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Keyword: humans

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  • Neanderthals are almost TWICE as old as first thought: DNA suggests emerged 700,000 years ago

    09/14/2015 5:01:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 37 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | September 14, 2015 | Richard Gray
    They are one of our closest human relatives and dominated Europe and much of Asia for hundreds of thousands of years, but Neanderthals may be far older than previously thought. A new study by geneticists has revealed a collection of fossilised bones discovered in a cave in northern Spain belonged to an early member of the Neanderthal family. It is the oldest partial genome from early human fossils ever to be sequenced and pushes back the date for the origins of the Neanderthal branch of our evolutionary tree by up to 300,000 years....
  • New Species of Human Relative Discovered in South African Cave (Homo Naledi)

    09/10/2015 6:00:52 AM PDT · by blam · 34 replies
    September 10, 2015 JOHANNESBURG—The discovery of a new species of human relative was announced today (Sept. 10) by the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University), the National Geographic Society and the South African Department of Science and Technology/National Research Foundation (DST/NRF). Besides shedding light on the origins and diversity of our genus, the new species, Homo naledi, appears to have intentionally deposited bodies of its dead in a remote cave chamber, a behaviour previously thought limited to humans. The finds are described in two papers published in the scientific journal eLife and reported in the cover story of the October...
  • Teen's big-game hunting photos spark outrage [Romans 1]

    08/05/2015 9:24:49 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 3 replies
    AOL ^ | 7/1/2014 | Staff
    One Texas teen's hobby is stirring up controversy among animal rights activists by posing with big game she killed in Africa. Here's how KHOU introduced to her: "So 19-year-old Kendall Jones is a cheerleader at Texas Tech and an avid hunter. She's posted a lot of pictures on her Facebook page of the big game she has killed in Africa - everything from lions to elephants." But it doesn't look like Jones has earned herself many fans on Facebook. The first two comments featured when we went to take a look read, "You are contributing to the extinction of beautiful...
  • Sanity in the Court: Judge Denies Claim That Chimps are Persons

    08/01/2015 3:02:56 PM PDT · by NYer · 75 replies
    Aletelia ^ | August 1, 2015 | JOHN BURGER
    Though a New York judge ruled Thursday that the law still considers chimpanzees property, not people, a prominent thinker in the pro-life movement warned that attempts to raise animals to human status will continue.  Wesley J. Smith, co-director of the Discovery Institute's Center on Human Exceptionalism, said Friday, "We are gratified that a court refused to declare two chimpanzees 'persons.' That is right and proper. Chimps are animals, and the 'species barrier' separating the value of humans and animals, as some animal rights advocates put it, must never be breached."   "But make no mistake," Smith said. "Attempts to...
  • Teeth found near Tel Aviv point to a new prehistoric human species

    06/21/2015 10:29:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 59 replies
    Ynet News ^ | June 20, 2015 | Dudi Goldman
    Researchers found four teeth in the Qesem Cave near Rosh Ha'ayin (not far from Tel Aviv), and they were astonished at test results that conclude the fossils to be some 400,000-years-old. The significance of this is that it's possible that the origin of prehistoric man is in Israel, and not in East Africa. And an additional surprise is that prehistoric man was mainly vegetarian and not carnivorous. The cave is 10 meters deep and its surface area is approximately 300 square meters. Researchers have been sifting through it for some 15 years to discover remains from prehistoric times. The ancient...
  • 'New species' of ancient human found

    05/27/2015 10:23:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 41 replies
    The British Broadcasting Corporation ^ | May 28, 2015 | Rebecca Morelle
    A new species of ancient human has been unearthed in the Afar region of Ethiopia, scientists report. Researchers discovered jaw bones and teeth, which date to between 3.3m and 3.5m years old. It means this new hominin was alive at the same time as several other early human species, suggesting our family tree is more complicated than was thought. The study is published in the journal Nature. The new species has been called Australopithecus deyiremeda, which means "close relative" in the language spoken by the Afar people. The ancient remains are thought to belong to four individuals, who would have...
  • Stephen Hawking warns computers will overtake humans within 100 years

    05/14/2015 4:46:48 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 28 replies
    Tech World ^ | 05/14/15 | Sam Shead
    Stephen Hawking today warned that computers will overtake humans in terms of intelligence at some point within the next century. Speaking at the Zeitgeist 2015 conference in London, the internationally renowned cosmologist and Cambridge University professor, said: “Computers will overtake humans with AI at some within the next 100 years. When that happens, we need to make sure the computers have goals aligned with ours.” Hawking, who signed an open letter alongside Elon Musk earlier this year warning AI development should not go on uncontrolled, added: “Our future is a race between the growing power of technology and the wisdom...
  • Cheaper Robots, Fewer Workers (Video and Article)

    04/24/2015 1:13:50 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 14 replies
    NY Times ^ | 4/24/15 | Jonah M. Kessel and Taige Jensen
    China faces rising labor costs and a shortage of workers. But a government project called “replacing humans with robots” is trying to change the face of the work force in Guangdong Province.
  • Dog Flu Sweeping Through Chicago

    04/15/2015 6:54:18 PM PDT · by EBH · 24 replies
    Radio Pet Lady ^ | 4/15/2015
    Have you heard about the brand new H3N2 dog flu sweeping through Chicago and sickening and killing dogs? It may actually be worse than you think: round-the-clock testing has unveiled that this heretofore unknown canine influenza was originally an avian flu that made a “mammalian adaptation” and has been infecting dogs and cats in Asia since 2007. Now it is here in the epicenter of the U.S. Will it sweep across the country and endanger dogs everywhere? Will this deadly flu become like the bird flu in Asia and the swine flu in England, both of which did transform into...
  • Neanderthals Wore Eagle Talons As Jewelry 130,000 Years Ago

    03/13/2015 9:39:56 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies
    Live Science ^ | 3-14-2015 | Megan Gannon
    Megan Gannon March 14, 2015The eight eagle talons from Krapina arranged with an eagle phalanx that was also found at the site. (Luka Mjeda, Zagreb) Long before they shared the landscape with modern humans, Neanderthals in Europe developed a sharp sense of style, wearing eagle claws as jewelry, new evidence suggests. Researchers identified eight talons from white-tailed eagles — including four that had distinct notches and cut marks — from a 130,000-year-old Neanderthal cave in Croatia. They suspect the claws were once strung together as part of a necklace or bracelet. "It really is absolutely stunning," study author David Frayer,...
  • Just A Bit Of DNA Helps Explain Humans' Big Brains

    02/20/2015 11:40:45 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    National Public Radio ^ | February 19, 2015 | Nell Greenfieldboyce
    (AUDIO-AT-LINK)Scientists studying the difference between human and chimpanzee DNA have found one stretch of human DNA that can make the brains of mice grow significantly bigger. "It's likely to be one of many DNA regions that's critical for controlling how the human brain develops," says Debra Silver, a neurobiologist at Duke University Medical School. It could also help explain why human brains are so much bigger than chimp brains, says Silver, who notes that "there are estimates of anywhere from two to four times as big." In addition to having bigger brains, Silver says, humans also "have more neurons, and...
  • Fossil Found In Asia Could Be A New Species Of Human

    01/28/2015 10:26:09 AM PST · by blam · 77 replies
    BI - Livescience ^ | 1-28-2015 | Charles Q. Choi
    Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience January 27, 2015An ancient human fossil discovered from the seafloor near Taiwan reveals that a primitive group of humans, potentially an unknown species, once lived in Asia, researchers say. These findings suggest that multiple lineages of extinct humans may have coexisted in Asia before the arrival of modern humans in the region about 40,000 years ago, the scientists added. Although modern humans, Homo sapiens, are the only surviving human lineage, others once walked the globe. Extinct human lineages once found in Asia include Neanderthals, the closest extinct relatives of modern humans; Denisovans, whose genetic legacy may...
  • Cage-bound chimp doesn't have same rights as humans, court rules

    12/04/2014 4:00:31 PM PST · by PROCON · 25 replies
    cbsnews ^ | Dec. 4, 2014 | CBS/AP
    ALBANY, N.Y. -- A New York appeals court says a chimpanzee isn't entitled to the rights of a human and doesn't have to be freed by its owner. The three-judge Appellate Division panel was unanimous Thursday in denying "legal personhood" to Tommy, who lives alone in a cage in upstate Fulton County. A trial level court had previously denied the Nonhuman Rights Project's effort to have Tommy released. The group's lawyer, Steven Wise, told the appeals court in October that the chimp's living conditions are akin to a person in unlawful solitary confinement.
  • First Europeans 'weathered Ice Age'

    11/07/2014 2:56:57 AM PST · by Natufian · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/6/2014
    The genetic ancestry of the earliest Europeans survived the ferocious Ice Age that took hold after the continent was initially settled by modern people. That is the suggestion of a study of DNA from a male hunter who lived in western Russia 36,000 years ago. His genome is not exactly like those of people who lived in Europe just after the ice sheets melted 10,000 years ago. But the study suggests the earliest Europeans did contribute their genes to later populations.
  • What does a 45,000-year-old femur mean for the Neanderthal in you?

    10/23/2014 9:01:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor's Science Blog ^ | October 23, 2014 | Anne Steele
    A genetic analysis of a 45,000-year-old thigh bone narrows down the time when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred.A 45,000-year-old leg bone is raising questions about just how close modern-day humans are to our thick-browed Stone Age ancestors. DNA from the femur of a Siberian man is helping to pinpoint when modern humans and Neanderthals first interbred, researchers say. But what does this mean for the human connection to a species that disappeared nearly 30,000 years ago? The thigh bone, spotted six years ago on the banks of the Irtysh River in Siberia by a Russian artist who carves jewelry...
  • 'Promising' Ebola vaccine to go into trials - and it could be available by the end of the year

    08/28/2014 11:07:23 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 17 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 28 August 2014 | Jenny Hope for the Daily Mail
    Britons are to be the first in the world to test a new vaccine against the deadly ebola virus. Altogether 60 healthy volunteers will be given the vaccine next month in a trial led by Oxford University scientists. If the vaccine performs as well in humans as in monkeys, the trial will be extended to 80 people in The Gambia and in Mali. The entire trial programme is being fast-tracked – subject to ethical approval – with the intention of using the vaccine in people at high risk in West Africa early next year. Latest figures show that more than...
  • NYU Professor Wants to Make Humans Greener: Human engineering as a solution to global warming

    07/25/2014 8:19:19 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    National Review ^ | 07/25/2014 | Molly Wharton
    A New York University professor has a revolutionary idea for combating global warming: making ourselves greener.Matthew Liao, director of NYU’s bioethics program, thinks that human engineering is a possible solution to global warming, and he lays out his ideas in a new paper. While previous environmental efforts have been focused on reducing the carbon emissions that are said to be causing global warming, Liao says we should look to changing ourselves.“We tried to think outside the box,” Liao told BBC News. “What hasn’t been suggested with respect to addressing climate change?” One of his ideas is to artificially induce...
  • Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change

    06/09/2014 4:13:04 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 46 replies
    Royal Society Publishing ^ | May 13, 2014 | Christopher Sandom, Søren Faurby, Brody Sandel and Jens-Christian Svenning
    "A new study led by Jens-Christian Svenning of Aarhus University has strongly suggested that humans are squarely responsible for the disappearance of megafauna during the last 100,000 years. The results have been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."
  • HUMANS ARE AWESOME GoPro Tribute (music video)

    05/24/2014 5:06:25 PM PDT · by Jack Hydrazine · 37 replies
    GoogTube ^ | 23JUN2013 | Gerry B
    HUMANS ARE AWESOME People Are Awesome, they are brilliant in comparison to all other living beings. Our abilities are amazing and somewhat out of this world. The official non-fail extreme video compilation channel! This time a tribute to GoPro cameras. Be sure to watch it in 1080P. Music: "Time" by Luckner featuring Sophie Louise
  • Anatomically Modern Humans Left Africa Earlier Than Previously Thought, Suggests Study

    05/21/2014 12:18:44 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | April 21, 2014
    An international team of scientists conducting an analysis of the genetic diversity and cranial measurements of 10 African and Asian human populations conclude that anatomically modern humans may have dispersed out of Africa earlier than previously thought, and in more than one stage: initially into Asia by taking a southern route through Arabia as much as 130,000 years ago; and later into Northern Eurasia on a more northerly route 50,000 years ago. The timing and nature of early modern human dispersal out of Africa has long been disputed among scholars, with competing theories or models about how and when it...
  • Humans Grew More Than 4 Inches In The Last 100 Years

    05/02/2014 3:41:15 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies
    BI - The Conversation UK ^ | 5-2-2014 | Tim Hatton, University of Essex, The Conversation
    Humans Grew More Than 4 Inches In The Last 100 Years The Conversation Tim Hatton, University of Essex, The Conversation May 2, 2014, 5:02 PM It is a commonplace for children to be taller than their parents, but four generations ago this wasn’t the case. A recent study of soldiers around the age of 20 who enlisted in the army during World War I revealed an average height of five feet six inches (168cm). Today the average for young men is five feet ten inches (178cm). A gain of four inches seems a lot. But it is not unique to...
  • "The War on Humans" documentary Feb. 17, 2014

    02/13/2014 8:03:08 AM PST · by fishtank · 9 replies
    The Discovery Institute ^ | 2-13-2014 | Wesley Smith
    Are humans the enemy? Should pigs and plants be given constitutional rights? The War on Humans e-book and companion documentary explore how a new generation of activists are pushing a radical agenda whose ultimate victims may be the poorest and most vulnerable among us.
  • The evolution of beauty: Face the facts

    11/14/2013 11:16:02 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 26 replies
    The Economist ^ | November 16, 2013 | The Economist
    What makes for a beautiful visage, and why, may have been discovered accidentally on a Russian fur farm BEAUTY, the saying has it, is only skin deep. Not true. Skin is important (the cosmetics industry proves that). But so is what lies under it. In particular, the shape of people’s faces, determined by their bone structure, contributes enormously to how beautiful they are. And, since the ultimate point of beauty is to signal who is a good prospect as a mate, what makes a face beautiful is not only an aesthetic matter but also a biological one. How those bone...
  • Should We Live Shorter to Save the Planet?

    10/11/2013 7:45:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 68 replies
    The National Review's Human Exceptionalism ^ | October 10, 2013 | Wesley J. Smith
    Humans are the enemy! A new study published in Ecology and Society claims that longer life expectancy for us is bad news for the planet. From the study by Aaron Lotz and Craig R. Allen: We found a positive relationship between life expectancy and the percentage of endangered and invasive species in a country…The overall trend in high-income countries with improvements to the Human Development Index, which includes human life expectancy as one of its variables, is toward a disproportionately larger negative impact on a country’s ecological footprint. However, some lower-income countries have a high level of development without a...
  • Hawking Gives Humans 1,000 Years to Escape Earth

    04/12/2013 8:55:26 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 78 replies
    VOA ^ | 4/11/13
    Famed astrophysicist Stephen Hawking warns that humans will need to go beyond the planet Earth if they are to survive as a species. “We must continue to go into space for humanity,” Hawking told a gathering this week in Los Angeles, California. “We won’t survive another 1,000 years without escaping our fragile planet.” Hawking, 71, has long been a proponent of space exploration. Speaking at a 2008 ceremony marking the 50th anniversary of the U.S. space agency, NASA, Hawking called for a new era in human space exploration, comparable, he said, to the European voyages to the New World more...

    04/09/2013 10:10:40 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 71 replies
    The Register ^ | 04/09/2013 | By Jasper Hamill
    Scientists claim to have identified the missing link between human speech and monkey chatter. Researchers analysed the distinctive "lip-smacking" sounds made by wild gelada baboons of the Ethopian highlands and found striking similarities to human speech. Their noises are so human-like that Thore Bergman, an assistant professor with the University of Michigan, thought he heard people talking while he was hanging out with the creatures. "I would find myself frequently looking over my shoulder to see who was talking to me, but it was just the geladas," he said. "It was unnerving to have primate vocalizations sound so much...
  • Neanderthals Died Out Earlier Than Thought

    02/05/2013 1:16:36 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 40 replies
    Discovery ^ | FEB 5, 2013 | CHARLENS Q. CHOI
    The last Neanderthals had passed by southern Iberia quite earlier than previously thought. Neanderthals may have died out earlier than before thought, researchers say. These findings hint that Neanderthals did not coexist with modern humans as long as previously suggested, investigators added.Modern humans once shared the planet with now-departed human lineages, including the Neanderthals, our closest known extinct relatives. However, there has been heated debate over just how much time and interaction, or interbreeding, Neanderthals had with modern humans. To help solve the mystery, an international team of researchers investigated 215 bones previously excavated from 11 sites in southern Iberia,...
  • DNA Unveils Enigmatic Denisovans

    09/29/2012 1:04:30 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | 9-22-2012 | Bruce Bower
    DNA Unveils Enigmatic Denisovans Extinct Neandertal relatives serve up a complete genetic playbook By Bruce BowerScience News September 22nd, 2012; Vol.182 #6 (p. 5) A replica of a partial Denisovan finger bone, placed on its corresponding position on a person’s hand, emphasizes the small size of this ancient find. Scientists have retrieved a comprehensive set of genetic instructions from the actual Denisovan finger fossil. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Genetic data of unprecedented completeness have been pulled from the fossil remains of a young Stone Age woman. The DNA helps illuminate the relationships among her group — ancient Siberians...
  • Future Humans Will All Look Brazilian, Researcher Says

    09/19/2012 11:09:41 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 62 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 09/19/2012 | Natalie Wolchover
    It really happened: Six generations of inbreeding spanning the years 1800 to 1960 caused an isolated population of humans living in the hills of Kentucky to become blue-skinned. The startlingly blue people, all descendants of a French immigrant named Martin Fugate and still living near his original settlement on the banks of Troublesome Creek when hematologists studied them in the 1960s, turned out to have a rare blood condition called methemoglobinemia. A recessive gene was pairing with itself to change the molecular composition of their blood, making it brown as opposed to red, which tinted their skin blue. The hematologists'...
  • Humans and Gorillas Closer Than Thought, Genome Sequence Says

    03/07/2012 1:49:57 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 39 replies · 1+ views
    Bloomberg News via SFGate ^ | 3-7-12 | Elizabeth Lopatto
    <p>March 7 (Bloomberg) -- Gorillas have been portrayed as militaristic bullies in the Planet of the Apes movies and as "highly social gentle giants" by researcher Dian Fossey.</p> <p>Now scientists say they're closer genetically to humans than they once thought.</p>
  • DNA Study Contradicts Human/Chimp Common Ancestry

    11/15/2011 7:37:50 AM PST · by fishtank · 29 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 11-15-2011 | Brian Thomas
    DNA Study Contradicts Human/Chimp Common Ancestry by Brian Thomas, M.S. | Nov. 15, 2011 Evolutionary biologists argue that since human and chimp DNA are nearly identical, both species must have evolved from a common ancestor. However, creation scientists have pointed out that their DNA is, in fact, very dissimilar. The vast majority of each species' DNA sequence is not genes, but instead regulated gene expression. A new report unmistakably confirmed that the regulatory DNA of humans is totally different from that of chimps, revealing no hint of common ancestry. Biologist John F. McDonald, of the Georgia Institute of Technology's School...
  • Dolphins 'Talk' Like Humans, New Study Suggests

    09/08/2011 9:24:29 AM PDT · by twister881 · 34 replies
    Live Science ^ | 07 September 2011 | Jeanna Bryner
    Dolphins "talk" to each other, using the same process to make their high-pitched sounds as humans, according to a new analysis of results from a 1970s experiment. The findings mean dolphins don't actually whistle as has been long thought, but instead rely on vibrations of tissues in their nasal cavities that are analogous to our vocal cords.
  • Humans may not be main climate change source: Romney

    08/24/2011 7:07:09 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/24/11 | Jason McLure - Reuters
    LEBANON, New Hampshire (Reuters) - Presidential candidate Mitt Romney, in danger of losing his 2012 Republican primary front-runner status, on Wednesday tweaked his position on global climate change, saying he does not know if humans are the primary cause. Romney, the former Massachusetts governor, also said he would not place restrictions on carbon emissions if elected and did not favor spending heavily on climate solutions. He was asked about global warming at a town hall meeting in Lebanon, New Hampshire, and said he believed the world is getting hotter and humans contribute in some way to the change. "Do I...
  • Humans Spew More Carbon Dioxide than All of Earth's Volcanoes

    06/14/2011 1:33:54 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 71 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 6/14/11 | Stephanie Pappas - LiveScience
    Explosive volcanic eruptions might be attention grabbing, but a new review of research finds that their environmental impact pales in comparison to human activities. According to the research, humans put out the same amount of carbon dioxide in three to five days that all of the volcanoes on Earth put out in one year. "Anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions dwarf global volcanic carbon dioxide emissions," study researcher Terrance Gerlach, of the U.S. Geological Survey, said in a statement. Carbon dioxide, or CO2, is the main greenhouse gas responsible for climate change. Gerlach crunched the carbon dioxide numbers from earlier studies of...
  • Neanderthals and Early Humans May Not Have Mingled Much

    05/10/2011 5:06:10 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 47 replies
    NY Times ^ | May 9, 2011 | Nicholas Wade
    An improvement in the dating of fossils suggests that the Neanderthals, a heavily muscled, thick-boned human species adapted to living in ice age Europe, perished almost immediately on contact with the modern humans who started to enter Europe from the Near East about 44,000 years ago. Until now bones from several Neanderthal sites have been dated to as young as 29,000 years ago, suggesting there was extensive overlap between the two human species. This raised the question of whether there had been interbreeding between humans and Neanderthals, an issue that is still not resolved. RSS Feed RSS Get Science News...
  • Out of (southern) Africa: Modern man 'evolved from desert bushmen'

    03/08/2011 4:50:30 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | March 8, 2011 | DAVID DERBYSHIRE
    The first modern people evolved in southern Africa more than 60,000 years ago - and not in the east of the continent as most scientists believe, a study concludes. After analysing DNA samples from 27 populations in modern-day Africa, researchers say the most likely location for the 'cradle of humanity' is the Kalahari desert region of South Africa, Namibia and Botswana. The modern-day click-speaking bushman from the desert show the greatest genetic diversity of any Africans - suggesting that their home was the birthplace of the first true Homo sapiens. Originators: The home of the modern day click-speaking bushman in...

    01/29/2011 4:56:25 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 50 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Jan 28, 2011 | Jennifer Viegas
    Humans, versus other great apes, are built for running fast and long as opposed to very impressive strength, but what about Neanderthals? If a modern human and a Neanderthal competed in a marathon, who would win? (Comparison of Neanderthal and Modern Human skeletons. Credit: K. Mowbray, Reconstruction: G. Sawyer and B. Maley, Copyright: Ian Tattersall) In a short sprint, the Neanderthal might have had a chance, but most fit humans would always win longer races, suggests new research accepted for publication in the Journal of Human Evolution. Anthropologist David Raichlen of the University of Arizona and his colleagues determined that...
  • Lice DNA Study Shows Humans First Wore Clothes 170,000 Years Ago

    01/09/2011 9:30:07 AM PST · by Salman · 21 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Jan. 7, 2011 | Science Daily staff writer
    A new University of Florida study following the evolution of lice shows modern humans started wearing clothes about 170,000 years ago, a technology which enabled them to successfully migrate out of Africa. Principal investigator David Reed, associate curator of mammals at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus, studies lice in modern humans to better understand human evolution and migration patterns. His latest five-year study used DNA sequencing to calculate when clothing lice first began to diverge genetically from human head lice. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the study is available online and appears in this...
  • 'Enviropigs': genetically modified for food consumption--(video at link)

    01/05/2011 3:36:28 AM PST · by Flavius · 17 replies
    bbc ^ | 1/4/11 | Jeremy Cooke
    Genetically modified crops may have once been cutting edge, but now there is a new frontier - genetically modified animals.
  • Ancient humans, dubbed 'Denisovans', interbred with us

    12/22/2010 6:26:50 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 56 replies · 6+ views
    BBC ^ | 12/22/10 | Pallab Ghosh
    Scientists say an entirely separate type of human identified from bones in Siberia co-existed and interbred with our own species.The ancient humans have been dubbed "Denisovans" after the caves in Siberia where their remains were found. There is also evidence that this population was widespread in Eurasia. A study in Nature journal shows that Denisovans co-existed with Neanderthals and interbred with our species - perhaps around 50,000 years ago. An international group of researchers sequenced a complete genome from one of the ancient hominins (human-like creatures), based on nuclear DNA extracted from a finger bone.
  • Harvard scientists reverse the ageing process in mice – now for humans

    11/29/2010 9:18:29 PM PST · by djf · 37 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Nov 28, 2010 | Ian Sample
    Harvard scientists were surprised that they saw a dramatic reversal, not just a slowing down, of the ageing in mice. Now they believe they might be able to regenerate human organs Scientists claim to be a step closer to reversing the ageing process after rejuvenating worn out organs in elderly mice. The experimental treatment developed by researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, turned weak and feeble old mice into healthy animals by regenerating their aged bodies. The surprise recovery of the animals has raised hopes among scientists that it may be possible to achieve a similar feat...
  • Global Warming Means Lower Death Rates

    11/28/2010 4:35:58 PM PST · by John Semmens · 4 replies
    A Semi-News/Semi-Satire from AzConservative ^ | 27 November 2010 | John Semmens
    A new study published in the peer reviewed journal Climate Change revealed that the phenomenon of global warming is likely to lead to lower human death rates. The research by professors Christidis, Donaldson, and Stott found that 0.7 deaths per million persons per year could be attributed to higher temperatures in the hottest areas, while 85 deaths per million persons per year could be attributed to lower temperatures in the coldest areas. For every one life lost due to increased heat 121 lives are saved. Climate guru Al Gore challenged the premises of the research as “possibly racist and most...
  • Obama Admin Okays Second Trial of Embryonic-Like Stem Cells in Humans

    11/22/2010 8:45:04 AM PST · by julieee · 8 replies ^ | November 22, 2010 | Steven Ertelt
    Obama Admin Okays Second Trial of Embryonic-Like Stem Cells in Humans Washington, DC -- The Obama administration today approved the second trial involving the use of human embryonic stem cells on patients despite significant problems in animal studies.
  • Humans were problem for Discovery Channel attacker (Algore's fault?)

    09/05/2010 10:45:49 PM PDT · by Libloather · 31 replies
    GJ Sentinal ^ | 9/05/10 | Gary Harmon
    Humans were problem for Discovery Channel attackerBy Gary Harmon Sunday, September 5, 2010 Well, that’s one way to reduce the surplus population. Al Gore acolyte James J. Lee managed to get himself offed by a police sharpshooter after taking over the Discovery Communications headquarters in Silver Spring, Md., on Wednesday. No word on whether the sharpshooter used EPA-approved ammunition in the job, not that it should matter. In some quarters, though, such issues weigh heavily. Wouldn’t want the lethal projectile to harm the environment, after all. Lee, it turns out, might be one who would have wished to be ushered...
  • Sex Makes the Brain Grow

    08/03/2010 6:43:22 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 41 replies · 255+ views
    Asylum for All Mankind ^ | July 30, 2010 | Jeremy Taylor
    Our happy hour fact to amaze your drinking buddies with. In an experiment involving lab rats, sex was correlated with adult brain growth. Since previous studies have shown that stressful, unpleasant situations can hinder brain growth, researchers from Princeton University wanted to see if stressful but pleasurable situations -- like sex -- would achieve the opposite effect. So, they divided male lab rats into three groups: The rats in one group were given sex partners daily, the second group got set up with female companionship once every two weeks and the third group got nothing at all. The rats that...
  • FDA OKs First Embryonic Stem Cell Research Trial on Humans, Despite Concerns

    07/30/2010 10:21:44 AM PDT · by julieee · 11 replies · 1+ views ^ | July 30, 2010 | Steven Ertelt
    FDA OKs First Embryonic Stem Cell Research Trial on Humans, Despite Concerns Washington, DC -- The Obama administration has approved the bid by cloning company Geron to undertake the first trial involving the use of embryonic stem cells in humans. They have never been used before in people because the cells cause tumors and have immune system rejection issues when tried in animals.
  • Video of Woman Getting Attacked by Pack of Wild Dogs, Then Saved by Man

    07/08/2010 3:55:31 PM PDT · by OneVike · 11 replies · 1+ views
    This video is from Russia, but I cannot say what city it is in. What you will see is a pack of wild dogs going after a women. Worry not though, because just when it seems there will be no hope for her, a man comes out with a shovel to save her from the dogs. Follow the link below to see the incredible video of a Woman Getting Attacked by Pack of Wild Dogs, Then Saved by Man
  • Backing off on environmental perfection

    05/20/2010 2:22:30 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 3 replies · 256+ views
    The Manteca Bulletin ^ | 5-20-10 | Dennis Wyatt
    It will go down as a landmark decision. U.S. District Judge OIiver W. Wagner ruled this week that people have rights. That may sound a bit daffy but in the wacky world of California water politics people take second class citizen status behind fish and even vegetation. In a nutshell, Wagner ruled that federal water officials must consider humans along with fish when it comes to divvying up how California’s most precious resource – water – is discharged or moved through the Delta. The judge also directed the federal government to stop using what he termed “guestimations” instead of precise...
  • Missing link between man and apes found (New skeleton found)

    04/04/2010 1:26:05 PM PDT · by jerry557 · 57 replies · 1,562+ views ^ | 04/03/10 | Richard Gray
    The new species of hominid, the evolutionary branch of primates that includes humans, is to be revealed when the two-million-year-old skeleton of a child is unveiled this week. Scientists believe the almost-complete fossilised skeleton belonged to a previously-unknown type of early human ancestor that may have been a intermediate stage as ape-men evolved into the first species of advanced humans, Homo habilis. Experts who have seen the skeleton say it shares characteristics with Homo habilis, whose emergence 2.5 million years ago is seen as a key stage in the evolution of our species. The new discovery could help to rewrite...
  • Humans must be to blame for climate change, say scientists (No other way around it)

    03/06/2010 7:46:23 AM PST · by Libloather · 19 replies · 644+ views
    Link only - Humans must be to blame for climate change, say scientists