Keyword: animalhusbandry

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

    08/21/2018 1:49:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | August 14, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Studies of ancient preserved plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road. Spengler identified a rich assemblage of fruit and nut crops, showing that many of the crops we are all familiar with today were cultivated along the ancient trade...
  • A Mesolithic face from Southern Europe

    03/12/2014 4:00:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 12 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-9-2014
    The Mesolithic, a transitional period that lasted from circa 11,000 to 5,000 years ago (between the Palaeolithic and Neolithic), ends with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry and the concurrent arrival of new genetic material from the Middle East. The arrival of the Neolithic farmers, with their carbohydrate-based and domesticated animal diet, along with food-borne pathogens and the inherent metabolic /immunological challenges can be reflected in genetic adaptations of post- Mesolithic populations.Pre-Neolithic genetic material The individual at the centre of the study belongs to a group prior to this influx of new genetic material.“The biggest surprise was to discover...
  • Cats Sailed With Vikings to Conquer The World, Says Genetic Study

    08/08/2018 10:58:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 68 replies
    n the first large-scale study of ancient feline DNA, the results reveal how our inscrutable friends were domesticated in the Near East and Egypt some 15,000 years ago, before spreading across the globe and into our hearts. The study was presented at the International Symposium on Biomolecular Archaeology in Oxford, UK back in 2016, and sequenced DNA from 209 cats that lived between 15,000 and 3,700 years ago - so from just before the advent of agriculture right up to the 18th century. Found in more than 30 archaeological sites in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa, these ancient feline...
  • The Reengineering of the Common Tomato

    08/04/2018 4:25:08 PM PDT · by vannrox · 58 replies
    metallicman ^ | June 2018 | editorial staff
    Did you know that the tomato is a fruit? It actually is, you know. It certainly does not taste like one today. Though, it really used to. Tomatoes used to be sweet and delicious. That is, until the 1920’s in the United States. What in the world was going on then? All that damned “Progressivism” and trying to change America into a utopia ruled by a benevolent wealthy class. Nonsense. Oh, yes. They implemented the Federal income tax, and they banned alcohol and did all kinds of things (like giving the right to vote to woman) to turn the world...
  • You Always Knew Your Cat Was Half Wild But Now There’s Genetic Proof

    11/12/2014 6:45:03 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    Time ^ | November 11, 2014 | Helen Regan
    A new study on house cats has found that our feline companions are actually only semi-domesticated. People began domesticating cats around 9,000 years ago but DNA researchers from Washington University in St. Louis found that house cats still have many of the same traits as their wild cousins. The fact that cats have retained the ability to hunt and survive effortlessly in the wild just underscores how little impact we humans have had on them.
  • Archeological Plant Remains Point to Southwest Amazonia as Crop Domestication Center

    07/29/2018 3:42:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, July 25, 2018 | PLoS ONE
    Genetic analysis of plant species has long pointed to the lowlands of southwest Amazonia as a key region in the early history of plant domestication in the Americas, but systematic archaeological evidence to support this has been rare. The new evidence comes from recently-exposed layers of the Teotonio archaeological site, which has been described by researchers as a "microcosm of human occupation of the Upper Madeira [River]" because it preserves a nearly continuous record of human cultures going back approximately 9,000 years. In this study, Watling and colleagues analyzed the remains of seeds, phytoliths, and other plant materials in the...
  • Found: 14,400-Year-Old Flatbread Remains That Predate Agriculture

    07/23/2018 11:30:19 PM PDT · by vannrox · 47 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | 16JUL18 | PAULA MEJIA
    ....snip.... That’s no longer the case. Today, a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen, the University College London, and the University of Cambridge released a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences detailing their discovery of 14,400-year-old crumbs from a flatbread. The archaeological site, known as Shubayqa 1, is located in the Black Desert of northeastern Jordan and was home to Natufian hunter-gatherers. The flatbread remains are not only the oldest instance of bread found to date, but also preeminent examples of how bread-making existed even before agriculture developed some 4,000 years later. “Nobody had...
  • Archeologists Find World's Oldest Bread

    07/18/2018 6:36:50 AM PDT · by C19fan · 40 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | July 17, 2018 | Avery Thompson
    Bread is life, but according to new research, it might be even more than that. A group of archeologists in northeastern Jordan have found the oldest bread in the world, and their findings show that this bread predates the invention of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. According to this discovery, the hunt for better bread ingredients may have triggered the agricultural revolution, which would make bread largely responsible for all of civilization as we know it. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, University College London and University of Cambridge were excavating an archeological site in Jordan when they discovered...
  • Scientists Have Discovered The Earliest Evidence of Bread, And It's Much Older Than We Expected

    07/16/2018 9:01:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    The people who built the ancient structure, members of what's called the Natufian culture, struggled in a "hostile environment to gain more energy from their food," said Ehud Weiss, an archaeobotanist at Bar-Ilan University in Israel who was not involved with the study. Archaeologists found the bread remains in sediment samples at a site named Shubayqa 1 in Jordan. The structure was oval with a fireplace in the center, and its builders carefully laid stones into the ground. Arranz Otaegui said she did not know whether the building was a dwelling or had other, perhaps ceremonial, purposes. Sifting through the...
  • Ancient 'Iceman' shows signs of a well-balanced last meal

    07/12/2018 5:57:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    apey-news ^ | Thursday, July 12, 2018 | Emiliano Rodriguez Mega
    Talk about a paleo diet. Scientists have uncovered the last meal of a frozen hunter who died 5,300 years ago in the Alps. The stomach contents of the corpse, widely known as Oetzi the Iceman, offer a snapshot of what ancient Europeans ate more than five millennia ago, researchers said. On the menu, described Thursday in the journal Current Biology, were the fat and meat of a wild goat, meat of a red deer and whole wheat seeds, which Oetzi ate shortly before his death. Traces of fern leaves and spores were also discovered in Oetzi's stomach. Scientists think he...
  • Seeds of Success [Kenyan herders turn to ag]

    06/21/2018 1:12:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    US News ^ | June 21, 2017 | Anthony Langat
    As drought kills Kenya’s livestock, some herders are fighting hunger by growing their own grass. At noon in Joseph Kwopin's dry and dusty homestead in Kenya's central Baringo County, a calf shelters from the sweltering sun under a shed made of sticks. The barren ground has no vegetation but for a few shrubs and the red-flowered Carraluma socotrana plant – a rare species whose appearance here could seem cruel given that it isn't edible, even to livestock... According to UNICEF, 2.6 million Kenyans have become food insecure as a result of the lack of rainfall. The Kenya Red Cross reported...
  • Fried food heart risk 'a myth'

    01/25/2012 2:54:55 PM PST · by PJ-Comix · 80 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | January 25, 2012 | Stephen Adams
    They say there is mounting research that it is the type of oil used, and whether or not it has been used before, that really matters. The latest study, published in the British Medical Journal, found no association between the frequency of fried food consumption in Spain - where olive and sunflower oils are mostly used - and the incidence of serious heart disease.
  • Fried food heart risk 'a myth'

    01/25/2012 5:06:01 PM PST · by the scotsman · 19 replies
    Daily Telegraph ^ | 25th January 2012 | Stephen Adams
    'It is a "myth" that regularly eating fried foods causes heart attacks, researchers have found, as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil. They say there is mounting research that it is the type of oil used, and whether or not it has been used before, that really matters. The latest study, published in the British Medical Journal, found no association between the frequency of fried food consumption in Spain - where olive and sunflower oils are mostly used - and the incidence of serious heart disease. However, the British Heart Foundation warned Britons not to "reach for...
  • Scientists Discover Why Olive Oil Lowers Blood Pressure

    05/23/2014 11:45:25 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    The secret to the Mediterranean diet may be in the salad. Eating unsaturated fats, like those in olive oil, along with leafy greens and other vegetables creates a certain kind of fatty acid that lowers blood pressure, scientists said Monday. These nitro fatty acids are formed when consuming spinach, celery and carrots that are filled with nitrates and nitrites, along with avocado, nuts and olive oils that contain healthy fats. Nitro fatty acids appear to inhibit an enzyme known as soluble epoxide hydrolase, which regulates blood pressure, said the research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a...
  • Corn, sunflower, safflower oil health benefits challenged

    11/11/2013 6:15:51 PM PST · by Alaska Wolf · 29 replies
    CBC NEWS ^ | Nov 11, 2013 | The Canadian Press
    Omega-6-rich oils don't have same benefits as canola, soybean and olive oils, studies show The Canadian Press Posted: Nov 11, 2013 1:46 PM ET Last Updated: Nov 11, 2013 2:10 PM ET In 2012, Health Canada agreed to let manufacturers of cooking oils containing either omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acids claim on their product labels that these oils help reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol. (iStock) A pair of Canadian scientists are challenging the fact that manufacturers of some cooking oils are entitled to make health claims about the products. They argue that new evidence suggests oils...
  • An ingredient in olive oil that appears to kill cancer cells

    02/21/2015 11:40:43 AM PST · by Tired of Taxes · 76 replies
    Kurzweil ^ | 2-20-15 | Unknown
    A Rutgers nutritional scientist and two cancer biologists at New York City’s Hunter College have found that an ingredient in extra-virgin olive oil kills a variety of human cancer cells without harming healthy cells. The ingredient is oleocanthal, a compound that ruptures a part of the cancerous cell, releasing enzymes that cause cell death. Paul Breslin, professor of nutritional sciences in the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, and David Foster and Onica LeGendre of Hunter College, report that oleocanthal kills cancerous cells in the laboratory by rupturing vesicles that store the cell’s waste. The findings are published in Molecular...
  • Fish, Seafood Better Than Olive Oil, Nuts Against Heart Disease

    05/07/2007 4:30:52 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 349+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 5-7-2007 | American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Source: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Date: May 7, 2007 Fish, Seafood Better Than Olive Oil, Nuts Against Heart Disease Science Daily — Researchers have found that a diet rich in fish, seafood, and grains -- also called polyunsaturated fats -- is better at preventing heart disease than a diet containing olive oil, nuts, and avocados -- called monounsaturated fats. Although both types of fats are healthy, people should probably include more of the first than the second in their diet to keep a healthy heart, the scientists say. Too much cholesterol has long been linked to increasing...
  • Molecular Biology Provides Clues to Health Benefits of Olive Oil

    06/28/2010 11:53:09 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    U.S. Department of Agriculture ^ | June 28, 2010 | Rosalie Marion Bliss
    Health conscious consumers have long known that virgin olive oil is a good choice when it comes to preparing meals and dipping breads. Now, a team of researchers, including one with the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), has found that phenolic components in olive oil actually modify genes that are involved in the inflammatory response. The researchers knew from other studies that consuming high-phenolic-content virgin olive oil reduces pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-blood-clotting biomarkers when compared with consuming low-phenolic-content olive oil. But they wanted to know whether olive oil’s beneficial effects could be the result of gene activity. The study, published recently...