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Keyword: humangenome

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  • Human Genome Is Much More Than Just Genes

    09/06/2012 10:04:50 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 5 September 2012 | Elizabeth Pennisi
    Enlarge Image Zooming in. This diagram illustrates a chromosome in ever-greater detail, as the ENCODE project drilled down to DNA to study the functional elements of the genome. Credit: ENCODE project The human genome—the sum total of hereditary information in a person—contains a lot more than the protein-coding genes teenagers learn about in school, a massive international project has found. When researchers decided to sequence the human genome in the late 1990s, they were focused on finding those traditional genes so as to identify all the proteins necessary for life. Each gene was thought to be a discrete piece...
  • I’ve found God, says man who cracked the genome

    06/11/2006 9:51:12 PM PDT · by Marius3188 · 407 replies · 8,449+ views
    Times Online ^ | June 11, 2006 | Steven Swinford
    THE scientist who led the team that cracked the human genome is to publish a book explaining why he now believes in the existence of God and is convinced that miracles are real. Francis Collins, the director of the US National Human Genome Research Institute, claims there is a rational basis for a creator and that scientific discoveries bring man “closer to God”. His book, The Language of God, to be published in September, will reopen the age-old debate about the relationship between science and faith. “One of the great tragedies of our time is this impression that has been...
  • I’ve found God, says man who cracked the genome

    04/07/2008 2:25:19 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 163 replies · 496+ views
    The London Times ^ | June 11, 2006 | Steven Swinford
    THE scientist who led the team that cracked the human genome is to publish a book explaining why he now believes in the existence of God and is convinced that miracles are real. Francis Collins, the director of the US National Human Genome Research Institute, claims there is a rational basis for a creator and that scientific discoveries bring man “closer to God”. His book, The Language of God, to be published in September, will reopen the age-old debate about the relationship between science and faith. “One of the great tragedies of our time is this impression that has been...
  • Not Your Father's Genome

    01/15/2008 7:55:39 PM PST · by neverdem · 26 replies · 119+ views
    familypracticenews.com ^ | 1 January 2008 | GREG FEERO, M.D., PH.D.
    DR. FEERO is a family physician with a doctorate in human genetics from the University of Pittsburgh. He is a senior adviser for genomic medicine in the Office of the Director at the National Human Genome Research Institute. Our understanding of the genome is changing rapidly and drastically. For starters, the Human Genome Project has revealed that humans are, on a numerical basis, genetically less complex than a mustard plant (Arabidopsis). In fact, our genome contains between 20,000 and 25,000 sequences suggestive of “genes” encoding proteins, whereas Arabidopsis contains about 27,000. If that doesn't make much sense to you, don't...
  • Gene Master - How a private researcher won the race to decode the human genome

    11/02/2007 1:26:08 AM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies · 654+ views
    Wall Street Journal ^ | October 27, 2007 | RONALD BAILEY
    Craig Venter is not a man who is inclined to underestimate himself. But then why should he? He beat the government's science bureaucrats in the race to decode the human genome. Fueled by $3 billion in taxpayer money, the federal Human Genome Project had waddled along for years until Mr. Venter, in 1998, managed to come up with private funding for a $300 million parallel research effort, Celera Genomics. He announced that his team would sequence the genome -- mapping the three billion DNA base-pairs that make up all 26,000 or so human genes (plus tracking long stretches of currently...
  • CENTAURS AND MERMAIDS NEED LAWS, TOO

    10/25/2007 1:48:07 AM PDT · by WesternCulture · 5 replies · 196+ views
    The Copenhagen Post ^ | 10/24/2007 | The Copenhagen Post
    The Danish Council of Ethics has proposed a set of rules to deal with the prospective possibility that human and animal genes will be combined The first hybrid sheep-goat was created some 20 years ago, and science has since used cell and gene research to put a baboon heart into an infant and use other animal organs to save human lives. But where this technology will eventually lead to is of great concern to both the Danish Council of Ethics and the Council for Animal Ethics, who Tuesday presented their proposals for dealing with the unnerving prospect of combining human...
  • So similar, yet so different

    10/17/2007 11:08:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies · 92+ views
    Nature News ^ | 17 October 2007 | Erika Check Hayden
    In his 2000 State of the Union Address, President Bill Clinton chose to emphasize something he had recently heard from a genome researcher: that humans are all, irrespective of race, 99.9% the same genetically. “Modern science,” he told his country's legislators, “has confirmed what ancient faiths have always taught: the most important fact of life is our common humanity.” Seven years on, and four years after the final publication of the sequences from the Human Genome Project, new technologies and larger data sets are allowing genome biologists to answer a conundrum embodied in that unity-inspiring percentage: if our DNA is...
  • Human genome more variable than previously thought

    11/24/2006 9:48:22 AM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies · 1,458+ views
    news@nature.com ^ | 22 November 2006 | Helen Pearson
    Close window Published online: 22 November 2006; | doi:10.1038/news061120-9 Human genome more variable than previously thoughtSurprisingly large segments of DNA found to differ from person to person.Helen Pearson How alike are you and me? About 99.5%Getty Nearly six years after the sequence of the human genome was sketched out, one might assume that researchers had worked out what all that DNA means. But a new investigation has left them wondering just how similar one person's genome is to another's. Geneticists have generally assumed that your string of DNA 'letters' is 99.9% identical to that of your neighbour's, with differences...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/15/2006 10:23:52 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 34 replies · 972+ views
    Times UK ^ | 8/15/06 | Times UK
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out. Several well-preserved mammoth carcasses have been found in the permafrost of Siberia, and scientists estimate that there could be millions more. Last year a Canadian team demonstrated that it was possible to...
  • Mammoths may roam again after 27,000 years

    08/14/2006 9:17:59 PM PDT · by peyton randolph · 129 replies · 3,440+ views
    Times Online (U.K.) ^ | 08/15/2006 | Mark Henderson
    BODIES of extinct Ice Age mammals, such as woolly mammoths, that have been frozen in permafrost for thousands of years may contain viable sperm that could be used to bring them back from the dead, scientists said yesterday. Research has indicated that mammalian sperm can survive being frozen for much longer than was previously thought, suggesting that it could potentially be recovered from species that have died out...
  • The Human Factor: A man of science face Darwin and the Deity(Book by Head of Human Genome Project)

    08/07/2006 10:27:04 AM PDT · by SirLinksalot · 118 replies · 1,704+ views
    Weekly Standard ^ | 08/06/2006 | David Klinghoffer
    The Human Factor :A man of science face Darwin and the Deity. by David Klinghoffer The Language of God A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief by Francis S. Collins Free Press, 304 pp., $26 ------------------------------------- Head of the Human Genome Project, Francis Collins is among the country's foremost author ities on genetics, a staunch Darwinist, and a prominent critic of Intelligent Design. He's also an evangelical Christian who dramatically describes the moment he accepted Jesus as his personal savior. If that sounds like it might be a paradox, read on. Collins was hiking in the Cascade Mountains of western Washington...
  • Pterosaur-like Creatures Reported in Papua New Guinea

    07/20/2006 7:42:59 PM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 309 replies · 16,006+ views
    E-Media Newswire ^ | July 20, 2006 | Staff
    Intermittent expeditions on Umboi Island, Papua New Guinea, from 1994 through 2004, resulted in the compilation of eyewitness testimonies that substantiated a hypothesis that pterosaurs may not be extinct. Long Beach, Calif. (PRWEB) July 20, 2006 -- The conflict between evolution and creation took a new form with an investigation of reports of a pterosaur-like creature in Papua New Guinea. According to standard models of science, all pterosaurs became extinct by about 65-million years ago, but traditional interpretations of the Bible suggest that they lived in human times. According to Jonathan Whitcomb, a forensic videographer who interviewed native islanders in...
  • Reason to Believe : A leading geneticist argues that science can lead to faith

    07/09/2006 8:40:40 PM PDT · by SirLinksalot · 205 replies · 3,155+ views
    Washington Post ^ | 07/09/2006 | Scott Russell Sanders
    Reason to Believe A leading geneticist argues that science can lead to faith. Reviewed by Scott Russell Sanders THE LANGUAGE OF GOD A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief By Francis S. Collins Here we are, briefly, under the sun, one species among millions on a gorgeous planet in the remote provinces of the universe, our very existence a riddle. Of all the words we use to mask our ignorance, none has been more abused, none has given rise to more strife, none has rolled from the tongues of more charlatans than the name of God. Nor has any word been...
  • Not Interested or Sick of Darwinism Debates?

    06/14/2006 6:07:58 PM PDT · by PurpleMountains · 6 replies · 162+ views
    From Sea to Shining Sea ^ | 6/14/06 | Purple Mountains
    I come back now and then to the subject of Darwinism not so much to get at an answer, but because of Darwin’s underpinning of the collapse of a God-inspired life of moral absolutes and the growth of the liberal religion of collectivism and doing whatever feels right.
  • Woolly mammoth genome comes to life (Jurassic Park, here we come)

    12/22/2005 9:33:04 PM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 65 replies · 3,289+ views
    EurekAlert! ^ | December 22, 2005 | Staff
    Decoding extinct genomes now possible, says geneticist A McMaster University geneticist, in collaboration with genome researchers from Penn State University and the American Museum of Natural History has made history by mapping a portion of the woolly mammoth's genome. The discovery, which has astounded the scientific world, surpasses an earlier study released today by Nature that also concerns the woolly mammoth. Hendrik Poinar, a molecular evolutionary geneticist in the department of anthropology and pathology at McMaster University, says his study involves the vital nuclear DNA within a Mammoth rather than the lesser mitochondria, on which the Nature study is based....
  • Human genome completed (again)

    05/17/2006 2:10:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies · 1,244+ views
    news@nature.com ^ | 17 May 2006 | Helen Pearson
    Close window Published online: 17 May 2006; | doi:10.1038/news060515-12 Human genome completed (again)Scientists today publish the sequence of chromosome 1: the largest and last of the human chromosomes to be done and dusted. News@nature finds out what this latest milestone means.Helen Pearson Haven't scientists already announced the completion of the human genome? Well, yes. Twice. In 2000, two teams declared with great fanfare that they had produced a draft copy of the human genetic code, but there were many gaps and errors in this version. Another announcement, in 2003, marked the completion of a far more accurate 'finished' sequence...
  • Last chromosome in human genome sequenced

    05/17/2006 10:16:27 AM PDT · by HAL9000 · 11 replies · 495+ views
    Reuters ^ | May 17, 2006 | Patricia Reaney
    Excerpt - LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have reached a landmark point in one of the world's most important scientific projects by sequencing the last chromosome in the Human Genome, the so-called "book of life." Chromosome 1 contains nearly twice as many genes as the average chromosome and makes up eight percent of the human genetic code. It is packed with 3,141 genes and linked to 350 illnesses including cancer, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. "This achievement effectively closes the book on an important volume of the Human Genome Project," said Dr Simon Gregory who headed the sequencing project at the Sanger...
  • IBM Discovery Could Shed New Light on Workings of the Human Genome

    04/30/2006 5:57:12 AM PDT · by Tribune7 · 24 replies · 967+ views
    Yorktown Heights, NY, April 25, 2006 – IBM today announced its researchers have discovered numerous DNA patterns shared by areas of the human genome that were thought to have little or no influence on its function and those areas that do. As reported today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), regions of the human genome that were assumed to largely contain evolutionary leftovers (called “junk DNA”) may actually hold significant clues that can add to scientists’ understanding of cellular processes. IBM researchers have discovered that these regions contain numerous, short DNA “motifs,” or repeating sequence fragments,...
  • A Real-Life Jurassic Park

    01/31/2006 8:22:33 AM PST · by Calpernia · 31 replies · 1,333+ views
    MSNBC ^ | Jan. 30, 2006 | Mac Margolis
    (snip) Most scholars now agree that hunters—more than climate change or a mystery epidemic—are what doomed the mammoths. Whatever the cause, by 11,000 years ago the king of the Pleistocene was a goner. (snip) If a group of devotees has its way, this shaggy ice-age mascot—and a host of other bygone megafauna besides—may yet walk again. (snip) The scientists, in other words, had managed to assemble half the woolly-mammoth genome; they claimed that in three years they could finish the job. That would put scientists within striking distance of an even greater feat: repopulating the earth with creatures that vanished...
  • Innovative Businessmen Join X PRIZE Foundation Board of Trustees

    04/29/2005 11:38:42 AM PDT · by anymouse · 341+ views
    X PRIZE Foundation Press Release ^ | April 29, 2005 | Ian Murphy
    The X PRIZE Foundation today announced the election of three new members to its Board of Trustees: J Craig Venter, Founder and President of the J. Craig Venter Institute and the J. Craig Venter Science Foundation; Eric Anderson, President and CEO of Space Adventures, Ltd; and Takafumi Horie, CEO and President of livedoor, Co., Ltd. The X PRIZE Foundation is an educational 501(c)3 that uses competitions to create breakthroughs in space and related technologies for the benefit of humanity. On October 4th, 2004, the X PRIZE captured world headlines when Mojave Aerospace led by Burt Rutan and Paul Allen built...
  • 1997 - Scientists grow monkeys from cloned embryos

    03/24/2005 5:24:12 AM PST · by Calpernia · 4 replies · 298+ views
    cnn.com ^ | March 2, 1997
    1997PORTLAND, Oregon (CNN) -- Scientists have produced sibling rhesus monkeys from cloned embryos in the technology's closest application yet to a species related to humans. The monkeys were developed using cells from different embryos, so they are not genetically identical, said Don Wolf, senior scientist at the Oregon Regional Primate Research Center.
  • "This is the Way God Made Me":A Scientific Examination of Homosexuality and the "Gay Gene"

    11/22/2004 2:39:49 PM PST · by Ed Current · 127 replies · 5,480+ views
    Apologetics Press, Inc ^ | 2003 | Brad Harrub, Ph.D., Bert Thompson, Ph.D., Dave Miller, Ph.D.
    The trumpets were left at home and the parades were canceled. The press releases and campaign signs were quietly forgotten. The news was big, but it did not contain what some had hoped for. On April 14, 2003, the International Human Genome Consortium announced the successful completion of the Human Genome Project—two years ahead of schedule. The press report read: "The human genome is complete and the Human Genome Project is over" (see "Human Genome Report...," 2003, emp. added). Most of the major science journals reported on the progress in the field of genetics, but also speculated on how the...
  • Unravelling of human code paves way for new treatments

    10/20/2004 8:03:13 PM PDT · by PeaceBeWithYou · 1 replies · 243+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Thu 21 Oct 2004 | JAMES REYNOLDS
    Tailored therapies to target a range of diseases, such as diabetes and breast cancer, may be a step closer after the final draft of the gene-rich part of the "human book of life" was published yesterday. The sequence provides a blueprint of the genes that make life possible and is accurate to only one error in 100,000 "letters" of code, an article in the journal Nature reveals. Analysis of the new data shows that the human genome, which is the entire genetic map of an organism, contains between 20,000 and 25,000 genes. Surprisingly, the number of genes is possibly...
  • Humans May Have Fewer Genes Than Thought

    10/20/2004 6:59:09 PM PDT · by neverdem · 13 replies · 469+ views
    NY Times ^ | October 20, 2004 | NICHOLAS WADE
    A new and perhaps final report from the international consortium of laboratories that decoded the human genome has revised the number of expected human genes sharply downward. Some 20,000 human genes have been identified for sure, and up to 5,000 more may await discovery, the consortium says in a report in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. This fast shrinking tally is considerably less than the 30,000 or so human genes predicted by both the consortium and its commercial rival, Celera, when they first described their draft genome sequences in February 2001. The 30,000 figure was itself a surprising downgrade...
  • EVOLUTION: Genome Comparisons Hold Clues to Human Evolution

    12/13/2003 12:46:20 PM PST · by Lessismore · 1 replies · 241+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2002-12-12 | Elizabeth Pennisi
    Despite decades of study, geneticists don't know what makes humans human. Language, long arms, and tree-climbing prowess aside, humans and our kissing cousins, chimpanzees, share practically all of our DNA. Genomic studies have suggested that the regulation of genes, rather than the genes themselves, set the two primate species apart. But genes are still an important part of the story, says Michele Cargill, a geneticist at Celera Diagnostics in Alameda, California. She and her colleagues found key differences between chimp and human genome coding sequences, differences that propelled human evolution and sometimes lead to genetic diseases. Genes for olfaction and...
  • Genome Evolution | First, a Bang Then, a Shuffle

    01/31/2003 4:19:03 PM PST · by jennyp · 89 replies · 803+ views
    The Scientist ^ | 1/27/2003 | Ricki Lewis
    Picture an imperfect hall of mirrors, with gene sequences reflecting wildly: That's the human genome. The duplications that riddle the genome range greatly in size, clustered in some areas yet absent in others, residing in gene jungles as well as within vast expanses of seemingly genetic gibberish. And in their organization lie clues to genome origins. "We've known for some time that duplications are the primary force for genes and genomes to evolve over time," says Evan Eichler, director of the bioinformatics core facility at the Center for Computational Genomics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. For three decades, based largely...
  • Humans Are Three Percent Puffer Fish

    07/28/2002 9:10:51 AM PDT · by Karl_Lembke · 8 replies · 1,057+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Friday, July 26, 2002 | David Perlman, Chronicle Science Editor
    <p>The poisonous Japanese pufferfish, known as fugu to gourmets who risk their lives eating it, has yielded valuable new genetic information in the quest for deeper knowledge of the basics of human heredity and disease.</p> <p>Led by gene-mappers at the Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, an international team of scientists has analyzed and assembled a virtually complete draft of all the genes in the deadly fish, the researchers report.</p>
  • Humans Are Three Percent Puffer Fish

    07/28/2002 9:07:33 AM PDT · by Karl_Lembke · 27 replies · 556+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Friday, July 26, 2002 | David Perlman, Chronicle Science Editor
    <p>The poisonous Japanese pufferfish, known as fugu to gourmets who risk their lives eating it, has yielded valuable new genetic information in the quest for deeper knowledge of the basics of human heredity and disease.</p> <p>Led by gene-mappers at the Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, an international team of scientists has analyzed and assembled a virtually complete draft of all the genes in the deadly fish, the researchers report.</p>