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Keyword: dinosaurs

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  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Dinosaurs 'already in decline' before asteroid apocalypse

    04/18/2016 2:00:44 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/18/2016 | University of Bristol
    Dinosaurs were already in an evolutionary decline tens of millions of years before the meteorite impact that finally finished them off, new research has found. The findings provide a revolution in the understanding of dinosaur evolution. Palaeontologists previously thought that dinosaurs were flourishing right up until they were wiped out by a massive meteorite impact 66 million years ago. By using a sophisticated statistical analysis in conjunction with information from the fossil record, researchers at the Universities of Reading, UK and Bristol, UK showed that dinosaur species were going extinct at a faster pace than new ones were emerging from...
  • Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks [tr]

    03/31/2016 11:34:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 31, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    Jaws may have terrified you at the cinema, but the iconic great white would have been dwarfed by Carcharocles megalodon, the largest shark in the history of the planet. The giant creatures lived between 23 million and 2.6 million years ago and scientists are divided over how and why the species perished. Now, details of fossils from the huge shark that lived alongside the dinosaurs have been studied for the first time in an attempt to solve this mystery.
  • Did Neutrinos Kill The Dinosaurs?

    03/25/2016 6:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Physics News [PDF] ^ | January 11, 1996 | Phillip F. Schewe and Ben Stein
    Massive collapsing stars radiate most of their binding energy (about 10^53 ergs) in the form of neutrinos. The rate of such collapses in our galaxy is expected to be greater, perhaps by a large factor, than the supernova rate. John Bahcall estimates a rate of about one collapse every 11 years in our galaxy. Stellar collapses might not exhibit the conspicuous optical show of full-blown supernovas but can still be potent emitters of neutrinos. According to Juan Collar, recently of the University of South Carolina but now with the University of Paris, stellar-collapse neutrinos may have played a role in...
  • We Finally Know How Much the Dino-Killing Asteroid Reshaped Earth

    03/22/2016 10:32:51 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 48 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 2/25/2016 | Jane Palmer
    More than 65 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smashed into Mexico's Yucatán peninsula, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and an explosion of debris that blanketed the Earth in layers of dust and sediment. Now analysis of commercial oil drilling data—denied to the academic community until recently—offers the first detailed look at how the Chicxulub impact reshaped the Gulf of Mexico. Figuring out what happened after these types of impacts gives researchers a better idea of how they redistribute geological material around the world. It also gives scientists an idea of what to expect if another such impact were to occur...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...
  • Scientists gear up to drill into ‘ground zero’ of the impact that killed the dinosaurs

    03/06/2016 8:35:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 59 replies
    Science mag online ^ | Mar. 3, 2016 , 2:00 PM | Eric Hand
    This month, a drilling platform will rise in the Gulf of Mexico, but it won’t be aiming for oil. Scientists will try to sink a diamond-tipped bit into the heart of Chicxulub crater—the buried remnant of the asteroid impact 66 million years ago that killed off the dinosaurs, along with most other life on the planet. They hope that the retrieved rock cores will contain clues to how life came back in the wake of the cataclysm, and whether the crater itself could have been a home for novel microbial life. And by drilling into a circular ridge inside the...
  • New dinosaur species may have been found (Should say Marine Reptile)

    01/25/2016 8:18:55 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | January 23, 2015 | Nicola Harley
    Paleontologists believe they may have discovered a new species of dinosaur after digging up the remains of a 165 million year old sea creature. The five-and-a-half metre plesiosaur skeleton was found in a quarry in Peterborough and experts believe it could be a new species of the flippered marine reptile.
  • Building the biggest dinosaur that ever lived: Titanosaur skeleton is so large its head pokes [tr]

    01/15/2016 6:39:52 AM PST · by C19fan · 5 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 15, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    It was the biggest dinosaur that ever lived, so when museum experts tried to reconstruct a life-sized skeleton of the recently discovered titanosaur it presented something of a challenge. The American Museum of Natural History in New York needed to use some careful spatial planning when it built a replica of the enormous creature for a new exhibition. At 20 ft (6 m) tall and 122 ft (37 m) long, the recently discovered dinosaur's skeleton is so big it does not fit in the museum’s warehouse-sized exhibition room.
  • Montana Officials Want Dollar Value On Dinosaur Fossils

    01/04/2016 9:45:28 PM PST · by This_far · 19 replies
    AP / Montana Standard ^ | January 03, 2016 9:30 pm | AP
    BOZEMAN (AP) - Montana State University is trying to put a value on dinosaur bones after state auditors said they need it for insurance policies, despite opposition from Museum of the Rockies' dinosaur experts who say it's unethical and dangerous to treat scientific research like it is marketable.
  • Unusual 'sail-backed' dinosaur roamed Spain 125 million years ago

    12/16/2015 7:34:46 PM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    Reuters ^ | December 16, 2015 | Will Dunham
    Along a lush river delta in what is now northeastern Spain, a herd of dinosaurs munched on ferns and conifers similar to modern-day cypresses 125 million years ago. These creatures stood out from the others in this Cretaceous Period landscape by virtue of the unusual sail-like structure on their backs, and experts today can only hypothesize about its function.
  • Dark matter and the dinosaur: New theory challenges notions on origins of human life

    12/12/2015 1:32:59 AM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 22 replies
    National Post ^ | December 12, 2015 | Joseph Brean
    TORONTO — Dark matter inspires many strange theories, but until now few have involved giant lizards and the origins of humanity. If physicist Lisa Randall’s theory is correct, however, there is a clear link between dark matter, the great unknown majority of universal stuff and the extinction of the dinosaurs, which cleared the path for the rise of mammals, including that special species, homo sapiens. Roughly, her idea is that the rotation of a vast disc of dark matter through our solar system dislodged an asteroid from a weak and distant orbit, and sent it hurtling toward Earth, where it...
  • Rapid short-term cooling following the Chicxulub impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

    05/19/2014 4:31:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    PNAS.org ^ | approved April 11, 2014 | Johan Vellekoop et al
    Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), we are able to demonstrate unambiguously that the impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (K–Pg, ∼66 Mya) was followed by a so-called “impact winter.” This impact winter was the result of the injection of large amounts of dust and aerosols into the stratosphere and significantly reduced incoming solar radiation for decades. Therefore, this phase will have been a key contributory element in the extinctions of many biological clades, including the dinosaurs. The K–Pg boundary impact presents a unique event in Earth history because it caused global change at an unparalleled rate. This detailed...
  • Dinosaur Puke Fossil Mystery Deepens

    11/16/2015 10:04:55 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    .discovery.com ^ | Alyssa Danigelis
    When researchers came across a unique fossil in Northern Italy in 1989, they concluded it was dinosaur vomit roughly 220 million years old. The fossil lacked the mineralization that would have put it in the dinosaur poop category — that’s “coprolite” if you want to be technical. They also identified the bones captured for eternity inside the puke as a tiny winged pterosaur. These reptilian dinosaur cousins evolved into dozens of species, and were the first animals after insects to evolve powered flight, according to the American Museum of Natural History. Vomit like this, usually from a predator regurgitating indigestible...
  • Leading Harvard physicist has a radical new theory for why humans exist

    11/15/2015 7:47:38 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 63 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/15/2015 | Jessica Orwig
    Where do we come from? There are many right answers to this question, and the one you get depends on who you ask. For example, an astrophysicist might say that the chemical components of our bodies were first forged in the nuclear fires of stars. On the other hand, an evolutionary biologist might look at the similarities between our DNA and that of other primates' and conclude we evolved from apes. Lisa Randall, a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, has a different, and novel answer, which she describes in her latest book, "Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs." Randall has written...
  • Newly discovered dinosaur flaunts its feathers

    11/04/2015 12:41:20 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 35 replies
    Fox News ^ | November 04, 2015 | Michael Casey
    The remains of an ostrich-like creature with preserved feathers and soft tissue is shedding light on how dinosaurs used their plumage and further strengthens the linkages between these ancient beasts and modern birds. A paleontology student at the University of Alberta discovered the 75 million-year-old skeleton of an Ornithomimus dinosaur in the Upper Cretaceous Dinosaur Park Formation of Alberta - one of only three feathered specimens found in the world. And while the feathers on the specimen were crushed, the researchers were surprised to see how similar they were to modern ostriches or emus.
  • The fiery world before dinosaurs: New research reveals fires were more common

    10/27/2015 12:40:54 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 32 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/26/205 | University of Royal Holloway London
    Scientists from the Department of Earth Sciences at Royal Holloway, University of London together with colleagues from the USA, Russia and China, have discovered that forest fires across the globe were more common between 300 and 250 million years ago than they are today. This is thought to be due to higher level of oxygen in the atmosphere at that time. The study which was published in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science, found that peats that were to become coal contained high levels of charcoal that could only be explained by the high levels of fire activity. The team...
  • Now that really IS a mutant turtle: Archaeologists find bizarre pig snouted created once roamed Utah

    10/22/2015 5:15:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | October 21, 2015 | Mark Prigg
    The extinct turtle was about 2 feet long from head to tail. Its streamlined shell was adapted for living in a riverine environment. When it was alive, 76 million years ago during the Cretaceous Period, Southern Utah looked more like present-day Louisiana. The climate was wet and hot, and the landscape was dominated by rivers, bayous and lowland flood plains. It lived alongside tyrannosaurs, armored ankylosaurs, giant duck-billed dinosaurs such as Gryposaurus and Parasaurolophus, and other dinosaurs that left abundant fossil remains in the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Southern Utah. But those fossil beds also hold the remains of...
  • Post-apocalyptic 'beaver' thrived after dinosaurs died

    10/05/2015 2:36:03 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    https://ca.news.yahoo.com ^ | 10-05-2015 | By By Will Dunham
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world had been wrecked. An asteroid impact in Mexico compounded by colossal volcanism in India 66 million years ago had killed about three-quarters of Earth's species including the dinosaurs. But relatively soon afterward, a plucky critter that looked like a beaver was thriving, exemplifying the resilience of the mammals that would arise from the margins of the animal kingdom to become Earth's dominant land creatures. Scientists on Monday announced the discovery in northwestern New Mexico's badlands of the fossil remains of Kimbetopsalis simmonsae, a plant-eating, rodent-like mammal boasting buck-toothed incisors like a beaver that lived just...
  • The Artists Who Paint Dinosaurs

    10/05/2015 6:42:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 7 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | October 5, 2015 | Ross Anderson
    I have a theory about why kids love dinosaurs. You might think it’s their size, their ferocity, the number and sharpness of their teeth. It is all of these things, but it is something else, too. Dinosaurs are remote from us in time. They belong to an alien realm. They ruled this planet for more than 150 million years, the longest such reign ever achieved by Earth’s megafauna. We know this because their bones froze into stone, and became fossils. But the dinosaurs left only a few of these remains, and they are, after all, mostly skeletal.
  • Bones Of Contention: Dinosaur Cells Survived Millions Of Years Trapped In Bone

    08/15/2015 8:58:12 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | Mary Schwietzer
    Twenty years ago Mary Schweitzer found herself the closest that anyone has ever been to a living dinosaur. As she examined a thin slice of a T. Rex bone fragment under a microscope, she realized she was looking at what appeared to be preserved red blood cells- cells which had no place in a 65 million year old fossil. It was the first time that anyone had found evidence that biological material could survive the passage of millions of years and still retain its molecular structure, challenging one of the central beliefs of paleontologists. Proving that what she was seeing...
  • 'Loch Ness monster' dinosaur fossil found in Alaska

    08/08/2015 11:44:33 AM PDT · by NYer · 17 replies
    Telegraph ^ | August 7, 2015
    Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming Photo: Nobu Tamura Researchers in Alaska have uncovered the bones of a prehistoric marine reptile dating back 70 million years. This is the first time an elasmosaur has ever been unearthed in this state. Its vertebrae were discovered embedded in an eroding cliff. Curvin Metzler (left) and Dr Patrick Druckenmiller on the cliff face where the elasmosaur was discovered  Photo: University of Alaska Museum of the North Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming. • Scientists study remains of massive Dreadnoughtus dinosaur, in pics...
  • Dinosaur egg treasure trove found in Japan

    07/15/2015 9:53:12 AM PDT · by ETL · 17 replies
    FoxNews - Science ^ | July 14, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    Researchers have discovered fragments of fossilized dinosaur eggs in Southern Japan, according to a June 29 report in the journal Cretaceous Research. The 90 eggshell fragments once housed five different types of dinosaurs, all of them small. “We know from the eggshells that small dinosaurs were roaming Japan’s landscape in the Cretaceous Period [65 to 145 million years ago],” Darla Zelenitsky, an assistant professor of paleontology at the University of Calgary and study co-author, told Foxnews.com. “Many of the bones known from Japan are from larger dinosaurs, but we now know (from the eggshells) that small dinosaurs were also an...
  • Jurassic World Called "Racist" Over Dinosaur Name

    06/21/2015 12:03:14 PM PDT · by rightistight · 76 replies
    The Social Memo ^ | 6/21/15 | Aurelius
    Some viewers of Jurassic World are taking offense to the film, calling one of the lines in the movie "racist." Specifically, the abbreviation of the dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus. During the course of the film, the Pachycephalosaurus escape from their enclosures, leading one character to shout, "The Pachys are out of containment!" This has led news outlets and Twitter users to call the film "racist." A British comedian originally brought attention to the line, offering a tongue-in-cheek rant against the dinosaur's name. However, people did not get the joke, and are actually calling the film racist. The Independent called the line "very...
  • Mystery solved: Why large dinosaurs avoided the tropics for millions of years

    06/20/2015 1:31:56 PM PDT · by ETL · 66 replies
    FoxNews.com/science ^ | June 17, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    New research has revealed why it took more than 30 million years for large Triassic dinosaurs to populate the tropics after they first appeared on Earth, ending a mystery that has kept researchers baffled for decades. Using new geological evidence culled from Ghost Ranch, N.M., researchers from the University of Southampton in the U.K. have found that an extremely unpredictable hot and arid climate due to elevated carbon dioxide levels (four to six times of what they are today) kept large herbivorous dinos at bay until after 200 million years ago.
  • Five amazing extinct creatures that aren't dinosaurs

    06/19/2015 7:19:56 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-18-2015 | Staff Source: The Conversation
    The release of Jurassic World has reignited our love for palaeontology. Many of us share a longing to understand the dinosaurs that roamed the Earth long before we arrived. But palaeontology is a discipline much broader than this. Dinosaurs dominated the land for 135 million years, but what happened during the rest of the Earth's 4.6 billion-year history? The role of palaeontologists past and present has been to unravel the mysteries of life on Earth, and in doing so they've found a lot more than just dinosaur bones. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. The spiky-backed ocean dweller: Right side up? Credit: Natural Math/flickr,...
  • Signs of ancient cells and proteins found in dinosaur fossils

    06/15/2015 11:56:01 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Science ^ | 06/15/2015 | By Robert F. Service
    The cupboards of the Natural History Museum in London hold spectacular dinosaur fossils, from 10-centimeter, serrated Tyrannosaurus rex teeth to a 4-meter-long hadrosaur tail. Now, researchers are reporting another spectacular find, buried in eight nondescript fossils from the same collection: what appear to be ancient red blood cells and fibers of ancient protein. Using new methods to peer deep inside fossils, the study in this week’s issue of Nature Communications backs up previous, controversial reports of such structures in dinosaur bones. It also suggests that soft tissue preservation may be more common than anyone had guessed. “It’s encouraging,” especially because...
  • 'JURASSIC WORLD' BITES OFF BIGGEST GLOBAL DEBUT OF ALL TIME

    06/15/2015 5:52:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    AP ^ | June 14, 2015 | Lindsey Bahr
    Dinosaurs are anything but extinct at the box office. "Jurassic World," the fourth film in the series, became the highest global opener of all time with a staggering $511.8 million in its first days in theaters. It also devoured a number of domestic box office records with a $204.6 million take, the Rentrak media-measurement company estimated on Sunday.
  • ‘Jurassic World’s Saturday Slips 20%, Putting Dino Pic On Course For $200M Weekend

    06/14/2015 6:43:40 AM PDT · by C19fan · 20 replies
    Deadline Hollywood ^ | June 13, 2015 | Anthony D'Alessandro and Anita Busch
    5th UPDATE, Saturday, 11:45PM: Industry calculations tonight are pointing toward an opening weekend of $200M for Universal’s Jurassic World, which would make it the second biggest domestic opening of all-time behind The Avengers’ $207.4M all-time title. After posting a $83M Friday, JW‘s Saturday is coming in precisely where most expected it to be, down 20% from Friday, putting the second day for the dino redux at $66.8M. Most think Sunday will decline another 22%. By the time the fifth NBA final game airs tomorrow night at 5PM PST/8PM EST, the thinking is that it won’t taser the dinosaurs’ momentum. The...
  • Fibres and cellular structures preserved in 75-million–year-old dinosaur specimens

    06/10/2015 2:56:39 PM PDT · by Sopater · 42 replies
    Nature Communications ^ | 09 June 2015 | Sergio Bertazzo, Susannah C. R. Maidment, Charalambos Kallepitis, Sarah Fearn, Molly M. Stevens
    Abstract Exceptionally preserved organic remains are known throughout the vertebrate fossil record, and recently, evidence has emerged that such soft tissue might contain original components. We examined samples from eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones using nano-analytical techniques; the bones are not exceptionally preserved and show no external indication of soft tissue. In one sample, we observe structures consistent with endogenous collagen fibre remains displaying ~67 nm banding, indicating the possible preservation of the original quaternary structure. Using ToF-SIMS, we identify amino-acid fragments typical of collagen fibrils. Furthermore, we observe structures consistent with putative erythrocyte remains that exhibit mass spectra similar to emu...
  • Scientists just found soft tissue inside a dinosaur fossil. Here's why that's exciting.

    06/09/2015 12:22:24 PM PDT · by ETL · 167 replies
    Vox.com ^ | June 9, 2015 | Joseph Stromberg
    Dinosaur fossils, it was long thought, are simple objects. The fossilization process leaves the overall shape of a dinosaur's bones intact, but all the microscopic structures inside them — the blood cells, connective fibers, and other sorts of soft tissue — inevitably decay over time. The photo above, from a new study published today in Nature Communications and led by Sergio Bertazzo of Imperial College London, shows an extremely zoomed-in view of a 75-million-year-old theropod claw, taken from the London Natural History Museum's collection. When researchers scraped tiny pieces off the fossil and looked at them under an electron microscope,...
  • Enjoy water? You’re drinking dinosaur pee

    05/29/2015 4:47:31 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 68 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | May 29, 2015 | Postmedia Network
    That glass of water in your hand is dinosaur pee, apparently. Not like it's unfiltered, but a science YouTube video posted this week raises the interesting tidbit that, since dinosaurs were around for 186 million years and water molecules are everlasting, it's a foregone conclusion that every drop of water on the planet passed through the prehistoric species once upon a time. "While most of the water molecules in your 8 ounce glass have never been drunk by another human, almost every single molecule has been drunk by a dinosaur," the video by CuriousMinds says. "So drink up and enjoy...
  • Dinosaur-like snouts grown on chicken embryos

    05/12/2015 2:35:40 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Birds are thought to have evolved from dinosaurs, but have very different jaws. Bird-like dinosaurs such as the velociraptor have two bones at the tip of their upper jaws. In birds, those bones are fused to form a beak. By blocking two proteins that are activated when chicken embryos grow their beaks, U.S. researchers caused their jaws to "revert" to a velociraptor-like snout. The changes were observed in chick embryos that developed until they were close to hatching. To their surprise, the birds' palates, on the roof of their mouths, also became dinosaur-like. "This was unexpected and demonstrates the way...
  • Bat-Like, Pigeon-Sized Dino Soared Over China

    04/29/2015 12:01:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Jennifer Viegas
    A dinosaur with bat-like wings once soared through the skies of what is now China, The Jurassic dinosaur, named Yi qi, has the shortest name ever given to a dino: Yi qi, pronounced "ee chee," means "strange wing." It also appears to be the earliest known flying non-avian dinosaur. At 160 million years old, it is older than the first known birds, such as Archaeopteryx. ... He and his colleagues unearthed the remains for Yi qi at Hebei Province in China. At first, the scientists puzzled over rod-like bones that extended from each wrist of the tiny dinosaur that weighed...
  • Dino impact gave Earth the chill

    06/01/2004 1:02:01 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 33 replies · 1,537+ views
    BBC NEWS ^ | 05/31/04 | N/A
    Dino impact gave Earth the chill A cloud of sulphate particles may have blocked out the sun's warmth Evidence has been found for a global winter following the asteroid impact that is thought to have killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Rocks in Tunisia reveal microscopic cold-water creatures invaded a warm sea just after the space rock struck Earth. The global winter was probably caused by a pollutant cloud of sulphate particles released when the asteroid vapourised rocks at Chicxulub, Mexico. The results are reported in the latest issue of the journal Geology. Italian, US and Dutch...
  • The Brontosaurus Is Back [it really is a separate species]

    04/08/2015 6:41:36 PM PDT · by grundle · 30 replies
    Scientific American ^ | April 7, 2015 | Charles Choi
    Some of the largest animals to ever walk on Earth were the long-necked, long-tailed dinosaurs known as the sauropods—and the most famous of these giants is probably Brontosaurus, the "thunder lizard." Deeply rooted as this titan is in the popular imagination, however, for more than a century scientists thought it never existed. The first of the Brontosaurus genus was named in 1879 by famed paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh. The specimen still stands on display in the Great Hall of Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History. In 1903, however, paleontologist Elmer Riggs found that Brontosaurus was apparently the same as the...
  • Brontosaurus Finally Validated as a Distinct Dinosaur

    04/08/2015 4:11:18 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    ABC News ^ | Apr 7, 2015, 10:43 AM ET | ALYSSA NEWCOMB
    On the edge of the solar system, the dwarf planet Pluto, which knows what it feels like to be banished from an exclusive club, may be cheering for the brontosaurus. While the long-necked dinosaur's name may be known by legions of fans and even made it on to a postage stamp in the 1980s, most paleontologists would be quick to correct people that the brontosaurus is not a dinosaur. But the iconic dinosaur name may finally be reinstated more than a century after researchers found the long-necked brontosaurus and apatosaurus likely belonged to the same genus, according to an analysis...
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • Ocean hot in days of dinosaurs, study finds

    02/18/2006 7:38:53 AM PST · by worldclass · 43 replies · 935+ views
    Sometimes we make that first dash into the ocean on summer vacation and happily announce, "It's warm as bathwater." But a new study based on ancient sediments collected off South America indicates that the tropical Atlantic Ocean really did hit temperatures as high as 107 degrees Fahrenheit back when dinosaurs ruled. The finding, reported Friday by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, also estimates that carbon dioxide made up as much as six times more of the atmosphere at that time than it does today.
  • Dinosaur footprint found in Alaska national park

    07/06/2005 1:37:52 AM PDT · by phoenix_004 · 11 replies · 464+ views
    Reuters ^ | Jul 5, 2005
    A recently discovered fossilized footprint shows that dinosaurs once roamed in what is now a national park in Alaska, scientists said on Tuesday. The footprint, estimated to be 70 million years old, was discovered on June 27, the first evidence of dinosaurs ever found in Denali National Park and Preserve, the National Park Service said. The find was made by a University of Alaska Fairbanks student attending a field camp in the park. The three-toed track, six inches wide and nine inches long, appears to be from the left foot of a therapod, a class of two-legged predators, said Anthony...
  • A Pint-Size Polar Predator

    12/26/2014 7:25:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Discover ^ | Wednesday, December 10, 2014 | Gemma Tarlach
    Nanuqsaurus hoglundi was the big little dinosaur find that nearly got left behind. Classified in a March study, the hobbit T. rex, barely two-thirds the size of its more famous relative, roamed the Arctic some 70 million years ago. It's the only tyrannosaur ever found outside temperate latitudes, rewriting our understanding of the animals' diversity... In 2006, Fiorillo's team was above the Arctic Circle, on Alaska's North Slope. The polar season for fieldwork is brief, and they were busy excavating horned dinosaurs. But they also noticed a few interesting-looking, basketball-size rocks lying around the site. Fiorillo set them aside, thinking...
  • Oldest Horned Dinosaur in North American Discovered

    12/26/2014 7:25:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Paleontologists working in southern Montana unearthed a 3-inch beaked skull with pointed cheeks, which they believe is the oldest definitive evidence of a horned dinosaur in North America. Though small, the skull helps fill gaps in the evolutionary history of horned creatures on this continent... Fossil remains of horned dinosaurs, called neoceratopsian, have been found throughout North America, but the fossil record of these creatures is incredibly limited further back in time. That's been a hang-up for paleontologists because the late Early Cretaceous period (roughly 113 to 105 million years ago) was a time of important diversification for horned dinosaurs....
  • 'Jurassic World' Dinosaurs Stuck in the 1980s, Experts Grumble

    11/27/2014 10:48:23 AM PST · by EveningStar · 38 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 26, 2014 | Linda Qiu and Dan Vergano
    Who doesn't love a dinosaur flick? Well, paleontologists have a few fossil bones to pick with Jurassic World, the latest in a line of dinosaur movies that once bragged about its scientific credibility. The trailer for the new movie, a reboot of the popular 1990s Jurassic Park franchise, was released Tuesday and has already been viewed more than 14 million times on YouTube. Like the original movie, Jurassic World takes place in an island safari park, where tourists visit living dinosaurs cloned from ancient DNA—until one hybrid monster goes rogue. Despite global fervor among fans, dinosaur scientists are not thrilled...
  • Jurassic World (2015 Film)

    11/25/2014 7:10:19 PM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | November 25, 2014
    Jurassic World, the fourth film in the Jurassic Park series, is scheduled for release on June 12, 2015. Colin Trevorrow is the director and Steven Spielberg is one of the executive producers. The official trailer has been released and you can watch it here. More links: WikipediaIMDbWhy did Steven Spielberg invent a new dinosaur for Jurassic World?Official SiteUK SiteNewsFacebookTwitter Of course, many of the dinosaurs depicted in the Jurassic Park series lived in the Cretaceous period rather than the Jurassic period.
  • New evidence that stegosaur tails were thigh-goring killing machines

    10/22/2014 6:29:16 AM PDT · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 21, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    They may have been plant-eaters, but stegosaurs were no easy prey: Researchers have found the fossil remains of what might be a deadly wound inflicted by the creature's spiked tail. Stegosaur tails have been a matter of some debate. While paleontologists used to say they were only for decoration, recent studies have suggested that the spiked, dexterous tails were actually used in combat. In 2005, researchers reported that a non-fatal wound found in the fossil of an allosaur -- a fearsome predator of stegosaurus's age -- was most likely inflicted by a stegosaur tail. But it turns out that those...
  • Chicxulub Didnt Do It All By Itself

    10/17/2014 11:40:09 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Geology Times ^ | 10/10/2014 | Staff
    Geoscientists now overwhelmingly agree that a single large asteroid or comet impact, such as Chicxulub in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, could not have been the sole cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Instead, new research in both planetary/space science and multiple earth-science specialties reveals that concomitant volcanic activity and the associated climate and environmental changes were significant contributing factors in four of the five major mass extinctions in Earth history.
  • T. Rex Confirmed As Great Grandaddy Of All Birds

    04/24/2008 1:37:14 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 3,796+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 4-24-2008 | Ewen Callaway
    T. rex confirmed as great granddaddy of all birds 19:00 24 April 2008 NewScientist.com news service Ewen Callaway John Asara, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Mary Schweitzer, North Carolina State University Thomas Holtz, University of Maryland Tyrannosaurus rex, meet the chicken – your third cousin more than 100 million years removed. A new family tree based on protein sequences recovered from dinosaur fossils firms up the dinosaur's avian lineage. "Palaeontologists have known this overall connection. We have now confirmed it with molecular data," says John Asara, a biochemist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who led the study....
  • Ancient Birds Flew On All Fours

    09/22/2006 6:27:23 AM PDT · by Tokra · 181 replies · 2,650+ views
    eurekalert ^ | Spet. 22, 2006 | Nick Longrich
    The earliest known ancestor of modern-day birds took to the skies by gliding from trees using primitive feathered wings on their arms and legs, according to new research by a University of Calgary paleontologist. In a paper published in the journal Paleobiology, Department of Biological Sciences PhD student Nick Longrich challenges the idea that birds began flying by taking off from the ground while running and shows that the dinosaur-like bird Archaeopteryx soared using wing-like feathers on all of its limbs. "The discussions about the origins of avian flight have been dominated by the so-called 'ground up' and 'trees down'...
  • Discovery of the Oldest-Known Ceratopsian, an Ancestor of Triceratops and Other Horned Dinosaurs

    08/24/2006 10:49:15 PM PDT · by Virginia-American · 27 replies · 943+ views
    George Washington University Press Release ^ | May 16, 2006 | Wendy Carey, Matt Lindsay
    GW PROFESSOR JAMES M. CLARK LEADS DISCOVERY OF THE OLDEST-KNOWN CERATOPSIAN, AN ANCESTOR OF TRICERATOPS AND OTHER HORNED DINOSAURS New Find is Evolutionary Link Between Ceratopsians and Pachycephalosaurs, the "Bone-Headed" Dinosaurs WASHINGTON -- James M. Clark, Ronald B. Weintraub Associate Professor of Biology at The George Washington University, and Xu Xing of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, have discovered the oldest-known ceratopsian, a finding that solidifies the close evolutionary evidence between ceratopsians and pachycephalosarians, the "bone-headed" dinosaurs. Roaming the earth 160 million years ago, the new basal ceratopsian dinosaur, Yinlong downsi, appeared 20 million years...
  • Dover, PA Evolution Trial [daily thread for 07 Oct]

    10/07/2005 7:23:15 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 456 replies · 4,761+ views
    York Daily Record ^ | 07 October 2005 | Staff
    To keep this all in one daily thread, here are links to two articles in the York Daily Record (with excerpts from each), which has been doing a great job of reporting on the trial: Forrest cross-examination a rambling wonder. About the time that Richard Thompson, head law guy at the Thomas More center and chief defender of the Dover Area School Board, started his third year of cross-examination of philosopher Barbara Forrest, it was easy to imagine that at that moment, everyone in the courtroom, including Forrest, who doesn’t believe in God, was violating the separation of church and...