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Keyword: minoan

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  • Dynasty of Priestesses [ Iron Age necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete ]

    03/02/2010 7:16:04 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 18,903+ views
    Archaeology ^ | March 1, 2010 | Eti Bonn-Muller
    For a quarter century, Greek excavation director Nicholas Stampolidis and his dedicated team have been unearthing the untold stories of the people buried some 2,800 years ago in the necropolis of Orthi Petra at Eleutherna on Crete. Until now, the site has perhaps been best known for the tomb its excavators dubbed "A1K1," an assemblage of 141 cremated individuals, all but two of whom were aristocratic men who likely fell in battle in foreign lands. Excavated between 1992 and 1996, this elaborate rock-cut tomb was brimming with fantastic burial goods that date from the ninth to the seventh century B.C.,...
  • Cretan Excavation Sheds New Light On Dark Ages Of Greek History

    12/07/2004 1:44:53 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 920+ views
    Kathimerini (English Edition) ^ | 12-7-2004 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Cretan excavation sheds light on Dark Ages of Greek historyFinds from ancient Eleutherna at Cycladic Museum A marble statue of Aphrodite, from a second- to first-century-BC bathhouse in Eleutherna. By Nicholas Paphitis - Kathimerini English Edition On a narrow spur under the shadow of Mount Ida in central Crete, archaeologists for the past 20 years have been excavating a town that flourished from the Dark Ages of Greece’s early history until Medieval times. The Eleutherna project, a systematic dig carried out by a three-pronged team of top archaeologists from the University of Crete, is in itself unusual in a country...
  • Archaeologists On Crete Find Skeleton Covered With Gold Foil In 2,700-year-old Grave

    10/01/2010 2:54:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Canadian Press via Google News ^ | Tuesday, September 28, 2010 | Nicholas Paphitis
    Excavator Nicholas Stampolidis said his team discovered more than 3,000 pieces of gold foil in the 7th-century B.C. twin grave near the ancient town of Eleutherna... The tiny gold ornaments, from 1 to 4 centimetres (0.4 to 1.5 inches) long, had been sewn onto a lavish robe or shroud that initially wrapped the body of a woman and has almost completely rotted away but for a few off-white threads... The woman, who presumably had a high social or religious status, was buried with a second skeleton in a large jar sealed with a stone slab weighing more than half a...
  • 4,000-Year-Old Necropolis with more than 100 Tombs Discovered Near Bethlehem

    03/07/2016 4:26:38 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | March 8, 2016 | M.R. Reese
    By studying and excavating ancient burial grounds, we can learn about how final respects were paid when people died during ancient times. The artifacts located alongside these remains also provide insight into what items people valued and what they believed about the afterlife. A 2013 discovery of an ancient burial ground near Bethlehem is providing new information about one civilization that lived approximately 4000 years ago. In 2013, efforts began to build an industrial park near Bethlehem, leading to a discovery that may prove to offer fresh insights about the ancient world. The area where the industrial park was to...
  • Bronze-Age Cemetery Discovered Near Bethlehem

    03/06/2016 6:20:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, March 04, 2016 | editors / LiveScience
    A 4,000-year-old cemetery made up of more than 100 tombs has been found near Bethlehem in the West Bank. Now known as Khalet al-Jam'a, the cemetery probably served an undiscovered settlement for more than 1,500 years. Many of its tombs have been destroyed by modern construction or looting, but at least 30 tombs have survived. Many of them are shaft tombs with one or more rock-cut chambers. According to Lorenzo Nigro of Sapienza University of Rome, the settlement was situated near trade routes, and artifacts from the tombs indicate that it had been a wealthy place. "Typical pieces of the...
  • Archaeology professor scrutinizes age-old mystery [ Uluburun wreck excavation]

    11/24/2008 3:39:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 1,338+ views
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Kayla Kitts
    In 1983 a sponge diver found funny metal biscuits with ears at the ocean floor. That is how the excavation got started, Hirschfeld said. The ship carried ten tons of copper ingots, which after being analyzed, were determined to be from Cyprus. Each ingot weighs approximately 60 pounds, she said. She and her team also excavated glass ingots, tons of tin, and three Italian swords that were not part of the cargo of the ship. Among the 130 Canaanite jars they found, there were traces of wine in the jars and one was full of glass beads. The team also...
  • Ancient Furnace Sparks Archaeological Interest

    01/22/2006 3:32:36 PM PST · by blam · 6 replies · 701+ views
    Cypress Weekly ^ | 1-22-2006
    Ancient furnace sparks archaeological interest A UNIQUE site in the whole of the Eastern Mediterranean and expected to shed more light on ancient copper mining has been uncovered in the Mathiatis area, about 20km south of Nicosia. It consists of the base of a copper smelting furnace with its last charge of slag still in place. The discovery was made by students participating in an educational research programme in cooperation with Inter Community School Cyprus Project 2005, under the direction of Dr Walter Fasnacht. The participants from the staff of the Department of Antiquities were G. Georgiou, archaeologist, and E...
  • Archaeological discovery yields surprising revelations about Europe's oldest city

    01/08/2016 2:21:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | January 6, 2016 | heritagedaily
    The discovery suggests that not only did this spectacular site in the Greek Bronze Age (between 3500 and 1100 BC) recover from the collapse of the socio-political system around 1200 BC, but also rapidly grew and thrived as a cosmopolitan hub of the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Antonis Kotsonas, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of classics, will highlight his field research with the Knossos Urban Landscape Project at the 117th annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and Society for Classical Studies. The meeting takes place Jan. 7-10, 2016 in San Francisco. Kotsonas explains that Knossos, "renowned as...
  • Newberry Tablet

    12/26/2015 5:57:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Fort de Buade Museum ^ | bef. 2015 | unattributed
    ...Why do the Greek descendants of the Minoans share a gene in their DNA with the Chippewas and no one else on the planet? In November of 1896, near the town of Newberry, Michigan. In Michigan's Upper Peninsula two woodsmen clearing land on a farm uprooted a tree and discovered three statues, and a clay tablet. The tablet was 19 by 26 inches in size. 140 small squares were cut into the stone. In each square a letter or character. The University of Michigan and the Smithsonian Institution were notified. Both of these institutions, at the time refused to look...
  • Underwater archaeology: Hunt for the ancient mariner

    01/26/2012 9:06:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | Jo Marchant
    Foley, a marine archaeologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, and his colleagues at Greece's Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in Athens have spent the day diving near the cliffs of the tiny island of Dia in the eastern Mediterranean. They have identified two clusters of pottery dating from the first century BC and fifth century AD. Together with other remains that the team has discovered on the island's submerged slopes, the pots reveal that for centuries Greek, Roman and Byzantine traders used Dia as a refuge during storms, when they couldn't safely reach Crete. It is a nice...
  • The first inter-cultural ‘party’ in Europe?

    12/07/2015 10:44:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 6, 2015 | Francesco Iacono
    The sharing of food and alcoholic beverages is extremely important today as in the past because provides a wealth of information on societies where this occurred. So far however, most of these practices known through archaeology have been primarily those undertaken by people from the same individual community or regional district. The Bronze Age site of Roca (2) in Southern Italy, has produced clear evidence for the existence at this place of one of the earliest inter-cultural feasting 'party' in Mediterranean Europe, dating to c.a. 1200 BC. This small (about 3 hectares nowadays, although it was larger in the past)...
  • Aegean Sea: CO2 opalescent pools found at site of volcanic eruption that wiped out Minoan...

    07/18/2015 5:36:15 AM PDT · by markomalley · 29 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 7/17/15 | Hannah Osborne
    Opalescent pools full of carbon dioxide have been found at the site of the second biggest volcanic eruption recorded in human history. The eruption in the Aegean Sea off the coast of Santorini wiped out the Minoan civilisation living along the coast in 1600 BC. The newly discovered pools were found forming at a depth of 250m. They is a series of interconnected white pools that have high concentrations of CO2 and scientists say they could shed light on future volcanic eruptions and answer questions about deep sea carbon storage. An international team of scientists used sophisticated underwater exploration vehicles...
  • The Minoans of Crete

    05/07/2015 3:43:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, April 06, 2015 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    ...In the course of both Boyd's and Watrous' excavations, more than 50 houses or areas with evidence of industrial activity have been uncovered -- 20 areas producing pottery, 15 producing stone vases, 18 producing bronze and bronze implements, and some with evidence for textile production. At one location on the north edge of the settlement, Buell points out an area of burned bedrock inside a space identified as a foundry. 'Here we have all sorts of scraps of bronze crucibles, bronze drips, copper scraps, and iron used for flux. Elsewhere, we also found a tin ingot, the closest known source...
  • A serving of Philistine culture: Boar, dog and fine wine

    09/03/2007 8:38:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 259+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | Monday, September 3, 2007 | Ofri Ilani
    Research into the dispersal of Philistine cooking methods among various populations in Israel shows that the Philistines spread their culture beyond the areas under their control... Unlike most of the peoples living in the region in the biblical era, the Philistines were not Semites... They prepared meals in a characteristic sealed pottery vessel suited to long cooking times at low heat, while most inhabitants of Canaan at the time used open pots and faster cooking methods. The bones found at the Philistine cities showed that... the Philistines ate mainly pork, with an occasional meal of dog meat. The Philistines' wine...
  • Cultural connections with Europe found in ancient Jordanian settlement

    01/27/2014 8:33:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    University of Gothenburg ^ | January 16, 2014 | Thomas Melin
    Swedish archaeologists in Jordan led by Professor Peter M. Fischer from the University of Gothenburg have excavated a nearly 60-metre long well-preserved building from 1100 B.C. in the ancient settlement Tell Abu al-Kharaz. The building is from an era characterised by major migration... Pottery from one of the rooms from 1100 B.C.‘We have evidence that culture from present Europe is represented in Tell Abu al-Kharaz. A group of the Sea Peoples of European descent, Philistines, settled down in the city,’ says Peter Fischer. ‘We have, for instance, found pottery resembling corresponding items from Greece and Cyprus in terms of form...
  • Last practitioner of Minoan rituals may have lived in Jerusalem's Old City till '48

    05/04/2015 7:48:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | April 20, 2015 | Roy (Chicky) Arad
    Midwife Mercada Dasa lived in the Old City of Jerusalem until 1948. In her attic she raised an unusual pet -- a white female snake about a meter and a half long -- and fed it sugar cubes. Just before the entry of the Jordanian Legion she left the besieged city with her family and her pet remained behind. That a midwife, whose family lived in Jerusalem since the time of the Second Temple, carried on a tradition of feeding white female snakes was part of the family's lore, but not something anyone considered significant. Now Mercada's grandson, Benny Avigdory,...
  • New Lemnian Inscription

    12/28/2014 11:18:54 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Rasenna Blog ^ | December 1, 2010 | rwallace
    A new Lemnian inscription was discovered recently during excavation of an ancient sanctuary at Efestia on the island of Lemnos. The inscription was incised in two lines on the upper portion of a rectangular altar measuring 50 cm. in length and 13.05 cm. in height (see photograph below). The direction of writing is boustrophedon. The upper line reads from left-to-right, the lower line from right-to-left. The inscription has 26 letters plus punctuation marks in the form of three vertically-aligned points separating words. The transcription provided below is that given by de Simone (2009). The letter âi (= palatal sibilant) is...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life

    09/28/2013 1:09:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Discovery News ^ | September 20, 2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods. "It's a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans," Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria. A fun loving and eclectic people who among other things taught the French...
  • Italy: Ancient Etruscan home found near Grosseto

    06/01/2010 8:45:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 572+ views
    ADNKRONOS ^ | Tuesday, May 25, 2010 | AKI
    An ancient Etruscan home dating back more than 2,400 years has been discovered outside Grosseto in central Italy. Hailed as an exceptional find, the luxury home was uncovered at an archeological site at Vetulonia, 200 kilometres north of Rome. Archeologists say it is rare to find an Etruscan home intact and believe the home was built between the 3rd and 1st century BC. Using six Roman and Etruscan coins uncovered at the home, archeologists believe the house collapsed in 79 AD during wars unleashed by Roman general and dictator, Lucio Cornelio Silla. Archeologists have discovered a large quantity of items...
  • Golden Bough from Roman mythology 'found in Italy'

    02/23/2010 6:45:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 664+ views
    Telegraph ^ | February 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    In Roman mythology, the bough was a tree branch with golden leaves that enabled the Trojan hero Aeneas to travel through the underworld safely. They discovered the remains while excavating religious sanctuary built in honour of the goddess Diana near an ancient volcanic lake in the Alban Hills, 20 miles south of Rome. They believe the enclosure protected a huge Cypress or oak tree which was sacred to the Latins, a powerful tribe which ruled the region before the rise of the Roman Empire. The tree was central to the myth of Aeneas, who was told by a spirit to...
  • Etruscan tomb unearthed in Perugia

    07/09/2008 9:46:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 201+ views
    ANSA.it ^ | Tuesday, July 8, 2008 | unattributed
    An ancient Etruscan tomb has resurfaced after centuries underground during the course of building work in the central Italian city of Perugia. The tomb, which has been preserved in excellent condition, contains seven funerary urns, the municipal archaeology department said. It is in the shape of a square and was covered by a sheet of travertine marble, which had apparently remained untouched since being laid centuries ago. The tomb is split into two halves by a pillar and there are two benches running along each side. The funerary urns, which were placed on the benches, were marked with brightly coloured...
  • Ancient Etruscans Were Immigrants From Anatolia (Turkey)

    06/17/2007 4:55:52 PM PDT · by blam · 44 replies · 1,903+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 6-17-2007 | Mary Rice
    Contact: Mary Rice mary@mrcommunication.org European Society of Human Genetics Ancient Etruscans were immigrants from Anatolia, or what is now TurkeyGeneticists find the final piece in the puzzle Nice, France: The long-running controversy about the origins of the Etruscan people appears to be very close to being settled once and for all, a geneticist will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. Professor Alberto Piazza, from the University of Turin, Italy, will say that there is overwhelming evidence that the Etruscans, whose brilliant civilisation flourished 3000 years ago in what is now Tuscany, were settlers from...
  • DNA Boosts Herodotus’ Account of Etruscans as Migrants to Italy

    04/03/2007 9:27:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 58 replies · 1,641+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 3, 2007 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Geneticists have added an edge to a 2,500-year-old debate over the origin of the Etruscans, a people whose brilliant and mysterious civilization dominated northwestern Italy for centuries until the rise of the Roman republic in 510 B.C. Several new findings support a view held by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus — but unpopular among archaeologists — that the Etruscans originally migrated to Italy from the Near East. Though Roman historians played down their debt to the Etruscans, Etruscan culture permeated Roman art, architecture and religion. The Etruscans were master metallurgists and skillful seafarers who for a time dominated much of...
  • Where Did The Etruscans Come From?

    08/06/2005 9:08:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies · 2,066+ views
    Etruscology website ^ | June 2002 | Dieter H. Steinbauer
    Nevertheless, after more than a century of research, the linguistic relationship between Lemnian and Etruscan -- despite the scanty material -- is nowadays established to a large extent as an undeniable fact. The phonemic systems can not be set to coincide completely, yet it is significant that apart from the already mentioned four vowel system parallels exist in the consonant inventory, too. There are two varieties of s (here written s and sh) and no indications of the voiced plosives b, d, g, while next to each other are to be found in both languages t and th (no aspirate...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found What Was Once The Biggest City In Italy

    11/07/2004 5:27:22 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 2,055+ views
    The Economist ^ | 11-4-2004
    Scientific treasure hunters Nov 4th 2004 | CLUSIUM, OR POSSIBLY NOT From The Economist print edition Archaeologists may have found what was once the biggest city in Italy REAL archaeology bears about as much resemblance to an Indiana Jones movie as real spying bears to James Bond. Excavation—at least if it is to be meaningfully different from grave robbing—is a matter of painstaking trowel work, not gung-ho gold-grabbing. But there is still a glimmer of the grave robber in many archaeologists, and the search for a juicy royal tomb can stimulate more than just rational, scientific instincts. Few tombs would...
  • The Etruscans: Reopening the Case of the Mute Civilization

    08/04/2004 11:39:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 947+ views
    New York Times ^ | May 27, 2001 | Alan Riding
    Yet even the catalog is wary of answering the question central to the "mystery" of the Etruscans: where did they come from? Did they migrate from Greece or beyond? Did they travel down from the Alps? Or, as their pre- Indo-European language might suggest, were they a people indigenous to today's Tuscany who suddenly acquired the tools for rapid development? Such are the pros and cons of each theory, the French historian Dominique Briquel notes in his catalog essay, that "the problem must be held to be unresolved." ...[T]hey spoke the same language, which also existed in a written...
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Phaistos Disc declared as fake by scholar

    07/30/2008 10:56:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies · 302+ views
    The Times of London ^ | July 12, 2008 | Dalya Alberge, Arts Correspondent
    Jerome Eisenberg, a specialist in faked ancient art, is claiming that the disc and its indecipherable text is not a relic dating from 1,700BC, but a forgery that has duped scholars since Luigi Pernier, an Italian archaeologist, "discovered" it in 1908 in the Minoan palace of Phaistos on Crete. Pernier was desperate to impress his colleagues with a find of his own, according to Dr Eisenberg, and needed to unearth something that could outdo the discoveries made by Sir Arthur Evans, the renowned English archaeologist, and Federico Halbherr, a fellow Italian... Dr Eisenberg, who has conducted appraisals for the US...
  • Phaistos Disk: Greek or Luwian?

    06/25/2009 3:16:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 592+ views
    Examiner ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2009 | Diana Gainer
    Since this disk was found in Crete, and the people of Crete today speak Greek, that's a good language to assume was spoken by the maker of the disk. Still, that's a guess, or a hypothesis, not a fact. Besides that, we know that not everybody on Crete spoke Greek in the Bronze Age. The classical Greeks mentioned people they called Eteocretans who did not speak Greek. Further, we know that Linear A, written by the Minoans on Crete before the Mycenean Greeks came, did not represent Greek. Professor Hubert LaMarle considers it to be an early Indo-Iranian language, related...
  • Mystery of 4,000-year-old ‘CD-ROM’ is solved

    10/26/2014 7:04:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    uk.news.yahoo.com ^ | Fri, Oct 24, 2014 | Rob Waugh –
    A mysterious symbol-covered disc which was found in Greek ruins in 1908 has finally revealed its secrets after archaeologists battled to decode it for more than a century. The Phaistos Disc - described as the ‘first Minoan CD-ROM’ is covered in 241 images, thought to be fragments of 45 mysterious symbols. The language used is unknown, and the technology behind the disc is equally mysterious. The disc was created in 1,700 BC - using pre-printed symbols to press a mysterious message into clay. The disc pre-dates the printing press by thousands of years, but uses a similar technology - which...
  • 4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded

    10/29/2014 3:28:53 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 44 replies
    Clapaway ^ | October 28, 2014
    4000-Year-Old Phaistos Disk Decoded October 28, 2014 Scientists have been trying to decipher the mysterious “Phaistos Disk” markings ever since the clay disk from the Second Millenium B.C. was first discovered in 1908 on the Greek island of Crete. And it seems like they’ve finally cracked the code. At 4,000 years old, the relic dates back to the Minoan civilization and features an inscription that boasts a mysterious language, with symbols on both sides in a spiral configuration, which can be read inward from the outside rim. Researchers have been studying the puzzling artifact since its discovery, and now Dr....
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • DNA Sheds Light On Minoans

    04/04/2008 8:02:26 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 1,101+ views
    Kathimerini ^ | 4-4-2008
    DNA sheds light on Minoans Crete’s fabled Minoan civilization was built by people from Anatolia, according to a new study by Greek and foreign scientists that disputes an earlier theory that said the Minoans’ forefathers had come from Africa. The new study – a collaboration by experts in Greece, the USA, Canada, Russia and Turkey – drew its conclusions from the DNA analysis of 193 men from Crete and another 171 from former neolithic colonies in central and northern Greece. The results show that the country’s neolithic population came to Greece by sea from Anatolia – modern-day Iran, Iraq and...
  • Expedition Seeks Clues To Lost Bronze Age Culture (Minoans - Robert Ballard)

    06/04/2006 4:05:30 PM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 656+ views
    Yahoo ^ | 6-1-2006 | Richard C. Lewis
    Expedition seeks clues to lost Bronze Age culture By Richard C. Lewis Thu Jun 1, 4:11 PM ETReuters Photo: Deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard speaks at the National Geographic Society in an undated file photo.... PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island (Reuters) - An underwater explorer who found the Titanic and a team of international scientists will soon survey waters off the Greek island of Crete for clues to a once-powerful Bronze Age-era civilization. The expedition about 75 miles northwest of Crete aims to learn more about the Minoans, who flourished during the Bronze Age, and seeks to better understand seafaring four millennia ago,...
  • Ancient Volcano, Seeds And Treerings, Suggest Rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean History (More)

    04/29/2006 12:24:20 PM PDT · by blam · 15 replies · 723+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 4-28-2006 | Alex Kwan
    April 28, 2006Cornell study of ancient volcano, seeds and tree rings, suggests rewriting Late Bronze Age Mediterranean history By Alex Kwan Separated in history by 100 years, the seafaring Minoans of Crete and the mercantile Canaanites of northern Egypt and the Levant (a large area of the Middle East) at the eastern end of the Mediterranean were never considered trading partners at the start of the Late Bronze Age. Until now. Trenchmaster Vronwy Hankey and foreman Antonis Zidianakis excavate storage jars from the Minoan settlement Myrtos-Pyrgos. The jars were analyzed in the Cornell study using radiocarbon analyses. Cultural links between...
  • Minoan civilization was made in Europe

    05/14/2013 12:29:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 5-13-2013 | Ewen Callaway
    When the British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans discovered the 4,000-year-old Palace of Minos on Crete in 1900, he saw the vestiges of a long-lost civilization whose artefacts set it apart from later Bronze-Age Greeks. The Minoans, as Evans named them, were refugees from Northern Egypt who had been expelled by invaders from the South about 5,000 years ago, he claimed. Modern archaeologists have questioned that version of events, and now ancient DNA recovered from Cretan caves suggests that the Minoan civilization emerged from the early farmers who settled the island thousands of years earlier....
  • Greek Island of Santorini Volcano Erupted in 16th Century

    03/22/2014 4:46:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | March 8, 2014 | Abed Alloush
    According to a recent international study, the volcano of the island Santorini, Greece, erupted in the 16th century BC and not earlier. The survey characterized a number of research studies that took place in the past and have indicated that Santorini's volcano may have erupted a century earlier, as unreliable because the method based on tree-ring measurements that they used, could not provide them with accurate results. An international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity, that this method cannot provide...
  • Who Were the Hurrians?

    06/25/2008 6:23:45 PM PDT · by blam · 28 replies · 595+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | July/August 2008 | Andrew Lawler
    Who Were the Hurrians? Volume 61 Number 4, July/August 2008 New discoveries in Syria suggest a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization Excavations at the 3rd millennium city of Urkesh in Syria are revealing new information about the mysterious people who lived there, known as the Hurrians. This view of the city's royal palace shows the service area (left) and living quarters (right). (Ken Garrett) With its vast plaza and impressive stone stairway leading up to a temple complex, Urkesh was designed to last. And for well over a millennium, this city on the dusty plains of what is...
  • Unearthed Hittite artifacts in Istanbul break new ground [sic, Hurrians]

    11/03/2013 9:48:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Thursday, October 31, 2013 | Omer Erbil
    Traces of the Hurrian civilization discovered in excavations in the ancient city of Bathonea in Istanbul's Küçükçekmece river basin are being hailed as the year's most important discovery as they provide the first ever proof that the Hittites came to Europe and civilisations' long history... The traces from the Hurrian civilization -- the early Hittite era -- were found in the Küçükçekmece river basin in the western parts of the city. The discoveries -- iron god and goddess statues that were found in two different places -- have created great excitement among researchers... Two Hurrian statues, bitumen, tin and...
  • Genetic study proves Israel's wild boars originated in Europe

    11/10/2013 7:44:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Nov 04, 2013 | Tel Aviv University
    Wild boars look more or less the same in Israel as they do anywhere else: stalky and hairy with big heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. So scientists had no reason to suspect Israeli wild boars were any different than their brothers and sisters roaming the Middle East, from Egypt to Iran... unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild boars originated in Europe. After a genetic and archaeological analysis, the researchers suggest the wild boars living in Israel are descendants of domesticated pigs brought to Israel starting almost 3,000 years ago by the Philistines and other...
  • 50 Ancient Tombs Uncovered (1400BC, Crete)

    07/18/2004 1:17:56 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 2,126+ views
    The Australian ^ | 7-18-2004
    50 ancient tombs uncovered From correspondents in Athens July 18, 2004 ARCHEOLOGISTS have discovered 50 tombs dating back to the late Minoan period, around 1400 BC, and containing a number of artifacts on the Greek island of Crete, ANA news agency reported today. The tombs were part of the once powerful ancient city of Kydonia, which was destroyed at the time but later rebuilt. The oldest among them contained bronze weapons, jewellery and vases and are similar to the tombs of fallen soldiers of the Mycenaean type from mainland Greece, said the head of the excavations, Maria Vlazaki. The more...
  • Inscription in Carian and Greek

    07/17/2004 6:20:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,150+ views
    Anistoriton ^ | 27 Dec. 1997 | (editors)
    On 8/9 November 1997 the Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung reported that German and Turks archaeologists, who conducted excavations at the ancient site of Kaunos on Asia Minor coast just across the Greek island of Rhodes, unearthed an inscription in two scripts. The top part is inscribed in the Carian language and the same text is repeated in the lower part in classical Greek. The inscription is a resolution of the city of Kaunos to honor two Athenians, one of whom is Nikokles of Lycekleous a fairly know person and contemporary of Demosthenes. Thus, the stone was safely dated to...
  • In the footsteps of the Bronze Men [ the Carians in Egypt ]

    04/06/2010 6:03:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 317+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | Issue No. 992, April 1-7, 2010 | Nevine El-Aref
    When Herodotus toured the known world during the fifth century BC to compile his international history, he did not forget his hometown Caria, now Bodrum in Turkey. Caria (the name means "the steep country") stood in the western part of Anatolia, whose coast, according to the ancient world map, stretched from mid-Ionia to Lycia and east to Phrygia. Mountains and valleys were the main features of the country's scenery, and it was poor in agriculture in comparison with its counterparts at the time: Egypt and Babylonia. Its hilltops were fortified, while villages were scattered in valleys and it was hard...
  • Quarry, Setting and Team Marks: The Carian Connection

    10/08/2004 3:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 499+ views
    University of Leiden (Netherlands) ^ | 1998 | (about) Sheldon Lee Gosline
    In this paper, the author proposes some specific attributions for signs deriving from the Carian or another West-Anatolian script found on in situ blocks from standing walls: quarry, block positioning, or team marks. The proposals are based on data from three distant yet related sites where such marks have been preserved, among which the Khnum temple terrace on Elephantine. In time, however, the quarry marks at Elephantine do not correspond with the other two sites. Therefore, the author proposes that the terrace was built several hundred years earlier than the Graeco-Roman Period to which the terrace is usually dated, or...
  • "King's" villas cause outrage [Caria, in modern Turkey]

    05/17/2008 11:11:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 190+ views
    Voices Newspaper ^ | Saturday, May 17, 2008 | editor
  • Illegal excavation reveals an important discovery

    08/10/2010 8:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | Sunday, August 8, 2010 | Dogan News Agency
    The Tourism and Culture Ministry started a research investigation into an illegal excavation which took place in the Zeus Karios area in Milas, Bodrum. The illegal excavation revealed the large tomb stone of King Hekataios. The tomb stone was made in 390 B.C. and it is said that the discovery is one of the most important archeological discovery in modern times. Speaking after the research, Undersecretariat of Culture and Tourism Ministry Özgür Özarslan said: "The discovery revealed that the tomb stone belongs to Hekataios's father Mausolos. Mausolos was the satrap of Karia." The tomb stone is thought to have been...
  • Remains of Minoan-style painting discovered during excavations of Canaanite palace

    11/10/2009 8:30:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 851+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | Monday, November 9, 2009 | Amir Gilat, Ph.D., Rachel Feldman
    The remains of a Minoan-style wall painting, recognizable by a blue background, the first of its kind to be found in Israel, was discovered in the course of the recent excavation season at Tel Kabri. This fresco joins others of Aegean style that have been uncovered during earlier seasons at the Canaanite palace in Kabri. "It was, without doubt, a conscious decision made by the city's rulers who wished to associate with Mediterranean culture and not adopt Syrian and Mesopotamian styles of art like other cities in Canaan did. The Canaanites were living in the Levant and wanted to feel...
  • Bulgarian Archaeology Finds Said to Rewrite History of Black Sea Sailing

    09/14/2011 2:56:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Novinite ^ | Monday, September 12, 2011 | Sofia News Agency
    Massive ancient stone anchors were found by divers participating in an archaeological expedition near the southern Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol. The expedition, led by deputy director of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum Dr Ivan Hristov, found the precious artifacts west of the Sts. Cyricus and Julitta island. The 200-kg beautifully ornamented anchors have two holes in them -- one for the anchor rope and another one for a wooden stick. They were used for 150-200-ton ships that transported mainly wheat, but also dried and salted fish, skins, timber and metals from what now is Bulgaria's coast. The anchors' shape...
  • Non-Attic Characters

    07/18/2004 6:43:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 951+ views
    University of California, Irvine, Thesaurus Linguae Graecae ^ | September 7 2003 (rev 9-28-2003) | Nick Nicholas
    The first character is the sampi, as it was used (briefly) in the Ionic alphabet as a sibilant. The first question to answer is whether it should be separated from the numerical sampi at all... The second question is what the phonetic value of sampi was... Jeffery (1990:39)... also suspects that sampi was originally borrowed from Carian, and used to express the Carian sibilant in loanwords... In the pre-Hellenic language of Lemnos (possibly related to Etruscan), it is used, but Jeffery has no idea what it sounded like. In the older inscriptions of the non-Hellenic language of Phrygia (related...