Keyword: huntergatherers

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  • USA! USA! Neil deGrasse Tyson claims humans ‘invented’ cows, Ben Shapiro’s mockery is MOO-rific

    08/08/2017 6:35:55 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 34 replies
    Twitchy ^ | 8-8-2017 | Sam J.
    eil deGrIf you had told this editor she would spend two days in a row writing about cows at Twitchy, she’d have laughed and asked you to stop eating paint chips … and yet here we are. Day two covering cows, all because PETA decided it was SEXIST to eat cheese. Oh you didn’t see that one? Promise we’re not making that up, see for yourself. And now THIS: Neil deGrasse Tyson ✔@neiltyson A cow is a biological machine invented by humans to turn grass into steak. 6:38 PM - Aug 7, 2017 2,914 Replies 19,215 Retweets 62,451 likes (snip)...
  • Ancient DNA reveals male diffusion through the Neolithic Mediterranean route

    06/02/2011 5:26:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Neolithic is a key period in the history of the European settlement. Although archaeological and present-day genetic data suggest several hypotheses regarding the human migration patterns at this period, validation of these hypotheses with the use of ancient genetic data has been limited. In this context, we studied DNA extracted from 53 individuals buried in a necropolis used by a French local community 5,000 y ago. The relatively good DNA preservation of the samples allowed us to obtain autosomal, Y-chromosomal, and/or mtDNA data for 29 of the 53 samples studied. From these datasets, we established close parental relationships within...
  • How Middle Eastern Milk Drinkers Conquered Europe

    10/15/2010 7:56:47 AM PDT · by Palter · 30 replies
    Spiegel ^ | 15 Oct 2010 | Matthias Schulz
    New research has revealed that agriculture came to Europe amid a wave of immigration from the Middle East during the Neolithic period. The newcomers won out over the locals because of their sophisticated culture, mastery of agriculture -- and their miracle food, milk. Wedged in between dump trucks and excavators, archeologist Birgit Srock is drawing the outline of a 7,200-year-old posthole. A concrete mixing plant is visible on the horizon. She is here because, during the construction of a high-speed rail line between the German cities of Nuremberg and Berlin, workers happened upon a large Neolithic settlement in the Upper...
  • Beer and the Wheel

    11/24/2018 8:27:46 AM PST · by sodpoodle · 23 replies
    email and multiple sites author not listed | 11/24/2018 | unknown
    The two most important events in all of history were the invention of beer and the invention of the wheel. Beer required grain and that was the beginning of agriculture, about 9,000 years ago. Neither the glass bottle nor aluminum can were invented yet, so while our early humans were sitting around waiting for them to be invented, they just stayed close to the brewery. That's how villages were formed. The wheel was invented to get man to the beer and vice versa. These two were the foundation of modern civilization and together were the catalyst for the splitting of...
  • World’s oldest chocolate was made 5300 years ago—in a South American rainforest

    11/04/2018 12:35:57 PM PST · by ETL · 40 replies
    ScienceMag.com ^ | Oct 29, 2018 | Colin Barras
    Our love affair with chocolate is much older than we thought, and newly discovered traces of cocoa on ancient pots suggest it started in the rainforests of what is now Ecuador some 5300 years ago. That’s nearly 1500 years older than earlier evidence, and it shifts the nexus of cocoa production from Central America to the upper Amazon. “This is an incredibly strong demonstration,” says Rosemary Joyce, an archaeologist at the University of California, Berkeley, who was not involved in the new study. “It puts to rest any lingering claims that the use of [cocoa] pods … was an invention...
  • The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5,300 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:06:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 30, 2018 | presse@cirad.fr
    Traces of cocoa dating back 5300 years have been found in ancient pots in the Ecuadorian Amazon. This is the oldest proof of cocoa use ever found. It predates the domestication of cocoa by the Olmec and the Maya in Central America by some 1500 years. This evidence was collected in the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, at the Santa Ana La Florida (SALF) archaeological site near Palanda, discovered 16 years ago by the archaeologist Francisco Valdez and his Franco-Ecuadorian team (IRD/INPC) (2). The Mayo Chinchipe, the oldest known Amerindian civilization in the upper Amazon, had consumed cocoa almost continuously from at...
  • Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

    11/02/2018 11:30:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 31, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals -cattle, sheep, and goat - made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more than four millennia ago... in many of the most important channels of the Silk Road itself, including Kyrgyzstan's Alay Valley (a large mountain corridor linking northwest China with the oases cities of Bukhara and Samarkand), very little is...
  • Fungi that live in cockroaches, oil paintings, and other bizarre places come to light in new report

    09/12/2018 6:58:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | Sep. 11, 2018 , 7:01 PM | Erik Stokstad
    Those pale button mushrooms in your supermarket hardly do justice to the diversity of fungi. The world hosts an incredible array of these important organisms—and mycologists are discovering more than 2000 new species a year, including ones that live on driftwood, bat guano, and even an oil painting. That’s according to a new report, titled State of the World’s Fungi, from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, a botanical research institution in Richmond, U.K. The lavishly illustrated overview covers the usefulness of fungi (think beer, bread, and penicillin, for starters) as well as the serious threats that some fungi pose to...
  • 'Man the Hunter' theory is debunked in new book

    02/03/2005 2:27:13 PM PST · by aculeus · 202 replies · 2,790+ views
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | February 2, 2005 | By Neil Schoenherr
    Feb. 2, 2005 — You wouldn't know it by current world events, but humans actually evolved to be peaceful, cooperative and social animals. In a new book, an anthropologist at Washington University in St. Louis goes against the prevailing view and argues that primates, including early humans, evolved not as hunters but as prey of many predators, including wild dogs and cats, hyenas, eagles and crocodiles. Despite popular theories posed in research papers and popular literature, early man was not an aggressive killer, argues Robert W. Sussman, Ph.D., professor of anthropology in Arts & Sciences. Sussman's book, "Man the Hunted:...
  • Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan already 3,500 years ago

    10/22/2018 9:50:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Popular Archeology ^ | Tuesday, October 16, 2018 | editors
    Some 3,500 years ago, there was already a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea. This conclusion follows from the analysis of 100 fish teeth that were found at various archeological sites in what is now Israel. The saltwater fish from which these teeth originated is the gilthead sea bream, which is also known as the dorade. It was caught in the Bardawil lagoon on the northern Sinai coast and then transported from Egypt to sites in the southern Levant. This fish transport persisted for about 2,000 years, beginning in the Late Bronze Age and...
  • Oklahoma’s Choctaw horses connect to Mississippi [Spanish Explorer's Horses Descendants]

    10/16/2018 11:31:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    AP ^ | 10/16/2018 | By JANET McCONNAUGHEY
    <p>POPLARVILLE, Miss. (AP) — Six foals sired by a cream-colored stallion called DeSoto scamper across a pasture in southwest Mississippi — the first new blood in a century for a line of horses brought to America by Spanish conquistadors and bred by Choctaw Indians who were later forced out of their ancestral homelands.</p>
  • Easter Island inhabitants collected freshwater from the ocean's edge in order to survive

    10/12/2018 12:24:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 9, 2018 | Binghamton University
    The process of coastal groundwater discharge makes it possible for humans to collect drinkable freshwater directly where it emerges at the coast of the island... "The porous volcanic soils quickly absorb rain, resulting in a lack of streams and rivers," Lipo said. "Fortunately, water beneath the ground flows downhill and ultimately exits the ground directly at the point at which the porous subterranean rock meets the ocean. When tides are low, this results in the flow of freshwater directly into the sea. Humans can thus take advantage of these sources of freshwater by capturing the water at these points." ...He...
  • Cuisine of early farmers revealed by analysis of proteins in pottery from Catalhoyuk

    10/08/2018 11:45:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    EurekAlert ^ | October 3, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Çatalhöyük was a large settlement inhabited from about 7100 BC to 5600 BC by early farmers, and is located in what is now central Turkey. The site showcases a fascinating layout in which houses were built directly next to each other in every direction and stands out for its excellent preservation of finds... For this study, the researchers analyzed vessel sherds from the West Mound of Çatalhöyük, dating to a narrow timeframe of 5900-5800 BC towards the end of the site's occupation. The vessel sherds analyzed came from open bowls and jars, as shown by reconstructions and had calcified residues...
  • Humans delayed the onset of the Sahara desert by 500 years

    10/01/2018 9:21:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 1, 2018 | University College London
    Credit: Chris Ford via Flickr ====================================================================== Humans did not accelerate the decline of the 'Green Sahara' and may have managed to hold back the onset of the Sahara desert by around 500 years, according to new research led by UCL. The study by a team of geographers and archaeologists from UCL and King's College London, published in Nature Communications, suggests that early pastoralists in North Africa combined detailed knowledge of the environment with newly domesticated species to deal with the long-term drying trend. It is thought that early pastoralists in North Africa developed intricate ways to efficiently manage sparse...
  • Prehistoric art hints at lost Indian civilisation

    10/01/2018 4:59:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | Monday, October 1, 2018 | unattributed
    The rock carvings -- known as petroglyphs -- have been discovered in their thousands atop hillocks in the Konkan region of western Maharashtra. Mostly discovered in the Ratnagiri and Rajapur areas, a majority of the images etched on the rocky, flat hilltops remained unnoticed for thousands of years... animals, birds, human figures and geometrical designs are all depicted. The way the petroglyphs have been drawn, and their similarity to those found in other parts of the world, have led experts to believe that they were created in prehistoric times and are possibly among the oldest ever discovered. "Our first deduction...
  • Research proves South East Asian population boom 4,000 years ago

    09/24/2018 7:38:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | September 20, 2018 | Australian National University
    Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth. Using the new population measurement method, which utilises human skeletal remains, they have been able to prove a significant rapid increase in growth across populations in Thailand, China and Vietnam during the Neolithic Period, and a second subsequent rise in the Iron Age. Lead researcher Clare McFadden, a PhD Scholar with the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology, said the population trend was consistent across samples taken...
  • Iberia’s Neolithic Farmers Linked to Modern-Day Basques

    09/08/2015 12:40:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Tuesday, September 08, 2015
    DNA samples were obtained from eight early Iberian farmers whose remains were discovered in Spain’s El Portalón cave in Atapuerca. Like populations in central and northern Europe, the Iberian farmers had traveled from the south and mixed with local hunter-gatherer groups. “The genetic variation observed in modern-day Basques is significantly closer to the newly sequenced early farmers than to older Iberian hunter-gatherer samples,” “Parts of that early farmer population probably remained relatively isolated since then (which we can still see in the distinct culture and language of Basques)
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • Climate change killed off Neanderthals, study says

    08/31/2018 11:13:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Fox ^ | Chris Ciaccia |
    The evidence is there that Europe experienced stark cold and dry spells, putting a strain on Neanderthals' food supply and ability to survive. Thanks to a group of researchers looking at stalagmites in Romania, we may have proof this was indeed the case. Dr. Ersek and his team looked at the stalagmites—rocks that gather in caves for long stretches of time —to look at the climate. Stalagmites contain rings, similar to trees, which can give an indication of how extreme weather patterns, occurring over thousands of years, impacted Neanderthals. The study was published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the...
  • Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road

    08/21/2018 1:49:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | August 14, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    Studies of ancient preserved plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road. Spengler identified a rich assemblage of fruit and nut crops, showing that many of the crops we are all familiar with today were cultivated along the ancient trade...