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Keyword: foodsupply

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  • Climate change is making pigs skinnier, which could mean more expensive pork

    09/27/2018 10:48:40 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 52 replies
    National Post - Canada ^ | September 25, 2018 | by Laura Brehaut
    Pork is the most widely consumed animal protein in the world. Representing more than 36 per cent of global meat-eating, a hit to production could have devastating effects. As a new Scientific American report suggests, a warming planet may result in skinnier pigs that produce less meat. The potential outcome: a future where pork is scarce and strips of bacon will cost you dearly. Previous studies have identified climate change as a threat to livestock in general as rising temperatures affect feed quality, availability of water and biodiversity. By 2050, worldwide demand for livestock products is anticipated to double, according...
  • It’s the year 2038–here’s how we’ll eat 20 years in the future (Statist fantasy)

    08/27/2018 3:01:21 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 41 replies
    Fast Company ^ | 08/27/18 | Marius Robles
    It’s the year 2038. The word “flavor” has fallen into disuse. Sugar is the new cigarettes, and we have managed to replace salt with healthy plants.
 We live in a society in which we eat fruit grown using genetics. We drink synthetic wine, scramble eggs that do not come from chickens, grill meat that was not taken from animals, and roast fish that never saw the sea. ...... Agriculture is now mostly in the hands of the young generation, 70% of whom are college graduates and refer to themselves as “urban farmer-scientists.” They grow all kinds of plants in containers...
  • Emirates is building a giant vertical farm to feed airline passengers

    08/20/2018 5:54:51 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 59 replies
    Eyewitness News ^ | August 16, 2018 | Alex Gray, World Economic Forum
    The world’s largest vertical farm is coming to Dubai. The indoor farm is a $40 million joint venture between Crop One Holdings and Emirates Flight Catering, who say it’s a way of producing pesticide-free crops while using a fraction of the water that traditional farming does. The produce will feed passengers of Emirates and other airlines at Dubai’s Al Maktoum International Airport. The farm will be built near the airport, eliminating trucking costs and emissions. But is vertical farming really as green as it seems? HOW DOES IT WORK? To feed a growing global population, which could reach 9.1 billion...
  • More than 600 people got sick after eating at one Chipotle. Health officials don’t know why yet.

    08/08/2018 8:00:06 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 80 replies
    Washington POSt ^ | 08/07/2018 | Eli Rosenberg
    Chipotle in Powell between July 26 and 30 Chipotle said that it voluntarily closed the store last week for 24 hours after the period the illnesses were reported, replacing all of its food and cleaning and sanitizing the restaurant. Sheila L. Hiddleson, the health commissioner from the county, said in an email that it was still awaiting lab results to determine the cause of the sicknesses. The Dayton Daily News said that tests have so far come back negative for Salmonella, Shigella, E. coli and Norovirus. Chipotle has had some high-profile issues with food safety before. A federal inquiry examined...
  • China may have to resume U.S. soybean purchases in weeks: Oil World

    08/07/2018 12:50:59 PM PDT · by xzins · 38 replies
    AP ^ | 7 Aug 18 | AP staff
    HAMBURG (Reuters) - China may have to start buying U.S. soybeans again in coming weeks despite the trade war between the two countries as other regions cannot supply enough soybeans to meet China’s needs, Hamburg-based oilseeds analysts Oil World said on Tuesday.
  • North Korea warns of natural disaster as heatwave sears crops

    08/06/2018 3:41:07 PM PDT · by blueplum · 12 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 06 Aug 2018 | Benjamin Haas
    The North Korean government has called on its people to wage an “all-out battle” against a record heatwave as the country’s already fragile crops face drought and the authorities struggle to respond. The drought represented an “unprecedented natural disaster”, reported the Rodong Sinmun newspaper, the mouthpiece of the ruling Workers’ party. It urged citizens to “join the struggle” to save food production in a country that is no stranger to famine. Temperatures have reached more than 40C (104F) in some regions since late July and there have been sporadic reports of deaths from the heat. {snip} In South Korea, far...
  • Wraps And Salads Sold At Trader Joe’s, Other Major Retailers Recalled For Parasite Concern

    07/31/2018 9:48:59 PM PDT · by ATOMIC_PUNK · 13 replies
    https://boston.cbslocal.com ^ | July 31, 2018 at 4:08 pm
    (CBS News) — Federal officials are warning consumers to be on guard for signs of intestinal distress if they’ve eaten any of more than two dozen types of salads and wraps sold by several major retailers around the U.S. In a public health alert issued Monday night, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) cited worries that beef, pork and poultry salad and wrap products may be infected by a parasite known as cyclospora cayetanenis. Distributed nationwide by Caito Foods of Indianapolis, the possibly tainted products were sold by retailers including Kroger, Trader Joe’s and Walgreens....
  • McDonald’s salads linked to parasite that’s made dozens sick in two Midwest states

    07/13/2018 12:39:15 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 34 replies
    fox59.com ^ | Updated at 08:30AM, July 13, 2018 | Staff
    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — McDonald’s salads will be off the menu in two Midwest states until further notice because they may be linked to a parasite infection Health officials in Illinois and Iowa are investigating an increase in people becoming sick from a parasite that causes intestinal illness. The Illinois Department of Public Health said in a news release Thursday that it has received confirmation of about 90 cases of cyclosporiasis, which is caused by the Cyclospora parasite. The Iowa Department of Public Health, in its own release, said it has identified 15 cases linked to the same illness and parasite....
  • FDA: Parasites In Del Monte Vegetables Causing ‘Explosive’ Diarrhea

    07/09/2018 12:17:43 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    chicago.cbslocal.com ^ | July 9, 2018 at 10:36 am | Staff
    (CBS Local)– Over 200 people have now been infected by an outbreak of parasites linked to recalled vegetable trays from Del Monte. According to the CDC, 212 cases of cyclosporiasis – an intestinal infection caused by the cyclospora parasite – were reported as of July 5. The condition has been linked to “6 oz., 12 oz., and 28 oz. vegetable trays containing fresh broccoli, cauliflower, celery sticks, carrots, and dill dip,” which were recalled by Del Monte Fresh Produce on June 15. More than 200 hit by parasite from Del Monte vegetables; symptoms can include 'explosive' bowel movements https://t.co/bs63NaRJbM pic.twitter.com/XiYnkpXzxP...
  • Maryland Department of Health warns not to eat fresh crab meat from Venezuela

    07/07/2018 7:46:42 PM PDT · by Extremely Extreme Extremist · 21 replies
    ABC 7 ^ | 07 JULY 2017 | ABC 7
    WASHINGTON (ABC7) — The Maryland Department of Health has put out a warning not to eat fresh crab meat imported from Venezuela due to a "potential risk of infection."
  • End of BANANAS? Scientists warn favourite fruit could become EXTINCT

    07/05/2018 7:51:06 PM PDT · by EdnaMode · 51 replies
    Daily Star ^ | July 5, 2018 | Martin Coulter
    Experts say a special breed found in Madagascar could hold the key to keeping them alive. But there are only five known trees in existence. Scientists are racing to develop new banana varieties strong enough to survive Panama disease, which is a major threat to banana crops around the world. Because bananas are clones, the disease is able to spread very quickly from one to another. It is currently wreaking havoc with crops in Asia – but could wipe out the world’s supply if it spreads to America. Richard Allen, senior conservation assessor at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, told...
  • Travis County hit hardest by Cyclospora outbreak

    07/03/2018 6:23:26 PM PDT · by bgill · 11 replies
    cbsaustin ^ | July 3, 2018 | Bettie Cross
    A microscopic parasite is getting dozens of Texans sick. Since May, state health officials say 56 cases of Cyclospora have been reported in Texas. 16 of those cases originated in Travis County, which breaks down to more than one out of four victims being in the Austin area. This is the sixth consecutive year Texas has faced a Cyclospora outbreak from late spring to the end of summer. Health officials know they need to shut it down from the source... A 2015 outbreak was finally traced to fresh cilantro. “They were actually tracing it back to the particular fields in...
  • The U.S. needs 50,000 truck drivers to avoid a shipping squeeze

    05/28/2018 12:38:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 98 replies
    MSN ^ | May 28, 2018 | Jaden Urbi, CNBC
    Retailers are facing a shipping squeeze, and the trucking industry just can't keep up. According to the American Trucking Associations, there's a shortage of roughly 50,000 truck drivers across the country. And it's hitting both businesses and consumers in the wallet. Companies are complaining about how the driver shortage is impacting their business. Meanwhile, the cost of convenient shipping is starting to catch up with consumers. Amazon recently hiked its Prime membership to $119 a year from $99 a year. The retail giant said one of the reasons for the price jump was increased shipping costs. But the driver shortage...
  • Landmark lawsuit claims Monsanto hid cancer danger of weedkiller for decades

    05/22/2018 8:24:53 AM PDT · by yoe · 118 replies
    The Guardian ^ | May 22, 2018 | Carey Gillam
    In June, a California groundskeeper will make history by taking company to trial on claims it suppressed harm of RoundupAt the age of 46, DeWayne Johnson is not ready to die. But with cancer spread through most of his body, doctors say he probably has just months to live. Now Johnson, a husband and father of three in ( California), hopes to survive long enough to make Monsanto take the blame for his fate. On 18 June, Johnson will become the first person to take ( the global seed and chemical company) to trial on allegations that it has spent...
  • Who's gonna grow the food?

    05/19/2018 8:34:23 AM PDT · by rktman · 54 replies
    wnd.com ^ | 5/18/2018 | Patrice Lewis
    With Donald Trump’s election, it seems the lines have been drawn even more firmly between the left and right, between progressives and conservatives, between the religious and the irreligious. But interestingly, another line has been quietly drawn – or rather, been quietly deepened: the line between the urban and the rural. I’ve lived in both worlds, but I’ve never made any bones about where my allegiance lies: with rural America. Flyover country. Real America, as in the name of this column. Sadly, more and more people are fleeing rural areas and migrating to cities. According to a recent article in...
  • Weedkiller products more toxic than their active ingredient, tests show

    05/08/2018 11:10:30 AM PDT · by rktman · 40 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | 5/8/2018 | Unk
    Monsanto introduced its glyphosate-based Roundup brand in 1974. But it is only now, after more than 40 years of widespread use, that the government is investigating the toxicity of “glyphosate-based herbicides” on human cells.
  • Weedkiller found in granola and crackers, internal FDA emails show

    04/30/2018 8:34:18 AM PDT · by Mariner · 73 replies
    The Guardian ^ | April 30th, 2018 | Carey Gillam
    US government scientists have detected a weedkiller linked to cancer in an array of commonly consumed foods, emails obtained through a freedom of information request show. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been testing food samples for residues of glyphosate, the active ingredient in hundreds of widely used herbicide products, for two years, but has not yet released any official results. But the internal documents obtained by the Guardian show the FDA has had trouble finding any food that does not carry traces of the pesticide. “I have brought wheat crackers, granola cereal and corn meal from home and...
  • 207 million eggs in nine states recalled over salmonella fears

    04/14/2018 10:42:55 PM PDT · by blueplum · 56 replies
    CNN via MSN ^ | 14 Apr 2018 | Faith Karimi
    A farm in Indiana is recalling more than 200 million eggs sold in nine states over salmonella fears. Rose Acre Farms voluntarily recalled 206,749,248 eggs due to potential contamination with Salmonella Braenderup, the Food and Drug Administration said in a statement. At least 22 illnesses have been reported so far, the FDA said Friday. The eggs were sold through retail stores and restaurants. They reached consumers in ...
  • Insect farms gear up to feed soaring global protein demand

    04/13/2018 9:39:55 AM PDT · by ptsal · 59 replies
    Reuters ^ | 13-Apr-2018 | Karl Plume
    LANGLEY, British Columbia (Reuters) - Layers of squirming black soldier fly larvae fill large aluminum bins stacked 10-high in a warehouse outside of Vancouver. They are feeding on stale bread, rotting mangoes, overripe cantaloupe and squishy zucchini. [snip] Enterra Feed, one of an emerging crop of insect growers, will process the bugs into protein-rich food for fish, poultry - even pets. After being fattened up, the fly larvae will be roasted, dried and bagged or pressed to extract oils, then milled into a brown powder that smells like roasted peanuts.
  • Americans used to eat pigeon all the time—and it could be making a comeback

    02/19/2018 2:13:35 PM PST · by Red Badger · 99 replies
    www.popsci.com ^ | February 16, 2018 | By Eleanor Cummins
    It’s reviled by city slickers, but revered by chefs. A vintage postcard of a pigeon plant. Wikimedia Commons ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Brobson Lutz remembers his first squab with perfect clarity. It was the 1970s at the now-closed French restaurant Lutèce in New York City. “I came from North Alabama where there was a lot of dove and quail hunting and I knew how tasty little birds were,” the fast-talking Southerner recalls. “I’m not even sure if I knew then if it was a baby pigeon or not. But I became enamored with them.” When he returned home, however, the New Orleans-based physician...