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Keyword: greenland

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  • Massive crater under Greenland’s ice points to climate-altering impact in the time of humans

    11/14/2018 3:09:50 PM PST · by ETL · 50 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Nov 14, 2018 | Paul Voosen
    On a bright July day 2 years ago, Kurt Kjær was in a helicopter flying over northwest Greenland—an expanse of ice, sheer white and sparkling. Soon, his target came into view: Hiawatha Glacier, a slow-moving sheet of ice more than a kilometer thick. It advances on the Arctic Ocean not in a straight wall, but in a conspicuous semicircle, as though spilling out of a basin. Kjær, a geologist at the Natural History Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, suspected the glacier was hiding an explosive secret. The helicopter landed near the surging river that drains the glacier, sweeping out rocks...
  • NASA satellite launched to measure Earth’s ice changes

    09/15/2018 11:39:46 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Sep. 15, 2018 12:13 PM EDT
    A NASA satellite designed to precisely measure changes in Earth’s ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice and vegetation was launched into polar orbit from California early Saturday. A Delta 2 rocket carrying ICESat-2 lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base at 6:02 a.m. and headed over the Pacific Ocean. NASA Earth Science Division director Michael Freilich says that the mission in particular will advance knowledge of how the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica contribute to sea level rise. The melt from those ice sheets alone has raised global sea level by more than 1 millimeter (0.04 inch) a year recently,...
  • Arctic's oldest and thickest sea ice breaks for first time

    08/21/2018 8:06:59 AM PDT · by SMGFan · 66 replies
    The oldest and most robust sea ice in the Arctic has reportedly began breaking up for the first time in recorded history. The Guardian reported on Tuesday that the ice breaks, which result in water opening up north of Greenland, have happened twice in 2018 because of warm winds and a heat wave caused by climate change. The sea off the northern coast of Greenland was once referred to as "the last ice area” because of how perpetually frozen it normally is. It was also believed that it would be one of the final northern areas to be impacted by...
  • not forsaken but Esteemed[Charismatic Caucus]

    08/21/2018 9:38:05 AM PDT · by Jedediah · 1 replies
    I have not forsaken you, even now you stand in my courts beside me as I in all My majesty release my justice and blessings . You see you are on display in my courts as one wise and esteemed for you know IAM and in the precipise of this revelation all of creation stands before The living God awaiting My desire for I AM All in All and this is who you know to be True and Faithfull as Creator Lord and God . Yahweh is My name and there is nothing before I AM. Therfore fear not oh...
  • Caelestiventus hanseni: Newly-Discovered Triassic Pterosaur Lived in Harsh Desert

    08/19/2018 11:53:24 AM PDT · by ETL · 9 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 14, 2018 | Natali Anderson
    Pterosaurs were giant flying reptiles that flew over the heads of the dinosaurs. Soaring on skin wings supported by a single huge finger, they were the largest animals ever to take wing. Originating in the Late Triassic epoch (around 215 million years ago), they thrived to the end of the Cretaceous period (66 million years ago).Triassic pterosaurs are extraordinarily rare and are known exclusively from marine deposits in the Alps (Italy, Austria and Switzerland), except for Arcticodactylus cromptonellus from fluvial deposits in Greenland.The new Triassic pterosaur is from the Saints & Sinners Quarry near Dinosaur National Monument in Utah.Named Caelestiventus...
  • Lost Norse of Greenland fueled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests

    08/17/2018 12:55:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archeology ^ | Tuesday, August 7, 2018 | University of Cambridge
    Some have suggested that trading commodities – most notably walrus tusks – with Europe may have been vital to sustaining the Greenlanders. Ornate items including crucifixes and chess pieces were fashioned from walrus ivory by craftsmen of the age. However, the source of this ivory has never been empirically established. Now, researchers from the universities of Cambridge and Oslo have studied ancient DNA from offcuts of tusks and skulls, most found on the sites of former ivory workshops across Europe, in order to trace the origin of the animals used in the medieval trade. In doing so they have discovered...
  • Air Force silent after 2-kiloton meteor hits Earth near base (Thule AFB, Greenland)

    08/06/2018 5:55:49 PM PDT · by Signalman · 48 replies
    NY Post ^ | 8/4/2018 | news.com.au
    A meteor hit Earth and exploded with 2.1 kilotons of force in July, but the Air Force has made no mention of the event. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed an object of unspecified size traveling at 15.1 miles per second (54,360 miles per hour) struck the ground in Greenland, just 27 miles north of Thule Air Base, on July 25. The base is mainly used to detect missile launches. Director of the Nuclear Information Project for the Federation of American Scientists Hans Kristensen tweeted about the impact, but the US Air Force has not reported the event. Kristensen argues it’s...
  • Arctic people were spinning yarn before the Vikings arrived

    08/01/2018 5:46:48 PM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 34 replies
    Digital Journal ^ | 7-24-18 | Karen Graham
    New research and technologies may end up changing the way we think about early Arctic history, upending the assumption that the ancient ancestors of today's Inuit people learned how to spin yarn from Viking settlers. It has long been assumed that the ancient Dorset and Thule people learned how to spin yarn from Norse settlers who arrived in Newfoundland some 1,000 years ago, according to the Canadian press. “There’s a lot we don’t know,” said Michele Hayeur Smith of Brown University in Rhode Island and lead author of a recent paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science. Hayeur Smith and...
  • Air Force says no damage from Greenland meteor

    08/03/2018 6:23:45 PM PDT · by waterhill · 15 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | 2-3-2018 | Travis J. Tritten
    The Air Force said Friday that there was no damage to Thule Air Base in Greenland after a large meteor fell nearby last week. The fireball incident occurred just miles from the remote military base on July 25 and entered the atmosphere with a 2.1 kiloton force, according to the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima was 15 kilotons. The Air Force 21st Space Wing monitors missile launches and space activity via sensors at Thule, and directed any questions to NASA, which did not immediately provide a statement.
  • Air Force remains silent after huge meteor hits near US military base

    08/03/2018 5:13:30 PM PDT · by BBell · 77 replies
    A meteor hit the earth and exploded with 2.1 kilotons of force last month, but the US Air Force has made no mention of the event. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory confirmed an object of unspecified size travelling at 24.4 kilometres per second struck earth in Greenland, just 43 kilometres north of an early missile warning Thule Air Base on the 25th of July, 2018. Director of the Nuclear Information Project for the Federation of American Scientists, Hans Kristensen, tweeted about the impact, but America’s Air Force has not reported the event.Mr. Kristensen argues it’s concerning there was no public warning...
  • How Greenland scorched its underside

    08/01/2018 10:06:42 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    BBC ^ | Jonathan Amos
    It's like the underside of the island got a good roasting in the distant past and still has the big scar to prove it. That hotspot, by the way, is the one which today is building Iceland in the middle of the North Atlantic. The plume of broiling rock rising from deep inside the Earth has broken through the thin ocean floor at Iceland's location and is now creating new land with regular eruptions of lava. Greenland's warm NW-SE band is reported by a team of researchers led by the US space agency (Nasa) and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS)....
  • 11-million-ton iceberg threatens to inundate tiny Greenland village with tsunami

    07/15/2018 11:12:45 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 70 replies
    | Fox News ^ | Jly 15,2018 | By Christopher Carbone
    An 11-million ton iceberg, perched off the coast of a tiny Greenland village, is striking fear in the hearts of residents. Residents of Innaarsuit worry that a chunk of it could break off and unleash a tsunami upon the town. What happens to the gigantic mountain of ice, which a Danish meteorologist said is 650 feet wide—nearly the length of two football fields—and rises almost 300 feet into the air, depends largely on the weather. A strong wind could push the iceberg into the nearby Baffin Bay, averting a crisis. Alternatively, a large amount of warm precipitation could further destabilize...
  • Man set foot in Ice-Age Tibet

    06/14/2018 12:22:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    CNN Hong Kong ^ | April 17, 2002 | Nick Easen
    Fossilized hand and footprints have revealed that mankind lived on the Tibetan plateau at the height of the Ice Age -- 16,000 years earlier than anyone previously thought. The 19 fossilized signs of life have also cast doubt on the theory that the plateau was fully covered by a glacier one kilometer thick at that time. The 20,000 year-old prints, 85 kilometers (53 miles) from Lhasa, predates any archaeological evidence on the plateau and suggests that man may have migrated to the "roof of the world" extremely early on. At the arid and frigid site, 4,200 meters above sea level,...
  • Ancient LIVING shark born in 1500s is world's OLDEST vertebrate and could be 512 years old

    12/13/2017 10:56:09 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    Daily Star ^ | 12th December 2017 | Anthony Blair
    A SHARK believed to be the oldest living vertebrate has been discovered in the North Atlantic Ocean. Danish scientists found the ancient creature — which is believed to be 512 years old and is 18ft long. The shark is the world's oldest vertebrate – an animal with a backbone – and may have been born in 1505, when King Henry VIII was just 14 years old. According to the journal Science, Greenland sharks grow at just one cm a year. So when they discovered a female shark measuring a whopping 18 feet, they knew this creature had to be...
  • Ancient Supervolcano Affected the Ends of the Earth

    11/08/2012 6:20:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | November 5, 2012 | Staff
    About 74,000 years ago, the Toba volcano on the Indonesian island of Sumatra erupted with catastrophic force. Estimated to be 5,000 times larger than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, it is believed to be the largest volcanic event on Earth in the last 2 million years. Toba spewed enough lava to build two Mount Everests, it produced huge clouds of ash that blocked sunlight for years, and it the left behind a crater 31 miles (50 kilometers) across. The volcano even sent enough sulphuric acid into the atmosphere to create acid rain downpours in the Earth's polar regions,...
  • Frozen Hair Yields First Ancient Human Genome

    02/10/2010 12:57:13 PM PST · by decimon · 59 replies · 1,143+ views
    Live Science ^ | Feb 10, 2010 | Andrea Thompson
    A few tufts of hair frozen in the permafrost of Greenland for more than 4,000 years have allowed scientists to sequence the genome of an ancient human for the first time. The hairs belonged to a member of the ancient Saqqaq culture of Greenland, the first humans known to inhabit the icy island. Scientists have long wondered where the Saqqaq came from and whether or not they were the ancestors of today's modern Inuit and Greenlanders. The new findings, detailed in the Feb. 11 issue of the journal Nature, have helped to settle that question. The hairs also tell about...
  • Rush for iron spurred Inuit ancestors to sprint across Arctic, book contends

    02/10/2010 4:03:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies · 705+ views
    Vancouver Sun ^ | February 8, 2010 | Randy Boswell, Canwest News Service
    One of Canada's top archeologists argues in a new book that the prehistoric ancestors of this country's 55,000 Inuit probably migrated rapidly from Alaska clear across the Canadian North in just a few years -- not gradually over centuries as traditionally assumed -- after they learned about a rich supply of iron from a massive meteorite strike on Greenland's west coast. The startling theory, tentatively floated two decades ago by Canadian Museum of Civilization curator emeritus Robert McGhee, has been bolstered by recent research indicating a later and faster migration of the ancient Thule Inuit across North America's polar frontier...
  • Ancient Greenland was much warmer than previously thought

    06/11/2018 4:13:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 4, 2018 | Northwestern University
    Although researchers have long known that the last two interglacial periods experienced warming in the Arctic... Just beyond the northwest edge of the vast Greenland Ice Sheet, Northwestern University researchers have discovered lake mud that beat tough odds by surviving the last ice age. The mud, and remains of common flies nestled within it, record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods -- the early Holocene and Last Interglacial -- experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in Earth's orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland...
  • First American in Europe 'was native woman kidnapped by Vikings and hauled back to Iceland...'

    11/17/2010 8:33:00 AM PST · by Albion Wilde · 87 replies · 2+ views
    Daily Mail Online (UK) ^ | November 17, 2010 | NIALL FIRTH
    A native woman kidnapped by the Vikings may have been the first American to arrive in Europe around 1,000 years ago, according to a startling new study. The discovery of a gene found in just 80 Icelanders links them with early Americans who may have been brought back to Iceland by Viking raiders. The discovery means that the female slave was in Europe five centuries before Christopher Columbus first paraded American Indians through the streets in Spain after his epic voyage of discovery in 1492...
  • New North America Viking Voyage Discovered

    06/06/2013 7:08:32 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 33 replies
    LiveScience ^ | June 5, 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Some 1,000 years ago, the Vikings set off on a voyage to Notre Dame Bay in modern-day Newfoundland, Canada, new evidence suggests. The journey would have taken the Vikings, also called the Norse, from L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of the same island to a densely populated part of Newfoundland and may have led to the first contact between Europeans and the indigenous people of the New World.