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Keyword: mesolithic

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  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • Stunning cave paintings found 300 metres below Spain

    05/27/2016 1:19:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Local ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Jones
    The cave joins that at Altamira as one of Spain’s most exciting and best-preserved set of cave paintings and for Garate, marks a career high. "Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career," he told The Local. "I have been searching the caves of the Basque Country for ten years and have discovered lots of new caves but none as important as Atxurra. It could very well be the cave with the most animal figures in the Basque Country," he added. The Atxurra caves were originally discovered in 1929, but as the paintings are at a depth...
  • Exploration of underwater forest [Loch Tay]

    07/16/2008 10:42:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 1,480+ views
    BBC ^ | Tuesday, July 15, 2008 | unattributed
    Underwater archaeologists are taking to Loch Tay to try to uncover more about a submerged prehistoric woodland. The stumps of about 50 trees were discovered in 2005 - some of them are thought to be about 6,000 years old. The experts are now aiming to find their root system and establish the depth to which the trees are buried. Meanwhile, a campaign has been launched to help restore the reconstructed crannog, an ancient loch dwelling, which attracts thousands of visitors. The Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology will spend the next two weeks inspecting the drowned forest. They will be focusing...
  • Perthshire Rock Art Sheds Light On Scotland's Prehistoric Past

    08/05/2007 4:00:40 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 737+ views
    24 Hour Museum ^ | 8-3-2007 | Graham Spicer
    PERTHSHIRE ROCK ART SHEDS LIGHT ON SCOTLAND'S PREHISTORIC PAST By Graham Spicer 03/08/2007 Archaeologists have discovered a large group of ancient rock art in Perthshire, which they hope will shed more light on the area’s prehistoric inhabitants. A team working on National Trust for Scotland (NTS) land as part of the Ben Lawers Historic Landscape Project found the previously undiscovered ‘cup-and-ring’ style markings on a hillside overlooking Loch Tay and Kenmore. The carvings could date back to Neolithic times and be up to 5,000 years old. Cup-and-ring rock art features abstract symbols of circles and cups, chipped out of the...
  • Seafaring in the Aegean: new dates

    03/02/2012 6:23:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | January 21, 2012 | Journal of Archaeological Science
    Seafaring before the Neolithic -- circa 7th millennium BCE -- is a controversial issue in the Mediterranean. However, evidence from different parts of the Aegean is gradually changing this, revealing the importance of early coastal and island environments. The site of Ouriakos on the island of Lemnos (Greece) tentatively dates to the end of the Pleistocene and possibly the beginning of the Holocene, circa 12,000 BP... Obsidian, or 'volcanic glass', has been a preferred material for stone tools wherever it is found or traded. It also absorbs water vapour when exposed to air -- for instance, when it is shaped...
  • Earliest evidence of humans in Ireland

    03/21/2016 7:57:11 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | March 21, 2016
    A bear bone found in a cave may push back dates for the earliest human settlement of Ireland by 2,500 years. The bone shows clear signs of cut marks with stone tools, and has been radiocarbon dated to 12,500 years ago. This places humans in Ireland in the Palaeolithic era; previously, the earliest evidence of people came from the Mesolithic, after 10,000 years ago. The brown bear bone had been stored in a cardboard box at the National Museum of Ireland for almost a century.
  • Anthropologist suggests Mediterranean islands inhabited much earlier than thought

    11/16/2012 8:16:41 AM PST · by Renfield · 4 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-16-2012 | Bob Yirka
    Modern science has held that islands such as Cypress and Crete were first inhabited by seafaring humans approximately 9,000 years ago by agriculturists from the late Neolithic period. Simmons writes that research over the past 20 years has cast doubt on that assumption however and suggests that it might be time to rewrite the history books. He cites evidence such as pieces of obsidian found in a cave in mainland Greece that were found to have come from Melos, an island in the Aegean Sea and were dated at 11,000 years ago as well as artifacts from recent digs on...
  • Mysterious Graves Discovered at Ancient European Cemetery

    02/16/2016 9:31:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    National Geographic ^ | February 11, 2016 | Andrew Curry
    Archaeologists in Germany have uncovered the bodies of children and of one adult man who was buried, strangely, standing upright. One of the oldest cemeteries in Europe has recently been discovered, with graves dating back almost 8,500 years. Two of the most intriguing finds are the skeleton of a six-month-old child and a mysterious upright burial of a man in his early 20s. The German cemetery, called Gross Fredenwalde after a nearby village, belongs to a time known as the Mesolithic, when Europe was populated by hunter-gatherers. At a press conference Thursday morning in Berlin, excavators announced that nine skeletons...
  • 200,000 fish bones suggest ancient Scandinavian people were more complex than thought

    02/08/2016 10:58:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 8, 2016 | Elsevier
    200,000 fish bones discovered in and around a pit in Sweden suggest that the people living in the area more than 9000 years ago were more settled and cultured than we previously thought. Research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science suggests people were storing large amounts of fermented food much earlier than experts thought. The new paper reveals the earliest evidence of fermentation in Scandinavia, from the Early Mesolithic time period, about 9,200 years ago. The author of the study, from Lund University in Sweden, say the findings suggest that people who survived by foraging for food were actually...
  • Hazelnut shells found at Skye Mesolithic site

    10/25/2015 12:19:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | October 22, 2015 | Steven McKenzie
    The remains of hazelnuts eaten by some of Skye's earliest inhabitants were found at a dig on the island, archaeologists have revealed. Hazelnuts were a favourite snack of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, according to archaeologists at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI). The shells found at an excavation above Staffin Bay could be 8,000-years-old. UHI carried out the dig along with Staffin Community Trust, school children and volunteers. Dan Lee, lifelong learning and outreach archaeologist at UHI, said: "We have found lots of fragments of charred hazelnut shells in the lower soil samples. "They are the ideal thing to date...
  • Mesolithic site on Skye to be investigated

    09/04/2015 11:18:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    BBC ^ | 2 September 2015 | unattributed
    Excavations of a Mesolithic site on Skye could give new insights into the lives of some of the island's earliest residents. Archaeologists believe the location above Staffin Bay has the remains of a house that could be 8,000 years old. Mesolithic flints have previously been found in an area of eroded grazing land near the site. Archaeologists will work with Staffin Community Trust and volunteers in making small excavations. The University of the Highlands and Islands' Archaeology Institute will lead the investigation. Archaeologist Dan Lee said the dig at the site of "important prehistoric occupation" had "huge potential". Staffin Community...
  • Dig reveals human skulls mounted on stakes (Sweden)

    09/20/2011 7:55:48 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 1+ views
    The Local ^ | September 19, 2011 | David Landes
    Several human skulls found mounted on wooden stakes have been uncovered from a Stone Age lake bed in central Sweden in what is believed to be the first discovery of its kind anywhere in the world. “We found two skulls that still had wooden stakes sticking out of them through a whole at the base of the skull,” archeologist Fredrik Hallgren, head of excavation with the Stiftelsen Kulturmiljövård Mälardalen (‘Cultural Preservation Society of Mälardalen’) told The Local. The skulls and other artifacts, including bones of wild animals, were recovered at the Kanaljorden excavation site in the town of Motala in...
  • Prehistoric settlers in Scotland similar to first peoples of North America or Australia...

    06/05/2015 1:46:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Culture24 ^ | April 4, 2015 | editors
    Situated on the eastern coast of the county, the Yarrows and Watenan area is one of the richest concentrations of well-preserved historical and archaeological remains of all periods in northern mainland Britain. The absence of industrial-scale agriculture in the area has ensured the survival of important archaeological and historical monuments together with the spaces – now fossil landscapes – in which they were built. In 1985, a survey of the area recorded 240 sites. Over the last few years, evidence for Mesolithic activity has been uncovered on the Thrumster Estate by Islay MacLeod... Mesolithic settlers in Caithness had lifestyles comparable...
  • Stone Age Sites Found Under North Sea (8,000BC)

    12/09/2003 5:30:54 PM PST · by blam · 90 replies · 2,982+ views
    Stone Age sites found under North Sea Date released 12 September 2003 Experts have discovered the first ever evidence of Stone Age settlements in the British North Sea, dating back as far as 10,000 years. Subject to further investigation, one of them could be the earliest underwater archaeological site in the UK. The exciting find, discovered by accident by a team from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, could lead to a rewriting of the history books and revolutionise our understanding of the way our ancestors lived. The discovery of several stone artefacts, including tools and arrowheads, have pinpointed...
  • A Mesolithic face from Southern Europe

    03/12/2014 4:00:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-9-2014
    The Mesolithic, a transitional period that lasted from circa 11,000 to 5,000 years ago (between the Palaeolithic and Neolithic), ends with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry and the concurrent arrival of new genetic material from the Middle East. The arrival of the Neolithic farmers, with their carbohydrate-based and domesticated animal diet, along with food-borne pathogens and the inherent metabolic /immunological challenges can be reflected in genetic adaptations of post- Mesolithic populations.Pre-Neolithic genetic material The individual at the centre of the study belongs to a group prior to this influx of new genetic material.“The biggest surprise was to discover...
  • Lepenski Vir: a Mesolithic Paradise: The birth of town planning, the birth of sculpture

    08/23/2007 10:46:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 330+ views
    Smithsonian (via author's website) ^ | 1975 | Robert Wernick
    Once the inhabitants had settled in, time seems to have stood still in Lepenski Vir. Study of the bones found there shows that there was no admixture of foreign population; the same people remained on the spot, intermarrying generation after generation, perhaps 120 generations in all - well over 2,500 years. During all that time they remained healthy. (Did they, like the ancient Greeks, toss aside the infants that did not live up to their sturdy standards?) There are no deformed or diseased bones here, and the women were so robust that it is hard to tell their skeletons from...
  • Ancient Astronomical Calendar Discovered in Scotland Predates Stonehenge by 6,000 Years

    08/07/2013 1:42:27 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 7, 2013 | David Dickinson on
    A team from the University of Birmingham recently announced an astronomical discovery in Scotland marking the beginnings of recorded time. Announced last month in the Journal of Internet Archaeology, the Mesolithic monument consists of a series of pits near Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Estimated to date from 8,000 B.C., this 10,000 year old structure would pre-date calendars discovered in the Fertile Crescent region of the Middle East by over 5,000 years.
  • Shellfish and the rise of modern human behaviour

    06/23/2013 4:42:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Saturday, June 22, 2013 | unattributed
    Researchers had previously theorised that it was an increase in population that drove behavioural innovations which in turn led to the creation of these artefacts and eventually, the expansion out of Africa. However, by examining mollusc shells from Stone Age sites, Richard Klein of Stanford University and Teresa Steele of University of California, Davis, have determined that a significant population increase did not occur until the Later Stone Age (LSA), after the out of Africa migration had already begun... The researchers found that the median size of MSA shells was larger than that of LSA shells. This showed that selection...
  • Snails Reveal Ancient Human Migration from France to Ireland

    06/23/2013 4:32:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, June 19, 2013 | Public Library of Science
    A genetic study of snails, combined with other factors, suggests a migration of Mesolithic peoples from the Pyrenees to Ireland. A recent study of the mitochondrial DNA of the Cepaea nemoralis land snail, a snail curiously common only between Ireland and the Pyrenees region of Southern France, has led researchers to conclude the possibility that ancient Mesolithic people carried the fauna with them in a migration from the French region to Ireland about 8,000 years ago. This correlates with studies of human genetics and the colonization of Ireland, according to the research* published June 19 in the open access journal...
  • Stonehenge 5,000 Years Older Than Thought

    04/20/2013 6:32:59 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 30 replies
    Discovery ^ | 4-19-2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Excavation near Stonehenge found evidence of a settlement dating back to 7,500 BC, revealing the site was occupied some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought. Working at Vespasian’s Camp in Amesbury, Wiltshire, less than a mile from the megalithic stones, a team led by archaeologist David Jacques of the Open University unearthed material which contradicted the general belief that no people settled there until as late as 2,500 BC. Indeed, carbon dating of the material revealed the existence of a semi-permanent settlement which was occupied from 7,500 to 4,700 BC. The dating showed that people were present during every millennium...
  • Mesolithic People Adapted Their Environment In Severn Estuary

    01/17/2013 4:47:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Monday, January 14, 2013 | Source: Reading University
    New and exciting evidence has been found at a threatened archaeological site on the Severn Estuary that seems to show Mesolithic people knew how to adapt their environment to suit their needs... Researchers from the University of Reading found 7500 year-old worked flint tools, bones, charcoal and hazelnut shells while working at Goldcliff, near Newport, south Wales, in September 2012. Charcoal remains discovered on the site suggest these people used fire to encourage the growth of particular plants, such as hazelnuts, crab apples and raspberries. This evidence may indicate that Mesolithic people were deliberately manipulating the environment to increase their...
  • Complex Fish Traps Over 7,500 Years Old Found in Russia

    01/26/2012 8:28:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | unattributed
    An international team of archeologists, led by Ignacio Clemente, a researcher with the Spanish National Research Council, has discovered and documented an assemblage of fish seines and traps in the Dubna Basin near Moscow that are dated to be more than 7,500 years old. They say that the equipment, among the oldest found in Europe, displays a surprisingly advanced technical complexity. The finds illuminate the role of fishing among European settlements of the early Holocene (about 10,000 years ago), particularly where people did not practice agriculture until just before the advent of the Iron Age. Says Clemente: "Until now, it...
  • Mesolithic beads found at Welsh dolmen site

    02/21/2011 11:52:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | February 11, 2011 | Edited from George Nash PR
    A recent excavation led by archaeologist George Nash in November 2010 at the Trefael Stone in south-west Wales - originally a portal dolmen transformed in later times in a standing stone - has revealed a small assemblage of exotic artefacts including three drilled shale beads, identical to those found at a nearby Early Mesolithic coastal habitation site. These items, each measuring about 4.5 centimetres in diameter, were found within a disturbed cairn or post-cairn deposit... Similar perforated shale beads have also been found at a number of other sites including Manton Warren (Humberside), Newquay (Cardiganshire), Star Carr (Yorkshire) and Staple...