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Keyword: brain

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  • 2013 - Congress, Fearing 'Brain Drain,' Seeks to Opt Out of Participating in Obamacare's Exchanges

    07/30/2017 4:13:19 AM PDT · by Libloather · 17 replies
    Forbes ^ | 4/25/13 | Avik Roy
    As Obamacare was winding its way through the Senate in 2009, Sen. Chuck Grassley (R., Iowa) slipped in an amendment requiring that members of Congress, and their staff, enroll in Obamacare’s health insurance exchanges. The idea was simple: that if Congress was going to impose Obamacare upon the country, it should have to experience what it is imposing firsthand. But now, word comes that Congress is quietly seeking to rescind that provision of the law, because members fear that staffers who face higher insurance costs will leave the Hill. The news has sparked outrage from the right and left. Here’s...
  • New Orleans doctors help regrow toddler's brain after drowning

    07/21/2017 3:34:25 PM PDT · by Wonder Warthog · 41 replies
    WWL ^ | July 21, 2017 | None Given
    Two-year-old Eden Carlson lost a significant amount of brain tissue after spending 15 minutes underwater. Director of Hyperbaric Medicine, Dr. Paul Harch, says she made remarkable improvements after being treated with oxygen for 45 minutes twice a day. Weeks later, Eden’s parents brought her to New Orleans, and Harch put her in a hyperbaric chamber. “I dosed it at the same level of oxygen but now with pressure, and she made another very noticeable improvement with just the first hyperbaric treatment and from there just accelerated,” Harch said. In February of 2016, Eden escaped the baby gate in her home...
  • [N. Korea] Doctors: Warmbier suffered "severe injuries to all areas" of his brain

    06/16/2017 2:18:12 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 74 replies
    NPR ^ | June 15, 2017 | Stefan Becket
    Doctors: Warmbier suffered "severe injuries to all areas" of his brain Doctors treating an American who was released earlier this week by North Korea said he suffered "severe injuries to all areas" of his brain while he was in captivity. Speaking at a press conference Thursday, Otto Warmbier's doctors said he is breathing on his own but does not consistently respond to verbal cues. Warmbier, who was in a coma when he was released, suffered "extensive loss of brain tissue in all regions of the brain," one of his doctors said. Doctors Daniel Kanter, Jordan Bonomo and Brandon Foreman briefed...
  • Researchers identify specific neurons that distinguish between reality and imagination

    06/01/2017 9:01:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | June 1, 2017 | Provided by: University of Western Ontario
    New Western University research shows that neurons in the part of the brain found to be abnormal in psychosis are also important in helping people distinguish between reality and imagination. The researchers, Dr. Julio Martinez-Trujillo, principal investigator and professor at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry and Dr. Diego Mendoza-Halliday, postdoctoral researcher at M.I.T., investigated how the brain codes visual information in reality versus abstract information in our working memory and how those differences are distributed across neurons in the lateral prefrontal cortex region of the brain. The results were published today in Nature Communications. "You can look...
  • Cancer resources

    05/06/2017 11:29:57 AM PDT · by Dacula · 117 replies
    Self
    My wife has stage 4 metastatic cancer. She has battled this before and survived twice. This time the cancer has reached her brain and the doctors are a bit more apprehensive than before. Does anyone know about grants? All of her doctors are telling us to apply for grants to pay for her medicine. Any advice would be appreciated. I may not be able to respond right away, but I will do my best. Lots of planning and preparation on my part.
  • Artificial 'brain in a dish' created in a world first: could shed light on Alzheimer's

    04/27/2017 7:40:30 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 34 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 14:52 EDT, 26 April 2017 | Victoria Allen Science Correspondent
    Scientists have grown the first working 'mini-brains' in a dish which could provide future treatments for autism and epilepsy. The lab-grown organs have their own brain cells, formed into circuits similar to those of a two-month-old baby in the womb. Described as 'thrilling science', it is the first time a human forebrain has been seen in action outside the body. Scientists hope to use the mini-brains to watch in real time the triggers for epilepsy, when brain cells become hyperactive, and autism, where they are thought to form bad connections. It could pave the way for drugs to treat these...
  • Cryogenically frozen brains will be 'woken up' and transplanted in donor bodies...

    04/27/2017 6:18:46 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 60 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 27 April 2017 • 11:46am | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    People who have had their brains cryogenically frozen could be 'woken up' within three years, a pioneering Italian surgeon has claimed. Professor Sergio Canavero, Director of the Turin Advanced Neuromodulation Group, is aiming to carry out the first human head transplant within 10 months and then wants to begin trials on brain transplants. If the procedures are successful, he believes that frozen brains could be thawed and inserted into a donor body. Hundreds of people who are dying or paralysed have had their bodies or brains cryogenically preserved in the hope that medical science will be able to bring them...
  • Brain cell therapy 'promising' for Parkinson's disease (hope for Hillary alert)

    04/11/2017 12:46:29 AM PDT · by Zakeet · 8 replies
    BBC ^ | April 11, 2017
    Scientists believe they have found a way to treat and perhaps reverse Parkinson's disease, by making replacement cells to mend the damaged brain. They say human brain cells can be coaxed to take over the job of the ones that are destroyed in Parkinson's. Tests in mice with Parkinson-like symptoms showed that the therapy appeared to ease the condition. Many more studies are needed before similar tests can begin in people. Experts say the research published in Nature Biotechnology is hugely promising, although at a very early stage.
  • Las Vegas Dave desperately needs prayer (just informed)

    04/08/2017 6:07:16 AM PDT · by JockoManning · 110 replies
    Phone call from his wife | March 11 2017 | Jocko Manning
    Was just informed that Las Vegas Dave has had bleeding in the frontal lobe of his brain. Is on a trache and is not responsive. Prayer greatly needed and appreciated.
  • In an Unexplained Case, Brain Activity Has Been Recorded as Much as 10 Minutes After Death

    03/09/2017 6:33:20 AM PST · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 8 MAR 2017 | BEC CREW
    Doctors in a Canadian intensive care unit have stumbled on a very strange case - when life support was turned off for four terminal patients, one of them showed persistent brain activity even after they were declared clinically dead. For more than 10 minutes after doctors confirmed death through a range of observations, including the absence of a pulse and unreactive pupils, the patient appeared to experience the same kind of brain waves (delta wave bursts) we get during deep sleep. And it's an entirely different phenomenon to the sudden 'death wave' that's been observed in rats following decapitation. "In...
  • Filipina Wakes Up From Nine-Month Coma, Ready to Go Home

    02/07/2017 3:01:45 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    Gulf News ^ | February 6, 2017
    Mother of two has been receiving treatment at Rashid Hospital after slipping into coma in April 2015A Filipina who has been undergoing treatment and physiotherapy at Rashid Hospital after waking up from a nine-month coma is now well on her way to recovery and is ready to go back to the Philippines to see her children. Perlite Almonte, 35, was first admitted to the hospital on April 18, 2015 after she was found unconscious in the bathroom of her house. Doctors who examined Almonte said she had slipped into a coma. Dr Zeyad Al Rais, Head of Critical Care Department...
  • Older, fitter adults experience greater brain activity while learning (Physical and brain fitness)

    01/16/2017 4:03:51 PM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 15 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 1/13/17 | N/A
    Older adults who experience good cardiac fitness may be also keeping their brains in good shape as well. In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, older adults who scored high on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) tests performed better on memory tasks than those who had low CRF. Further, the more fit older adults were, the more active their brain was during learning. These findings appear in the journal Cortex. Difficulty remembering new information represents one of the most common complaints in aging and decreased memory performance is one of the hallmark impairments in Alzheimer's disease. Healthy...
  • Prayers Appreciated - upcoming surgery

    01/05/2017 10:05:24 AM PST · by Slainte · 47 replies
    Self | 1/5/2017 | Slainte
    My family and I would really appreciate your thoughts and prayers for healing over the next few weeks. On the 19th of January I'm scheduled to have brain surgery. At end of October I suffered a minor stroke. It didn't feel minor at the time but fortunately I recovered quickly and almost completely. Within a few weeks I was back at work, and after a month of therapy my speech and movement had resolved to a level where only those who knew me very well pre-stroke had any idea something had happened. In the MRI taken to diagnose the stroke,...
  • If you have left-handers in your family, your brain is different

    12/23/2016 5:52:16 PM PST · by donna · 102 replies
    Arizona Daily Star ^ | Dec 23, 2016 | Thomas Bever
    About half the world's population is right-handed but has left-handed family members. Such right-handers have special neurological organization of language and thought. This has implications for therapies and our understanding of the genetic bases for language. Our brain imaging studies show that grammatical knowledge is represented differently if you have left-handers in your family. For example, when it comes to language, everyone’s brain responds to certain language tasks quickly. But that response is much stronger in the brain's right hemisphere if you have left-handers in your family and stronger in the left hemisphere if you have no left-handers in your...
  • Three-year-olds can be identified as criminals of the future

    12/13/2016 5:47:05 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 61 replies
    The Times UK ^ | 13 Dec 16 | Tom Whipple
    People who will commit most crime can be predicted by looking at deprivation and brain health in childrenA fifth of the population is responsible for four fifths of crime, two fifths of obesity, three quarters of fatherless families and for claiming two thirds of benefits. What’s more, scientists say, you can identify this troublesome group at the age of three. A 45-minute test rating children on IQ and self-control, combined with information about deprivation and maltreatment, allowed researchers to predict “with considerable accuracy” which would go on to be the greatest burden on the state. The 38-year study may be...
  • Magnetic brain stimulation can bring back stowed memories: study [help for Hillary!]

    12/01/2016 2:19:03 PM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Dec 01, 2016 | Provided by: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Results by Rose et al. overturn a theory that in order for short-term memories to exist, neurons that represent that memory must be constantly active. Instead, the neural activity supporting that memory need only arise when the person trying to recall it consciously focuses his or her attention on the memory. Credit: N.S. Rose et al. =========================================================================================================================== It's clear that your working memory—which holds attention on small things of short-term importance—works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it. Describing how it works, however—how the brain determines what to keep in mind,...
  • Your Dog Remembers What You Did

    11/23/2016 11:48:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    EurekaAlert ^ | 11-23-2016 | Claudia Fugazza, Ákos Pogány, and Ádám Miklós
    Claudia Fugazza, Ákos Pogány, and Ádám MiklósNovember 23, 2016 People have a remarkable ability to remember and recall events from the past, even when those events didn't hold any particular importance at the time they occurred. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on November 23 have evidence that dogs have that kind of "episodic memory" too. The study found that dogs can recall a person's complex actions even when they don't expect to have their memory tested. "The results of our study can be considered as a further step to break down artificially erected barriers between non-human animals...
  • A Brain-damaged US President with Finger on the Nuclear Button?

    08/28/2016 4:30:46 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 47 replies
    New Eastern Outlook, journal-neo.org ^ | August 24, 2016 | F. William Engdahl
    Hillary Rodham Clinton seems to surround herself with more scandals than you can shake a stick at, as we said when I was growing up in Texas. We had the Mena, Arkansas scandals when her husband, Bubba, otherwise known as William Jefferson Clinton, was Attorney General and then Governor. Ambrose Evans Pritchard, the British Telegraph investigative journalist did a masterful documentation of that in his The Secret Life of Bill Clinton, when Bill was President facing impeachment in the 1990's. Then there are the Clinton Foundation scandals documented in the 2015 Peter Schweitzer book, Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of...
  • Fourth brain-eating amoeba case of the year being treated ( Florida )

    08/18/2016 11:54:23 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 13 replies
    CNN ^ | 8/18/2016 | Debra Goldschmidt
    An unidentified patient in Florida is being treated after being infected with a brain-eating amoeba last week, according to the Florida Department of Health. It is the fourth known case this year of infection by the parasite Naegleria fowleri. "We believe that the individual contracted the infection after swimming in unsanitary water on a single private property," said Mara Gambineri, the health department's communications director, noting that there is no risk to the general public. The parasite is almost always deadly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 1962 and 2015 there were 138 known cases of...
  • Zika infection may affect adult brain cells

    08/18/2016 9:56:28 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 19 replies
    medicalxpress ^ | August 18, 2016 | Joseph Gleeson & Howard Hughes
    Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology suggests that certain adult brain cells may be vulnerable to infection as well. Among these are populations of cells that serve to replace lost or damaged neurons throughout adulthood, and are also thought to be critical to learning and memory. "This is the first study looking at the effect of Zika infection on the adult brain," says Joseph Gleeson,...