    05/11/2020 2:04:05 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 7 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON 4: EDUCATION A classical education focuses on the study of the classical languages, Latin and Greek, and on the study of the classical civilization of Greece and Rome. But why is the word classical reserved only for the languages of the Greeks and Romans and only for their civilization? What really is so special about the Greeks and Romans and why should Christians study them? After all they were not Christians, they were pagans. Some have objected to the word pagan and misunderstood its meaning. Pagan is a word Christians coined in the later Roman Empire to refer to...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics Reason #3: Science

    05/08/2020 2:21:35 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 15 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #3: SCIENCE Because we live in the aftermath of what has been called the “scientific revolution,” we modern people consider ourselves quite superior to the ancients in regard to the study of the natural world. We are polished practitioners of what C.S. Lewis called “chronological snobbery.” We think ancient people were ignorant of the natural world and that we, with all our advanced scientitic knowledge, have little to learn from them. But one of the problems with having your nose so high in the air is that you can miss the thing right in front of you. Science, as...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics Reason #2: Virtue

    05/07/2020 1:49:56 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 33 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #2: VIRTUE In the last article, we learned that the Greeks established the first principles of architecture by studying nature. The proportions that are most pleasing to the human eye are those of nature’s greatest work of art—the human body. We learned that God gave man reason and the desire to know, but he did not leave us without guides. He gave us the Greeks, the world’s first systematic, abstract thinkers. And so we study and honor the Greeks because they teach us how to use reason to explore and understand our world, a world that is material and...
  • Why Christians Should Read the Pagan Classics Reason #1: Architecture

    05/06/2020 2:53:05 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 13 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2012 | Cheryl Lowe
    REASON #1: ARCHITECTURE Of all of the points that I will make, this is the easiest to understand because it is so visible: we see its evidence every day. The power and beauty of classical architecture is everywhere, from grand buildings like our Supreme Court to our humble everyday homes. The Greeks discovered the proportions that are most pleasing to the human eye which, they tell us, are based on nature’s greatest work of art: the human body. Scale, mass, proportion, and symmetry—the principles of classical architecture—were worked out by the Greeks in great detail and built upon in succeeding...
  • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Greek Classics

    11/27/2019 5:15:47 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 4 replies
    The National Herald ^ | Jan 25, 2008 | Alex Mallias
    This year will mark the 40th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. His death on April 4, 1968, found my country in the midst of one of its darkest hours, as the one year anniversary of an oppressive military dictatorship neared. With my fellow citizens living under military rule and deprived of the very basic freedoms, I was inspired by the people of Birmingham, Ala., of Memphis and Atlanta, who, in a most dignified way, poured into the streets, standing up for what was rightly theirs. Across the Atlantic, the civil-rights movement reached us in the clarion...
  • The Genius of Byzantium: Reflections on a Forgotten Empire

    11/04/2019 11:21:03 AM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 41 replies
    Intellectual Takeout ^ | Oct 12, 2016 | Marcia Christoff-Kurapovna
    “Le grand absent—c’est l’Empire” C. Dufour, Constantinople Imaginaire Everywhere Western man longs for Constantinople and nowhere has he any idea how to find her. To do so is to reclaim, at last, the meaning of an empire that once defined a hierarchy of imagination long ago abandoned by our civilization; of an eleven-century political, religious and cultural struggle that sought to reconcile Christianity and Antiquity, transforming the Western spirit into a brilliant battleground between Latin and Greek, Augustus and Basileus, reason and faith, ancient and modern. Yet to unearth this Byzantium, this “heaven of the human mind”, as Yeats dreamed...
  • The Greek Way

    03/31/2019 6:26:23 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 3 replies
    W.W. Norton & Company ^ | 1930, 1943 | Edith Hamilton
    I have felt while writing these new chapters a fresh realization of the refuge and strength the past can be to us in the troubled present. “Let us keep our silent sanctuaries,” Senancour wrote, “for in them the eternal perspectives are preserved.” Religion is the great stronghold for the untroubled vision of the eternal; but there are others too. We have many silent sanctuaries in which we can find a breathing space to free ourselves from the personal, to rise above our harassed and perplexed minds and catch sight of values that are stable, which no selfish and timorous preoccupations...
  • Nile Shipwreck Discovery Proves Herodotus Right

    03/23/2019 3:53:54 PM PDT · by wildbill · 36 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 2/23/1918 | Staff
    In the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of his Historia, the ancient world’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”. For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around the sunken port city of Thonis-Heracleion has revealed just how accurate the historian was.
  • Greek Authorities Say Lost Ancient City of Tenea Located

    11/13/2018 11:12:41 AM PST · by rdl6989 · 19 replies
    VOA.com ^ | November 13, 2018
    ATHENS, GREECE — Greece's culture ministry said Tuesday that archaeologists have located the first tangible remains of a lost city that the ancient Greeks believed was first settled by Trojan captives of war after the sack of Troy. A ministry statement said excavations from September to early October in the southern Greek region of the Peleponnese turned up "proof of the existence of the ancient city" of Tenea, until now known mostly from ancient texts. Finds included walls and clay, marble or stone floors of buildings, as well as household pottery, a bone gaming die and more than 200 coins...
  • Stunning new archaeological discovery made on Kythnos island

    09/08/2018 8:41:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Greek City Times ^ | September 5, 2018 | GCT
    Archaeologists have made a huge discovery with signs of habitation stretching from the Protocycladic era until the 7th-8th century AD, which was unearthed at Vryokastro on the island of Kythnos, the site of an ancient city, and the nearby islet Vryokastraki that was once connected to the island by a narrow isthmus. The excavation work was carried out from June 24 until August 4 and finds include an early Christian basilica with later additions, including two towers and strong exterior walls, a number of rectangular rooms partly carved from rock that was used until late antiquity and obsidian tools and...
  • War and Sex: The Power of Women in the Ancient Greek play Lysistrata

    01/22/2018 11:36:01 AM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 17 replies
    For years men have waged war and, of course, sex is not a novel concept or construct. Lysistrata portrays women in a powerful role, namely in control of their sex and sex in general. They have authority over the men. When the absurdities of war have taken their men away, the women use sex as a weapon in order to obtain peace. By withholding sex, women come to essentially control their men. The men eventually succumb to the women and yield in their determination to carry out a war. This is interesting because in Ancient Greek tradition, the women are...
  • Sprawling Greek monuments built 4,500 years ago on 'the world's oldest maritime sanctuary'...

    01/18/2018 9:10:25 AM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 01/18/2018 | By Harry Pettit For Mailonline
    FULL TITLE: Sprawling Greek monuments built 4,500 years ago on 'the world's oldest maritime sanctuary' reveal the impressive engineering skills of Bronze Age islanders Excavations around Keros show the technological prowess of Bronze Age Greeks Researchers found the remains of terraced walls and giant gleaming structures The structures were built using 1,000 tons of stone dug up six miles away Together they turned a tiny islet near Keros into a single, massive monument A remote Greek island known as the 'world's oldest maritime sanctuary' was once covered in complex monuments built using stone dug up six miles (10 km) away....
  • Looted AD 200 marble artifact heading back to Greece

    02/12/2017 4:58:56 PM PST · by ETL · 21 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | February 12, 2017
    An ancient marble slab that wound up on display in a midtown Manhattan art gallery after being stolen in Greece 30 years ago has been returned to Greek officials. The large sarcophagus fragment worth $500,000 was stolen from a burial ground near the port city of Thessaloniki and its whereabouts had long been a mystery despite an international search. The 400-pound artifact dates from 200 A.D. and depicts a battle between Greek and Trojan warriors, the New York Post reported. The Royal-Athena Galleries agreed to forfeit the piece when presented evidence of its theft, the paper reported. (snip) “Sadly, in...
  • Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000

    09/20/2016 3:08:48 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Sept 19, 2016 | By Associated Press and Cheyenne Macdonald
    Full title: Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000 years at the bottom of the sea Buried beneath sand and the fragments of ancient pottery, researchers have discovered the 2,000-year-old remains of a sailor who died upon the ill-fated 'Antikythera ship.' Archaeologists have investigated the famous shipwreck off a tiny Greek island for which it's named for over a century, revealing a trove of remarkable artefacts – including the mysterious 'Antikythera Mechanism,' thought to be a 'guide to the galaxy.'
  • August 9th is the anniversary of the battle of Thermopylae

    08/09/2016 4:07:55 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 41 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 08/09/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    A legendary battle of western history: Today is the anniversary of the battle of Thermopylae in 480 B.C. Thermopylae is a pass in east central Greece between the cliffs of Mount Oeta and the Malic Gulf, and in ancient times, it was a principal entrance into southern Greece from the north. It was there that the Greeks confronted the third Persian expedition of the Persian Wars - an army of as many as a half-million men under Xerxes. When they found that their position had been turned, however, the Greeks retreated precipitously - all except for a 300-strong Spartan contingent...
  • Archaeologists To Study Shackled Skeletons From Ancient Greece To Understand Rise Of Athens

    03/28/2016 8:12:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Forbes ^ | March 24, 2016 | Kristina Killgrove
    Not even four miles south of Athens lies Phaleron — a site unknown to most tourists. A port of Athens in classical times, Phaleron also boasts one of the largest cemeteries ever excavated in Greece, containing more than 1,500 skeletons. Dating to the 8th-5th centuries BC, Phaleron is significant for our understanding of the rise of the Greek city-state. And, in particular, for understanding the violence and subjugation that went with it. Two mass burials at Phaleron include people who were tossed face-down into a pit, their hands shackled behind their backs. To learn more about these deviant burials and...
  • Ancient Greek silver mine unearthed

    02/15/2016 8:37:16 AM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Mining.com ^ | 2/15/2016 | Andrew Topf
    Archeologists working in Thorikos, Greece, have found a pristine silver mine that has lain untouched for over 5,000 years. Thorikos on southern Attica – the peninsula that juts into the Aegean Sea – was a site for ancient lead and silver mining. In a post on Sunday, New Historian says the mining complex, discovered by French scientists from the University of Lorraine and the UMR National Center for Scientific Research 5608 of Toulouse, has infrastructure unlike any seen from the time period of around 3,200 BC. "The Greek mine is exceptional not only for its scope but for its layout...