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Keyword: birds

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  • Biomedical bleeding affects horseshoe crab behavior

    10/24/2018 1:53:58 AM PDT · by piasa · 11 replies
    New research from Plymouth State University and the University of New Hampshire indicates that collecting and bleeding horseshoe crabs for biomedical purposes causes short-term changes in their behavior and physiology that could exacerbate the crabs' population decline in parts of the east coast. Each year, the U.S. biomedical industry harvests the blue blood from almost half a million living horseshoe crabs for use in pharmaceuticals—most notably, a product called Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), used to ensure vaccines and medical equipment are free of bacterial contamination. This lifesaving product can only be made from horseshoe crab blood, says researcher Win Watson,...
  • Occasional Birdy Thread Q4 '18(In memory of Swampsniper)

    10/02/2018 6:50:46 PM PDT · by Chipper · 166 replies
    October 2, 2018 | Self
    Going to start this back up, with permission from Islander7. Posts, comments and stories for the birders/birdwatchers/twitchers on FR. Post and share. I was walking through a small sanctuary in my county, when I had two Barred Owls paying very close attention to me. I happened to look straight up over my left shoulder and saw why. Then on the other side of the tree I saw another reason why. One of the best birding experiences I have had. Parent bringing in the food. The other watchful parent Barn Swallow Northern Harrier so focused on hunting it was within 30...
  • Breakthrough as dinosaur DNA structure is recreated by scientists

    08/27/2018 4:07:50 PM PDT · by plain talk · 17 replies
    Daily Star ^ | August 27, 2018 | Rachel O'Donoghue
    Researchers at the University of Kent say their groundbreaking studies unlock one of the greatest mysteries about the prehistoric monsters – why they came in such varied sizes and shapes. It is also said the team’s work will explain how dinosaurs were able to be the most dominant species on Earth for nearly 200 million years. Professor Darren Griffin, who led the research, said they were able to map out the creatures’ genetic code by studying the DNA of their closest living relatives, turtles and birds. It is believed that dinosaurs were so varied in their appearances because they had...
  • The Mystery of Lizard Breath: One-Way Air Flow May Be 270 Million Years Old

    12/12/2013 2:07:17 PM PST · by Renfield · 19 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12-11-2913
    Air flows mostly in a one-way loop through the lungs of monitor lizards -- a breathing method shared by birds, alligators and presumably dinosaurs, according to a new University of Utah study. The findings -- published online Dec. 11 in the journal Nature -- raise the possibility this breathing pattern originated 270 million years ago, about 20 million years earlier than previously believed and 100 million years before the first birds. Why remains a mystery. "It appears to be much more common and ancient than anyone thought," says C.G. Farmer, the study's senior author and an associate professor of biology...
  • Dozens of drunk seagulls found on beaches in Southern England

    07/08/2018 4:50:25 PM PDT · by ETL · 19 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | July 6, 2018 | James Rogers
    Dozens of drunk seagulls have been found on beaches in Southwest England after scavenging alcohol, according to news reports. ..." "The birds appear disoriented and confused and struggle to stand,” explained RSPCA [Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals] vet David Couper. "We took some video of one of the birds who is staggering around and losing his balance just like a person would if they'd had too much to drink." DevonLive reports that one seagull “reeking of beer” vomited over firefighters sent to rescue it after it had fallen off a roof in Lyme Regis.
  • Wind energy takes a toll on birds, but now there's help

    04/17/2018 8:58:29 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 42 replies
    NBC "News" ^ | April 17, 2018 | by Tom Metcalfe
    With more than 50,000 wind turbines in place across the U.S., wind power now accounts for 8 percent of the nation's energy-generating capacity — and experts predict that figure could rise to 20 percent by 2030. But all that clean, renewable energy comes with a high cost to the nation's wildlife. Researchers estimate that 140,000 to 328,000 birds are killed every year in collisions with the turbines' spinning rotor blades and support towers. The risk to birds is highest at night, when the blades and towers are cloaked in darkness. Now researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, have...
  • Biz & Tech Apple Park: Transcript of 911 Calls About Injuries From Walking Into Glass

    03/05/2018 10:31:21 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    Below are transcripts of three 911 calls from Apple’s new campus, obtained by The Chronicle via a public-records request. The calls, all made in January, relate to injuries suffered by people who walked into glass at the campus, which is called Apple Park. The transcript has been lightly edited. Click here for a story about how a Cupertino official had warned Apple last year about the problem.Call 1 (Jan. 2) Dispatcher: Medical emergency, 185, what are you reporting? Caller: This is Apple security reporting a medical injury. Dispatcher: OK, what is the address of the emergency? Caller: Just a moment....
  • Jilted Hawk Discovers Her Nest Is Home to a third Bird

    03/03/2018 7:49:59 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 36 replies
    New York Post ^ | March 3, 2018 | Melkorka Licea
    A cheep slut has come between a hawk and her hubby. For the last five years, two red-tailed hawks named Christo and Dora have ruled the roost at Tompkins Square Park, mating and raising 10 chicks together. But three months ago, Dora had to leave and go to rehab for an injured wing. And while hawks usually mate for life, an opportunistic bachelorette named Nora soon arrived and began flapping her feathers at Christo.
  • Remote Scottish islands Declared Rat-Free - Lured to Captivity With Peanut Butter & Chocolate

    03/02/2018 10:44:01 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 2 MARCH 2018 | Nicola Harley
    Remote Scottish islands declared rat-free after rodents lured to captivity using peanut butter and chocolateA remote Scottish island has officially been declared rat-free after rodents were caught using peanut butter and chocolate. In a four year programme to rid the Shiant Isles of its rodents, the RSPB placed mini rat motels across the area filled with cocoa and peanut butter flavoured wax blocks to catch them. It is hoped by ridding the island of its non-native rats the seabird populations will be boosted by protecting their breeding sites The Isles, a cluster of islands five miles east of the Isle...
  • 'One in a Million' Yellow Cardinal Spotted in Alabama

    02/27/2018 11:36:35 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 69 replies
    al.com ^ | Feb 22, 2018
    By Dennis Pillion dpillion@al.com An extremely rare cardinal has birders and biologists flocking to Shelby County, Alabama this week, as images of a yellow cardinal have circulated around social media. Auburn University biology professor Geoffrey Hill said the cardinal in the photos is an adult male in the same species as the common red cardinal, but carries a genetic mutation that causes what would normally be brilliant red feathers to be bright yellow instead. Alabaster resident Charlie Stephenson first noticed the unusual bird at her backyard feeder in late January and posted about it on Facebook. She said she's been...
  • Yellow Cardinal Spotted In Alabama Considered 1 In A Million

    02/26/2018 7:38:58 AM PST · by blam · 38 replies
    Fox News ^ | 2-26-2018
    Birders and biologists are reportedly heading to Alabama after pictures of a yellow cardinal started to circulate online, AL.com reported. Geoffrey Hill, a biology professor at Auburn, told the website that the cardinal in photos appears to be a male and carries a genetic mutation, hence the bright yellow plumage. The bird was first spotted in January. "I've been birdwatching in the range of cardinals for 40 years and I've never seen a yellow bird in the wild," Hill, who is on sabbatical in Australia, told AL.com via email. "I would estimate that in any given year there are two...
  • Your Birdfeeder Is a Battleground, But the Bigger Birds Don't Always Win

    02/18/2018 10:07:42 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 32 replies
    WCAI ^ | FEB 7, 2018 | MARK FAHERTY
    Have you heard of “bird feeder fight club”? If not, that’s probably because I just made it up. But it totally could be a real thing, according to scientists using Cornell’s vast Project FeederWatch data set. Feeder Watch is one of several bird related citizen science projects managed by Cornell University’s Lab of Ornithology, which also include eBird and Nest Watch. More on those projects another time, but I will say that if you are not using eBird yet, you should be. The brilliance of these projects is that they harness the collective observational power of hundreds of thousands of...
  • Hundreds of birds fall from sky in Draper

    02/02/2018 5:18:55 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 31 replies
    KTSU ^ | January 30, 2018 | Elle Thomas
    More than 200 birds fell from the sky onto a Draper street Monday, leading residents to wonder what caused this mass avian accident. “It’s one of the rarest things I’ve ever heard of,” said Sergeant Chad Carpenter with the Draper City Police Department. “As I was driving, these birds were just falling out of the sky,” said Draper resident, Lacey Brown as she was driving down the street on 300 East in Draper. “They were all on the ground right around here and on the roadway,” Brown said, “They were just falling out of the sky like leaves,” she added.
  • Birds Seem to Intentionally Spread Fires!

    01/17/2018 1:43:18 PM PST · by fishtank · 53 replies
    Proslogion ^ | 1-15-18 | Jay Wile
    Birds Seem to Intentionally Spread Fires! Jan. 15, 2018 Birds are incredibly intelligent animals. They work through certain probability problems better than some students, they communicate with people in order to hunt, they build structures with perspective in mind, they can figure out other birds’ desires, and they use and modify tools. Well, now we have one more thing to add to the list. According to a recent study published in the Journal of Ethnobiology, at least three species of bird (Black Kites, Whistling Kites, and Brown Falcons) also use fire!
  • Winter Birds to Chopin Etude.

    01/05/2018 12:12:16 PM PST · by mairdie · 26 replies
    The plastic feeder acted as a greenhouse, and the birds would sleep in the feeder attached to our kitchen window during the coldest part of winter.
  • Adorable moment baby skimmer bird gives mom a hug after she fed him first

    01/04/2018 5:13:22 PM PST · by mairdie · 50 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 4 January 2018 | Chris Pleasance
    A baby bird has been caught hugging his mum's beak at just two days old. The affectionate black skimmer chick was photographed by wildlife fanatic, Thomas Chadwick, 21, from St. Petersburg, Florida, US. He had been following the nest since before the birds hatched and had watched this chick being bullied by his sibling.
  • Microlight pilot dubbed 'birdman' flying with orphaned geese as he helps them migrate in France

    12/29/2017 4:37:33 PM PST · by mairdie · 22 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 29 December 2017 | Tim Stickings
    They say birds of feather flock together and these birds are no exception as they take to the skies with a microlight pilot they believe to be their mother. Christian Moullec has been dubbed the 'birdman' for his extraordinary relationship with birds and as this breathtaking footage shows, the 58-year-old loves nothing more than sharing his passion with others - taking people up on his microlight and encouraging them to reach out and touch the birds mid-flight. Christian, from Cantal in France, first starting flying with birds back in 1995 in a bid to migrate them to areas where they...
  • Weird Event. . . looked like meteor shower but wasn't but something else! (Vanity)

    11/29/2017 12:54:55 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 97 replies
    Swordmaker Vanity | November 28, 2017 | Swordmaker
    Something VERY strange occurred tonight while my girlfriend and I were soaking in our spa in the backyard about 9:45 PM. We live in the unincorporated area between Sacramento and Rancho Cordova, CA. It was a very cool and clear night and we could, for the first time in a long while see the stars clearly. We turned off the security lights that illuminated the walkway along the garage and enjoyed to clear stars as we lay back and enjoyed a glass of brandy in the spa. Air temperature was about 46º F but the water temperature was a toasty...
  • Birders fear loss of habitat to Obama Center, Jackson Park golf course development

    08/05/2017 8:31:19 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 34 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 5 Aug 2017 | Manya Brachear Pashman
    At a recent community forum to discuss plans for the Obama Presidential Center, Karin Droegemueller stepped up to the microphone and introduced herself as an "angry birder." She is among a flock of birders who fear that the proposed $30 million Tiger Woods golf course and expanded driving range tied to the development of the Obama Center will ward off the millions of migratory birds that stop in Jackson Park, and displace the nearly 300 species that have helped make the park a favorite Chicago birding destination... But not all open land is equal, they say. A manicured golf course...
  • Curious cockatoo shuts cheeky cat inside basket after she takes a swipe at her [tr]

    07/28/2017 5:08:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 1 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | July 28, 2017 | Sophie Inge
    A cat and a cockatoo have become an unlikely comic duo after a hilarious standoff between the pair went viral. Footage from Nagoya, Japan, shows the parrot, named Karin, using her beak to prize open a wicker basket - revealing Koume the cat.