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Keyword: neolithic

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  • Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity - Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians

    01/02/2012 6:33:58 AM PST · by blam · 42 replies
    Science Direct ^ | Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack Of Continuity Between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers And Contemporary Scandinavians September 24, 2009. Summary The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century [1] , [2] and [3] . Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible [3] , [4] and [5] . Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers existed in parallel to early...
  • Ancient DNA reveals male diffusion through the Neolithic Mediterranean route

    06/02/2011 5:26:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Neolithic is a key period in the history of the European settlement. Although archaeological and present-day genetic data suggest several hypotheses regarding the human migration patterns at this period, validation of these hypotheses with the use of ancient genetic data has been limited. In this context, we studied DNA extracted from 53 individuals buried in a necropolis used by a French local community 5,000 y ago. The relatively good DNA preservation of the samples allowed us to obtain autosomal, Y-chromosomal, and/or mtDNA data for 29 of the 53 samples studied. From these datasets, we established close parental relationships within...
  • Genetic Study Uncovers New Path to Polynesia

    02/05/2011 4:22:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Thursday, February 3, 2011 | University of Leeds
    The islands of Polynesia were first inhabited around 3,000 years ago, but where these people came from has long been a hot topic of debate amongst scientists. The most commonly accepted view, based on archaeological and linguistic evidence as well as genetic studies, is that Pacific islanders were the latter part of a migration south and eastwards from Taiwan which began around 4,000 years ago. But the Leeds research -- published February 3 in The American Journal of Human Genetics -- has found that the link to Taiwan does not stand up to scrutiny. In fact, the DNA of current...
  • New research forces U-turn in population migration theory

    05/23/2008 10:49:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies · 142+ views
    University of Leeds ^ | May 23, 2008 | Unknown
    Research led by the University of Leeds has discovered genetic evidence that overturns existing theories about human migration into Island Southeast Asia (covering the Philippines, Indonesia and Malaysian Borneo) - taking the timeline back by nearly 10,000 years. Prevailing theory suggests that the present-day populations of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) originate largely from a Neolithic expansion from Taiwan driven by rice agriculture about 4,000 years ago - the so-called "Out of Taiwan" model. However an international research team, led by the UK’s first Professor of Archaeogenetics, Martin Richards, has shown that a substantial fraction of their mitochondrial DNA lineages (inherited...
  • Return of the death mound: Neolithic-style tombs are back in fashion after 5,000 years...

    09/09/2018 3:22:14 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Mailonline ^ | 7 September 2018 | Phoebe Weston and Harry Pettit
    Full Headline: Return of the death mound: Neolithic-style tombs are back in fashion after 5,000 years as Britain runs out of space to bury the dead These stunning images show the Milky Way etched across the night sky over a Neolithic burial barrow, which will open this weekend as part of a Stone Age tradition being resurrected across Britain. The Soulton Long Barrow in Shropshire is only the third of its kind to be opened in modern times. The burial chamber is based on ancient solution to the lack of burial space in Britain used by our Neolithic ancestors almost...
  • Catalhoyuk Mural: The Earliest Representation of a Volcanic Eruption? [Hasan Dag]

    08/22/2018 8:26:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    BAR ^ | August 8, 2018 | Noah Wiener
    In the early 1960s, archaeologist James Mellaart uncovered a mural at Çatalhöyük, the world's largest and best-preserved Neolithic site, which he interpreted to represent a volcanic eruption. Fifty years later, scientific tests done on pumice at the nearby volcano Hasan Dag confirm that there was, in fact, an eruption between 9,500 and 8,400 years ago -- a timespan including the era that the mural was likely painted. ...In an Archaeology Odyssey article, Michael Balter, author of The Goddess and the Bull, wrote: "One painting, he [Mellart] thought, seemed to represent a town plan of the Neolithic village, with an erupting...
  • Archaeologists explore a rural field in Kansas, and a lost city emerges

    08/20/2018 6:00:52 AM PDT · by C19fan · 64 replies
    LA Times ^ | August 19, 2018 | David Kelly
    Of all the places to discover a lost city, this pleasing little community seems an unlikely candidate. There are no vine-covered temples or impenetrable jungles here — just an old-fashioned downtown, a drug store that serves up root beer floats and rambling houses along shady brick lanes. Yet there’s always been something — something just below the surface.
  • The Catalhoyuk site in Turkey

    08/16/2018 12:17:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Science Mag ^ | August 13, 2018 | Michael Price
    Animal fat on ancient pottery reveals a nearly catastrophic period of human prehistory -- A bit more than 8000 years ago, the world suddenly cooled, leading to much drier summers for much of the Northern Hemisphere. The impact on early farmers must have been extreme, yet archaeologists know little about how they endured. Now, the remains of animal fat on broken pottery from one of the world’s oldest and most unusual protocities -- known as Çatalhöyük -- is finally giving scientists a window into these ancient peoples’ close call with catastrophe... Today, Çatalhöyük is just a series of dusty, sun-baked...
  • A Mesolithic face from Southern Europe

    03/12/2014 4:00:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 12 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-9-2014
    The Mesolithic, a transitional period that lasted from circa 11,000 to 5,000 years ago (between the Palaeolithic and Neolithic), ends with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry and the concurrent arrival of new genetic material from the Middle East. The arrival of the Neolithic farmers, with their carbohydrate-based and domesticated animal diet, along with food-borne pathogens and the inherent metabolic /immunological challenges can be reflected in genetic adaptations of post- Mesolithic populations.Pre-Neolithic genetic material The individual at the centre of the study belongs to a group prior to this influx of new genetic material.“The biggest surprise was to discover...
  • Prehistoric wine discovered in inaccessible caves forces a rethink of ancient Sicilian culture

    06/21/2018 12:08:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Conversation US (Creative Commons license) ^ | February 13, 2018 | Davide Tanasi
    Monte Kronio rises 1,300 feet above the geothermally active landscape of southwestern Sicily. Hidden in its bowels is a labyrinthine system of caves, filled with hot sulfuric vapors. At lower levels, these caves average 99 degrees Fahrenheit and 100 percent humidity. Human sweat cannot evaporate and heat stroke can result in less than 20 minutes of exposure to these underground conditions. Nonetheless, people have been visiting the caves of Monte Kronio since as far back as 8,000 years ago. They’ve left behind vessels from the Copper Age (early sixth to early third millennium B.C.) as well as various sizes of...
  • Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years ago

    04/03/2018 1:44:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Urethralert ^ | 22-Mar-2018 | University of Helsinki
    Researchers mapped the arrival routes of pottery and people representing the Corded Ware Culture complex (c. 2900-2300 BCE) into the Nordic countries by identifying the areas where the pottery was made. Corded Ware pottery was very different from earlier Stone Age pottery. It represented a new technology and style, and as a new innovation, used crushed ceramics -- or broken pottery -- mixed in with the clay. Finland, Estonia and Sweden had at least five different manufacturing areas for Corded Ware pottery which engaged in active pottery trade across the Baltic Sea approximately 5000 years ago. Häme in Southern Finland...
  • Scientists reconstruct the face of 'angry' Mesolithic girl

    01/23/2018 1:32:40 PM PST · by mairdie · 78 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 23 January 2018 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    The last time anyone looked on Dawn's face was 9,000 years ago. Now the teenager can be seen again, after scientists reconstructed her face to show what people looked like in the Mesolithic period, around 7,000 BC. And, according to the experts, this included more 'masculine features' – for both men and women. It's thought that Dawn (known as Avgi, in Greek) was around 15-18 years old when she died.
  • Neolithic girl's reconstructed face unveiled at Athens Acropolis Museum on January 19th

    01/18/2018 6:24:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Tornos news ^ | January 10, 2018 | unattributed
    An 18-year-old girl who lived in Greece 7,000 years ago and was unearthed by archaeologists in Theopetra cave, near the city of Trikala, has had her face reconstructed and is about to officially introduce herself to the public... Dawn (Avgi in Greek) is a woman from the Mesolithic era (7,000 BC) who lived in the Theopetra cave, according to Athens University professor Manolis Papagrigorakis; who has invested a great deal of time and learning in order to bring Greeks “face to face” with their ancestors... Papagrigorakis' team is also working on the reconstruction of the skull of a girl from...
  • Worship Of Phoenix May Have Started 7,400 Years Ago In Central China

    02/23/2006 10:37:30 AM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 664+ views
    Worship of phoenix may start 7,400 years ago in central China New archaeological discoveries show that the worship of the phoenix by ancient Chinese can be dated back as early as 7,400 years ago in central China. A large amount of pottery, decorated with the patterns of beasts, the sun and birds have been excavated at the Gaomiao relics site in Hongjiang, Huaihua City of central China's Hunan Province, according to a report by the Guangming Daily. "The patterns of birds should be the phoenix worshipped by ancient Chinese," said He Gang, a researcher with the Hunan Institute of Archaeology....
  • 'Indiana Joan', 95, is accused of looting $1MILLION in ancient artefacts from Egypt and the ME

    11/25/2017 6:10:05 AM PST · by mairdie · 48 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 25 November 2017 | Brooke Rolfe
    ...Ms Howard, otherwise known as 'Indiana Joan', volunteered on archeological digs for around 11 years with British and American archaeologists in Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel from around 1967... Her collection includes neolithic axe heads more than 40,000 years old, pottery and weapons from the Phoenicians and the Romans, coins and seals and jewellery from the time of the pharaohs, and a precious funerary mask from Egypt. She said a favourite was a Roman dagger she found buried with the skeletal remains of its owner. Another was the wrappings of a mummy's remains and a cat claw wound...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.
  • Immigrants from Middle East reviving lamb and goat market

    09/17/2017 3:27:47 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 46 replies
    Berks Country ^ | September 13, 2017 | Lisa Scheid
    Shumaila Shah knows how to cook her husband's favorite dish the way one might say the Pledge of Allegiance. "Cook onions, tomatoes, garlic and ginger crushed together," she said, articulating something so familiar it didn't need words, English or Punjabi. "Salt, pepper, garam masala. Put meat in and add water to make a gravy. Cook until the meat is soft, not tough." How long? She thinks for a moment. "A half-hour; it depends on the meat," she said. "Then add the potatoes, because they take a shorter time to cook. We eat it with naan." The recipe for her aloo...
  • Lost cities #8: mystery of Cahokia – why did North America's largest city vanish?

    08/19/2016 11:42:09 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 08/17/2016 | Lee Bey
    Located in southern Illinois, eight miles from present-day St Louis, it was probably the largest North American city north of Mexico at that time. It had been built by the Mississippians, a group of Native Americans who occupied much of the present-day south-eastern United States, from the Mississippi river to the shores of the Atlantic. Cahokia was a sophisticated and cosmopolitan city for its time. Yet its history is virtually unknown by most Americans and present-day Illinoisans. ... Its mix of people made Cahokia like an early-day Manhattan, drawing residents from throughout the Mississippian-controlled region: the Natchez, the Pensacola, the...
  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call “farm animals,” including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you won’t find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists — just like there’s no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • Archaeology: The milk revolution

    08/02/2013 11:45:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 40 replies
    Nature ^ | 7-31-2013 | Andrew Curry
    In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd artefacts. The people who had lived there around 7,000 years ago were among central Europe's first farmers, and they had left behind fragments of pottery dotted with tiny holes. It looked as though the coarse red clay had been baked while pierced with pieces of straw. Looking back through the archaeological literature, Bogucki found other examples of ancient perforated pottery. “They were so unusual — people would almost always include them in publications,”...