Keyword: jamestown

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  • Long Live The Pig!

    05/29/2013 5:01:34 PM PDT · by Starman417 · 125 replies
    Flopping Aces ^ | 05-29-13 | Dave The Sage
    Domesticated swine and Western Civilization go back a long way together. The domestic pig was being raised in Europe by about 1500 BC. Rome improved pig breeding and spread them throughout their empire. The early Christians increasingly abandoned the Jewish ban on the eating of pork by about 50 AD and it’s been the celebrated ‘other white meat’ ever since. Pigs and the discovery of the New World went hand in hand. Christopher Columbus took eight pigs on his voyage to Cuba in 1493 at Queen Isabella’s insistence. Hernando de Soto brought America’s first thirteen pigs to Tampa Bay, Fla.,...
  • Larry Schweikart (FReeper "LS"): America's Socialist Origins (video - 5:38)

    03/21/2016 10:11:48 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 66 replies
    Prager University ^ | March 21, 2016 | Larry Schweikart
    Was America once socialist? Surprisingly, yes. The early settlers who arrived at Plymouth and Jamestown in the early 1600s experimented with socialist communes. Did it work? History professor Larry Schweikart of the University of Dayton shares the fascinating story.
  • New named pipe found at Jamestown

    11/01/2015 11:04:00 PM PST · by Brad from Tennessee · 21 replies
    History Blog ^ | October 31, 2015
    Archaeologists at Historic Jamestown have discovered the tenth Virginia-made pipe with a name inscribed on the stem. It’s the first new named pipe found at the site since 2009, and in contrast to most of the earlier discoveries, the name is complete: William Faldo. The stockholders of the Virginia Company were expecting to make a quick profit from their investment in the Jamestown settlement, but the struggling colonists could barely keep themselves alive, never mind send back the riches in minerals and trade goods the company had envisioned. They weren’t even self-sufficient, having clashed with the Powhatan tribes weeks after...
  • Mystery reliquary found under America’s first Protestant church

    07/30/2015 2:08:28 PM PDT · by NYer · 14 replies
    Catholic Herald ^ | July 30, 2015 | Madeleine Teahan
    Historians speculate that early settler leader could have been a Catholic spy Historians have discovered four bodies and a mystery Catholic reliquary under the first English Protestant church in America.In an extraordinary turn of events, graves have been discovered under what used to be the floor of America’s first Protestant church in Jamestown, Virginia – the church where Pocahontas married the English colonist John Rolfe.The graves include the bodies of Captain William West, who was killed by Indians, Rev Robert Hunt, Jamestown’s first Anglican minister and Sir Ferdinando Wainman, the first English knight buried in America. The grave of...
  • A Skeleton, a Catholic Relic, and a Mystery About American Origins

    07/29/2015 12:31:45 PM PDT · by BlatherNaut · 32 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 7/28/15 | Adrienne LaFrance
    After 400 years in the Virginia dirt, the box came out of the ground looking like it had been plucked from the ocean. A tiny silver brick, now encrusted with a green patina and rough as sandpaper. Buried beneath it was a human skeleton. The remains would later be identified as those of Captain Gabriel Archer, one of the most prominent leaders at Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America. But it was the box, which appeared to be an ancient Catholic reliquary, that had archaeologists bewildered and astonished... ...It’s the kind of discovery that makes historians, anthropologists, archaeologists,...
  • Jamestown settlers ate 14-year-old girl, researchers say

    03/18/2015 6:31:00 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 80 replies
    Pioneer Press/LA Times ^ | 3-18-15 | Matt Pearce
    The early American settlers called it "the starving time," and accounts of the winter of 1609-1610 were so ghastly, and so morbid, that scholars weren't sure if the stories were true. George Percy, then president of the English settlement of Jamestown in Virginia, wrote that settlers ate horses, then cats and dogs, then boots and bits of leather, and, finally, one another. "One of our colony murdered his wife, ripped the child out of her womb and threw it into the river, and after chopped the mother in pieces and salted her for his food," wrote Percy, who then ordered...
  • Starvation Cannibalism at Jamestown

    01/19/2014 4:03:14 AM PST · by Renfield · 35 replies
    Bones Don't Lie ^ | 5-2-2013 | Katy Myers
    If you’ve read any news in the past day, you’ve seen reports regarding cannibalism in colonial Jamestown. It was known prior that the colonists had undergone a number of starvation years where they were forced to eat foods that they wouldn’t normally. The trash pits from the sites hold the remains of animals who aren’t normally butchered, including horses, cats, dogs, rats and snakes. Burials from this period are not given the complete funerary treatment likely due to the high number of deaths, and the skeletons show evidence of nutritional hardship and early death. The colony was founded in 1607...
  • 2013 Virginia Governor's Thanksgiving Day Proclamation

    11/27/2013 10:41:02 AM PST · by Perseverando · 2 replies
    Virginia.gov ^ | November 27, 2013 | Governor Bob McDonnell
    WHEREAS, the first permanent English speaking settlement in the New World was established in Virginia at Jamestown in 1607, as Captain John Smith led a group of settlers across the Atlantic on a voyage that would entail much hardship over the coming years, including disease and starvation; and WHEREAS, to show their appreciation for the colony's success and to take stock and give thanks for their own gifts and blessings, and in spite of tremendous adversity, the settlers in Virginia found time to celebrate the first Thanksgiving in America at Berkeley Plantation on December 4, 1619; and WHEREAS, a state...
  • How Much Do We Really Know About Pocahontas?

    11/03/2013 3:30:17 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 50 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 11-3-13 | Tony Horwitz
    Historian Tony Horwitz tries to separate the truth from the myths that have been built up about the Jamestown “princess” Pocahontas is the most myth-encrusted figure in early America, a romantic “princess” who saves John Smith and the struggling Jamestown colony. But this fairy tale, familiar to millions today from storybook and film, bears little resemblance to the extraordinary young woman who crossed cultures and oceans in her brief and ultimately tragic life. The startling artwork (above), the oldest in the National Portrait Gallery collection, is the only image of Pocahontas taken from life. Made during her visit to London...
  • Colonial America's Oldest Unsolved Murder

    06/25/2013 8:38:04 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    NPR ^ | June 24, 2013 | Linton Weeks
    When archaeologists in Virginia uncovered the skeletal remains in 1996 of one of Jamestown's first settlers — a young European male designated as JR102C in the catalog — they said he was the victim in what was perhaps Colonial America's oldest unsolved murder. At the time, archaeologist William Kelso, now director of archaeological research and interpretation at Jamestown Rediscovery, reported that "the lead bullet and shot fragments lodged in his lower right leg contained enough force to fracture his tibia and fibula bones, rupturing a major artery below the knee. JR would have bled to death within minutes." Now, 17...
  • 10 European colonies in America that failed before Jamestown

    05/15/2013 3:01:48 PM PDT · by presidio9 · 84 replies
    National Constitution Center ^ | Tue, May 14, 2013..
    The Jamestown settlement in Virginia, which officially was started on May 14, 1607, was one of the first European colonies to last in North America, and was historically significant for hosting the first parliamentary assembly in America. But Jamestown barely survived, as recent headlines about the confirmation of cannibalism at the colony confirm. The adaption to the North American continent by the early Europeans was extremely problematic. The success of tobacco as an early cash crop helped Jamestown weather the loss of most early colonists to disease, starvation, and attacks by the resident population of Native Americans. A turning point...
  • Scientists Find Cannibalism at American Settlement (Jamestown, VA)

    05/02/2013 6:50:53 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 12 replies
    U-T San Diego ^ | May 1, 2013 | Brett Zongker
    Scientists find cannibalism at American settlement WASHINGTON — Scientists say they have found the first solid archaeological evidence that some of the earliest American colonists survived harsh conditions by resorting to cannibalism. On Wednesday, the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and archaeologists from Jamestown announced the discovery of the bones of a 14-year-old girl with clear signs that she was cannibalized. The human remains date back to the deadly winter of 1609-1610, known as the "starving time" in Jamestown, when hundreds of colonists died. Scientists have said the settlers arrived from England during the worst drought in 800 years....
  • Starving Settlers in Jamestown Colony Resorted to Cannibalism

    05/02/2013 3:41:19 AM PDT · by kimtom · 31 replies
    smithsonianmag.com ^ | May 01, 2013 | Joseph Stromberg
    The harsh winter of 1609 in Virginia’s Jamestown Colony forced residents to do the unthinkable. A recent excavation at the historic site discovered the carcasses of dogs, cats and horses consumed during the season commonly called the “Starving Time.” But a few other newly discovered bones in particular, though, tell a far more gruesome story: the dismemberment and cannibalization of a 14-year-old English girl. “The chops to the forehead are very tentative, very incomplete,” says Douglas Owsley, the Smithsonian forensic anthropologist who analyzed the bones after they were found by archaeologists from Preservation Virginia. “Then, the body was turned over,...
  • 'Proof' Jamestown settlers turned to cannibalism

    05/01/2013 6:13:03 PM PDT · by Altariel · 36 replies
    BBC ^ | May 1, 2013 | Jane O'Brien
    Newly discovered human bones prove the first permanent English settlers in North America turned to cannibalism over the cruel winter of 1609-10, US researchers have said. Scientists found unusual cuts consistent with butchering for meat on human bones dumped in a rubbish pit. The four-century-old skull and tibia of a teenage girl in James Fort, Virginia, were excavated from the dump last year. James Fort, founded in 1607, was the earliest part of the Jamestown colony.
  • Archaeologists Unearth Rare 17th Century Find at Jamestown Excavations

    06/26/2012 9:44:52 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 18 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thu, Jun 21, 2012 | Anon.
    The pocket-sized ivory sundial likely belonged to one of the early English gentlemen colonists. It was discovered while archaeologists were carefully digging fill soil above a cellar dated to the early James Fort period (1607-1610) at Jamestown, Virginia, the site of North America's first successful English colony. The artifact was the lower leaf of an ivory pocket sundial known in the 17th century as a diptych dial. It clearly bore the name of its maker, Hans Miller, who was a 17th century craftsman known to have made sundials in Nuremberg, Germany. Like many objects found at the Jamestown excavations, it...
  • Ruins of Oldest Protestant Church in America Found at Jamestown

    11/18/2011 11:39:32 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 68 replies · 1+ views
    The Christian Post ^ | 11-14-11 | Michael Gryboski
    Researchers at Jamestown, Va., may have found the site where the first Protestant church in North America was built. Dr. William Kelso, head of the research team at Jamestown, which was founded as a settlement established by the Virginia Company of London in the 17th century, explained in an interview with The Christian Post that the group began excavating at the site where they may have found the church in the summer of 2010. Kelso, an American archaeologist specializing in Virginia’s colonial period, believes the ruins found are the church because of a “Record of construction in Spring of 1608,...
  • The Unknown Story of Pocahontas. Learning the story of Jamestown, Virginia's survival.

    05/14/2011 9:30:40 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 20 replies · 1+ views
    American Thinker ^ | 05/14/2011 | Charlotte Cushman
    Yesterday was the anniversary of the landing at Jamestown How many people know the story of its survival, a story that reflects our American heritage? I am firm in my conviction that children should know the history of their own country and I find it sad and frightening that multiculturalism is making headway in education. It is very damaging to allow an educational environment where children celebrate everybody else's culture or history, but not their own. I have been appalled to talk to young adults who don't know that the United States was the first country established on the basis...
  • Bin Laden’s Neighbors Say Compound Was Under Surveillance Since 2005

    05/06/2011 3:11:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Jamestown Foundation ^ | May 5, 2011 | Arif Jamal
    An official from Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) told the BBC that the compound was raided by the ISI while still under construction in 2003 when the agency believed senior al-Qaeda operative Abu Faraj al-Libi was on site. Since then, however, the official claimed the intelligence agency had taken no interest in the facility: "The compound was not on our radar; it is an embarrassment for the ISI… We're good, but we're not God" (BBC, May 3). However, in a statement that appeared to reveal the confusion over the incident at the highest levels of the Pakistani government, an official from...
  • Jamestown unearths 400-year-old pipes for patrons (tobacco pipes)

    12/31/2010 7:44:44 PM PST · by decimon · 16 replies
    Associated Press ^ | December 31, 2010 | MICHAEL FELBERBAUM
    RICHMOND, Va. – Archeologists at Jamestown have unearthed a trove of tobacco pipes personalized for a who's who of early 17th century colonial and British elites, underscoring the importance of tobacco to North America's first permanent English settlement. > "It really brings the people back into the picture," said Bly Straube, senior archaeological curator for the Jamestown Rediscovery Project. "We have a lot of artifacts that we can associate with types of people like gentleman or women or children, but to find things like the pipe that bears the name Sir Walter Raleigh, I mean, my goodness. ... It just...
  • Do Southerners Have the Right to be Described as "Native Americans"?

    10/07/2010 8:12:40 AM PDT · by ComtedeMaistre · 272 replies · 1+ views
    10-7-2010 | comtedemaistre
    Southerners who celebrate their cultural heritage, are among the most misunderstood people in America. Italians who celebrate Colombus Day, and Irishmen who celebrate St. Patricks Day, never have to suffer the grief that Southerners who want to celebrate Robert E. Lee's Birthday have to endure. Southern identity is partly about celebrating the Anglo-Celtic culture, which is the core culture that existed in America at the time of the founding of America in 1776. It is the culture that gave us the King James Bible, Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, William Faulkner, and others. Most Southerners, both white and black, are...