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Keyword: bronzeage

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  • DNA clue to origins of early Greek civilization

    08/03/2017 9:21:11 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 8/3/17 | BBC
    DNA is shedding light on the people who built Greece's earliest civilizations. Researchers analysed genetic data from skeletons dating to the Bronze Age, a period marked by the emergence of writing, complex urban planning and magnificent art and architecture. These ancient Aegean people were mostly descended from farmers who had settled the region thousands of years earlier. But they showed signs of genetic - and possibly cultural - contact with people to the north and to the east. Dr Iosif Lazaridis, from Harvard Medical School in Massachusetts, and colleagues focussed on burials from the Minoan civilization, which flourished on the...
  • Skeletons of 5,000-year-old found buried alongside remains of two sacrificed horses (trunc)

    07/28/2018 12:03:40 PM PDT · by BBell · 33 replies
    https://www.thesun.co.uk ^ | 7/27/18 | Will Stewart
    ETERNAL LOVE Skeletons of 5,000-year-old Romeo and Juliet ‘lovers’ found buried alongside remains of two sacrificed horses ‘pulling a chariot into the afterlife’The couple were found buried with lavish jewellery, spearheads and ceramic pottery in the Karaganda regionTHE 5,000-year-old remains of a "Romeo and Juliet" couple have been unearthed next to the skeletons of two sacrificed horses in Kazakhstan. Their bones were found lying side by side in an ancient grave alongside metal spearheads, precious stones and ceramic pottery in the Karaganda region. Their bones look worn but it's clear both lovers are lying on their sides and almost locked...
  • Ancient 'sauna' unearthed in Assynt

    10/20/2012 9:09:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, October 17, 2012 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of what they believe could be an Bronze Age bathing site, or a sauna. The metre-deep pit with a channel to a nearby stream was discovered at Stronechrubie, Assynt, in the north west Highlands. The find was made by the Fire and Water Project, which is run by archaeology and history group Historic Assynt. The project team had been trying to understand what a crescent shaped mound of stones had been created for. Excavations at the mound by archaeologists and volunteers unearthed the pit and channel from beneath a layer of clay. Archaeologists believe it...
  • Researcher's swinging blade offers glimpse into how ancient Mycenaeans built palaces

    05/05/2018 8:26:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Science News ^ | May 1, 2018 | Bruce Bower
    Nicholas Blackwell and his father went to a hardware store about three years ago seeking parts for a mystery device from the past. They carefully selected wood and other materials to assemble a stonecutting pendulum that, if Blackwell is right, resembles contraptions once used to build majestic Bronze Age palaces. With no ancient drawings or blueprints of the tool for guidance, the two men relied on their combined knowledge of archaeology and construction. Blackwell, an archaeologist at Indiana University Bloomington, had the necessary Bronze Age background. His father, George, brought construction cred to the project... No one alive today has...
  • Ancient Cornish barrow site discovered

    04/02/2018 2:47:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thu, Mar 29, 2018 | Australian National University news release
    An Archaeologist at The Australian National University (ANU) has discovered a prehistoric Bronze-Age barrow, or burial mound, on a hill in Cornwall and is about to start excavating the untouched site which overlooks the English Channel. The site dates back to around 2,000 BC and was discovered by chance when ANU Archaeologist Dr Catherine Frieman, who was conducting geophysical surveys of a known site outside the village of Looe in Cornwall, was approached by a farmer about a possible site in a neighbouring field... Dr Frieman said ancient barrows in the UK are usually always burial sites, although in Cornwall...
  • Italian Skeletons Reveal Old World Diseases

    04/13/2004 5:22:18 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 719+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 4-13-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Italian Skeletons Reveal Old World Diseases By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Columbus: Syphilis Spreader? April 12, 2004 — Researchers investigating Italian cemeteries have found further evidence to confirm that syphilis and rheumatoid arthritis plagued the Americas long before the arrival of Columbus. Involving various sites throughout Italy, the study examined 688 skeletons dating from the Bronze Age to the Black Plague epidemic of 1485-1486. The remains were investigated for the presence of bony alterations characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis, gout, spondyloarthropathy and syphilis-causing organisms, called treponemes. Indeed, syphilis is known to scar and deform bones. Legend holds that Columbus and his...
  • REVEALED: Scientists find man with 'perfect smile' in 3,500 year-old BRONZE AGE SKELETON

    01/29/2018 10:25:39 PM PST · by beaversmom · 21 replies
    Express ^ | Jan 29, 2018 | Dan Falvey
    A “CATCH for the ladies” man, described as having the “perfect smile”, has been found by scientists examining a the remains of a young Bronze Age male with better teeth than many modern-day Britons, it has been revealed. Academics in forensic science from the University of Derby have been studying the ancient skeleton and uncovered some remarkable findings. Despite the age of the remains scientists were fascinated to discover that the man had “beautiful” teeth and did not have the same poor oral hygiene of most men from the Bronze era. Sanita Nezirovic, who has been studying the skeleton, said:...
  • Archaeologists Race Melting Glaciers 2 Rescue Iron & Bronze Age Artifacts Exposed by Climate Change

    01/24/2018 7:27:59 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 37 replies
    Newsweek ^ | January 24, 2018 | By Kastalia Medrano
    Glacial archaeologists are racing melting ice in Norway to rescue thousands of ancient artifacts exposed by climate change—revealing something surprising about a mysterious and little-known ice age. A team of scientists from Norway and the United Kingdom working in the mountains of Oppland, Norway, have discovered more than 2,000 artifacts, including Iron Age and Bronze Age weapons, remains of pack horses and even prehistoric skis. According to lead author Lars Pilø, co-director of the Glacier Archaeology Program at Oppland County Council, the skis differ from the modern-day version considerably. They're broader, and might have at one point been partly covered...
  • Melting [Norwegian] mountain ice reveals thousands of stunningly-preserved artefacts

    01/23/2018 6:09:22 PM PST · by mairdie · 42 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 23 January 2018 | Phoebe Weston
    More than 2,000 remarkably well-preserved hunting artefacts have emerged from melting ice in Norway's highest mountains, dating as far back as 4000 BC. The incredible finds were made by 'glacial archaeologists' in Jotunheimen and the surrounding areas of Oppland, which include Norway’s highest mountains. They looked at the edge of the contracting ice and recovered artefacts of wood, textile, hide and other organic materials. Included in the archaeologists' haul is a ski with preserved binding from 700 AD - only the second one to be preserved globally - as well as a Bronze Age shoe from 1300 BC.
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • How Asian Nomadic Herders Built New Bronze Age Cultures

    11/30/2017 10:22:42 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies
    Science News ^ | 11-30-2017 | Bruce Bower
    BIG MOVES Ancient DNA indicates horse-riding pastoralists called the Yamnaya made two long-distance migrations around 5,000 years ago. One trip may have shaped Europe’s ancient Corded Ware culture, while the other launched central Asia’s Afanasievo culture. Nomadic herders living on western Asia’s hilly grasslands made a couple of big moves east and west around 5,000 years ago. These were not typical, back-and-forth treks from one seasonal grazing spot to another. These people blazed new trails. A technological revolution had transformed travel for ancient herders around that time. Of course they couldn’t make online hotel reservations. Trip planners would have searched...
  • Gaza Bronze Age Remains Disappearing Under Concrete

    11/01/2017 7:35:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 24, 2017 | akher Abou El Oun with Laurent Lozano
    Palestinian archaeologist Moain Sadeq says the mound at Tell es-Sakan near Gaza City is a "unique" site that could offer an invaluable glimpse into the region's ancient heritage. It is "maybe the only fortified Canaanite city in southern Palestine" occupied continuously from 3200 to 2000 BC, he says. Since it was discovered by chance in 1998, the man-made mound has been scarred by bulldozers more than once. A few weeks ago the earthmoving equipment returned yet again, destroying a large part of archaeological excavations carried out in 1999 and 2000 by Sadeq and his French colleague Pierre de Miroschedji. The...
  • What Europe's most ancient battlefield reveals

    10/09/2017 8:49:00 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 15 replies
    dw.com ^ | October 9, 2017 | Klaus Krämer
    It is the site of a huge battle that took place 3,300 years ago in Germany. A relatively recent discovery, little is known about what actually happened there – but it still changes our perception of the Bronze Age.
  • Unexpected and Gruesome Battle of 1250 BC Involved 4,000 Men from Across Northern Europe

    03/25/2016 5:30:29 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 77 replies
    .ancient-origins.net/ ^ | 24 March, 2016 | Mark Miller
    A battlefield of 3,250 years ago in Germany is yielding remains of wounded warriors, wooden clubs, spear points, flint and bronze arrowheads and bronze knives and swords. The gruesome scene, frozen in time by peat, is unlike anything else from the Bronze Age in Northern Europe, where, researchers thought, large-scale warfare didn’t begin until later. Analysis of the remains of the 130 men, most between ages 20 and 30, found so far shows some may have been from hundreds of kilometers away—Poland, Holland, Scandinavia and Southern Europe. The hand-to-hand combat of the battle, which may have involved thousands of people...
  • Archaeologists find bones from prehistoric war in Germany

    10/11/2008 11:17:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 468+ views
    EarthTimes ^ | Thursday, October 9, 2008 | DPA
    Archaeologists have discovered the bones of at least 50 prehistoric people killed in an armed attack in Germany around 1300 BC. The signs of battle from around 1300 BC were found near Demmin, north of Berlin. They are the first proof of any war north of the Alps during the Bronze Age, said state archaeologist Detlef Jantzen on Thursday. One of the skulls had a coin-sized hole in it, indicating the 20- to 30-year-old man had received a mortal blow. A neurologist said he was probably hit with a wooden club and died within hours. Scientists plan DNA tests on...
  • For Peaceable Humans, Don’t Look to Prehistory

    07/01/2016 9:22:43 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 37 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 06/30/2016 | MELVIN KONNER
    Along a river in northern Germany, thousands of men lined up for a pitched battle. Some had come great distances, determined to seize or hold this modest waterway. They went at it mercilessly, leaving hundreds dead, many shot in the back while fleeing. Victory was decisive. [1250 BC]
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • Bronze Age Greek city found underwater

    08/31/2015 11:34:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Spero Forum ^ | August 27, 2015 | Martin Barillas
    Along the shore near the site, archaeologists have found more than 6,000 objects, including fragments of the red ceramics that are characteristic of the area. Beck called the area an “archaeologist’s paradise.” Beck points out that other civilizations were extant at the time, such as Egypt and the nascent civilizations at the islands of Crete and Santorini. The researchers expect that future research at Lambayanna will shed new light on a dense network of coastal settlements stretched throughout the Aegean Sea. Of the structures found by the researchers, Beck said “There must have been a brick superstructure above a stone...
  • Indus Valley civilisation may pre-date Egypt's pharoahs: Ancient society is 2,500 years older [tr]

    06/02/2016 6:41:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 2, 2016 | Sarah Griffiths
    With its impressive pyramids and complex rules, Ancient Egypt may seem to many the epitome of an advanced early civilisation. But new evidence suggests the Indus Valley Civilisation in India and Pakistan, famed for its well-planned cities and impressive crafts, predates Egypt and Mesopotamia. Already considered one of the oldest civilisations in the world, experts now believe it is 8,000 years old - 2,500 years older than previously thought.