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Keyword: greenland

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  • 11-million-ton iceberg threatens to inundate tiny Greenland village with tsunami

    07/15/2018 11:12:45 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 70 replies
    | Fox News ^ | Jly 15,2018 | By Christopher Carbone
    An 11-million ton iceberg, perched off the coast of a tiny Greenland village, is striking fear in the hearts of residents. Residents of Innaarsuit worry that a chunk of it could break off and unleash a tsunami upon the town. What happens to the gigantic mountain of ice, which a Danish meteorologist said is 650 feet wide—nearly the length of two football fields—and rises almost 300 feet into the air, depends largely on the weather. A strong wind could push the iceberg into the nearby Baffin Bay, averting a crisis. Alternatively, a large amount of warm precipitation could further destabilize...
  • Man set foot in Ice-Age Tibet

    06/14/2018 12:22:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    CNN Hong Kong ^ | April 17, 2002 | Nick Easen
    Fossilized hand and footprints have revealed that mankind lived on the Tibetan plateau at the height of the Ice Age -- 16,000 years earlier than anyone previously thought. The 19 fossilized signs of life have also cast doubt on the theory that the plateau was fully covered by a glacier one kilometer thick at that time. The 20,000 year-old prints, 85 kilometers (53 miles) from Lhasa, predates any archaeological evidence on the plateau and suggests that man may have migrated to the "roof of the world" extremely early on. At the arid and frigid site, 4,200 meters above sea level,...
  • Ancient LIVING shark born in 1500s is world's OLDEST vertebrate and could be 512 years old

    12/13/2017 10:56:09 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    Daily Star ^ | 12th December 2017 | Anthony Blair
    A SHARK believed to be the oldest living vertebrate has been discovered in the North Atlantic Ocean. Danish scientists found the ancient creature — which is believed to be 512 years old and is 18ft long. The shark is the world's oldest vertebrate – an animal with a backbone – and may have been born in 1505, when King Henry VIII was just 14 years old. According to the journal Science, Greenland sharks grow at just one cm a year. So when they discovered a female shark measuring a whopping 18 feet, they knew this creature had to be...
  • Ancient Supervolcano Affected the Ends of the Earth

    11/08/2012 6:20:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | November 5, 2012 | Staff
    About 74,000 years ago, the Toba volcano on the Indonesian island of Sumatra erupted with catastrophic force. Estimated to be 5,000 times larger than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, it is believed to be the largest volcanic event on Earth in the last 2 million years. Toba spewed enough lava to build two Mount Everests, it produced huge clouds of ash that blocked sunlight for years, and it the left behind a crater 31 miles (50 kilometers) across. The volcano even sent enough sulphuric acid into the atmosphere to create acid rain downpours in the Earth's polar regions,...
  • Frozen Hair Yields First Ancient Human Genome

    02/10/2010 12:57:13 PM PST · by decimon · 59 replies · 1,143+ views
    Live Science ^ | Feb 10, 2010 | Andrea Thompson
    A few tufts of hair frozen in the permafrost of Greenland for more than 4,000 years have allowed scientists to sequence the genome of an ancient human for the first time. The hairs belonged to a member of the ancient Saqqaq culture of Greenland, the first humans known to inhabit the icy island. Scientists have long wondered where the Saqqaq came from and whether or not they were the ancestors of today's modern Inuit and Greenlanders. The new findings, detailed in the Feb. 11 issue of the journal Nature, have helped to settle that question. The hairs also tell about...
  • Rush for iron spurred Inuit ancestors to sprint across Arctic, book contends

    02/10/2010 4:03:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies · 705+ views
    Vancouver Sun ^ | February 8, 2010 | Randy Boswell, Canwest News Service
    One of Canada's top archeologists argues in a new book that the prehistoric ancestors of this country's 55,000 Inuit probably migrated rapidly from Alaska clear across the Canadian North in just a few years -- not gradually over centuries as traditionally assumed -- after they learned about a rich supply of iron from a massive meteorite strike on Greenland's west coast. The startling theory, tentatively floated two decades ago by Canadian Museum of Civilization curator emeritus Robert McGhee, has been bolstered by recent research indicating a later and faster migration of the ancient Thule Inuit across North America's polar frontier...
  • Ancient Greenland was much warmer than previously thought

    06/11/2018 4:13:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 4, 2018 | Northwestern University
    Although researchers have long known that the last two interglacial periods experienced warming in the Arctic... Just beyond the northwest edge of the vast Greenland Ice Sheet, Northwestern University researchers have discovered lake mud that beat tough odds by surviving the last ice age. The mud, and remains of common flies nestled within it, record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods -- the early Holocene and Last Interglacial -- experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in Earth's orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland...
  • First American in Europe 'was native woman kidnapped by Vikings and hauled back to Iceland...'

    11/17/2010 8:33:00 AM PST · by Albion Wilde · 87 replies · 2+ views
    Daily Mail Online (UK) ^ | November 17, 2010 | NIALL FIRTH
    A native woman kidnapped by the Vikings may have been the first American to arrive in Europe around 1,000 years ago, according to a startling new study. The discovery of a gene found in just 80 Icelanders links them with early Americans who may have been brought back to Iceland by Viking raiders. The discovery means that the female slave was in Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus first paraded American Indians through the streets in Spain after his epic voyage of discovery in 1492...
  • New North America Viking Voyage Discovered

    06/06/2013 7:08:32 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 33 replies
    LiveScience ^ | June 5, 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Some 1,000 years ago, the Vikings set off on a voyage to Notre Dame Bay in modern-day Newfoundland, Canada, new evidence suggests. The journey would have taken the Vikings, also called the Norse, from L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of the same island to a densely populated part of Newfoundland and may have led to the first contact between Europeans and the indigenous people of the New World.
  • Are the Narragansett and other American Indians the descendants of Viking settlers?

    07/24/2002 6:25:27 PM PDT · by vannrox · 12 replies · 571+ views
    The Vinland Sagas ^ | July, 2000 | Frederick N. Brown
    Plain Talk on the Genetic Issue For some, a world outlook entails a vision of permanence and stability; that like the day, time commenced at some point and will continue to another; that the world is fixed, unchanging, and immutable - all that is necessary for human comfort is written for the ages as preparation for a coming Winter.Others see the universe in constant flux; that when the Lord made time, He made it in plenty - perhaps to see that not everything would happen all at once - that all things ~ all life ~ is in motion; that...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 69 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN — The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeleton’s teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • 2200 year old walrus bones suggest the most famous medieval chess set might be Icelandic in origin

    09/30/2015 1:06:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Icelandmag ^ | September 28, 2015 | staff
    Carbon dating of walrus bones found in Snćfellsnes peninsula indicates that the bones are at least 2000 years old. A large number of walrus skulls and walrus tusks have been found around Garđafjara beach on the south coast Snćfellsnes. The first skull was discovered 1884. All in all the bones of 50 walruses have been found, most in the past 50 years. Biologists argue this indicates Snćfellsnes was the home of a sizable walrus colony prior to the settlement of Iceland. Large pre-settlement colonies of walruses in Iceland A previous theory, explaining the concentration of bone discoveries, speculated they came...
  • Independence from Denmark key issue in Greenland vote

    04/24/2018 10:47:19 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 25 replies
    TheLocal.dk ^ | 24 April 2018 09:27 CEST+02:00 | AFP
    Greenland votes Tuesday in a local parliament election, with full independence a key issue for the self-ruled Danish territory threatened by global warming and struggling with youth suicides and sex abuse among its indigenous people. Rich in unexploited natural resources, Greenland gained autonomy from Denmark in 1979 and was granted self-rule in 2009, though Copenhagen retains control of foreign and defense affairs. The vast island between the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans, mostly covered in ice and home to just 55,000 people, also receives some 3.6 billion kroner (€483 million, $591 million) in subsidies each year from its former colonial...
  • The Harvest is ready now [charismatic caucus]

    02/25/2018 8:22:06 AM PST · by Jedediah · 6 replies
    The time to plow is over for the seeds are bearing fruit for I have gone before you as David in the Valley of Breakthrough . So speak and declare My Words of Righteousness given to all those that believe on Me for "Truly" The Harvest is ready to be brought into the Storehouse That is , "My Kingdom on Earth as it is in Heaven" for "Truly" You "ARE " My Keepers of My Love and ONE True Light EMMANUEL ( God with us ) JOHN 4:34-38 34 Jesus said to them, “My food is to do the will...
  • July 4, 2017 : Coldest July Temperature Ever Recorded In The Northern Hemisphere

    07/06/2017 8:19:47 AM PDT · by rktman · 47 replies
    realclimatescience.com ^ | 7/4/2017 | tonyheller
    Greenland just set the record for coldest July temperature ever reported in the Northern Hemisphere at -33C. Climate experts immediately responded to the record cold by saying Greenland is melting faster than expected at -33C.
  • At least 4 feared dead after tsunami in Greenland

    06/20/2017 9:51:56 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 6 replies
    CBC News ^ | 6/19/2017 | Mitch Wiles
    Four people are feared dead after tsunami waves struck the coast of Greenland on Saturday night. A 4.1 magnitude earthquake, which struck 28 kilometres north of the northwest village of Nuugaatsiaq, is believed to have partially triggered the tsunami, according to a report from Kalaallit Nunaata Radioa, the national broadcaster in Greenland. The local newspaper, Sermitsiaq, reported that the four feared dead were inside their home in Nuugaatsiaq when waves struck and swept the structure into the ocean. KNR says Nuugaatsiaq has been evacuated, adding that the waves also struck the communities of Uummannaq and Illorsuit. A helicopter and boats...
  • Study finds potential instability in Atlantic Ocean water circulation system

    01/05/2017 7:32:16 AM PST · by pa_dweller · 38 replies
    Yale University ^ | 1/4/17 | Jim Shelton
    One of the world’s largest ocean circulation systems may not be as stable as today’s weather models predict, according to a new study. In fact, changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) — the same deep-water ocean current featured in the movie “The Day After Tomorrow” — could occur quite abruptly, in geologic terms, the study says. The research appears in the Jan. 4 online edition of the journal Science Advances.
  • Greenland Enters 2017 Adding Extraordinary Amounts Of Ice And Snow

    01/03/2017 7:58:56 AM PST · by rktman · 30 replies
    dailycaller.com ^ | 1/2/2017 | Michael Bastasch
    Greenland’s ice sheet kicked off 2017 gaining about eight gigatons of snow and ice, which is well above what’s usually added to the ice sheet Jan. 1 for the last 24 years, according to Danish meteorologists. In fact, Greenland’s ice sheet has been gaining ice and snow at a rate not seen in years based on Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) data. DMI reports the Greenland ice sheet’s “mass surface budget” has been growing significantly since October. Greenland’s “surface mass budget” for winter 2016-2017 is already more than two standard deviations higher than the northern ice sheet’s mean snow and ice...
  • Real Viking Ship Completes North Atlantic Crossing

    06/30/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Ketill Frostbeard · 44 replies
    GCaptain.com ^ | June 30, 2016 | GCaptain Staff
    The world’s largest viking ship has arrived in North America after crossing the North Atlantic Ocean on a journey from its homeport in Haugesund, Norway. The Viking ship, named Draken Harald Hĺrfagre, set sail from Norway with its approximately 32 crew members in late April and made stops in Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland, Canada, before making its way through the Saint Lawrence Seaway to Toronto for the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2016 festival this weekend. Future stops for the Viking ship include Chicago, Green Bay and Duluth, before heading to U.S. east coast with stops in New York City...
  • Breedlove tells Congress US must rebuild forces in Europe to confront newly aggressive Russia

    02/25/2016 4:17:55 PM PST · by a_Turk · 50 replies
    Stars and Stripes ^ | February 25, 2016 | John Vandiver
    The U.S. military must rebuild in Europe to face a more aggressive Russia, whose advanced submarines, weapons systems and geographic advantage have the U.S. “playing zone defense,” the top U.S. commander in Europe said Thursday. “We have about 20 years of a different paradigm to correct,” Gen. Philip Breedlove, commander of U.S. European Command, said during testimony before the House Armed Services Committee. Breedlove, who has led EUCOM during the command’s biggest transformation in a generation, said he did not foresee a need to return to a Cold War-style military posture. But the era of trying to make a partner...