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Keyword: archaeologists

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  • 5,000 year-old stone balls continue to baffle archaeologists

    06/18/2018 10:56:29 AM PDT · by BBell · 126 replies
    http://www.foxnews.com ^ | 6/18/18 | Tom Metcalfe
    Some of the most enigmatic human-made objects from Europe's late Stone Age — intricately carved balls of stone, each about the size of a baseball — continue to baffle archaeologists more than 200 years after they were first discovered. More than 500 of the enigmatic objects have now been found, most of them in northeast Scotland, but also in the Orkney Islands, England, Ireland and one in Norway. Archaeologists still don't know the original purpose or meaning of the Neolithic stone balls, which are recognized as some of the finest examples of Neolithic art found anywhere in the world. But...
  • Archaeologists find new mass child sacrifice site in Peru

    06/09/2018 4:48:27 PM PDT · by BBell · 42 replies
    A group of archaeologists has discovered the remains of more than 50 children who were ritually sacrificed by the pre-Columbian Chimu culture on the northern coast of what is now Peru. The site is located a close to another where evidence of the biggest-ever sacrifice of children was found, with more than 140 youngsters were slain. But the most recent discovery may be even bigger. “So far we have found the remains of 56 children who were sacrificed by the Chimu culture,” archaeologist Gabriel Prieto told AFP. “At this new site, we can easily double the number of remains we...
  • Archaeologists discover new geoglyphs near Nazca Lines in Peru

    05/29/2018 3:56:50 AM PDT · by BBell · 25 replies
    PALPA, Peru, May 28 (Reuters) - Archaeologists using drones have discovered more than 25 geoglyphs etched into a swath of coastal desert in southern Peru near the Nazca Lines, a culture ministry official said Monday. Most of the newly found geoglyphs, which include figures of a killer whale and a woman dancing, appear to have been made by the Paracas culture more than 2,000 years ago, hundreds of years before the Nazca people created similar giant drawings nearby, said Johny Isla, an archaeologist who heads the culture ministry's conservation efforts in the region. An additional 25 geoglyphs that had previously...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found the Oldest Copy of One of the Gospels-(A mummy's mask)

    01/23/2015 12:03:21 PM PST · by virgil283 · 8 replies
    tatler ^ | January 21, 2015 | Chris Queen
    "New technology that allows scientists to remove the glue from the masks of mummies without damaging the ink on the paper used to make the mask has yielded an exciting discovery: a piece of papyrus that may contain the oldest known copy of one of the gospels. The finding, a fragment of the Gospel of Mark, which dates back to the year 90, is one of several fascinating texts that archaeologists are discovering in the masks of mummies. This first-century gospel fragment was written on a sheet of papyrus that was later reused to create a mask that was worn...
  • 2,750-year-old temple found near Jerusalem

    12/27/2012 9:47:49 AM PST · by Nachum · 41 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12/27/12 | Fox News
    Archaeologists have discovered a 2,750-year-old temple along with a cache of sacred artifacts, providing rare insight into religious practices at the time, the Israeli Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday. The temple was uncovered west of Jerusalem, at the Tel Motza archaeological site, in preparation for work on Highway 1. Among the finds are pottery figurines, fragments of chalices and decorated pedestals, which indicate the site was the stomping ground of a ritual cult. "The ritual building at Tel Motza is an unusual and striking find, in light of the fact that there are hardly any remains of ritual buildings of the...
  • Archaeologists Discover High Priest's Bell?

    07/21/2011 3:51:57 PM PDT · by Eleutheria5 · 15 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 21/7/11
    Archaeologists have discovered a rare gold bell with a small loop at its end. The finding was made during an archaeological excavation in the City of David National Park (near the walls of the Old City of Jerusalem) by the Israel Antiquities Authority in cooperation with the Israel Nature and Parks Authority and the Ir David Foundation. The directors of the excavation on behalf of the Antiquities Authority, archaeologists Eli Shukron and Professor Ronny Reich of Haifa University, said after the finding, “The bell looked as if it was sewn on the garment worn by a man of high authority...
  • 'Britain's first pre-Roman planned town' found near Reading

    08/20/2011 8:10:56 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies
    BBC ^ | August 17, 2011 | Louise Ord
    Archaeologists believe they have found the first pre-Roman planned town discovered in Britain.It has been unearthed beneath the Roman town of Silchester or Calleva Atrebatum near modern Reading. The Romans are often credited with bringing civilisation to Britain - including town planning. But excavations have shown evidence of an Iron Age town built on a grid and signs inhabitants had access to imported wine and olive oil. Prof Mike Fulford, an archaeologist at the University of Reading, said the people of Iron Age Silchester appear to have adopted an urbanised 'Roman' way of living, long before the Romans arrived. "It...
  • Iron Age road link to Iceni tribe

    08/15/2011 10:45:25 PM PDT · by Pontiac · 15 replies · 1+ views
    BBC ^ | 8/15/11 | Louise Ord
    A suspected Iron Age road, made of timber and preserved in peat for 2,000 years, has been uncovered by archaeologists in East Anglia. The site, excavated in June, may have been part of a route across the River Waveney and surrounding wetland at Geldeston in Norfolk, say experts. Causeways were first found in the area in 2006, during flood defence work at the nearby Suffolk village of Beccles. It is thought the road is pre-Roman, built by the local Iceni tribe. In AD60, the Iceni ambushed one Roman legion and sacked Roman settlements at London and Colchester before being defeated.
  • Archaeologists On Crete Find Skeleton Covered With Gold Foil In 2,700-year-old Grave

    10/01/2010 2:54:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Canadian Press via Google News ^ | Tuesday, September 28, 2010 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Excavator Nicholas Stampolidis said his team discovered more than 3,000 pieces of gold foil in the 7th-century B.C. twin grave near the ancient town of Eleutherna... The tiny gold ornaments, from 1 to 4 centimetres (0.4 to 1.5 inches) long, had been sewn onto a lavish robe or shroud that initially wrapped the body of a woman and has almost completely rotted away but for a few off-white threads... The woman, who presumably had a high social or religious status, was buried with a second skeleton in a large jar sealed with a stone slab weighing more than half a...
  • Peru archaeologists find hall for human sacrifice (carried out by the Moche people)

    07/22/2010 8:53:14 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 13 replies
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 7/22/10 | Emily Schmall
    LIMA (Reuters) – An ancient ceremonial ground used by a Pre-Columbian civilization for human sacrifices has been uncovered on Peru's northern coast, archaeologists said on Thursday. The discovery appears to reinforce prevailing theories about a ceremony known as "the presentation" that was carried out by the Moche people, an agricultural civilization that flourished between 100 B.C. and 800 A.D. Carlos Wester La Torre, director of the Bruning Museum in Peru and a leader of the dig, said the ceremonial site likely hosted ritual killings of prisoners of war. Photographs taken at the site show more than half a dozen skeletons...
  • Mayan King’s Tomb Discovered in Guatemala

    07/16/2010 1:57:59 PM PDT · by decimon · 19 replies
    Brown University ^ | July 16, 2010 | Unknown
    A team of archaeologists led by Stephen Houston has discovered a royal tomb in Guatemala, filled with materials that have been preserved for approximately 1,600 years. PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — A well-preserved tomb of an ancient Mayan king has been discovered in Guatemala by a team of archaeologists led by Brown University’s Stephen Houston. The tomb is packed with of carvings, ceramics, textiles, and the bones of six children, who may have been sacrificed at the time of the king’s death. The team uncovered the tomb, which dates from about 350 to 400 A.D., beneath the El Diablo pyramid...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Goliath's Hometown

    07/14/2010 6:05:30 PM PDT · by Nachum · 26 replies
    inn ^ | 7/14/10 | Maayana Miskin
    An ongoing archaeological excavation in Tel Tzafit continues to unearth the ruins of what was once the city of Gat – described in the Bible as the hometown of Goliath. Professor Aren Maeir, who is directing the dig, spoke to Arutz Sheva's Hebrew-language news service to discuss the latest finds. Recent finds from the Tel Tzafit excavation are “fascinating,” Maeir said. The site, inhabited at times by Canaanites and at other times by Philistines, has remnants from many periods of history. “We are focusing on the Canaanite period, the Philistine period, and the Israelite period, and for now we're primarily...
  • Archaeologists find suspected Trojan war-era couple

    09/22/2009 12:57:53 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 66 replies · 1,795+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 9/22/09 | Reuters
    ANKARA (Reuters) – Archaeologists in the ancient city of Troy in Turkey have found the remains of a man and a woman believed to have died in 1,200 B.C., the time of the legendary war chronicled by Homer, a leading German professor said on Tuesday. Ernst Pernicka, a University of Tubingen professor of archaeometry who is leading excavations on the site in northwestern Turkey, said the bodies were found near a defense line within the city built in the late Bronze age. The discovery could add to evidence that Troy's lower area was bigger in the late Bronze Age than...
  • Israeli archaeologists find ancient fortification (3700-year-old Canaanite 26-foot tall stone wall)

    09/02/2009 9:11:03 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 35 replies · 1,530+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 9/2/09 | Jen Thomas - ap
    JERUSALEM – Archaeologists digging in Jerusalem have uncovered a 3,700-year-old wall that is the oldest example of massive fortifications ever found in the city, the Israel Antiquities Authority said Wednesday. The 26-foot-high wall is believed to have been part of a protected passage built by ancient Canaanites from a hilltop fortress to a nearby spring that was the city's only water source and vulnerable to marauders. The discovery marks the first time archaeologists have found such massive construction from before the time of Herod, the ruler behind numerous monumental projects in the city 2,000 years ago, and shows that Jerusalem...
  • "Oldest Church" Discovery "Ridiculous," Critics Say

    06/14/2008 6:56:27 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 117+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 6-13-2008 | Mati Milstein
    "Oldest Church" Discovery "Ridiculous," Critics SayMati Milstein in Rihab, Jordan for National Geographic NewsJune 13, 2008 A Jordanian archaeologist's announcement this week that he had uncovered the world's first Christian church in an underground cave drew surprise and skepticism from experts in Jordan and beyond. The Jordan Times earlier this week quoted archaeologist Abdel-Qader al-Housan, director of the Rihab Center for Archaeological Studies as saying, "We have uncovered what we believe to be the first church in the world, dating from 33 A.D. to 70 A.D." Al-Housan later told the Associated Press that he discovered a cave beneath St. George's...
  • 'Cursus' Is Older Than Stonehenge: Archeologists Step Closer To Solving Ancient Monument Riddle

    06/10/2008 10:45:44 AM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 201+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 6-10-2008 | University of Manchester.
    'Cursus' Is Older Than Stonehenge: Archeologists Step Closer To Solving Ancient Monument Riddle ScienceDaily (Jun. 10, 2008) — A team led by University of Manchester archaeologist Professor Julian Thomas has dated the Greater Stonehenge Cursus at about 3,500 years BC – 500 years older than the circle itself.The recently discovered antler pick used to dig the Cursus. (Credit: Image courtesy of University of Manchester) They were able to pinpoint its age after discovering an antler pick used to dig the Cursus – the most significant find since it was discovered in 1723 by antiquarian William Stukeley. When the pick was...
  • Archeologists Discover Unique Things In Veliki Novgorod (Baby Bottles)

    05/27/2008 3:00:16 PM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 74+ views
    Russiaq IC ^ | 5-27-2008
    Archeologists Discover Unique Things in Veliki Novgorod 27.05.2008 A group of archeologists carrying out diggings in Veliki Novgorod have found several ancient feeding bottles for babies. The finds were discovered at the digging site in Mikhailova Street. Here the archeologists found wooden feeding devices made of cow horns. The Slavs used to attach leather sacks with milk to the broad ends of hollow horns and their babies would suck the milk through holes in the narrow part of horns. It is interesting to note that not far from the archeological excavation site there is a working municipal kindergarten. Almost every...
  • Star Watch - Archaeologists Discover A "Cosmic Clock"

    05/25/2008 8:29:53 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 202+ views
    Tenerife News ^ | 5-24-2008
    Star watch - Archaeologists discover a “cosmic clock” Overcrowded in their lower reaches they might be, but the Canary Islands still possess some solitary mountain wilder-nesses, places little visited thanks to their rugged inaccessibility, and which have hardly changed since they were frequented by the pre-colonial aboriginal islanders. And traces of their presence are still turning up, often in the form of petroglyphs, enigmatic scratched marks on rocks and boulders which held some special significance about which we can only guess today. The latest find is, say archaeologists, one of the most exciting. They are calling it a cosmic clock,...
  • Archaeologists Explore Peruvian Mystery

    05/22/2008 1:36:34 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 123+ views
    Physorg ^ | 5-22-2008 | University of Bristol
    Archaeologists explore Peruvian mystery A hummingbird geoglyph. Photo by Dr Nick Saunders Indiana Jones may be flying over the Nazca Lines in Peru in his latest Hollywood adventure, but two British archaeologists have been investigating the enigmatic desert drawings for several years. Dr Nick Saunders from Bristol University and Professor Clive Ruggles from the University of Leicester are locating and measuring the lines with high-precision GPS, photographing the distribution of 1,500-year old pottery, and painstakingly working out the chronological sequence of overlying lines and designs. Professor Ruggles and Dr Saunders agree with other experts that some lines were pathways across...
  • Fiji Jewellery Box Find Stuns Archaeologists (Lapita People)

    04/22/2008 2:59:43 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 642+ views
    Fiji Live ^ | 4-22-2008
    Fiji jewellery box find stuns archeologists 22 APR 2008 Archeologists have discovered a 3000-year-old pot in Fiji containing jewellery believed to have been made by the South Pacific’s original settlers – the Lapita people. The discovery was made by an excavation party from the Fiji-based University of the South Pacific and the Fiji Museum at Bourewa in Natadola on the Coral Coast. The dig at Bourewa, which is the earliest human settlement in Fiji, unearthed the pot and a thick piece of “exquisitely decorated pottery”. The Lapita people were the first colonists of Pacific Island groups, including the eastern Solomon...