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Keyword: clovisimpact

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  • Death from above? Fireball may have destroyed ancient Syrian village

    06/21/2020 9:53:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    Live Science ^ | 20 June 2020 | Nola Taylor Redd
    13,000 years ago, something very bad seems to have occurred, leaving a layer of carbon suggesting dramatic fires. But for much of the last decade, scientists inspecting the remnants of the village have debated what happened, unable to decide whether the carbon formed during an airburst or during more mundane fires among the thatched huts. So Moore decided to reexamine the glass in more detail. His analysis of the glass composition matched a 2012 finding claiming an airburst had destroyed Abu Hureyra, suggesting that the villagers' bucolic lifestyle ended suddenly when one or more fragments from a passing comet exploded...
  • Evidence from Chile Supports Younger Dryas Extraterrestrial Impact Hypothesis

    03/29/2019 6:18:08 AM PDT · by vannrox · 21 replies
    science news ^ | 20mar19 | Editorial staff
    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis, also known as Clovis comet hypothesis, posits that the hemisphere-wide debris field of a large, disintegrating asteroid (or comet) struck North America, South America, Europe, and western Asia approximately 12,800 years ago. This event triggered extensive biomass burning, brief impact winter, climate change, and contributed to extinctions of late Pleistocene megafauna. Controversial from the time it was proposed, this hypothesis continues to be contested by those who prefer to attribute the end-Pleistocene reversal in (global) warming entirely to terrestrial causes. Now, University of California, Santa Barbara’s Professor James Kennett and co-authors present further geologic and...
  • The Day the World Burned

    03/16/2019 10:59:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    University of California - Santa Barbara ^ | Friday, March 8, 2019 | Sonia Fernandez
    When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be... the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, which postulates that a fragmented comet slammed into the Earth close to 12,800 years ago, causing rapid climatic changes, megafaunal extinctions, sudden human population decrease and cultural shifts and widespread wildfires (biomass burning)... suggests a possible triggering mechanism for the abrupt changes in climate at that time, in particular a...
  • Evidence for deposition of 10 million tonnes of impact spherules across four continents 12,800 y ago

    05/23/2013 6:02:12 PM PDT · by Renfield · 17 replies
    National Academy of Sciences ^ | 5-17-2013 | James H. Wittke et al
    (Abstract only) Significance We present detailed geochemical and morphological analyses of nearly 700 spherules from 18 sites in support of a major cosmic impact at the onset of the Younger Dryas episode (12.8 ka). The impact distributed ∼10 million tonnes of melted spherules over 50 million square kilometers on four continents. Origins of the spherules by volcanism, anthropogenesis, authigenesis, lightning, and meteoritic ablation are rejected on geochemical and morphological grounds. The spherules closely resemble known impact materials derived from surficial sediments melted at temperatures >2,200 °C. The spherules correlate with abundances of associated melt-glass, nanodiamonds, carbon spherules, aciniform carbon, charcoal,...
  • Fingerprint of ancient abrupt climate change found in Arctic [Younger Dryas]

    07/15/2018 11:22:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 9, 2018 | Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    A research team led by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found the fingerprint of a massive flood of fresh water in the western Arctic, thought to be the cause of an ancient cold snap that began around 13,000 years ago... The cause of the cooling event, which is named after a flower (Dryas octopetala) that flourished in the cold conditions in Europe throughout the time, has remained a mystery and a source of debate for decades. Many researchers believed the source was a huge influx of freshwater from melting ice sheets and glaciers that gushed into the North Atlantic... However,...
  • America's Clovis people wiped out by meteorite 12000 years ago

    03/11/2017 8:25:15 AM PST · by ckilmer · 74 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | Martha Henriques
    Traces of platinum, a metal associated with meteorite impact, have been found at archaeological sites of the Clovis people across the US, suggesting that they were wiped out in a mini-Ice-Age triggered by the impact of an extraterrestrial object. The Clovis people disappeared from North America about 12,800 years ago. Many of the large creatures they hunted – a total of about 35 species – went extinct at about the same time.
  • Category 5 hurricanes hammered Florida 12,000 years ago, study reveals

    10/06/2017 7:14:26 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    Dailymail.com ^ | 5 October 2017 | Cecile Borkhataria
    While Hurricane Irma hit Florida as a ferocious category 4 storm last month, the sunshine state has withstood much stronger storms in the past. According to new research, category 5 hurricanes may have slammed Florida repeatedly 12,000 years ago, during a climatic shift called The Younger Dryas. While there were hurricane-suppressing cooler sea surface temperatures at the time, these conditions were outweighed by slowed ocean circulation - which plays a powerful role when it comes to generating hurricanes. The study, published in the journal Geology, involved analyzing turbidites: a type of undersea landslide deposit that can provide a record for...
  • 12,800 Years Ago, Earth Was Struck by a Disintegrating Comet, Setting Off Global Firestorms

    02/03/2018 4:13:39 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 73 replies
    Universe Today ^ | Feb 3, 2018 | Matt Williams
    ....[A]t this time – roughly 12,800 years ago, according to a new study from the University of Kansas – that a comet struck our planet and triggered massive wildfires. This impact also triggered a short glacial period that temporarily reversed the previous period of warming, which had a drastic affect on wildlife and human development. ... ...[T]he team combined data from ice core, forest, pollen and other geochemical and isotopic markers obtained from more than 170 different sites across the world. Based on this data, the team concluded that roughly 12,800 years ago, a global disaster was triggered when a...
  • Did Ancient Earth-Chilling Meteor Crash Near Quebec?

    09/02/2013 4:43:48 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 36 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 2 Sep 2013 | Becky Oskin
    A meteor or comet impact near Quebec heaved a rain of hot melted rock along North America's Atlantic Coast about 12,900 years ago, a new study claims. Scientists have traced the geochemical signature of the BB-sized spherules that rained down back to their source, the 1.5-billion-year-old Quebecia terrane in northeastern Canada near the Gulf of Saint Lawrence. At the time of the impact, the region was covered by a continental ice sheet, like Antarctica and Greenland are today. Around this time, a global cooling began and the big animals in North America all vanished. Their human hunters, the Clovis people,...
  • Early Americans faced late Pliestocene climate change

    02/26/2006 3:50:38 PM PST · by redpoll · 19 replies · 906+ views
    Eureka Alert! ^ | Feb. 19, 2006 | no author
    Early Americans faced rapid late Pleistocene climate change and chaotic environments The environment encountered when the first people emigrated into the New World was variable and ever-changing, according to a Penn State geologist. "The New World was not a nice quiet place when humans came," says Dr. Russell Graham, associate professor of geology and director of the Earth & Mineral Sciences Museum. Archaeologists agree that by 11,000 years ago, people were spread across North and South America, but evidence is building for an earlier entry into the New World, a date that would put human population of North and South...
  • Evidence Aquits Clovis People Of Ancient Killings, Archaeologists Say

    02/25/2003 4:46:54 PM PST · by blam · 98 replies · 1,378+ views
    University Of Washington ^ | 2-25-2003 | Joel Schwartz
    Contact: Joel Schwarz joels@u.washington.edu 206-543-2580 University of Washington Evidence acquits Clovis people of ancient killings, archaeologists say Archaeologists have uncovered another piece of evidence that seems to exonerate some of the earliest humans in North America of charges of exterminating 35 genera of Pleistocene epoch mammals. The Clovis people, who roamed large portions of North America 10,800 to 11,500 years ago and left behind highly distinctive and deadly fluted spear points, have been implicated in the exterminations by some scientists. Now researchers from the University of Washington and Southern Methodist University who examined evidence from all suggested Clovis-age killing sites...
  • Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists

    04/02/2010 4:06:27 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 77 replies · 1,652+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 04/02/10
    Hour-long hailstorm may have caused 1,000-year freeze, say scientists An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. Published: 8:00AM BST 02 Apr 2010 An hour-long hailstorm from space may have changed the climate of the Earth in 11,000 BC, leading to a freeze lasting more than 1,000 years, scientists say. A comet may well have caused the earth to freeze for over 1,000 years Photo: GETTY The catastrophe, caused by a disintegrating comet, wiped out large numbers of animal species and...
  • Did an extraterrestrial impact trigger the extinction of ice-age animals?

    10/25/2019 1:17:29 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 67 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 25, 2019 | by Carol J.g. Ward, University of South Carolina
    A controversial theory that suggests an extraterrestrial body crashing to Earth almost 13,000 years ago caused the extinction of many large animals and a probable population decline in early humans is gaining traction from research sites around the world. The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, controversial from the time it was presented in 2007, proposes that an asteroid or comet hit the Earth about 12,800 years ago causing a period of extreme cooling that contributed to extinctions of more than 35 species of megafauna including giant sloths, sabre-tooth cats, mastodons and mammoths. It also coincides with a serious decline in early...
  • space Here's More Evidence That Earth Got Hit by Something Huge 12,800 Years Ago

    10/07/2019 9:42:49 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    gizmodo uk ^ | 06 Oct 2019 at 6:00AM | George Dvorsky on
    Along with locations in North and South America, Greenland, Western Europe, and the Middle East, we can now add southern Africa to the list of places where scientists have uncovered evidence of a calamitous event that happened 12,800 years ago. This evidence of a 12,800-year-old platinum spike in Africa is the first to be found on the continent, and it’s yet further evidence in support of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. According to this theory, either a comet or asteroid struck Earth during the Pleistocene, triggering an impact winter that saw temperatures plummet around the globe. The associated loss of...
  • Scientists Find Possible Second Subglacial Impact Crater in Northwest Greenland

    02/12/2019 2:54:00 PM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Feb 12, 2019 | News Staff / Source
    Following the discovery of the 19.2-mile wide Hiawatha impact crater beneath the northwest margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet, Dr. Joe MacGregor of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and colleagues explored satellite and aerogeophysical data in search of additional such craters and found a possible second impact crater that is 22.7 miles wide and 114 miles southeast of the Hiawatha crater. The discovery is described in a paper in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. ..." Following the finding of that first crater, Dr. MacGregor and co-authors checked topographic maps of the rock beneath Greenland’s ice for signs of other craters....
  • Geoscientists Find Large Impact Crater in Greenland

    11/15/2018 7:47:28 AM PST · by ETL · 18 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Nov 15, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    An international team of geoscientists from the United States, Canada and Europe has discovered a large impact crater beneath the Hiawatha Glacier in remote northwest Greenland. A paper on the discovery was published in the journal Science Advances. The Hiawatha impact crater is approximately 19.2 miles (31 km) wide and lies under an ice sheet that is 0.6 miles (1 km) thick.The scientists believe this crater was formed by a 0.6-mile wide iron asteroid that slammed into the Earth at the end of the Pleistocene epoch, perhaps as recently as 12,000 years ago. ..." “Researchers were looking at the map...
  • Massive crater under Greenland’s ice points to climate-altering impact in the time of humans

    11/14/2018 3:09:50 PM PST · by ETL · 52 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Nov 14, 2018 | Paul Voosen
    On a bright July day 2 years ago, Kurt Kjær was in a helicopter flying over northwest Greenland—an expanse of ice, sheer white and sparkling. Soon, his target came into view: Hiawatha Glacier, a slow-moving sheet of ice more than a kilometer thick. It advances on the Arctic Ocean not in a straight wall, but in a conspicuous semicircle, as though spilling out of a basin. Kjær, a geologist at the Natural History Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, suspected the glacier was hiding an explosive secret. The helicopter landed near the surging river that drains the glacier, sweeping out rocks...
  • Ice core data supports ancient space impact idea (cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago?)

    08/01/2013 3:35:01 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 11 replies
    BBC News ^ | 8/1/13 | Simon Redfern
    New data from Greenland ice cores suggest North America may have suffered a large cosmic impact about 12,900 years ago. A layer of platinum is seen in ice of the same age as a known abrupt climate transition, US scientists report. The climate flip has previously been linked to the demise of the North American "Clovis" people. The data seem to back the idea that an impact tipped the climate into a colder phase, a point of current debate. Rapid climate change occurred 12,900 years ago, and it is proposed that this is associated with the extinction of large mammals...
  • Greenland Ice Core Analysis Shows Drastic Climate Change Near End Of Last Ice Age

    06/19/2008 3:33:44 PM PDT · by blam · 58 replies · 139+ views
    Physorg ^ | 6-19-2008 | University of Colorado
    Greenland ice core analysis shows drastic climate change near end of last ice age Caption: The North Greenland Ice Core Project camp. Credit: NGRIP Temperatures spiked 22 degrees F in just 50 years, researchers say Information gleaned from a Greenland ice core by an international science team shows that two huge Northern Hemisphere temperature spikes prior to the close of the last ice age some 11,500 years ago were tied to fundamental shifts in atmospheric circulation. The ice core showed the Northern Hemisphere briefly emerged from the last ice age some 14,700 years ago with a 22-degree-Fahrenheit spike in just...
  • Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago

    09/30/2007 10:14:28 AM PDT · by baynut · 55 replies · 1,887+ views
    A carbon-rich black layer, dating to 12.9 ka, has been previously identified at 50 Clovis-age sites across North America and appears contemporaneous with the abrupt onset of Younger Dryas (YD) cooling. The in situ bones of extinct Pleistocene megafauna, along with Clovis tool assemblages, occur below this black layer but not within or above it. Causes for the extinctions, YD cooling, and termination of Clovis culture have long been controversial. In this paper, we provide evidence for an extraterrestrial (ET) impact event at 12.9 ka, which we hypothesize caused abrupt environmental changes that contributed to YD cooling, major ecological reorganization,...