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Keyword: mayans

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  • In Search of the Lost Empire of the Maya

    08/13/2016 6:43:09 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 80 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Erik Vance Photographs by David Coventry
    The ambitious Snake kings used force and diplomacy to create the most powerful alliance in their culture’s history. The ancient city of Holmul isn’t much to look at. To the casual observer it’s just a series of steep, forested hills in the middle of the jungle in northern Guatemala, near the Mexican border. The jungle here in the Petén Basin is thick and warm but drier than you might expect. And silent, except for the drum of cicadas and the occasional calls of howler monkeys. Take a closer look, and you may notice that most of these hills are arranged...
  • How Southeastern Mayan People Overcame The Catastrophic Eruption Of Ilopango?

    06/18/2016 2:41:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Nagoya University
    A Nagoya University researcher and his leading international research group discovered a Great Platform built with different kinds of stone at the archeological site of San Andrés, El Salvador, and challenged the prevailing theory regarding the sociocultural development of Southeastern Maya frontier... Archaeological investigation conducted during 40's and 90's has shown that San Andrés had long human occupation beginning from the Middle Preclassic (ca. 600 BC) until the Early Postclassic (ca. AD 1200), in which had role as political, economic and religious center during the Late Classic period (AD 600-900)... Between February and May of 2016, the research group led...
  • Teen uses satellite imagery to discover possible ancient Mayan ruins

    05/20/2016 10:31:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 11, 2016 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: Canadian Space Agency, via TheTelegraph ====================================================================================================================== William Gadoury, a 15 year old Mayan history enthusiast who lives in Saint-Jean-de-Matha in Lanaudière, Quebec, has, according to Le Journal de Montréal, used satellite imagery to make associations between ancient Mayan city locations and constellations, and in so doing, may have actually discovered a site that has not been previously known. According to the news report, Gadoury, who claims to have been long interested in the Mayan culture, gained access to satellite imagery—after applying the Geographic Information System he found a correlation between 22 constellations and 117 Mayan cities. But, in so...
  • Breaking down the mythical 'Mayan city' discovery

    05/11/2016 3:12:04 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    cnn ^ | 05/11/2016 | AJ Willingham
    We're all suckers for a great story, and "Teen finds lost Mayan city" definitely sounds promising. Throw in some ancient cosmology, a little help from the Canadian Space Agency and some satellite sleuthing, and the movie offers practically write themselves. Sadly, the reality may not be as cinematic as promised. Experts say the "city" found by Canadian teen William Gadoury could be something much simpler: Abandoned fields. This whole archaeological kerfuffle started as a tantalizing possibility: Gadoury, 15, says he used Mayan constellation patterns to pinpoint ruins of a heretofore unknown ancient Mayan city. The Canadian Space Agency helped him...
  • Star pupil finds lost Mayan city by studying ancient charts of the night sky from his bedroom

    05/10/2016 6:51:59 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 94 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 10 May 16 | Telegraph Reporters
    (Title was shortened. Add: "of the night sky from his bedroom ") A Canadian schoolboy appears to have discovered a lost Mayan city hidden deep in the jungles of Mexico using a new method of matching stars to the location of temples on earth. William Gadoury, 15, was fascinated by the ancient Central American civilization and spent hours poring over diagrams of constellations and maps of known Mayan cities. And then he made a startling realisation: the two appeared to be linked. “I was really surprised and excited when I realised that the most brilliant stars of the constellations matched...
  • Recently Discovered Mayan Pyramid Confirmed As One Of The Largest Ever Seen

    05/06/2016 7:31:17 AM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 132 replies
    Misterious Earth ^ | 6 May 2016
    Researchers have confirmed that the Mayan pyramid excavated at the Acropolis of Toniná, Chiapas is one the largest pyramids ever discovered. Discovered in 2010, Emiliano Gallaga and his team began their excavation under the impression that the pyramid was built on the top of a hill. It was not until recently that they’ve managed to fully assess it and truly see what they’re working with. Wighing in at 75-meters tall with seven distinct districts all with their own purpose – such as Temples, palaces, markets, housing, administration – the magnitude of the Toniná pyramid compares even to that of the...
  • Aventura - Ancient Maya City Discovered On Modern Papaya Farm In Corozal

    06/02/2007 2:05:27 PM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 959+ views
    The Reporter ^ | 6-1-2007 | Joseph Stamp Romero
    Aventura - ancient Maya city discovered on modern papaya farm in Corozal Friday, 01 June 2007 By Joseph Stamp Romero - Staff Reporter Excavated structure where platform was found. Platform can be seen to the left of the gentleman. Archeologists say they have stumbled on three Mayan foundations, which are part of a large Mayan city called Aventura, dating back to the early Classic Period of the Mayan Civilization. Among the artifacts retrieved are the bones a man and a woman, believed to be 1,800 years old. The Belize National Institute of Archaeology have said that they found what appears...
  • Pictures: Massive Maya City Revealed by Lasers

    05/21/2010 8:59:04 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 17 replies · 1,428+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | May 20, 2010 | Brian Handwerk
    Maya City in 3-D Airborne lasers have "stripped" away thick rain forests to reveal new images of an ancient Maya metropolis that's far bigger than anyone had thought. An April 2009 flyover of the Maya city of Caracol used Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) equipment—which bounces laser beams off the ground—to help scientists construct a 3-D map of the settlement in western Belize. The survey revealed previously unknown buildings, roads, and other features in just four days, scientists announced earlier this month at the International Symposium on Archaeometry in Tampa, Florida. University of Central Florida anthropologists Arlen and Diane Chase...
  • Justin Bieber kicked out of Mexican archeological site

    01/08/2016 10:42:04 AM PST · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 1/8/2016 | By Guy Hedgecoe
    Canadian singer Justin Bieber asked to leave ancient Mayan city of Tulum after trying to climb an off-limits ruin Canadian pop sensation Justin Bieber was expelled from an archaeological site in Mexico after trying to clamber up some of its ruins. Bieber, 21, was on holiday in the Yucatan Peninsula, which overlooks the Caribbean, where he visited the ancient Mayan city of Tulum on Thursday afternoon.
  • Justin Bieber gets booted out of Mexican archaeological site for 'climbing a ruin and dropping [tr]

    01/08/2016 6:21:34 AM PST · by C19fan · 36 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | January 8, 2015 | Alexandra Genova
    Justin Bieber may have to say 'Sorry' after getting kicked out of a Mexican archeological site for reportedly 'pulling his underpants down and trying to climb one of its off-limits ruins'. The 21-year-old star was apparently asked to leave the ancient Mayan fortress of Tulum yesterday afternoon after a row over his behaviour. Police were also called to the incident, after he reportedly stripped off for a selfie and then shouted abuse at security guards who tried to stop him. He was filmed on a mobile phone arriving at the site with what looks to be his new girlfriend Hailey...
  • Volcanic Evidence Opens New Maya Mystery

    01/05/2016 12:43:59 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 30, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    Potters at Maya cities on the Caribbean side of Central America fused volcanic ash with local limestone to form household and ceremonial pottery, because the ash made their ceramics easier to fire. The distinctive recipe was a hallmark of the Late Classic Period from A.D. 600 to 900, Ford said. With thousands of people living in cities such as El Pilar and Tikal, the Mayan potters burned through several tons of volcanic ash every year, Ford has estimated. But no one can figure out where the ash came from. The mystery begins with the fact that there just aren't any...
  • Former Guatemalan Dictator to Face Retrial Over Mayan Genocide

    08/28/2015 10:25:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 6 replies
    UPI ^ | Aug. 27, 2015
    Former Guatemalan dictator Gen. Efraín Ríos Montt will face a new genocide trial for his alleged role in persecuting Maya Ixil Indians, but will be tried behind closed doors as he suffers from dementia. Ríos Montt, 89, will not be required to attend the trial, where he will be represented by his lawyers. The start of the retrial is scheduled for January 11. The retired general was convicted and sentenced in 2013 to 80 years imprisonment in connection the the killing of 1,771 people in the Mayan Highlands during 1982 and 1983. Ríos Montt ruled Guatemala for nearly 17 months...
  • Chocolate, Chocolate, It's Good For Your Heart, Study Finds

    06/22/2015 1:32:58 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    NPR ^ | June 19, 2015 5:03 AM ET | Allison Aubrey
    Here's a sweet notion: Eat a little chocolate each day and you could be doing your heart a favor. A new study published in the journal Heart found that habitual chocolate eaters had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and strokes compared to people who didn't eat chocolate. So, what is it about chocolate that could possibly lead to such a benefit? Well, when you strip out the sugar and milk that's added to chocolate, you're left with the cocoa bean. And it's the compounds in the cocoa that researchers are most interested in. The study is part of a...
  • Hunt for ancient royal tomb in Mexico takes mercurial twist

    04/25/2015 4:31:06 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 4 replies
    Reuters ^ | April 24, 2015 | David Alire Garcia
    A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the Plumed Serpent, about 30 miles (50...
  • Teotihuacan Lineage at Tikal Studied

    04/06/2010 5:05:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 238+ views
    Art Daily ^ | Tuesday, April 6, 2010 | unattributed
    Iconographic studies of Teotihuacan murals confirm the extension of the lineage of a ruler of the ancient city of Tikal, Guatemala, already revealed by epigraphists of the Maya area. The aforementioned investigation sums up to interpretations of Stele 31 of Tikal that relate to the dynastic line of Atlatl-Cauac ("Dart-thrower Owl"), possible ruler of Teotihuacan between 374 and 439 AD, and whose son, Yax Nuun Ayiin I, was seignior of Tikal. The emblem of this lineage would be represented by the image of a bird with a shield, observed in Teotihuacan murals, declared Dr. Raul Garcia Chavez, researcher at the...
  • Sacrificial Burial Deepens Mystery At Teotihuacan, But Confirms The City's Militarism (More)

    12/03/2004 3:31:14 PM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 625+ views
    Sacrificial burial deepens mystery at Teotihuacan, but confirms the city’s militarism Partially uncovered figurine, carved in jade, found in connection with three unbound, seated bodies and other objects at the top of the pyramid’s fifth stage (the offering was presumably made in the construction of the sixth stage), circa 350 AD. This object is notable in that it is carved from jade that originated in Guatemala, and appears to be Mayan in style. Other jade objects on top of the figurine are beads and earspools. A spectacular new discovery from an ongoing excavation at the Teotihuacan’s Pyramid of the Moon...
  • Will Liquid Mercury Show The Way To King's Tomb In Mysterious City Of Teotihuacan?

    04/25/2015 12:33:02 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 45 replies
    http://www.messagetoeagle.com ^ | 25 April, 2015 | unknown
    MessageToEagle.com - A Mexican archeologist hunting for a royal tomb in a deep, dark tunnel beneath a towering pre-Aztec pyramid has made a discovery that may have brought him a step closer: liquid mercury,' according to Reuters' report. In the bowels of Teotihuacan, a mysterious ancient city that was once the largest in the Americas, Sergio Gomez this month found "large quantities" of the silvery metal in a chamber at the end of a sacred tunnel sealed for nearly 1,800 years. "It's something that completely surprised us," Gomez said at the entrance to the tunnel below Teotihuacan's Pyramid of the...
  • Maya Mural Reveals Ancient 'Photobomb' [no it doesn't]

    03/25/2015 2:24:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    LiveScience ^ | February 20, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    The murals also provide information about a man buried beneath them. During an excavation, the archaeologists found the skeleton of a man dressed like the sages in the mural. It's possible the man once lived in the room, which later became his final resting place, Saturno said. Archaeologists discovered the approximately 1,250-year-old mural in the ancient city of Xultun, located in the northeastern part of present-day Guatemala. During an archaeological study of Xultun, an undergraduate student inspecting an old looters' trail noticed traces of paint on an ancient wall covered by dirt... the elements had been kind to the building...
  • Maya Calendars Actually Predict That Life Goes On

    12/13/2012 7:16:32 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 13, 2012 | Catherine Zuckerman
    Doomsday? No way. Ancient Maya said we’ll be around another 7,000 years or so.This December, not everyone is concerned with making plans for the New Year—especially not the people who think doomsday will get here first. Instead of planning parties, they're stockpiling food, refining escape routes, and honing survival skills ahead of the alleged date on which the Maya calendar "ends"—December 21, 2012. So should we all be preparing for imminent apocalypse? According to the scholars, no. The ancient Maya are usually cited as the predictors of the world coming to an end this month: One of their "great cycles"...
  • Painted ancient Maya numbers reflect calendar reaching well beyond 2012 (w/ Video)

    05/14/2012 1:19:34 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 10 MAY 2012 | Provided by National Geographic Society
    A vast city built by the ancient Maya and discovered nearly a century ago is finally starting to yield its secrets. Excavating for the first time in the sprawling complex of Xultún in Guatemala’s Petén region, archaeologists have uncovered a structure that contains what appears to be a work space for the town’s scribe, its walls adorned with unique paintings — one depicting a lineup of men in black uniforms — and hundreds of scrawled numbers. Many are calculations relating to the Maya calendar. One wall of the structure, thought to be a house, is covered with tiny, millimeter-thick, red...
  • Maya Artwork Uncovered In A Guatemalan Forest

    05/13/2012 8:34:28 AM PDT · by Theoria · 19 replies
    NPR ^ | 13 May 2012 | Christopher Joyce
    Conservator Angelyn Bass cleans and stabilizes the surface of a wall of a Mayan house that dates to the ninth century. The figure of a man who may have been the town scribe appears on the wall to her left. Archaeologists working in one of the most impenetrable rain forests in Guatemala have stumbled on a remarkable discovery: a room full of wall paintings and numerical calculations. The buried room apparently was a workshop used by scribes or astronomers working for a Mayan king. The paintings depict the king and members of his court. The numbers mark important periods in...
  • Mapping Ancient Civilization, in a Matter of Days

    05/10/2010 11:52:12 PM PDT · by Palter · 18 replies · 828+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 10 May 2010 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    For a quarter of a century, two archaeologists and their team slogged through wild tropical vegetation to investigate and map the remains of one of the largest Maya cities, in Central America. Slow, sweaty hacking with machetes seemed to be the only way to discover the breadth of an ancient urban landscape now hidden beneath a dense forest canopy. Even the new remote-sensing technologies, so effective in recent decades at surveying other archaeological sites, were no help. Imaging radar and multispectral surveys by air and from space could not “see” through the trees. Then, in the dry spring season a...
  • Satellites Spot Lost Guatamala Mayan Temples

    02/20/2008 7:28:52 PM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 603+ views
    Reuters ^ | 2-20-2008 | Mica Rosenberg - Catherine Bremer - David Wiessler
    Satellites spot lost Guatemala Mayan temples Wed Feb 20, 2008 1:29pm EST GUATEMALA CITY (Reuters) - Ancient Mayan astronomers aligned their soaring temples with the stars and now modern archeologists have found the ruins of hidden cities in the Guatemalan jungle by peering down from space. Archeologists and NASA scientists began teaming up five years ago to search for clues about the mysterious collapse of the Mayan civilization that flourished in Central America and southern Mexico for 1,000 years. The work is paying off, says archeologist William Saturno, who recently discovered five sprawling sites with hundreds of buildings using a...
  • NASA, UNH Scientists Uncover Lost Maya Ruins - From Space

    02/15/2006 10:53:23 AM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 1,277+ views
    Newswise - UNH ^ | 2-15-2006 | UNH
    Source: University of New Hampshire Released: Wed 15-Feb-2006, 09:15 ET NASA, UNH Scientists Uncover Lost Maya Ruins – from Space NASA and University of New Hampshire scientists are using space- and aircraft-based "remote-sensing" technology to uncover remains of the ancient Maya culture using the chemical signature of the civilization's ancient building materials. Newswise — Remains of the ancient Maya culture, mysteriously destroyed at the height of its reign in the ninth century, have been hidden in the rainforests of Central America for more than 1,000 years. Now, NASA and University of New Hampshire scientists are using space- and aircraft-based "remote-sensing"...
  • Earliest known Mayan writing found in Guatemala

    01/06/2006 9:02:08 AM PST · by Mikey_1962 · 59 replies · 1,273+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 1/6/06 | Mikey_1962
    ANTIGUA, Guatemala (Reuters) - Archeologists excavating a pyramid complex in the Guatemalan jungle have uncovered the earliest example of Mayan writing ever found, 10 bold hieroglyphs painted on plaster and stone. The 2,300-year-old glyphs were excavated last April in San Bartolo and suggest the ancient Mayas developed an advanced writing system centuries earlier than previously believed, according to an article published on Thursday in the journal Science. The glyphs date from between 200 BC and 300 BC and come from the same site in the Peten jungle of northern Guatemala where archeologist William Saturno found the oldest murals in the...
  • Oldest Maya Mural Uncovered in Guatemala

    12/13/2005 12:05:10 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 47 replies · 1,248+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 12/13/05 | Randolph E. Schmid - ap
    WASHINGTON - Archaeologist William Saturno said Tuesday he was awe-struck when he uncovered a Maya mural not seen for nearly two millennia. Discovered at the San Bartolo site in Guatemala, the mural covers the west wall of a room attached to a pyramid, Saturno said at a briefing. In brilliant color, the mural tells the Maya story of creation, he said. It was painted about 100 B.C., but later covered when the room was filled in. "It could have been painted yesterday," Saturno said in a briefing organized by the National Geographic Society, which supported his work and will detail...
  • A Mother Lode Of Jade Solves Maya Mystery

    05/24/2002 7:14:54 AM PDT · by blam · 45 replies · 970+ views
    Seattle PI ^ | 5-22-2002 | William J. Broad
    A mother lode of jade solves Maya mystery Hurricane exposes ancient mines Wednesday, May 22, 2002 By WILLIAM J. BROAD THE NEW YORK TIMES For half a century, scholars have searched for the source of the jade that the early civilizations of the Americas prized above all else and fashioned into precious objects of worship, trade and adornment. The searchers found some clues to the source of jadeite, as the precious rock is known, for the Olmecs and Mayas. But no lost mines came to light. Now, scientists exploring the wilds of Guatemala say they have found the mother lode...
  • Was the Mayan civilisation wiped out by an extreme drought? Study of Great Blue Hole suggests

    12/30/2014 5:54:07 AM PST · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 30, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    For hundreds of years the Mayans dominated large parts of the Americas until, mysteriously in the 8th and 9th century AD, a large chunk of the Mayan civilisation collapsed. The reason for this collapse has been hotly debated, but now scientists say they might have an answer - an intense drought that lasted a century. Studies of sediments in the Great Blue Hole in Belize suggest a lack of rains caused the disintegration of the Mayan civilisation, and a second dry spell forced them to relocate elsewhere.
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Connecting dots of migration in ancient Southwest [ Anasazi star orientation? ]

    07/03/2009 5:09:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 437+ views
    George Johnson ^ | Wednesday, July 1, 2009 | STL Today / St. Louis Post-Dispatch / Associated Press
    From the sky, the Mound of the Cross at Paquime, a 14th-century ruin in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, looks like a compass rose -- the roundish emblem indicating the cardinal directions on a map. About 30 feet in diameter and molded from compacted earth and rock taken near the banks of the Casas Grandes River, the crisscross arms point to four circular platforms. They might as well be labeled N, S, E and W...
  • Ancient Chihuahuas in Southeastern U.S.?

    11/30/2014 5:29:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Lost Worlds ^ | February 14, 2012 | Gary C. Daniels
    Do three dog effigy pots excavated in Georgia in the 1930s at the Bull Creek Site and one from the Neisler Mound site represent the Chihuahua breed, a native dog of Mexico? Is the tribe most likely associated with these pots the Kasihta/Cussetta Creek Indians whose migration legends strongly suggest an origin in west Mexico, likely the state of Colima which is also known for similar dog effigy pots? Did the Kasihta raise Chihuahuas for food which they fattened up for this purpose as depicted by the pots and as recorded by early Spanish eye-witness accounts? Finally, does this evidence...
  • History Channel program probes Mayan presence in North Georgia

    12/24/2012 8:48:15 PM PST · by Theoria · 40 replies
    Morris News Service ^ | 21 Dec 2012 | Wayne Ford
    On a recent December morning, Mack Jones hiked a trail bordering the lake at Sandy Creek Park in Athens before he ventured off the path and up a forested ridge. There he showed a group following him a series of mysterious stone terrace walls and rock piles. "It's hidden in plain sight, and it's been that way for the 30 years the park has been here," Jones said. "No one has messed with it and maybe they won't." Jones believes those numerous rock piles - and especially the stone wall terraces lacing the hillside - might constitute evidence that the...
  • Ancient Maya Cities Found in Jungle

    08/16/2014 9:23:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Aug 15, 2014 12:01 PM ET // by | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sprajc and his team found the massive remains as they further explored the area around Chactun, a large Maya city discovered by the Slovenian archaeologist in 2013. No other site has so far been located in this area, which extends over some 1800 square miles, between the so-called Rio Bec and Chenes regions, both known for their characteristic architectural styles fashioned during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, around 600 - 1000 A.D. One of the cities featured an extraordinary facade with an entrance representing the open jaws of an earth monster. The site was actually visited in the 1970s...
  • Clay balls unearthed at Mayan site probably used for cooking

    07/15/2013 4:00:13 PM PDT · by Renfield · 19 replies
    NBC News ^ | 11-29-2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Planning a last supper party on Dec. 21? To celebrate the Mayan way, you might need several clay balls. That's one way the Maya cooked their food, according to U.S. archaeologists who have unearthed dozens of rounded clay pieces from a site in Mexico. Conducted with the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH) and Millsaps College's financial support, the excavation of a kitchen at Escalera al Cielo in Yucatán revealed 77 complete balls and 912 smaller fragments....
  • Area Professor Breaks New Ground On Maya

    09/28/2003 5:04:31 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 945+ views
    San Antonio Express ^ | 9-28-2003 | Roger Croteau
    Area professor breaks new ground on Maya By Roger Croteau San Antonio Express-News Web Posted : 09/28/2003 12:00 AM Findings by a Texas State University-San Marcos professor at an archaeological site in Belize have pushed back the date for the rise of the Maya civilization to 300 years earlier than previously believed. Anthropology professor James J. Garber has worked at the site, known as Blackman Eddy, each summer since 1990. Although smaller than many other Maya ruins, it was a major cultural center in the Upper Belize Valley. "I would say it's a very important finding," said Sandra Noble, executive...
  • Mayan pool in the rainforest (Yucatan)

    08/26/2010 10:00:05 AM PDT · by decimon · 18 replies · 1+ views
    University of Bonn ^ | August 26, 2010 | Unknown
    Bonn archaeologists find huge artificial lake with a ceramic-lined floorSince 2009, researchers from Bonn and Mexico have been systematically uncovering and mapping the old walls of Uxul, a Mayan city. "In the process, we also came across two, about 100 m square water reservoirs," explained Iken Paap, who directs the project with Professor Dr. Nikolai Grube and the Mexican archaeologist Antonio Benavides Castillo. Such monster pools, which are also known from other Mayan cities, are called "aguadas." Similar to present-day water towers, they served to store drinking water. But the people of Uxul seem to have thought of a particularly...
  • Mayan pyramid bulldozed: Ancient pyramid flattened by construction crew

    05/15/2013 10:27:49 AM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 41 replies
    http://www.examiner.com ^ | May 14 2013 | Jay Petrillo
    Officials in Belize say a construction company has destroyed one of the country's largest Mayan pyramids, reports. Head of the Belizean Institute of Archaeology Jaime Awe said the Noh Mul temple was leveled by a road-building company seeking gravel for road filler.
  • Evidence suggests Maya roots more tangled than previously thought

    04/25/2013 8:11:19 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | April 25, 2013, 3:58 p.m. | Eryn Brown,
    In his view, the culture that went on to dominate Mesoamerica until the arrival of Europeans got its start during a power vacuum that lasted for about 200 to 350 years in a period of Olmec rule. That allowed the people who built the ceremonial structure at a site known as Ceibal to interact with others from nearby areas and begin forming a new culture. They probably had influences from as far away as Chiapas and the Pacific Coast, both about 200 miles away. "Ceibal was a part of this major change," Inomata said. Inomata has been working at Ceibal,...
  • Lost Mayan city discovered in Mexican jungle..but will find shed light on civilization's collapse

    06/24/2013 12:11:26 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    * Archaeologists have found an ancient Mayan city they named Chactun - meaning 'Red Rock' or 'Large Rock' * The heavily-forested area has been hidden deep in the Mexican jungle for more than 1,000 years * Chactun likely had its heyday during the late Classic period of Maya civilization between 600 and 900 A.D. * The research team found 15 pyramids, ball courts, plazas and tall, sculpted stone shafts Archaeologists have found an ancient Mayan city that remained hidden for centuries in the rain forests of eastern Mexico; a discovery in a remote nature reserve they hope will yield clues...
  • How the internet is fast unravelling mysteries of the Mayan script

    05/29/2013 7:53:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Washington Post via Guardian UK ^ | Tuesday, May 28, 2013 | Guy Gugliott
    Online collaborators are decoding ancient glyphs that for hundreds of years refused to give up their secrets Researchers began decoding the glyphic language of the ancient Maya long ago, but the internet is helping them finish the job and write the history of this enigmatic Meso-American civilisation... The Maya script began to give up its secrets in the 1950s and 1960s, and progress accelerated in the 1970s. But much remains to be puzzled out from the immense body of carvings and inscriptions that has languished for centuries in jungle ruins and museum closets. Enter University of Texas archaeologist David Stuart,...
  • Bulldozers destroy 3,200-year-old Mayan pyramid in Belize

    05/14/2013 5:32:14 AM PDT · by Perdogg · 25 replies
    Bulldozers and backhoes have essentially destroyed one of Belize's largest Mayan pyramids, which survived millennia of storms, rain and wind only to succumb to a construction company seeking gravel for road fill. The head of the Belize Institute of Archaeology says the destruction was detected late last week, and only a small portion of the center of the pyramid mound was left standing, according to the Associated Press. 7Newsbelize.com, the website for TV channel 7 in the small Caribbean country, accompanied a handful of archaeologists to the site recent.
  • New Thoughts on the Maya City of Kiuic

    01/16/2013 7:48:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, January 08, 2013 | unattributed
    A pyramid at the Maya city of Kiuic in Yucatan Peninsula started out as a ceremonial platform in 700 B.C., much earlier than previously thought, according to George Bey of Millsaps College. Many scholars think that the Maya collapse was caused by long-term drought and the depletion of natural resources, but Kiuic seems to have been abandoned rapidly around 880 A.D. Bey and Tomas Gallareta Negron of Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History have found evidence that the residents left behind their grinding stones and other valuable kitchen tools, along with the remains of ancestors. “These were the Maya...
  • It's 12-21-12 And The World Hasn't Ended...Yet...

    12/21/2012 10:44:00 AM PST · by The Looking Spoon · 9 replies
    The Looking Spoon ^ | 12-21-12 | The Looking Spoon
  • Maya Expert: The 'End Of Times' Is Our Idea, Not The Ancients Mayan's

    12/21/2012 5:26:28 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    NPR ^ | 12/21/2012 | Bill Chappell
    t is Dec. 20, 2012 — and citizens of Earth are panicking, consumed by the idea that the world will end Friday, something they say was predicted by Mayan astronomers. Of course, most people are not panicking, and Maya expert David Stuart says no one should. The calendar, he says, has plenty of room to go. In an interview airing on Thursday's Morning Edition, David Greene asks archaeologist Stuart, who helped translate influential ancient Mayan hieroglyphs in 1996, if he thinks the world will end on Dec. 21. "Absolutely not," is Stuart's answer, dashing the hopes of students eyeing a...
  • Coast To Coast AM: Tonight's Topics: "Apocalipticism" & "End of the Mayan Calendar"

    12/20/2012 10:04:37 AM PST · by SilvieWaldorfMD · 28 replies
    George Noory hosts. Tonight's topics: "Apocalipticism" and "End of the Mayan Calendar".
  • San Diegans prepare for Mayan doomsday: Mayan calendar ends on December 21, 2012

    12/19/2012 10:19:13 PM PST · by doug from upland · 50 replies
    10news.com ^ | 12-2012 | Zouves
    SAN DIEGO - With his gas mask on and machete in hand, Nikko Sanchez is ready for December 21. "It does possibly mean the end of the world," said Sanchez. "I do know about the Mayan calendar, I have done some research." The Mayan calendar only extends to December 21, 2012. Some people interpret that as a prediction for the end of the world on that date. "I've seen how horrific people can be when they really want to be," said Sanchez. Sanchez is a Gulf War veteran and he's ex-law enforcement. Now, he's a "prepper" -- prepared to survive...
  • Mayan Match!: Baillie discovers correlation between ice core chemistry spikes & Mayan Long Count...

    12/11/2012 3:33:21 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Cosmic Tusk 'blog ^ | December 3rd, 2012 | George Howard
    Mike is on to something mighty interesting. Nowhere, and I mean nowhere, has anyone noted the corellation [sic] between the the two early Mayan “Baktun” transitions and spikes in ice core chemistry from Greenland. Calendrical genius that he is, Mike even reverse engineers the data and finds the Mayan calendar -- baring [sic] incredible coincidence -- serves to memorialize the two events -- as well as perpetuate a useful chime for the future. It is hard to grasp given his sparse abstract, but if I understand Mike correctly, he infers that the Maya calendar writer, long after the two extraordinary...
  • Mayan apocalypse: panic spreads as December 21 nears

    12/07/2012 7:10:55 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 68 replies
    The London Daily Telegraph ^ | December 7, 2012 | Nick Allen, Los Angeles, Malcolm Moore in Beijing and Tom Parfitt in Moscow
    Ahead of December 21, which marks the conclusion of the 5,125-year "Long Count" Mayan calendar, panic buying of candles and essentials has been reported in China and Russia, along with an explosion in sales of survival shelters in America. In France believers were preparing to converge on a mountain where they believe aliens will rescue them. The precise manner of Armageddon remains vague, ranging from a catastrophic celestial collision between Earth and the mythical planet Nibiru, also known as Planet X, a disastrous crash with a comet, or the annihilation of civilisation by a giant solar storm. In America Ron...
  • Mayan Bones Reveal Painful End

    11/23/2012 6:27:19 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, November 14, 2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Evidence of the miserable life lived by the Maya during the Spanish conquest of the 16th century has emerged in an ancient settlement of Mexico's east coast, as archaeologists unearthed dozens of infant skeletons with signs of malnutrition and acute anemia. Found in the recently opened archaeological site of San Miguelito, in the middle of the hotel chain area of Quintana Roo, near Cancun, the human burials were excavated within 11 housing buildings dating to the Late Postclassic Mayan Period (1200 - 1550). Archaeologists of the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) estimate that at least 30 burials belong...
  • Archaeologists Discover Tomb of Maya Queen Lady K’abel in Guatemala

    10/06/2012 5:08:35 AM PDT · by csvset · 4 replies
    Sci-News ^ | 4 Oct 2012 | Enrico de Lazaro
    During excavations of the royal Maya city of El Perú-Waka’ in northwestern Petén, Guatemala, an international team of archaeologists has discovered the tomb of Lady K’abel, one of the great queens of Classic Maya civilization.El Perú-Waka’, located approximately 75 km west of the famous city of Tikal, is an ancient Maya city in northwestern Petén, Guatemala. It was part of Classic Maya civilization (200-900 AD) in the southern lowlands and consists of nearly a square kilometer of plazas, palaces, temple pyramids and residences surrounded by many square kilometers of dispersed residences and temples. A small, carved alabaster jar found in...