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Keyword: mesolithic

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  • Scientists reconstruct the face of 'angry' Mesolithic girl

    01/23/2018 1:32:40 PM PST · by mairdie · 78 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 23 January 2018 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    The last time anyone looked on Dawn's face was 9,000 years ago. Now the teenager can be seen again, after scientists reconstructed her face to show what people looked like in the Mesolithic period, around 7,000 BC. And, according to the experts, this included more 'masculine features' – for both men and women. It's thought that Dawn (known as Avgi, in Greek) was around 15-18 years old when she died.
  • Neolithic girl's reconstructed face unveiled at Athens Acropolis Museum on January 19th

    01/18/2018 6:24:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Tornos news ^ | January 10, 2018 | unattributed
    An 18-year-old girl who lived in Greece 7,000 years ago and was unearthed by archaeologists in Theopetra cave, near the city of Trikala, has had her face reconstructed and is about to officially introduce herself to the public... Dawn (Avgi in Greek) is a woman from the Mesolithic era (7,000 BC) who lived in the Theopetra cave, according to Athens University professor Manolis Papagrigorakis; who has invested a great deal of time and learning in order to bring Greeks “face to face” with their ancestors... Papagrigorakis' team is also working on the reconstruction of the skull of a girl from...
  • Stone Age Site Surfaces After 8,000 Years

    08/06/2007 11:28:14 AM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 1,147+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 8-5-2007
    Source: University of Southampton Date: August 5, 2007 Stone Age Site Surfaces After 8000 Years Science Daily — Excavations of an underwater Stone Age archaeological settlement dating back 8000 years took place at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton between 30 July – 3 August 2007. A diver working at the site just off the Isle of Wight coast. (Credit: Copyright Simon Brown 2007) Maritime archaeologists from the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology (HWTMA) have been working at the site just off the Isle of Wight coast. Divers working at depths of 11 metres have raised sections of the...
  • Stone Age remains are Britain's earliest house

    08/10/2010 10:26:34 AM PDT · by decimon · 19 replies
    The University of Manchester ^ | August 10, 2010 | Unknown
    Archaeologists working on Stone Age remains at a site in North Yorkshire say it contains Britain's earliest surviving house.The team from the Universities of Manchester and York reveal today that the home dates to at least 8,500 BC - when Britain was part of continental Europe. The research has been made possible by a grant from the Natural Environment Research Council, early excavation funding from the British Academy, and from English Heritage who are about to schedule the site as a National Monument . The Vale of Pickering Research Trust has also provided support for the excavation works. The research...
  • Scientists Discover Lost World (8,000 Years Old)

    02/15/2004 4:03:44 PM PST · by blam · 88 replies · 1,928+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-15-2004
    Scientists discover lost world A prehistoric lost world under the North Sea has been mapped by scientists from the University of Birmingham. The team used earthquake data to devise a 3D reconstruction of the 10,000-year-old plain. The area, part of a land mass that once joined Britain to northern Europe, disappeared about 8,000 years ago. The virtual features they have developed include a river the length of the Thames which disappeared when its valley flooded due to glaciers melting. This is the most exciting and challenging virtual reality project since Virtual Stonehenge. Professor Bob Stone Professor Bob Stone, head of...
  • 'Britain's Atlantis' found at bottom of North sea

    07/06/2012 5:11:33 AM PDT · by Dysart · 28 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 7-6-12 | David Waugh
    Divers have found traces of ancient land swallowed by waves 8500 years ago Doggerland once stretched from Scotland to Denmark Rivers seen underwater by seismic scans Britain was not an island - and area under North Sea was roamed by mammoths and other giant animals Described as the 'real heartland' of Europe Had population of tens of thousands - but devastated by sea level risesBritain's Atlantis' - a hidden underwater world swallowed by the North Sea - has been discovered by divers working with science teams from the University of St Andrews. Doggerland, a huge area of dry land that...
  • Lost World Warning From (Under) North Sea

    04/23/2007 2:29:02 PM PDT · by blam · 66 replies · 2,077+ views
    BBC ^ | 4-23-2007 | Sean Coughlan
    Lost world warning from North Sea By Sean Coughlan BBC News education How a homestead might have looked in the flooded area Archaeologists are uncovering a huge prehistoric "lost country" hidden below the North Sea. This lost landscape, where hunter gatherer communities once lived, was swallowed by rising water levels at the end of the last ice age. University of Birmingham researchers are heralding "stunning" findings as they map the "best-preserved prehistoric landscape in Europe". This large plain had disappeared below the water more than 8,000 years ago. Scientists at the University of Birmingham have been using oil exploration technology...
  • Stone Age Settlements Found Underwater In Britain

    09/11/2003 11:37:31 AM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 269+ views
    Reuters/Yahoo ^ | 9-11-2003
    Stone Age Settlements Found Underwater in Britain Thu Sep 11, 5:38 AM ET LONDON (Reuters) - Archaeologists have stumbled across the first underwater evidence of Stone Age settlements in Britain. Missed Tech Tuesday? Become a Wireless Whiz -- get connected in every room and secure your wireless network in six steps A team from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in northeast England say they found flint artifacts including tools and arrowheads off the coast near Tynemouth during a training session to prepare them for dive searches elsewhere. They say the items pinpoint two sites dating as far back as...
  • Giant Wave Hit Ancient Scotland

    09/07/2001 5:34:41 PM PDT · by blam · 63 replies · 1,481+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-7-2001 | Helen Briggs
    Friday, 7 September, 2001, 18:28 GMT 19:28 UK Giant wave hit ancient Scotland By BBC News Online's Helen Briggs A giant wave flooded Scotland about 7,000 years ago, a scientist revealed on Friday. The tsunami left a trail of destruction along what is now the eastern coast of the country. It looks as if those people were happily sitting in their camp when this wave from the sea hit the camp Professor David Smith, Coventry University Scientists believe a landslide on the ocean floor off Storegga, south-west Norway, triggered the wave. Speaking at the British Association Festival of Science in ...
  • Dating A Massive Undersea Slide (8,100 Year Ago)

    01/05/2007 4:42:11 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,065+ views
    Science News ^ | 1-5-2006 | Sid Perkins
    Dating a massive undersea slide Sid Perkins From San Francisco, at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union Pieces of moss buried in debris deposits along the Norwegian coast have enabled geologists to better peg the date of an ancient tsunami and the immense underwater landslide that triggered it. Carbon dating of the newly unearthed moss suggests that the landslide occurred about 8,100 years ago. Sometime after the end of the last ice age, the largest landslide known to geologists took place off the coast of Norway. Called the Storegga slide, this slump of seafloor sediments included about 3,000 cubic...
  • The moment Britain became an island

    02/14/2011 6:31:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | Monday, February 14, 2011 | Megan Lane
    The coastline and landscape of what would become modern Britain began to emerge at the end of the last Ice Age around 10,000 years ago. What had been a cold, dry tundra on the north-western edge of Europe grew warmer and wetter as the ice caps melted. The Irish Sea, North Sea and the Channel were all dry land, albeit land slowly being submerged as sea levels rose. But it wasn't until 6,100BC that Britain broke free of mainland Europe for good, during the Mesolithic period -- the Middle Stone Age. It is thought a landslide in Norway triggered one...
  • Ancient underwater forest discovered off Norfolk coast

    01/31/2015 4:49:37 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 January 2015 Last updated at 00:28 GMT | Credit: The underwater diving footage is copyright and courtesy of Rob Spray and Dawn Watson
    Nature experts have discovered a remarkable submerged forest thousands of years old under the sea close to the Norfolk coast. The trees were part of an area known as 'Doggerland' which formed part of a much bigger area before it was flooded by the North Sea. It was once so vast that hunter-gatherers who lived in the vicinity could have walked to Germany across its land mass.
  • ARCHAEOLOGY: Stone Age World Beneath the Baltic Sea

    12/09/2006 2:50:42 PM PST · by Lessismore · 51 replies · 2,178+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2006-12-08 | Andrew Curry
    As they map Germany's changing coastline, members of a research team called SINCOS are learning about settlements that were covered by water 6000 to 8000 years ago On a warm afternoon in September, archaeologist Harald Lübke looked out from the pilot house of the Goor, a bright red dive boat moored 200 meters off Germany's Baltic seacoast. Three meters below the water's glassy surface, divers in bulky drysuits were excavating a prehistoric hunting camp. A deafening motor mounted on the Goor's deck powered a pressure pump, which they were using to suck sediment from the sea bottom into mesh bags....
  • The Netherlands: Archaeologists Find Habitation Sites in Port of Rotterdam

    11/17/2011 4:51:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Dredging Today ^ | Tuesday, November 8, 2011 | unattributed
    The site of what is now Rotterdam's Yangtzehaven was inhabited by humans in the Middle Stone Age. At a depth of 20 metres, in the sea bed, unique underwater archaeological investigation found traces of bone, flint and charcoal from around 7000 BC. These finds are the very first scientific proof that humans lived at this spot in the Early and Middle Stone Age. Up to now, very little was known about this period in particular, the Early and Middle Mesolithic, so far to the west of the Netherlands... Some 9000 years ago, the area where the North Sea and the...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Archaeology suggests no direct link between climate change and early human innovation

    07/06/2016 5:10:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | Wednesday, July 6, 2016 | PLoS ONE
    Archaeological sites suggest climate may not have been directly linked to cultural and technological innovations of Middle Stone Age humans in southern Africa... The Middle Stone Age marked a period of dramatic change amongst early humans in southern Africa, and climate change has been postulated as a primary driver for the appearance of technological and cultural innovations such as bone tools, ochre production, and personal ornamentation. While some researchers suggest that climate instability may have directly inspired technological advances, others postulate that environmental stability may have provided a stable setting that allowed for experimentation. However, the disconnection of palaeoenvironmental records...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...
  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • Stunning cave paintings found 300 metres below Spain

    05/27/2016 1:19:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Local ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Jones
    The cave joins that at Altamira as one of Spain’s most exciting and best-preserved set of cave paintings and for Garate, marks a career high. "Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career," he told The Local. "I have been searching the caves of the Basque Country for ten years and have discovered lots of new caves but none as important as Atxurra. It could very well be the cave with the most animal figures in the Basque Country," he added. The Atxurra caves were originally discovered in 1929, but as the paintings are at a depth...