Keyword: mathematics

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  • Mathematicians work to expand their new pictorial mathematical language into other areas

    03/02/2018 3:52:26 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 2/6/18
    Mathematicians work to expand their new pictorial mathematical language into other areas February 6, 2018, Harvard University An illustration of the project is pictured in Lyman Building at Harvard University. Credit: Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer A picture is worth 1,000 words, the saying goes, but a group of Harvard-based scientists is hoping that it may also be worth the same number of equations. Pictorial laws appear to unify ideas from disparate, interdisciplinary fields of knowledge, linking them beautifully like elements of a da Vinci painting. The group is working to expand the pictorial mathematical language first outlined last year by...
  • Academic Insanity Syndrome

    12/01/2017 8:29:43 AM PST · by Oldpuppymax · 11 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 12/1/17 | Suzanne Eovaldi
    Indoctrination of today’s Students by the Far Left I do cry for you, Champaign-Urbana. The truth is I have left you. Now through all of my quiet days. Your old promise of giving students an education. Was it all just an illusion? Forgive me for my sarcasm in taking liberty with Evita's famous lyrics, but Wright Street is fast becoming Wrong Street when we realize academia is indoctrinating rather than educating America’s young people. Here is what a University of Illinois “academic” just published: "On many levels mathematics operates as Whiteness." In a newly published math education book, School of...
  • Monty Hall and the game show stick-or-switch onion puzzle

    10/12/2017 6:23:59 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 28 replies
    Financial Times ^ | October 6, 2017 | Tim Harford
    Forget Fermat’s last theorem. The most vexing challenge in mathematics just might be the Monty Hall problem. Monty Hall — born Monte Halparin — presented nearly 5,000 episodes of Let’s Make a Deal, the US game show that inspired the puzzle. It is an onion of a conundrum; layer after layer, and guaranteed to make you cry. The puzzle is this: a contestant faces three doors. Behind one of them is a big prize such as a Cadillac. Each of the other two doors conceals a booby prize such as a goat.
  • Carbon dating reveals earliest origins of zero symbol

    09/14/2017 1:28:41 PM PDT · by Republic_Venom · 43 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9/14/2017 | BBC
    Carbon dating shows an ancient Indian manuscript has the earliest recorded origin of the zero symbol. The Bakhshali manuscript is now believed to date from the 3rd or 4th Century, making it hundreds of years older than previously thought.
  • Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

    08/25/2017 9:41:11 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 77 replies ^ | 08-24-2017 | Provided by: University of New South Wales
    The 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet Plimpton 322 at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University in New York. Credit: UNSW/Andrew Kelly ================================================================================ UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals. The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry - the study of triangles - by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been...
  • Is The Academy Embracing Fake Math?

    04/26/2017 7:05:57 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 19 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | April 25, 2017 | Malcolm A. Kline
    The Left's long march through the academy may be nearing its penultimate battlesite—mathematics. Up until now, it has remained so neutral in the Culture Wars that a smattering of conservatives could even be found teaching it. "On a chilly evening in March, students in Cecilia Arias's mathematics course here at Rutgers University were learning about a concept called fair division," Shannon Najmabadi wrote in an article which appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education on April 21, 2017. "More specifically, they were considering the case of Jason, Kelly, and Lauren, three business owners who share a location in the mall."...
  • Fibonacci’s real mathematical legacy

    04/21/2017 9:41:09 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 50 replies
    Nature ^ | 20 Apr, 2017 | Barbara Kiser
    For hundreds of years until the ebb of the Italian Renaissance, one name was synonymous with arithmetic. This was Leonardo — not the polymath from Vinci, but Leonardo Pisano (ca. 1170-1250), now popularly known as Fibonacci. Yet we know little of Fibonacci’s life beyond the nickname and his Pisan roots: most details come from a 160-word autobiographical sketch written in 1202. He is often assumed to have discovered the so-called ‘Fibonacci sequence’, which starts with zero and 1 and is thereafter the sum of the two previous numbers (so 1, 2, 3, 5 and so on). The sequence shows up...
  • The Library of Babel and the Information Explosion

    02/11/2017 10:34:57 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 1 replies
    Irish Times ^ | Thu, Jan 19, 2017
    That’s Maths: Mathematical concepts influenced the structure and style of many of Jorge Luis Borges’ short stories The world has been transformed by the internet. Google, founded just 20 years ago, is a major force in online information. The company name is a misspelt version of “googol”, the number one followed by one hundred zeros. This name echoes the vast quantities of information available through the search engines of the company. Long before the internet, the renowned Argentine writer, poet, translator and literary critic Jorge Luis Borges envisaged the universe as a vast information bank in the form of a...
  • Is the Gateway Arch a Parabola?

    02/09/2017 9:11:59 PM PST · by grey_whiskers · 55 replies ^ | 06-May-2010 | Murray Bourne
    The Gateway Arch in St Loius, Mo., USA, is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial. The shape of the arch certainly looks like a parabola, but is it?
  • Theranos Whistleblower Shook the Company—And His Family

    11/16/2016 6:06:29 PM PST · by CorporateStepsister · 18 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | November 16 2016 | By John Carreyrou
    After working at Theranos Inc. for eight months, Tyler Shultz decided he had seen enough. On April 11, 2014, he emailed company founder Elizabeth Holmes to complain that Theranos had doctored research and ignored failed quality-control checks. The reply was withering. Ms. Holmes forwarded the email to Theranos President Sunny Balwani, who belittled Mr. Shultz’s grasp of basic mathematics and his knowledge of laboratory science, and then took a swipe at his relationship with George Shultz, the former secretary of state and a Theranos director. “The only reason I have taken so much time away from work to address this...
  • The Oracle of Arithmetic

    07/04/2016 4:38:42 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 33 replies
    Quanta ^ | 28 Jun, 2016 | Erica Klarreich
    At 28, Peter Scholze is uncovering deep connections between number theory and geometry. In 2010, a startling rumor filtered through the number theory community and reached Jared Weinstein. Apparently, some graduate student at the University of Bonn in Germany had written a paper that redid “Harris-Taylor” — a 288-page book dedicated to a single impenetrable proof in number theory — in only 37 pages. The 22-year-old student, Peter Scholze, had found a way to sidestep one of the most complicated parts of the proof, which deals with a sweeping connection between number theory and geometry. “It was just so stunning...
  • University Drops Math Requirement for Diversity Class

    06/30/2016 6:53:08 AM PDT · by MichCapCon · 30 replies
    Michigan Capitol Confidential ^ | 6/27/2016 | Derek Draplin
    A faculty committee has proposed adding a three credit hours requirement in diversity to the general education curriculum at Wayne State University. It also recommended that WSU drop its university-wide requirement in mathematics, an idea that was carried out on June 13. “We are proposing the creation of specific ‘Diversity’ courses, with students required to take one course in this designation,” said a document from the General Education Reform Committee, which is recalibrating what the university will expect from all students who earn a degree from the state university. It released the proposal in May. The committee report said, “These...
  • The 17 equations that changed the world

    06/29/2016 8:33:17 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 65 replies
    World Economic Forum ^ | 4 Apr, 2016 | Andy Kiersz
    In 2012, Mathematician Ian Stewart came out with an excellent and deeply researched book titled "In Pursuit of the Unknown: 17 Equations That Changed the World." His book takes a look at the most pivotal equations of all time, and puts them in a human, rather than technical context. "Equations definitely can be dull, and they can seem complicated, but that’s because they are often presented in a dull and complicated way," Stewart told Business Insider. "I have an advantage over school math teachers: I'm not trying to show you how to do the sums yourself." ... Stewart continued that...
  • World Famous Scientist: God Created the Universe

    06/09/2016 9:32:50 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 94 replies
    Intellectual Takeout ^ | June 8, 2016 | Jon Miltimore
    World Famous Scientist: God Created the Universe ‘The final resolution could be that God is a mathematician.’ Michio Kaku has made a name for himself as a world-leading theoretical physicist unafraid to speak his mind.Kaku, the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York, has published more than 70 articles in physics journals on topics such as supersymmetry, superstring theory, supergravity, and hadronic physics.His latest claim is likely to make waves in the world of science.“I have concluded that we are in a world made by rules created by an intelligence”, Kaku says...
  • Mathematicians And 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'

    04/30/2016 8:09:39 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 74 replies
    Inside Science ^ | 29 Apr, 2016 | Ramin Skibba
    (Inside Science) – In 1914, an unknown Indian man boarded a ship and traveled across the world to Cambridge University in England, where he could finally follow his passion for mathematics. In the few short years between his arrival and untimely death, he filled notebooks with formulas and discovered theorems, some of which still influence the work of mathematicians and scientists today. The new biopic, "The Man Who Knew Infinity," which opens in U.S. theaters beginning Friday, April 29, chronicles the life of Srinivasa Ramanujan. A self-taught Indian mathematician from the city then called Madras (now Chennai), Ramanujan struggled to...
  • A Liberal Magazine Just Spilled the Beans about K-12 Education

    04/20/2016 8:31:32 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 50 replies
    American Thinker ^ | April 20, 2016 | Bruce Deitrick Price
    This upscale progressive magazine ran a super-long, super-detailed article titled "The Math Revolution." It basically wanted to proclaim the happy news that extraordinary things are taking place in American education. The Atlantic fell all over itself with enthusiasm. You would reasonably suppose that some fresh winds were blowing, and students in America would actually know how to add and subtract with competence, and maybe even multiply and divide efficiently. What else does the word "revolution" suggest but wonderful sweeping change? At last, at long last, our public schools will redeem themselves and began to turn out little math experts. Then...
  • Is algebra an unnecessary stumbling block in US schools?

    03/28/2016 5:07:09 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 232 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Mar. 27, 2016 1:06 PM EDT | Karen Matthews
    Who needs algebra? That question muttered by many a frustrated student over the years has become a vigorous debate among American educators, sparked by a provocative new book that argues required algebra has become an unnecessary stumbling block that forces millions to drop out of high school or college. “One out of 5 young Americans does not graduate from high school. This is one of the worst records in the developed world. Why? The chief academic reason is they failed ninth-grade algebra,” said political scientist Andrew Hacker, author of “The Math Myth and Other STEM Delusions.” Hacker, a professor emeritus...
  • An Oxford professor has won £500,000 for solving the 300-year-old Fermat's Last Theorem

    03/16/2016 7:26:38 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 49 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 03/16/2016 | Charles Clark
    Oxford University professor Sir Andrew Wiles has been awarded the prestigious Abel Prize for his "stunning proof" of Fermat's Last Theorem. Wiles life has been dedicated to the three-century-old theorem which has been his "passion from an early age" after he read “The Last Problem” by ET Bell. His proof was first published in 1994 while working at Princeton University in New Jersey — he will collect the award 22 years later at a ceremony in Oslo in May. The theorem, created in 1637 by French mathematician Pierre de Fermant, says that there are no solutions in integers — or...
  • Mathematicians Discover Prime Conspiracy

    03/14/2016 5:28:27 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 58 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 13 Mar, 2016 | Erica Klarreich
    A previously unnoticed property of prime numbers seems to violate a longstanding assumption about how they behave. o mathematicians have uncovered a simple, previously unnoticed property of prime numbers — those numbers that are divisible only by 1 and themselves. Prime numbers, it seems, have decided preferences about the final digits of the primes that immediately follow them. Among the first billion prime numbers, for instance, a prime ending in 9 is almost 65 percent more likely to be followed by a prime ending in 1 than another prime ending in 9. In a paper posted online today, Kannan Soundararajan...
  • Babylonians Were Using Geometry Centuries Earlier Than Thought

    01/28/2016 2:56:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    smithsonian ^ | 01/28/2016 | Jesse Emspak
    Mathieu Ossendrijver of Humboldt University in Berlin found the tablet while combing through the collections at the British Museum. The written record gives instructions for estimating the area under a curve by finding the area of trapezoids drawn underneath. Using those calculations, the tablet shows how to find the distance Jupiter has traveled in a given interval of time. Until now, this kind of use of trapezoids wasn't known to exist before the 14th century. ... By 400 B.C. Babylonian astronomers had worked out a coordinate system using the ecliptic, the region of the sky the sun and planets move...