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Keyword: darkmatter

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  • Missing Light Crisis: 'Something is Amiss in the Universe'

    07/10/2014 6:57:55 AM PDT · by shove_it · 40 replies
    IBTimes ^ | 10 Jul 2014 | Hannah Osborne
    There is a "missing light crisis" taking place in the universe with a huge deficit on what there should be and what there actually is, astronomers have said. In a statement, experts from the Carnegie Institution for Science said "something is amiss in the universe" with 80% of the light missing. Lead author of the study Juna Kollmeier said: "It's as if you're in a big, brightly-lit room, but you look around and see only a few 40-watt lightbulbs. Where is all that light coming from? It's missing from our census." Published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, scientists found that the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Gamma Rays from Galactic Center Dark Matter?

    03/10/2014 5:36:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | March 10, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What is creating the gamma rays at the center of our Galaxy? Excitement is building that one answer is elusive dark matter. Over the past few years the orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been imaging our Galaxy's center in gamma-rays. Repeated detailed analyses indicate that the region surrounding the Galactic center seems too bright to be accounted by known gamma-ray sources. A raw image of the Galactic Center region in gamma-rays is shown above on the left, while the image on the right has all known sources subtracted -- leaving an unexpected excess. An exciting hypothetical model that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Heavy Black Hole Jets in 4U1630-47

    11/20/2013 3:05:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What are black hole jets made of? Many black holes in stellar systems are surely surrounded by disks of gas and plasma gravitationally pulled from a close binary star companion. Some of this material, after approaching the black hole, ends up being expelled from the star system in powerful jets emanating from the poles of the spinning black hole. Recent evidence indicates that these jets are composed not only electrons and protons, but also the nuclei of heavy elements such as iron and nickel. The discovery was made in system 4U1630-47 using CSIRO’s Compact Array of radio telescopes in...
  • Scientists proud of dark matter study that turns up nothing

    11/12/2013 6:08:01 PM PST · by Tailgunner Joe · 28 replies
    upi.com ^ | October 31, 2013 | Caroline Lee
    Scientists at the Homestake Gold Mine in South Dakota running the biggest, most sensitive dark matter detector yet released its first round of results yesterday -- and they found nothing. The Large Underground Xenon dark matter experiment, or LUX, consists of a vat of 368 kilograms of liquid xenon to minus 110 degrees Celsius, surrounded by a tank of water. LUX sits 4,850 feet underground at the old mine, shielded from cosmic rays. An international team of researchers watched for three months to see if any WIMPS -- weakly interacting massive particles -- would pass through the rock and reveal...
  • Art Bell - Dark Matter Cancelled by Art as of tonight!

    11/04/2013 2:55:12 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 79 replies
    Artbell.facebook.com ^ | November 4th 2013 | Art Bell
    Art Bell show on Sirius radio was being pirated by many and streaming free, he said, everywhere. Many haven't been able to hear Art's show as they could not pay for Sirius radio so Art tried to get Sirius radio to cut a deal with Sirius for the show be free as it aired. Only the night it aired. Today the news came through, the deal didn't: "Sometimes when you are "all in" you win, sometimes lose. By mutual agreement Dark Matter will no longer air as of tonight" ~ Art Bell
  • 'We may be able to watch dark energy turn on': U-M involved in unprecedented sky survey

    09/03/2013 4:20:57 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    U-Mich ^ | 9/3/13 | Nicole Casal Moore
    ANN ARBOR—Moonless nights outside the Cerro Tololo astronomical observatory in Chile are so dark that when you look down, you can't see your feet. "You can't see your hands," said David Gerdes, physics professor at the University of Michigan. "But you can hold them up to the sky and see a hand-shaped hole with no stars in it. It's really incredible." From this site in the Andes over the next five years, an international team will map one-eighth of the sky in unprecedented detail—aiming to make a time lapse of the past 8 billion years of a slice of the...
  • Simple theory may explain mysterious dark matter, physicists say

    06/11/2013 4:12:59 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 21 replies
    Science Recorder ^ | 6/11/13 | James Fluere
    One physicist says he likes this theory because of “its simplicity, uniqueness and the fact that it can be tested.”Theoretical physicists at Vanderbilt University contend that a simply theory may explain mysterious dark matter. They propose that most of the matter in the universe may be constructed of particles that have an abnormal, donut-shaped electromagnetic field known as an anapole. According to a news release from Vanderbilt University, Professor Robert Scherrer and post-doctoral fellow Chiu Man Ho carried out an in-depth analysis to determine the validity of this theory. Scherrer points out that he likes this theory because of “its...
  • Theorists weigh in on where to hunt dark matter

    05/26/2013 6:21:28 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 22, 2013 | Lori Ann White
    Enlarge Left panel: Air molecules whiz around at a variety of speeds, and some are very fast. When they collide with both heavy and light elements - for example, xenon (purple) and silicon (orange) - these fast moving particles have enough momentum to affect both nuclei. Right panel: Dark matter particles are moving more slowly and are less able to affect the heavy xenon nucleus. As a result, detectors made from lighter materials like silicon may prove to be more effective at picking up signals of dark matter. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Phys.org) —Now that it looks...
  • Physicists suggest possible existence of other kinds of dark matter

    05/26/2013 4:08:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 51 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 24, 2013 | Bob Yirka
    Credit: Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 211302 (2013) (Phys.org) —A team of Harvard University physicists has proposed the possible existence of a type of dark matter not described by current physics models. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team suggests it's possible that not all dark matter is cold and collision-less. In the visible universe, galaxies form into a disk shape—the Milky Way is a good example. All of its members align roughly along a single plane, this due to the forces of gravity and spin. Objects form into masses which, over time, spread out...
  • Dark matter experiment CDMS sees three tentative clues

    04/16/2013 5:43:41 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    bbc ^ | 15 April 2013 Last updated at 16:08 ET | Jason Palmer
    Researchers have revealed the first potential hints of the elusive material called dark matter at an underground laboratory in the US. Though it is believed to make up a quarter of our Universe, dark matter - true to its name - has never been seen. Scientists at the American Physical Society meeting showed three promising clues to it from the CDMS experiment. However, they stressed the preliminary nature of the results and that more data are needed to confirm it. Physics has a well-defined threshold for claiming that a new particle has been discovered, and this result still falls far...
  • Dark matter as elusive as ever – despite space station results

    04/05/2013 4:33:37 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 7 replies
    guardian.co.uk ^ | April 5, 2013 | Stuart Clark
    The first data from the $2bn Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) experiment on the International Space Station has confirmed a strange antimatter signal coming from space. However, the experiment has not yet collected enough data to allow scientists to determine the source of this antimatter. It could be coming from dark matter particles, making this a major breakthrough. Or it could be coming from fast-spinning stellar corpses known as pulsars, making it merely interesting.
  • Astroboffins map GIANT MASS of dark matter

    10/18/2012 9:31:59 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    The Register ^ | 17th October 2012 15:15 GMT | Brid-Aine Parnell
    3D image shows ginormous filament of Big Bang batter Dark matter can't really be "seen" as such, it can only be detected by looking at the gravitational effects it has on the space around it. But by collating images from the Hubble Space telescope, the researchers now have a picture of dark matter (shown in blue above) extending 60 million light-years away from one of the most massive galaxy clusters astrophysicists know about – MACS J0717. Big Bang theories predict that when the universe was first created, dense matter condensed into a web of tangled dark matter filaments throughout the...
  • IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field...

    09/08/2012 1:36:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    Indiana University ^ | Sept. 6, 2012 | NA
    IU mathematician offers unified theory of dark matter, dark energy, altering Einstein field equations BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A pair of mathematicians -- one from Indiana University and the other from Sichuan University in China -- have proposed a unified theory of dark matter and dark energy that alters Einstein's equations describing the fundamentals of gravity. Shouhong Wang, a professor in the IU College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Mathematics, and Tian Ma, a professor at Sichuan University, suggest the law of energy and momentum conservation in spacetime is valid only when normal matter, dark matter and dark energy are...
  • Revealed at last: Universe's intergalactic dark matter skeleton

    07/07/2012 2:37:39 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 16 replies
    The Register ^ | 6th July 2012 22:55 GMT | Rik Myslewski in San Francisco
    Boffins' first glimpse of the structural framework of our universe Higgs, Schmiggs... When that infinitesimal speck was sucking up all the journalistic oxygen on Independence Day, another momentous scientific discovery was also being announced: the first observation of filaments of dark matter, the stuff that forms the "skeleton" of our universe. Invisible, inexplicable dark matter makes up the vast majority of the mass of our universe. All the matter that we can see – stars, galaxies, planets, haggis, Michele Bachman – total only between 4 and 5 per cent of our universe's mass. The rest? There's dark matter and dark...
  • NASA gets two military spy telescopes for astronomy ('Dark Matter' research at top of the list)

    06/04/2012 10:00:18 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    WaPo ^ | 6/4/12 | Joel Achenbach
    The U.S. government’s secret space program has decided to give NASA two telescopes as big as, and even more powerful than, the Hubble Space Telescope. Designed for surveillance, the telescopes from the National Reconnaissance Office were no longer needed .. They have 2.4-meter (7.9 feet) mirrors, just like the Hubble. They also have an additional feature that the civilian space telescopes lack: A maneuverable secondary mirror that makes it possible to obtain more focused images. These telescopes will have 100 times the field of view of the Hubble, according to David Spergel, a Princeton astrophysicist and co-chair of the National...
  • Universe has more hydrogen than we thought (Undark’ matter hidden in plain view)

    06/02/2012 11:45:49 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies
    The Register ^ | 31st May 2012 23:59 GMT | Richard Chirgwin
    A re-analysis of radio telescope observations from three countries has yielded a surprising result: nearby galaxies harbour one-third more hydrogen than had previously been estimated. While nothing like enough matter to solve physics’ “dark matter” problem, the work by CSIRO astronomer Dr Robert Braun (chief scientist at the agency’s Astronomy and Space Science division in Sydney) also helps explain why the rate of star formation has slowed down. While there’s more hydrogen than astronomers had thought, its distribution makes star formation more difficult. Andromeda – the galaxy headed for a catastrophic collision with our own in about four billion years...
  • Dark Matter May Collide With Atoms Inside You More Often Than Thought

    04/27/2012 4:12:19 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 37 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 4/27/12 | Charles Q. Choi
    Invisible dark matter particles may regularly pass through our bodies, and dozens to thousands of these particles may be colliding with atoms inside us every year, according to a new calculation. However, radiation from these impacts is unlikely to cause cancer, investigators added. Dark matter is one of the greatest scientific mysteries of our time — an invisible substance thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists think it might be composed of things called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, that interact normally with gravity but very weakly with all the other known forces of...
  • Nearby Dark Matter Mysteriously Missing

    04/20/2012 5:27:18 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 4/18/12 | Charles Q. Choi
    A new study has found no trace of the mysterious substance known as dark matter around the sun, adding a twist to current theories, researchers say. Dark matter is one of the greatest cosmic mysteries of our time — an invisible, intangible material thought to make up five-sixths of all matter in the universe. Scientists currently think it is composed of a new type of particle, one that interacts normally with gravity but only very weakly with all the other known forces of the universe. As such, dark matter is detectable only via the gravitational pull it generates. Astronomers first...
  • Has Dark Matter Gone Missing?

    04/19/2012 9:54:03 PM PDT · by neverdem · 41 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 19 April 2012 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge Image Home sweet home. In the vicinity of the sun, our Milky Way galaxy seems to contain no dark matter, one team of astronomers claims. Credit: Serge Brunier/NASA If a new study is true, then the search for dark matter just got a lot weirder. Our little corner of the Milky Way contains no observable concentration of the mysterious stuff whose gravity binds the galaxy, claims one team of astronomers. That finding would present a major problem for models of how galaxies form and may undermine the whole notion of dark matter, the researchers claim. But some scientists...
  • Results From South Pole Support Einstein’s Cosmological Constant

    04/04/2012 1:05:17 AM PDT · by lbryce · 5 replies
    R & D ^ | April 2,2012 | Staff
    Analysis of data from the National Science Foundation-(NSF) funded 10-m South Pole Telescope (SPT) in Antarctica provides new support for the most widely accepted explanation of dark energy, the source of the mysterious force that is responsible for the accelerating expansion of the universe. The results begin to hone in on the tiny mass of the neutrinos, the most abundant particles in the universe, which until recently were thought to be without mass. The SPT data strongly support Albert Einstein's cosmological constant—the leading model for dark energy—even though researchers base the analysis on only a fraction of the SPT data...
  • New data support Einstein on accelerating universe

    04/03/2012 1:00:38 AM PDT · by U-238 · 59 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/2/2012 | Elizabeth Quill
    Einstein is still the boss, say researchers with the BOSS project for measuring key properties of the universe. BOSS, for Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, has measured the distance to faraway galaxies more precisely than ever before, mapping the universe as it existed roughly 6 billion years ago, when it was only 63 percent of its current size. The findings suggest that the mysterious “dark energy” causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate was foreseen by Einstein, the researchers reported April 1 at the American Physical Society meeting. To keep the universe in a static state, Einstein added a...
  • Survey gets a grip on dark energy (the BOSS project - Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey)

    03/31/2012 3:07:36 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 20 replies
    BBC News ^ | 3/30/12 | Jonathan Amos
    Astronomers have measured the precise distance to over a quarter of a million galaxies to gain new insights into a key period in cosmic history. The 3D map of the sky allows scientists to probe the time six billion years ago when dark energy became the dominant influence on the Universe's expansion. No-one knows the true nature of this repulsive force, but the exquisite data in the international BOSS survey will help test various theories. The analysis appears in six papers. These have all been posted on the arXiv preprint server. "This is an incredibly exciting time to be working...
  • 'Starbursts' and black holes lead to biggest galaxies

    01/25/2012 2:08:21 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 21 replies · 2+ views
    BBC News ^ | 1/25/12 | BBC
    Frenetic star-forming activity in the early Universe is linked to the most massive galaxies in today's cosmos, new research suggests. This "starbursting" activity when the Universe was just a few billion years old appears to have been clamped off by the growth of supermassive black holes. An international team gathered hints of the mysterious "dark matter" in early galaxies to confirm the link. The findings appear in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. ... Using the 12-metre Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope in Chile, an international team led by Ryan Hickox of Dartmouth College studied the way distant galaxies from...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Horseshoe Einstein Ring from Hubble

    12/22/2011 7:55:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | December 21, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's large and blue and can wrap itself around an entire galaxy? A gravitational lens mirage. Pictured above, the gravity of a luminous red galaxy (LRG) has gravitationally distorted the light from a much more distant blue galaxy. More typically, such light bending results in two discernible images of the distant galaxy, but here the lens alignment is so precise that the background galaxy is distorted into a horseshoe -- a nearly complete ring. Since such a lensing effect was generally predicted in some detail by Albert Einstein over 70 years ago, rings like this are now known as...
  • Dwarf galaxies suggest dark matter theory may be wrong

    09/16/2011 3:33:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 56 replies
    BBC ^ | September 16, 2011 | Leila Battison
    Scientists' predictions about the mysterious dark matter purported to make up most of the mass of the Universe may have to be revised.Research on dwarf galaxies suggests they cannot form in the way they do if dark matter exists in the form that the most common model requires it to. That may mean that the Large Hadron Collider will not be able to spot it. Leading cosmologist Carlos Frenk spoke of the "disturbing" developments at the British Science Festival in Bradford. The current theory holds that around 4% of the Universe is made up of normal matter - the stuff...
  • New method 'confirms dark energy'

    05/19/2011 3:02:45 PM PDT · by decimon · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | May 19, 2011 | Paul Rincon
    First results from a major astronomical survey have confirmed the existence of mysterious dark energy using a cutting-edge technique. Dark energy makes up some 74% of the Universe and its existence explains why the Universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate. The finding was based on studies of more than 200,000 galaxies. Scientists used two separate kinds of observation to provide an independent check on previous dark energy results. Two papers by an international team of researchers have been accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society journal. One type of observation used by...
  • Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the...

    04/16/2011 5:50:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 4/15/11
    Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the Observable Universe? Or, Might It Be Something ElseBack in the Middle Ages, maps showed terrifying images of sea dragons at the boundaries of the known world. Today, scientists have observed strange new motion at the very limits of the known universe -- kind of where you'd expect to find new things, but they still didn't expect this. A huge swathe of galactic clusters seem to be heading to a cosmic hotspot and nobody knows why. The unexplained motion has hundreds of...
  • Scientists Find First Signs of Dark Matter at LHC

    02/01/2011 3:01:27 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 24 replies
    Daily Tech ^ | February 1, 2011 1:45 PM | Jason Mick (Blog)
    Discovery of dark matter's behavior would solve many outstanding mysteries in physics Dark matter makes up five times more of the universe's mass that visible matter (~25% vs ~5%), yet scientists have yet to directly observe this ultra-abundant substance.  Scientists also have yet to observe dark energy, which may well beat out normal energy in universal abundance.  This lack of direct observations means that scientists no precious little about two of the most important physical components of our universe. That could soon change.  CERN's Large Hadron Collider, a 17-mile long circular underground track that is chilled to almost zero degrees Kelvin,...
  • Antarctic IceCube observatory to hunt dark matter (NSF study 'In Search of Neutrinos')

    12/23/2010 12:42:44 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 18 replies · 1+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 12/23/10 | AFP
    WELLINGTON (AFP) – An extraordinary underground observatory for subatomic particles has been completed in a huge cube of ice one kilometre on each side deep under the South Pole, researchers said. Building the IceCube, the world's largest neutrino observatory, has taken a gruelling decade of work in the Antarctic tundra and will help scientists study space particles in the search for dark matter, invisible material that makes up most of the Universe's mass. The observatory, located 1,400 metres underground near the US Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, cost more than 270 million dollars, according to the US National Science Foundation (NSF)....
  • Dark energy and flat Universe exposed by simple method

    11/24/2010 12:52:49 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 39 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11/24/10 | BBC
    Researchers have developed a simple technique that adds evidence to the theory that the Universe is flat. Moreover, the method - developed by revisiting a 30-year-old idea - confirms that "dark energy" makes up nearly three-quarters of the Universe. The research, published in Nature, uses existing data and relies on fewer assumptions than current approaches. Author Christian Marinoni says the idea turns estimating the Universe's shape into "primary school" geometry. While the idea of the Earth being flat preoccupied explorers centuries ago, the question of whether the Universe itself is flat remains a debatable topic. The degree to which the...
  • Physicists Discover "Violation of a Fundamental Symmetry of the Universe"

    11/04/2010 12:31:54 PM PDT · by lbryce · 110 replies · 1+ views
    i09.com ^ | November 3, 2010 | Staff
    Today physicists announced that they may have found the key to explaining dark matter in the universe. It all has to do with the potential discovery of a "sterile neutrino." According to a release about the new study: Neutrinos are neutral elementary particles born in the radioactive decay of other particles. The known "flavors" of neutrinos are the neutral counterparts of electrons and their heavier cousins, muons and taus. Regardless of a neutrino's original flavor, the particles constantly flip from one type to another in a phenomenon called "neutrino flavor oscillation." An electron neutrino might become a muon neutrino, and...
  • Cosmic Lens Used to Probe Dark Energy for First Time

    08/22/2010 7:57:00 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies
    PASADENA, Calif. -- Astronomers have devised a new method for measuring perhaps the greatest puzzle of our universe -- dark energy. This mysterious force, discovered in 1998, is pushing our universe apart at ever-increasing speeds. For the first time, astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope were able to take advantage of a giant magnifying lens in space -- a massive cluster of galaxies -- to narrow in on the nature of dark energy. Their calculations, when combined with data from other methods, significantly increase the accuracy of dark energy measurements. This may eventually lead to an explanation of what the...
  • Dark energy may not exist in space, scientists claim

    06/22/2010 3:48:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies · 1+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Tuesday, June 15, 2010 | Heidi Blake
    British scientists have claimed that the method used to calculate the make-up of the universe may be wrong. The universe as we know it -- formed of recognisable components such as planets, stars, asteroids and gas -- accounts for just four per cent of the cosmos, according to the decades old Standard Model. The rest is thought to be made up of mysterious dark matter and dark energy. This permeates space and powers the expansion of the universe. But physicists at Durham University now claim the calculations on which the Standard Model is based could be fatally flawed. This raises...
  • Missing piece found in particle puzzle: scientists...

    06/01/2010 4:08:50 PM PDT · by TaraP · 23 replies · 707+ views
    Reuters ^ | June 1st, 2010
    Research scientists announced on Monday they had identified the missing piece of a major puzzle involving the make-up of the universe by observing a neutrino particle change from one type to another. Science The CERN physics research center near Geneva, relaying the announcement from the Gran Sasso laboratory in central Italy, said the breakthrough was a major boost for its own LHC particle collider programme to unveil key secrets of the cosmos. According to physicists at Gran Sasso, after three years of monitoring multiple billions of muon neutrinos beamed to them through the earth from CERN 730 kms (456 miles)...
  • Found: 90% of the distant Universe

    03/25/2010 6:50:58 PM PDT · by zeugma · 35 replies · 1,108+ views
    Discover ^ | March 24th, 2010 | Phil Plait
    Found: 90% of the distant Universe This is fascinating news: 90% of the distant Universe was thought to be missing, but it was recently found. And what’s weird is, it was found to be in the red. Quite literally. [Note: before you ask, this has nothing to do with dark matter. See below!] GOODS_deepfield First, a bit of background. Galaxies are filled with hydrogen gas, and that gas is a major component of the clouds that collapse to form stars. When that happens, the hot stars ionize the gas: the flood of ultraviolet light strips the electron away from the...
  • Big Bang experiment may reveal dark universe: CERN

    03/08/2010 12:53:11 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 43 replies · 268+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 3/8/10 | Robert Evans
    GENEVA (Reuters) – Dark matter, which scientists believe makes up 25 percent of the universe but whose existence has never been proven, could be detected by the giant particle collider at CERN, the research center's head said Monday. Rolf-Dieter Heuer told a news conference some evidence for the matter may emerge even in the shorter term from mega-power particle collisions aimed at recreating conditions at the "Big Bang" birth of the universe some 13.7 billion years ago. "We don't know what dark matter is," said Heuer, Director-General of the European Organization for Nuclear Research on the Swiss-French border near Geneva....
  • Key to the universe found on the Iron Range? [WIMP scatters detected?]

    12/18/2009 6:56:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 843+ views
    Star Tribune ^ | Friday, December 18, 2009 | Bob Von Sternberg
    Scientists announced Thursday that they believe they have detected evidence of dark matter in data collected at an underground physics lab in Soudan... According to the Department of Energy's Fermilab, which is conducting the search for dark matter at the Soudan lab, "judging by the way galaxies rotate, scientists have known for 70 years that the matter we can see does not provide enough gravitational pull to hold the galaxies together. There must exist some form of matter that does not emit or reflect light." In the announcement, the lab said the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment has "detected...
  • Scientists expected to unveil the discovery of dark matter

    12/10/2009 12:40:05 AM PST · by geddylee · 16 replies · 940+ views
    Mail Online UK ^ | 12-10-09
    Physicists have detected a particle of dark matter for the first time in human history, according to rumours buzzing around the internet. Should it prove correct the finding would have an Earth-shattering effect on our understanding of how galaxies form. This week news leaked onto a physics blog that researchers from this Cryogenic Dark Matter Search will publish some important results in the next edition of the journal Nature. Physics papers rarely appear in that journal, except to announce a new discovery. The New Scientist has also reported that talks have hurriedly been scheduled for 18 December at SLAC National...
  • Tweak Gravity: What If There Is No Dark Matter?

    11/08/2009 6:07:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies · 946+ views
    Scientific American ^ | Thursday, November 5, 2009 | John Matson
    What if the discrepancy arises from a flaw in our theory of gravity rather than from some provider of mass that we cannot see? In the 1980s physicist Mordehai Milgrom of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, proposed a modification to Newtonian dynamics that would explain many of the observational discrepancies without requiring significant mass to be hidden away in dark matter. But it fell short of describing all celestial objects, and to incorporate the full span of gravitational interactions, a modification to Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity is needed. A review article in the November 6...
  • Is Earth AGAIN The Center of The Universe?

    09/03/2009 8:13:40 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies · 1,387+ views
    Christian Post ^ | 9/3/2009 | Allen J. Epling
    I came across a news item in the USA Today website, dated August 18, that got my attention. It concerns "Dark Energy", the mysterious force that seems to be speeding up the expansion of the universe, that no one can find or explain. Two scientists say is doesn't exist now because of a "mathematical solution they have produced, that suggests it is a natural result of the Big Bang. Part of the article is reproduced here. "What's the answer? It doesn't exist, suggest mathematicians Blake Temple and Joel Smoller, in a study released Monday by the Proceedings of the National...
  • Ray of hope in dark-matter hunt - Gamma-ray spike in Fermi telescope data hikes...

    07/25/2009 9:27:35 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies · 289+ views
    Nature News ^ | 24 July 2009 | Zeeya Merali
    Gamma-ray spike in Fermi telescope data hikes anticipation.The jury is still out on whether Fermi has spied dark matter.NASA/DOE/International LAT Team The murky hunt for dark matter has just got a little bit brighter. New gamma-ray results from the FERMI telescope fit with previous tantalizing hints of a detection of the mysterious stuff.Last year, a series of independent experiments caused a stir because they seemed to have detected signals of dark matter, which is believed to make up 85% of the universe's matter."There's been tremendous excitement about cosmic ray signals that have dark matter as one possible explanation," says Neal...
  • The day the universe froze; New dark energy model includes cosmological phase transition

    05/08/2009 1:40:50 PM PDT · by Mike Fieschko · 19 replies · 478+ views
    euarekalert.org ^ | May 8, 2009 | David F. Salisbury [?]
    Imagine a time when the entire universe froze. According to a new model for dark energy, that is essentially what happened about 11.5 billion years ago, when the universe was a quarter of the size it is today. The model, published online May 6 in the journal Physical Review D, was developed by Research Associate Sourish Dutta and Professor of Physics Robert Scherrer at Vanderbilt University, working with Professor of Physics Stephen Hsu and graduate student David Reeb at the University of Oregon. A cosmological phase transition -- similar to freezing -- is one of the distinctive aspects of this...
  • Dark matter intrigue deepens - Space telescope may have glimpsed hint of mystery particles.

    05/08/2009 12:58:54 AM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies · 1,088+ views
    Nature News ^ | 5 May 2009 | Eric Hand
    New data from two experiments -- one in space, one on a balloon floating above Antarctica -- hint at a tantalizing detection of dark matter, the mysterious stuff comprising 85% of the universe's matter. The evidence is a reported excess of high-energy electrons and their antimatter counterparts, positrons, which could be created as dark matter particles annihilate or decay. The signal from Fermi, the orbiting gamma-ray telescope, is subtle, whereas that claimed by the balloon-borne Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) is much more pronounced. The differences are puzzling, but the findings -- according to some -- could herald the birth...
  • Study plunges standard theory of cosmology into crisis

    05/05/2009 7:17:29 AM PDT · by decimon · 32 replies · 805+ views
    As modern cosmologists rely more and more on the ominous "dark matter" to explain otherwise inexplicable observations, much effort has gone into the detection of this mysterious substance in the last two decades, yet no direct proof could be found that it actually exists. Even if it does exist, dark matter would be unable to reconcile all the current discrepancies between actual measurements and predictions based on theoretical models. Hence the number of physicists questioning the existence of dark matter has been increasing for some time now. Competing theories of gravitation have already been developed which are independent of this...
  • Lights Out for Dark Matter Claim?

    05/05/2009 4:10:40 PM PDT · by neverdem · 37 replies · 1,433+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 2 May 2009 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge ImageKilljoy. NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has not reproduced a previously claimed signature of dark matter. Credit: NASA and General Dynamics Last November, data from a balloon-borne particle detector circling the South Pole revealed a dramatic excess of high-energy particles from space--a possible sign of dark matter, the mysterious substance whose gravity seems to hold our galaxy together. But satellite data reported today stick a pin in that claim. Researchers working with NASA's orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope say they do not see the purported excess. The observations don't disprove the existence of dark matter, but they...
  • Astronomers: Dark Matter Guides Universe's Structure

    04/05/2009 12:46:41 PM PDT · by BuckeyeTexan · 31 replies · 1,223+ views
    Information Week ^ | 04/05/2009 | Bob Evans
    A 10-year study of 100,000 galaxies close to our own offers compelling proof that long-hypothesized "dark matter" does exist and is in fact a guiding force behind the structure of the universe, a team of Australian, British, and American astronomers revealed this week. Saying that "the universe we see is really quite structured," one of the lead researchers explained that the 10-year "census" of galaxies near our own Milky Way offers powerful evidence that this invisible dark matter "seems to hold the galaxies together." The dark matter's influence on galaxies "stops their constituent stars from flying off and it seems...
  • Dark matter: Physicists may have found telltale

    04/01/2009 2:34:24 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 983+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 4/1/09 | AFP
    PARIS (AFP) – European astronomers said on Wednesday that an anomalous energy signal detected by an orbiting satellite could be a telltale of the enigmatic substance known as dark matter. The researchers, in a study appearing in the British journal Nature, say the hunch is that they picked up a signature of this strange phenomenon, but more work is needed. Some years ago, astrophysicists calculating the amount of matter in the Universe arrived at the startling discovery that ordinary material -- atoms -- comprises perhaps as little as five percent of the stuff in the cosmos. The rest, they believe,...
  • Does Dark Energy Really Exist?: Or does Earth occupy a very unusual place in the universe? (LOL!)

    03/29/2009 6:32:33 PM PDT · by GodGunsGuts · 74 replies · 2,881+ views
    Scientific American ^ | March 2009 | Timothy Clifton and Pedro G. Ferreira
    Does Dark Energy Really Exist? Or does Earth occupy a very unusual place in the universe? Scientific American, March 2009 By Timothy Clifton and Pedro G. Ferreira ... Most of us are very familiar with the idea that our planet is nothing more than a tiny speck orbiting a typical star, somewhere near the edge of an otherwise unnoteworthy galaxy. In the midst of a universe populated by billions of galaxies that stretch out to our cosmic horizon, we are led to believe that there is nothing special or unique about our location. But what is the evidence for this...
  • Discovered: Cosmic Rays from a Mysterious, Nearby Object

    11/20/2008 11:23:12 AM PST · by TaraP · 44 replies · 1,170+ views
    NASA ^ | Nov 19th, 2008
    Nov. 19, 2008: An international team of researchers has discovered a puzzling surplus of high-energy electrons bombarding Earth from space. The source of these cosmic rays is unknown, but it must be close to the solar system and it could be made of dark matter. Their results are being reported in the Nov. 20th issue of the journal Nature. "This is a big discovery," says co-author John Wefel of Louisiana State University. "It's the first time we've seen a discrete source of accelerated cosmic rays standing out from the general galactic background." Galactic cosmic rays are subatomic particles accelerated...
  • Did Dark Matter Power Early Stars?

    01/02/2009 11:46:33 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 36 replies · 616+ views
    Universe Today ^ | 1/02/09 | Nancy Atkinson
    The first stars to light the early universe may have been powered by dark matter, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of Michagan, Ann Arbor call these very first stars "Dark Stars," and propose that dark matter heating provided the energy for these stars instead of fusion. The researchers propose that with a high concentration of dark matter in the early Universe, the theoretical particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles(WIMPs), collected inside the first stars and annihilated themselves to produce a heat source to power the stars. "We studied the behavior of WIMPs in the first stars,"...