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Keyword: dinosaurs

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  • Newfound Dino Looks Like the Creepy Love Child of a Turkey and an Ostrich

    07/28/2017 5:24:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 11 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 27, 2017 | Laura Geggel
    A Chinese farmer has discovered the remains of a dinosaur that could have passed for the ostrich-like cassowary in its day, sporting the flightless bird's head crest and long thunder thighs, indicating it could run quickly, just like its modern-day lookalike, a new study finds.
  • Baby Bird from Time of Dinosaurs Found Fossilized in Amber

    07/14/2017 12:18:02 PM PDT · by ETL · 43 replies
    NatGeo ^ | June 7, 2017 | Kristin Romey
    The 99-million-year-old hatchling from the Cretaceous Period is the best preserved of its kind The remains of a baby bird from the time of the dinosaurs have been discovered in a specimen of 99-million-year-old amber, according to scientists writing in the journal Gondwana Research. The hatchling belonged to a major group of birds known as enantiornithes, which went extinct along with dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous period, about 65 million years ago. Funded in part by the National Geographic Society's Expeditions Council, this discovery is providing critical new information about these ancient, toothed birds and how they differed...
  • Rumors of T. Rex’s Feathery Past Were Greatly Exaggerated

    06/07/2017 6:41:13 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    The Seeker ^ | June 6, 2017 | Jen Viegas
    The first known fossilized skin impressions for Tyrannosaurus rex suggest that this gigantic carnivore, unlike many other dinosaurs, had little to no feathers. The fossils, reported in the journal Biology Letters, show that T. rex was instead covered with a tough and scaly hide. Fossilized skin impressions for other tyrannosaurs — including Albertosaurus, Gorgosaurus, and Daspletosaurus — reveal that all such dinosaurs lacked feathers, too.
  • Zhao Chuang: Meet the man who brings dinosaurs to life

    05/30/2017 6:12:19 AM PDT · by C19fan · 1 replies
    CNN ^ | May 29, 2017 | Nanlin Fang and Katie Hunt
    If you came to this Beijing warehouse at night it would be downright creepy. More than 20 towering dinosaurs stand in the yard, teeth sharp and claws unfurled; inside are 40 more life-sized models -- steel frames propping up carcasses made of fiberglass and clay.
  • Dec 2016: Feathered dinosaur tail fragment trapped in amber amazes scientists

    04/15/2017 2:35:43 PM PDT · by ETL · 101 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | December 09, 2016 | Rob Verger
    It’s a discovery that's straight out of “Jurassic Park.” Scientists have found a tiny section of a dinosaur’s tail trapped in amber, and not only that, it has feathers. Dating to about 99 million years ago, or the mid-Cretaceous period, the amber containing the eight dinosaur vertebrae originally came from Myanmar. While scientists have known since 1996 that some non-avian dinosaurs had feathers, and even suspected that fact 10 years before that, this new find can teach them more about how feathers have evolved over millions of years. The feathered tail in question came from a juvenile dinosaur, likely a...
  • Largest-Known Dinosaur Footprint (Australia)

    03/28/2017 6:09:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 72 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 3/27/17 | Bridget Katz
    group of scientists say they have discovered “Australia’s Jurassic Park” along the rocky shores of Kimberly, a remote region in Western Australia. As Jonathan Amos reports for the BBC, palaeontologists found a diverse collection of dinosaur footprints in the area—among them the largest dinosaur footprint known to science. The research team, which was comprised of palaeontologists from the University of Queensland and James Cook University, recorded twenty-one types of fossil footprints stamped into the sandstones of the Dampier Peninsula. They recently published their findings in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. “There were five different types of predatory dinosaur tracks, at...
  • 'Best ever' view of what a dinosaur really looked like

    03/01/2017 8:18:00 AM PST · by C19fan · 23 replies
    BBC ^ | March 1, 2017 | Helen Briggs
    A dinosaur that lived 160 million years ago had drumstick-shaped legs much like living birds, according to palaeontologists. The feathered dinosaur also had bird-like arms similar to wings. Scientists used high-powered lasers to reveal invisible details of what the creature looked like.
  • Dark matter caused the demise of the dinosaurs?

    12/14/2016 10:12:58 AM PST · by fishtank · 84 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 13 December 2016 (GMT+10) | John G. Hartnett
    Dark matter caused the demise of the dinosaurs? by John G. Hartnett Published: 13 December 2016 (GMT+10) Harvard University LisaRandallHarvardEdu American theoretical physicist and cosmologist Dr Lisa Randall is another scientist grasping at dark matter for answers. Dark matter has been invoked to solve many vexing problems in astrophysics and cosmology.1 Now it seems it has been invoked to solve the evolutionists’ problem of extinction of the dinosaurs.2 American theoretical physicist and cosmologist Dr Lisa Randall has developed a breakthrough five dimensional warped geometry theory. About two years ago she proposed a new hypothesis on dark matter which suggests the...
  • Dinosaur discovery casts light on final flurry of animals' evolution

    11/10/2016 1:56:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/10/2016 | University of Edinburgh
    A dinosaur fossil that almost went undiscovered is giving scientists valuable clues about a family of creatures that flourished just before the mass extinction. The bird-like species, found at a building site in southern China and nicknamed the 'Mud Dragon', was preserved almost intact, lying on its front with its wings and neck outstretched. Scientists speculate that the creature may have died in this pose after becoming mired in mud about 66-72 million years ago. Scientists have named the new species Tongtianlong limosus, meaning 'muddy dragon on the road to heaven'. The two-legged animal belongs to a family of feathered...
  • Dinosaurs in Noah’s vineyard (carvings at 14th century church)

    09/19/2016 1:18:28 PM PDT · by fishtank · 64 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 6-19-16 | David Lewis
    Dinosaurs in Noah’s vineyard by David Lewis The carving (see image at right), which appears to show two dinosaurs, is on an outside wall of the bell-tower of a fourteenth century church in the Republic of Georgia. Holy Trinity Church (also known as Tsminda Sameba) is on Mount Gergeti, near Stephantsminda village, in the Mount Kazbegi area—close to the borders with North Ossetia and Ingushetia. When I visited this area in 2006 and saw the carvings, I asked a Georgian cleric at the church what they depicted. He commented that they looked like dinosaurs, and he had no idea when...
  • Forget what you thought dinosaurs looked like — this adorable bird–lizard just changed the game

    09/16/2016 11:45:38 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 9/15/2016 | L. Dodgson
    Paleontologists have teamed up with a paleoartist to create a model which challenges everything you thought you knew about the typical dinosaur. Dr. Jacob Vinther ofa Psittacosaurus — nicknamed a "parrot-lizard" — is about the size of a turkey, has bristles on its tail and a birdlike beak. In other words, a bit weird, but also pretty cute. It's also quite likely that the animal had feathers and a horn on each cheek, the experts say. Quite aptly, Psittacosaurus belongs to the group ceratopsians, which basically means "horned faces" in Greek. It's the same group that contains Triceratops. The scientists...
  • Major Evolutionary Blunders: The Imaginary Archaeoraptor

    09/01/2016 7:41:12 PM PDT · by lasereye · 8 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 09/01/2016 | Randy J. Guliuzza, P.E., M.D.
    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is quite serious about flying safety. If an aircraft crashes, the FAA will conduct an investigation called a Root Cause Analysis. This involves methodical detective work that tracks events from the moment of the crash back in time. Flight and voice data recorders are invaluable to the inquiry. Root Cause Analysis identifies the most obvious problem that led to the crash and then lists the problem’s cause. That cause is then treated like a problem in itself, and the cause for its occurrence is investigated. This cycle is repeated until the very first cause is...
  • Did Oil Kill The Dinosaurs?

    07/19/2016 3:00:57 PM PDT · by bananaman22 · 53 replies
    Oilprice.com ^ | 19-07-2016 | Dino
    What killed the dinosaurs? It’s a question as old as – well the dinosaurs themselves, and one that everyone from school children to scientists have been asking for decades. Movies like Jurassic Park and the Land Before Time only heighten that sense of wonder and raise the stakes behind that question. Now according to a new scientific study, it seems that black gold may have been the source of the dinos’ demise. Japanese researchers at Tohuku University and the Meteorological Research Institute authored a recent study in the research journal Scientific Reports suggesting that a meteor impact 66 million years...
  • 'Descendents Of Dragon' Confirmed At Laiohe River Valley

    02/26/2004 12:30:26 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 1,717+ views
    Peoples Daily ^ | 2-26-2004
    'Descendants of the Dragon' confirmed at the Liaohe River ValleyIn thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this year, with continually findings of dragons in archeological work at the Liaohe River Valley, the statement that the Chinese people are "the descendant of the dragon" is further confirmed. In thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Dinosaurs 'already in decline' before asteroid apocalypse

    04/18/2016 2:00:44 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/18/2016 | University of Bristol
    Dinosaurs were already in an evolutionary decline tens of millions of years before the meteorite impact that finally finished them off, new research has found. The findings provide a revolution in the understanding of dinosaur evolution. Palaeontologists previously thought that dinosaurs were flourishing right up until they were wiped out by a massive meteorite impact 66 million years ago. By using a sophisticated statistical analysis in conjunction with information from the fossil record, researchers at the Universities of Reading, UK and Bristol, UK showed that dinosaur species were going extinct at a faster pace than new ones were emerging from...
  • Megalodons were wiped out when killer whales invaded: Competition for food drove 60ft sharks [tr]

    03/31/2016 11:34:01 AM PDT · by C19fan · 47 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 31, 2016 | Abigail Beall
    Jaws may have terrified you at the cinema, but the iconic great white would have been dwarfed by Carcharocles megalodon, the largest shark in the history of the planet. The giant creatures lived between 23 million and 2.6 million years ago and scientists are divided over how and why the species perished. Now, details of fossils from the huge shark that lived alongside the dinosaurs have been studied for the first time in an attempt to solve this mystery.
  • Did Neutrinos Kill The Dinosaurs?

    03/25/2016 6:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Physics News [PDF] ^ | January 11, 1996 | Phillip F. Schewe and Ben Stein
    Massive collapsing stars radiate most of their binding energy (about 10^53 ergs) in the form of neutrinos. The rate of such collapses in our galaxy is expected to be greater, perhaps by a large factor, than the supernova rate. John Bahcall estimates a rate of about one collapse every 11 years in our galaxy. Stellar collapses might not exhibit the conspicuous optical show of full-blown supernovas but can still be potent emitters of neutrinos. According to Juan Collar, recently of the University of South Carolina but now with the University of Paris, stellar-collapse neutrinos may have played a role in...
  • We Finally Know How Much the Dino-Killing Asteroid Reshaped Earth

    03/22/2016 10:32:51 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 48 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 2/25/2016 | Jane Palmer
    More than 65 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smashed into Mexico's Yucatán peninsula, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and an explosion of debris that blanketed the Earth in layers of dust and sediment. Now analysis of commercial oil drilling data—denied to the academic community until recently—offers the first detailed look at how the Chicxulub impact reshaped the Gulf of Mexico. Figuring out what happened after these types of impacts gives researchers a better idea of how they redistribute geological material around the world. It also gives scientists an idea of what to expect if another such impact were to occur...
  • Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experiment

    03/11/2016 7:08:42 PM PST · by Mellonkronos · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 10, 2016
    [I posted this under science and food. Why? Because it's a story about genetically engineering a chicken so it's legs will grow like a dinosaurs, from which it evolved. But think about it. Instead of drumsticks you can eat dino-legs! And what will they taste like? Chicken, of course! Yummy!Dinosaur-like lower leg created on bird through molecular experimentAny one that has eaten roasted chicken can account for the presence in the drumstick (lower leg) of a long, spine-like bone. This is actually the fibula, one of the two long bones of the lower leg (the outer one). In dinosaurs, which...