HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Carson  Cruz  Bush  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Please keep those donations coming in, folks. Our 1st quarter FReepathon is off to a great start and we have a chance of getting 'er done early! Thank you all very much!!

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $42,555
48%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 48% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: crete

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Cretan Excavation Sheds New Light On Dark Ages Of Greek History

    12/07/2004 1:44:53 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 920+ views
    Kathimerini (English Edition) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Cretan excavation sheds light on Dark Ages of Greek historyFinds from ancient Eleutherna at Cycladic Museum A marble statue of Aphrodite, from a second- to first-century-BC bathhouse in Eleutherna. By Nicholas Paphitis - Kathimerini English Edition On a narrow spur under the shadow of Mount Ida in central Crete, archaeologists for the past 20 years have been excavating a town that flourished from the Dark Ages of Greece’s early history until Medieval times. The Eleutherna project, a systematic dig carried out by a three-pronged team of top archaeologists from the University of Crete, is in itself unusual in a country...
  • Fortifications on Gournia Debunk Myth of Peaceful Minoan Society

    05/04/2010 5:03:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 451+ views
    Heritage Key ^ | Tuesday, May 4, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    A team of archaeologists, led by Professor Vance Watrous and Matt Buell of the University at Buffalo, have discovered a fortification system at the Minoan town of Gournia. The discovery rebukes the popular myth that the Minoans were a peaceful society with no need for defensive structures. That idea arose from work done in the early 20th century by Sir Arthur Evans... The town was originally excavated from 1901-1904 by Harriet Boyd Hawes, a pioneering women who was among the first to excavate a Minoan settlement. Located on the north coast, Gournia was in use during the "neo-palatial" period (ca....
  • Archaeological discovery yields surprising revelations about Europe's oldest city

    01/08/2016 2:21:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | January 6, 2016 | heritagedaily
    The discovery suggests that not only did this spectacular site in the Greek Bronze Age (between 3500 and 1100 BC) recover from the collapse of the socio-political system around 1200 BC, but also rapidly grew and thrived as a cosmopolitan hub of the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Antonis Kotsonas, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of classics, will highlight his field research with the Knossos Urban Landscape Project at the 117th annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and Society for Classical Studies. The meeting takes place Jan. 7-10, 2016 in San Francisco. Kotsonas explains that Knossos, "renowned as...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 6

    07/25/2013 2:39:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Geological testing was done at the site in 2005, for the purpose of placing pillars in solid ground so that the stability of the roof would not be an issue in the event of an earthquake. What they found while using high resolution travel time tomography, a method of getting images from under the surface of the earth using waves of energy, were underground cavities. These were both man made and natural. The man made gaps in the earth were filled with rocks, ceramics, and other items of interest to archeologists. Before drilling the new shafts and setting the pillars...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 5

    07/22/2013 8:06:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 6, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    Although ancient ruins in Akrotiri were discovered in 1860 by workers quarrying volcanic rock for the Suez Canal, large scale excavations there didn't begin until 1967. An archeologist by the name of Spyridon Marinatos suspected there were extensive ruins beneath the farmlands at Akrotiri and wrote about his theory in 1936. Due to the outbreak of World War II and the Greek Civil War, he had to postpone his explorations. Earlier digs in the area had been destroyed by plowing of the fields and there were no written records of where they had taken place or what the findings were....
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 1 [of 6]

    11/01/2009 11:02:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1,063+ views
    Santa Barbara Cultural Travel Examiner ^ | August 28, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The site was found by accident when the Suez Canal was being constructed in 1860. Workers quarrying Santorini's volcanic ash discovered the ruins, but serious excavations at the site didn't begin until 1967. An unfortunate collapse of the roof in 2005, which killed a British tourist, caused the site to be closed. It's scheduled to be reopened sometime after 2010. Greek bureaucracy has brought the repairs of the building to a halt, which has caused Santorini's tourist trade to suffer. Akrotiri is referred to by some as the "Minoan Pompeii" because of the similarities of the destruction by volcano and...
  • Archaeologist Claims to Have Unlocked Phaistos Disk Mystery [again]

    12/20/2015 6:53:53 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | December 16, 2015 | Philip Chrysopoulos
    The goddess of love, the Minoan Astarte, is the key figure that unlocks the mystery of the Phaistos Disk, according to linguist, archaeologist and coordinator of the program Erasmus of Crete Technological Institute; Gareth Owens. Speaking to the ANA -- MPA news agency, Owens said that after new data found in his research, his theory has changed slightly compared to the position he had expressed about a year ago. The focus is no longer the "pregnant mother", as originally estimated, but a "pregnant goddess" that takes shape in the face of Astarte, the goddess of love. "There is no doubt...
  • Grave of ‘Griffin Warrior’ at Pylos Could Be a Gateway to Civilizations

    10/27/2015 1:02:44 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 26, 2015 | By Nicholas Wade
    Archaeologists digging at Pylos, an ancient city on the southwest coast of Greece, have discovered the rich grave of a warrior who was buried at the dawn of European civilization. He lies with a yardlong bronze sword and a remarkable collection of gold rings, precious jewels and beautifully carved seals. Archaeologists expressed astonishment at the richness of the find and its potential for shedding light on the emergence of the Mycenaean civilization, the lost world of Agamemnon, Nestor, Odysseus and other heroes described in the epics of Homer. “Probably not since the 1950s have we found such a rich tomb,”...
  • Search of freighter stopped in Greece nets 5,000 shotguns, nearly 500,000 bullets __ so far

    09/03/2015 10:44:53 AM PDT · by Petrosius · 81 replies
    Fox News ^ | September 2, 2015
    ATHENS, Greece – Greek authorities say a partial inventory of unregistered weapons found on a Libya-bound freighter includes nearly 500,000 rounds of ammunition and 5,000 "police-style" shotguns. A coast guard statement Wednesday said that so far two of the 14 containers found on the Bolivian-flagged Haddad 1 have been searched. A coast guard special unit stopped the ship early Tuesday off Crete, and took it to the island's port of Iraklio.
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • Underwater archaeology: Hunt for the ancient mariner

    01/26/2012 9:06:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | Jo Marchant
    Foley, a marine archaeologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, and his colleagues at Greece's Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in Athens have spent the day diving near the cliffs of the tiny island of Dia in the eastern Mediterranean. They have identified two clusters of pottery dating from the first century BC and fifth century AD. Together with other remains that the team has discovered on the island's submerged slopes, the pots reveal that for centuries Greek, Roman and Byzantine traders used Dia as a refuge during storms, when they couldn't safely reach Crete. It is a nice...
  • Ancient Greece's 'global warming'

    05/08/2009 6:39:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 30 replies · 1,347+ views
    American Thinker ^ | May 08, 2009 | Ben-Peter Terpstra
    In Heaven + Earth (Global Warming: The Missing Science), Ian Plimer, Professor of Mining Geology at The University of Adelaide, Australia, asks us to embrace big-picture science views; for to recognize our limits is a sign of maturity. "Climate science lacks scientific discipline," says the pro-amalgamation Professor, and in order to see more clearly we need to adopt an interdisciplinary approach. This requires humbleness. In Chapter 2: History, Plimer travels back in time, thousands of years, in fact, to debunk Gore's catastrophic global warming myths. I particularly like his research on the ancient Greeks. For Plato (427-347 BC) advanced the...
  • The Minoans of Crete

    05/07/2015 3:43:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, April 06, 2015 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    ...In the course of both Boyd's and Watrous' excavations, more than 50 houses or areas with evidence of industrial activity have been uncovered -- 20 areas producing pottery, 15 producing stone vases, 18 producing bronze and bronze implements, and some with evidence for textile production. At one location on the north edge of the settlement, Buell points out an area of burned bedrock inside a space identified as a foundry. 'Here we have all sorts of scraps of bronze crucibles, bronze drips, copper scraps, and iron used for flux. Elsewhere, we also found a tin ingot, the closest known source...
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Greece tows migrant-packed ship to safety off Crete+ (Camp of the Saints 2014)

    A Greek frigate has towed a disabled cargo ship packed with 700 migrants to safety just off the island of Crete on Thursday, in one of the biggest sea rescues mounted by the Mediterranean nation, coastguard officials said. The Kiribati-flagged MV Baris issued a distress call on Tuesday after developing engine problems 30 nautical miles (45 km) southeast of Crete. A Greek frigate dispatched to the scene spent over 24 hours fighting off strong winds and waves to tow the ship close to the southeastern port of Ierapetra, where boats had begun transferring migrants to the town. "The coastguard has...
  • Grog of the Greeks [ barley beer, honey mead, retsina wine ]

    10/20/2008 5:05:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1,097+ views
    New Scientist ^ | November 27, 1999 | Stephanie Pain
    Scholars have always suspected that the ancients had odd tastes. If you believe Homer, wise old Nestor, veteran of the Trojan War, enjoyed a few scrapings of goat's cheese and a dollop of honey in his wine. And Homer might have been right: archaeologists often find little bronze cheese graters in later Greek graves which they think were part of a drinking kit. But until now there has been no good evidence that the Minoans and their mainland neighbours the Mycenaeans knew how to brew beer or mead, let alone mixed them into cocktails. After painstaking chemical analysis of cups,...
  • Decoding antiquity: Eight scripts that still can't be read

    05/29/2009 9:14:19 PM PDT · by BGHater · 38 replies · 1,621+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 27 May 2009 | Andrew Robinson
    WRITING is one of the greatest inventions in human history. Perhaps the greatest, since it made history possible. Without writing, there could be no accumulation of knowledge, no historical record, no science - and of course no books, newspapers or internet.The first true writing we know of is Sumerian cuneiform - consisting mainly of wedge-shaped impressions on clay tablets - which was used more than 5000 years ago in Mesopotamia. Soon afterwards writing appeared in Egypt, and much later in Europe, China and Central America. Civilisations have invented hundreds of different writing systems. Some, such as the one you are...
  • 4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded

    10/29/2014 3:28:53 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 44 replies
    Clapaway ^ | October 28, 2014
    4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded October 28, 2014 Scientists have been trying to decipher the mysterious “Phaistos Disk” markings ever since the clay disk from the Second Millenium B.C. was first discovered in 1908 on the Greek island of Crete. And it seems like they’ve finally cracked the code. At 4,000 years old, the relic dates back to the Minoan civilization and features an inscription that boasts a mysterious language, with symbols on both sides in a spiral configuration, which can be read inward from the outside rim. Researchers have been studying the puzzling artifact since its discovery, and now Dr....
  • Mystery of 4,000-year-old ‘CD-ROM’ is solved

    10/26/2014 7:04:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    uk.news.yahoo.com ^ | Fri, Oct 24, 2014 | Rob Waugh –
    A mysterious symbol-covered disc which was found in Greek ruins in 1908 has finally revealed its secrets after archaeologists battled to decode it for more than a century. The Phaistos Disc - described as the ‘first Minoan CD-ROM’ is covered in 241 images, thought to be fragments of 45 mysterious symbols. The language used is unknown, and the technology behind the disc is equally mysterious. The disc was created in 1,700 BC - using pre-printed symbols to press a mysterious message into clay. The disc pre-dates the printing press by thousands of years, but uses a similar technology - which...
  • Top 10 uncracked codes

    02/03/2011 12:33:31 AM PST · by Daffynition · 54 replies · 2+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 01 Feb 2011 | Nick Britten
    1. The Phaistos Disk is considered the most important example of hieroglyphic inscription from Crete. Discovered in 1903, both sides of the clay disc are covered with hieroglyphs arranged in a spiral zone, impressed on the clay when it was damp. Forty five different types of signs have been distinguished, of which a few can be identified with the hieroglyphs in use in the Proto- palatial period. [snip]
  • Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in (Minoan) Bronze Age wall paintings.

    03/02/2006 5:01:38 AM PST · by S0122017 · 51 replies · 2,327+ views
    www.nature.com/news ^ | 28 February 2006 | Philip Ball
    Published online: 28 February 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060227-3 Were ancient Minoans centuries ahead of their time? Unprecedented mathematical knowledge found in Bronze Age wall paintings. Philip Ball Did the Minoans understand the Archimedes' spiral more than 1,000 years before him? A geometrical figure commonly attributed to Archimedes in 300 BC has been identified in Minoan wall paintings dated to over 1,000 years earlier. The mathematical features of the paintings suggest that the Minoans of the Late Bronze Age, around 1650 BC, had a much more advanced working knowledge of geometry than has previously been recognized, says computer scientist Constantin Papaodysseus of...
  • The Phaistos Disk

    09/22/2005 8:12:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 965+ views
    various | various | various
  • DNA Sheds Light On Minoans

    04/04/2008 8:02:26 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 1,101+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-4-2008
    DNA sheds light on Minoans Crete’s fabled Minoan civilization was built by people from Anatolia, according to a new study by Greek and foreign scientists that disputes an earlier theory that said the Minoans’ forefathers had come from Africa. The new study – a collaboration by experts in Greece, the USA, Canada, Russia and Turkey – drew its conclusions from the DNA analysis of 193 men from Crete and another 171 from former neolithic colonies in central and northern Greece. The results show that the country’s neolithic population came to Greece by sea from Anatolia – modern-day Iran, Iraq and...
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: New Carbon Dates Support Revised History of Ancient Mediterranean

    04/27/2006 4:59:30 PM PDT · by Lessismore · 77 replies · 2,583+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 4/28/2006 | Michael Balter
    During the Late Bronze Age, the Aegean volcanic island of Thera erupted violently, spreading pumice and ash across the eastern Mediterranean and triggering frosts as far away as what is now California. The Theran town of Akrotiri was completely buried. Tsunamis up to 12 meters high crashed onto the shores of Crete, 110 kilometers to the south, and the cataclysm may ultimately have sped the demise of Crete's famed Minoan civilization. For nearly 30 years, archaeologists have fought over when the eruption took place. Those who rely on dates from pottery styles and Egyptian inscriptions put the event at roughly...
  • First Minoan Shipwreck: An unprecedented find off the coast of Crete

    02/23/2010 5:38:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 771+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | January/February 2010 | Eti Bonn-Muller
    Depictions of ships abound on Minoan seals and frescoes. They are detailed enough to show that the vessels were impressive: generally, they had 15 oars on each side and square sails, and were probably about 50 feet long. But little more was known about actual Minoan seafaring--until Greek archaeologist Elpida Hadjidaki became the first to discover a Minoan shipwreck... For nearly a month, she and a team of three sponge and coral divers aboard a 20-foot-long wooden fishing boat trolled up and down the island's shores. Together with George Athanasakis of Athens Polytechnic University, they used side-scanning sonar and detected...
  • Ancient Mariners: Did Neanderthals Sail to Mediterranean?

    11/24/2012 8:17:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, November 15, 2012 | Charles Choi
    Neanderthals and other extinct human lineages might have been ancient mariners, venturing to the Mediterranean islands thousands of years earlier than previously thought. This prehistoric seafaring could shed light on the mental capabilities of these lost relatives of modern humans, researchers say. Scientists had thought the Mediterranean islands were first settled about 9,000 years ago by Neolithic or New Stone Age farmers and shepherds... For instance, obsidian from the Aegean island of Melos was uncovered at the mainland Greek coastal site of Franchthi cave in layers that were about 11,000 years old, while excavations on the southern coast of Cyprus...
  • Neanderthals were ancient mariners

    03/02/2012 10:22:47 AM PST · by presidio9 · 14 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 29 February 2012 | Michael Marshall
    IT LOOKS like Neanderthals may have beaten modern humans to the seas. Growing evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago - though not everyone is convinced they weren't just good swimmers. Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos. That could be explained in two ways: either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow. Now, George Ferentinos of...
  • Ancient hominids may have been seafarers

    01/14/2010 4:18:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 636+ views
    Science News ^ | Friday, January 8th, 2010 | Bruce Bower
    Human ancestors that left Africa hundreds of thousands of years ago to see the rest of the world were no landlubbers. Stone hand axes unearthed on the Mediterranean island of Crete indicate that an ancient Homo species -- perhaps Homo erectus -- had used rafts or other seagoing vessels to cross from northern Africa to Europe via at least some of the larger islands in between, says archaeologist Thomas Strasser of Providence College in Rhode Island. Several hundred double-edged cutting implements discovered at nine sites in southwestern Crete date to at least 130,000 years ago and probably much earlier, Strasser...
  • Eleutherna, the heart of Crete

    09/28/2013 11:04:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Ekathimerini ^ | Saturday September 28, 2013 | Margarita Pournara
    The heart of Eleutherna beat for a very long time, from the Neolithic era to the Byzantine period, when it vanished from the map... a palimpsest showing a constant human presence that dates back to 3000 BC, architecture from the late Minoan period, prosperity in Homeric times and a great burst of growth in the Roman era. The decline of Eleutherna was gradual, starting in the 8th century AD and culminating in the 13th century. In the 14th century, the Venetians prohibited the unruly Cretans from living in the fortified city due to fears they would create a rebel stronghold....
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii -- part 4

    07/21/2013 11:27:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 4, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    While approximately forty buildings have been uncovered at Akrotiri, there are six that have been given more attention than the others. The architecture and function of each building is different. The largest building uncovered so far, Xeste 4, is three stories high and believed to be a public building because of its dimensions. The staircase had fragments of frescoes on either side depicting males ascending in a procession. The second largest building, Xeste 3, was at least two stories high, with fourteen rooms on each floor. The rooms were decorated with paintings and some had more than one door. One...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 3

    07/20/2013 10:28:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | September 3, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    With the archeological site at Akrotiri closed, and no firm date set for it to reopen, many visitors to the island of Santorini have been disappointed not to see what is inside the Akrotiri enclosure. Although it doesn't replace seeing the amazing number of buildings that have been uncovered, around 40 so far, the museums on the island hold a fair amount of artifacts and photographs of wall paintings. If archeology is at the top of your list of reasons for visiting Santorini, here are some helpful phone numbers to call and confirm hours and days they are open. The...
  • Akrotiri, Santorini: the Minoan Pompeii - part 2

    07/07/2013 6:45:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Examiner ^ | August 29, 2009 | Rachel de Carlos
    The excavations at the archeological site at Akrotiri in Santorini are ongoing, so there is scaffolding everywhere and supports in place to stabilize walls, windows and doorways that might otherwise collapse. You need to use your imagination to put yourself back in prehistoric times, but with the help of guides or signs posted along the walkways, you can get a fair idea of what life was like. An excavated toilet, pictured in the slide show, has been left in view for the amusement of the tourists and to demonstrate how advanced the plumbing and drainage system was. The inhabitants had...
  • The Riddle Of The Labyrinth: The Quest To Break An Ancient Code

    06/30/2013 2:47:37 PM PDT · by OddLane · 57 replies
    NPR ^ | Jume 30, 2013 | NPR Staff
    Critics have called Margalit Fox's new book, The Riddle of the Labyrinth, a paleographic detective procedural. It follows the story of the laborious quest to crack a mysterious script, unearthed in Crete in 1900, known by the sterile-sounding name Linear B. Fox, an obituary writer for The New York Times, is good at bringing the departed to life. In The Riddle of the Labyrinth, she tells the story of Alice Kober, a classics professor at Brooklyn College, who worked alone over decades and discovered the essential grammar of Linear B, only to die in 1950 before she could complete her...
  • Minoan civilization was made in Europe

    05/14/2013 12:29:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 5-13-2013 | Ewen Callaway
    When the British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans discovered the 4,000-year-old Palace of Minos on Crete in 1900, he saw the vestiges of a long-lost civilization whose artefacts set it apart from later Bronze-Age Greeks. The Minoans, as Evans named them, were refugees from Northern Egypt who had been expelled by invaders from the South about 5,000 years ago, he claimed. Modern archaeologists have questioned that version of events, and now ancient DNA recovered from Cretan caves suggests that the Minoan civilization emerged from the early farmers who settled the island thousands of years earlier....
  • Whistle-blower: Special forces could have saved Americans in Benghazi

    05/06/2013 6:41:26 PM PDT · by markomalley · 13 replies
    The Hill ^ | 5/6/2013 | Julian Pecquet
    U.S. special operations forces in Libya could have saved Americans killed in the attack last Sept. 11 on the consulate in Benghazi but were told to stand down, a State Department whistle-blower has told congressional investigators. The testimony by Gregory Hicks, who will appear before a House panel on Wednesday, contradicts previous testimony by administration officials who have said all U.S. forces in Libya were deployed the night of the attack. Hicks was in Tripoli during the attack and became the top U.S. diplomat in Libya when Ambassador Christopher Stevens was killed. He said the special operations team was ready...
  • Which volcanoes impacted ancient climate? Sulphur tells the story

    02/14/2013 2:57:27 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies
    The Register ^ | 14th February 2013 03:57 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A staple complaint of the climate sceptic, that it’s impossible to determine the impact of historical volcanic eruptions on the climate, is a step closer to being spiked, courtesy of work at the University of Copenhagen. The university’s Matthew Johnson, an associate professor in the Department of Chemistry, has published work conducted with the Tokyo Institute of Technology in which he uses the isotopes captured in old sulphur to determine the scale of eruptions. As explained in the university’s announcement, the work is designed to resolve the often-conflicting dates attached to recorded eruptions. Dating is difficult from ancient records, since...
  • Making Merry at Knossos or their's a sucker born every minute

    01/03/2013 7:17:33 AM PST · by Beowulf9 · 19 replies
    The Economist ^ | May 14th 2009 | unknown
    ARCHAEOLOGY is an inexact science, as Sir Arthur Evans, a flamboyant early practitioner, knew. However painstaking the digging process, an excavator can always promote an extravagant theory under the guise of interpreting the finds. As he started to unearth a prehistoric mound at Knossos in Crete at the turn of the 20th century, Evans put his imagination into high gear. He rebuilt parts of a 3,500-year-old palace in modernist style using cement and reconstructed fragmentary frescoes to suit his views on Bronze Age religion and politics.
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 3 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • Crete, 3500-year-old Minoan building found: From same period as Knossos Palace, over 1,300 square m

    10/08/2012 7:06:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Ansamed ^ | Thursday, October 4 , 2012 | unattributed
    In the past few years, the remains of an impressive and luxurious building from 3,500 years ago has seen the light. The building has two or three floors and some 80 rooms including workshops and storage rooms over a surface of 1,360 square metres and it is in excellent state. Sapouna-Sakellaraki told To Vima weekly that it is the first Minoan mountain settlement built in the same period as the Palace of Knossos. The archaeologist also said this is the largest summer residence found so far from the Minoan era. The structure of the building shows that it was not...
  • Computers to translate world's 'lost' languages after program deciphers ancient text

    07/21/2010 12:27:41 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 7/20/2010 | Niall Firth
    Scientists have used a computer program to decipher a written language that is more than three thousand years old. The program automatically translated the ancient written language of Ugaritic within just a few hours. Scientists hope the breakthrough could help them decipher the few ancient languages that they have been unable to translate so far. Ugaritic was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria and consists of dots on clay tablets. It was first discovered in 1920 but was not deciphered until 1932. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology told the program that the language was related to...
  • Atlantis: The Evidence [ Thera, Crete, the usual modern myths ]

    05/20/2012 5:46:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Watchumentary ^ | January 1st, 2011 | BBC, Timewatch, Natalie Maynes, Bettany Hughes
    In this Timewatch special, historian Bettany Hughes unravels one of the most intriguing mysteries of all time. She presents a series of geological, archaeological and historical clues to show that the legend of Atlantis was inspired by a real historical event -- the greatest natural disaster of the ancient world. She is tracing the origins of the Atlantis myth and presenting evidence that the Thera eruption inspired Plato's account of the mystical land. 2,400 years ago Greek philosopher Plato wrote of an ancient island civilization of unparalleled wealth and splendor, which was struck by earthquakes and floods and was swallowed...
  • Prehistoric Archaeology of the Aegean, Human Sacrifice

    07/26/2005 1:07:44 PM PDT · by Little Bill · 37 replies · 836+ views
    Dartmouth University ^ | 1995 | Various
    Site of Western Extension to Stratigraphical Museum at Knossos In a LM IB context in excavations just to one side of the Royal Road some distance northwest of the Little Palace at Knossos, 327 children's bones were found in a burnt deposit in the basement of a building christened the North House. Originally attributed to between eight and eleven children provisionally aged between ten and fifteen years old, between 21% and 35% of these bones, which included skull fragments as well as other bones, all found in an unarticulated heap, exhibited "fine knife marks, exactly comparable to butchery marks on...
  • Four Unknown Shipwrecks Found [ Crete ]

    02/22/2012 8:08:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Athens News ^ | Monday, February 20, 2012 | AMNA
    Four previously unknown shipwrecks have been discovered some 30 kilometers off the Bay of Irakleio, Crete, in recent underwater exploration conducted by the ephorate of underwater antiquities. The new finds comprise two Roman era shipwrecks, one containing 1st and 2nd-century Cretan amphorae and the other containing 5th-7th century post-Roman era amphorae, and two shipwrecks containing Byzantine amphorae, dated from the 8th-9th century and later. The finds, which were made south and east of the Dia islet, which lies 7 nautical miles north of Irakleio, were documented and taken ashore for further analysis. Three more recent shipwrecks were also discovered, as...
  • Turkey-Greece engage in mock dogfights over Cyprus as Israeli PM arrives

    02/17/2012 8:26:41 PM PST · by sukhoi-30mki · 8 replies
    Cyprus Mail ^ | February 17, 2012
    Turkey-Greece engage in mock dogfights over Cyprus as Israeli PM arrives GREEK AND Turkish jets tangled in mock dogfights in Cypriot airspace yesterday just as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was arriving on the island, reports said. According to Sigma, around 11am three Greek Mirage-2000 fighters began shadowing two Turkish F-16 jets after the latter flew between Rhodes and Crete on their way from the eastern Mediterranean where Turkish ships were conducting wargames with live ammunition. The Turkish military exercise, the Foreign Minister said earlier, took place within Cyprus’ Exclusive Economic Zone, in waters south of the island and close...
  • Earliest Sample of Minoan Hieroglyphics Found in Western Crete

    11/18/2011 7:13:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Thursday, November 17, 2011 | Stella Tsolakidou
    A four-sided red jasper sealstone is among the finds unearthed during this season's excavation of the Minoan peak sanctuary at Vrysinas, located south of the city of Rethymnon. The whole area was officially announced and included in the archaeological sites list by the Central Archaeological Council of Greece. The sealstone, which is carved on all four surfaces with characters of the Minoan Hieroglyphic script, constitutes the sole evidence to date for the presence of this earliest Minoan style of writing in Western Crete. The excavation, which began in 2004, is conducted by the Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities under...
  • News from Finds at the Minoan Palace of Zakros

    10/29/2011 5:41:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | October 24, 2011 | Apostolos Papapostolou
    Minoan civilisation, Zakros Palace in particular, are the focus of the 11th International Cretological Congress on October 21-27 in Rethymnon, one of the three big cities on the island. The Minoan Zakros Palace, located on the eastern part of the island, is one of the four Minoan palaces -- the others are Knossos, Festos and Malia – uncovered by archaeological excavations last century. The palace spans 4,500 square metres (one fifth of the area of the Palace of Knossos) and was the religious and administrative centre for a settlement that spanned 8,000 square metres. The palace has two main structures,...
  • How a society girl left her glamorous life to become one of America's first women in Iraq

    06/20/2011 7:58:39 AM PDT · by Niuhuru · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 9:40 AM on 20th June 2011 | By Daily Mail Reporter
    The daughter of a prominent New York lawyer has told of her amazing transformation from sheltered, society girl to seasoned combat veteran. Former Manhattan jetsetter Jane Blair swapped her pampered life in New York to become one of the first women on the frontline in Iraq. In her new memoir Hesitation Kills, Mrs Blair, now a 38-year-old captain in the Marine Reserves, recalls the moment that changed her life. She said: 'I grew up in this environment where I never had to work for a living. My dad told me, "I will always take care of you".' She was in...
  • Cretan tools point to 130,000-year-old sea travel

    01/03/2011 1:35:19 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 19 replies
    AP via Google ^ | 3 January 2011
    Archaeologists on the island of Crete have discovered what may be evidence of one of the world's first sea voyages by human ancestors, the Greek Culture Ministry said Monday A ministry statement said experts from Greece and the U.S. have found rough axes and other tools thought to be between 130,000 and 700,000 years old close to shelters on the island's south coast. Crete has been separated from the mainland for about five million years, so whoever made the tools must have traveled there by sea (a distance of at least 40 miles). That would upset the current view that...
  • Archaeologists On Crete Find Skeleton Covered With Gold Foil In 2,700-year-old Grave

    10/01/2010 2:54:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Canadian Press via Google News ^ | Tuesday, September 28, 2010 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Excavator Nicholas Stampolidis said his team discovered more than 3,000 pieces of gold foil in the 7th-century B.C. twin grave near the ancient town of Eleutherna... The tiny gold ornaments, from 1 to 4 centimetres (0.4 to 1.5 inches) long, had been sewn onto a lavish robe or shroud that initially wrapped the body of a woman and has almost completely rotted away but for a few off-white threads... The woman, who presumably had a high social or religious status, was buried with a second skeleton in a large jar sealed with a stone slab weighing more than half a...
  • Dynasty of Priestesses [ Iron Age necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete ]

    03/02/2010 7:16:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 18,903+ views
    Archaeology ^ | March 1, 2010 | Eti Bonn-Muller
    For a quarter century, Greek excavation director Nicholas Stampolidis and his dedicated team have been unearthing the untold stories of the people buried some 2,800 years ago in the necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete. Until now, the site has perhaps been best known for the tomb its excavators dubbed "A1K1," an assemblage of 141 cremated individuals, all but two of whom were aristocratic men who likely fell in battle in foreign lands. Excavated between 1992 and 1996, this elaborate rock-cut tomb was brimming with fantastic burial goods that date from the ninth to the seventh century B.C.,...