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Keyword: normanborlaug

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  • Happy Birthday Norman Borlaug - Credited with saving 1 billion people

    04/02/2014 9:37:01 AM PDT · by MichCapCon · 17 replies
    Capitol Confidential ^ | 3/28/2014 | Jarrett Skorup
    I was 21-years-old before I first heard the name Norman Borlaug. It’s a shame it took until my third year of college to learn about one of the greatest humans who ever lived. Borlaug, who died in 2009, was an Iowa-born scientist who spent his life teaching new farming techniques in third world countries. His movement was eventually called the "Green Revolution." Borlaug was introduced to me during a discussion about another of my heroes — the late economist Julian Simon. Simon was the author of, "The Ultimate Resource," in which he argued ferociously against Malthusian concerns about overpopulation. One...
  • Green Revolution leader Norman Borlaug statue unveiled at U.S. Capitol

    03/26/2014 12:07:46 AM PDT · by barmag25 · 19 replies
    WASHINGTON — The father of the so-called Green Revolution has a permanent home in the U.S. Capitol. Lawmakers unveiled a statue of Norman Borlaug on Tuesday in a ceremony on what would have been his 100th birthday. The Iowa native and University of Minnesota graduate is credited with saving as many as 1 billion people from hunger by creating a type of wheat that was disease resistant and high-yielding. Borlaug, who died in 2009, won the 1970 Nobel Prize for his work and has been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Gold Medal. His likeness will join...
  • The Greatest Man You’ve Never Heard Of: Norman Borlaug, An American Hero

    09/13/2012 1:04:14 AM PDT · by Rummyfan · 14 replies
    CAPCON ^ | 12 Sep 2012 | Jarrett Skorup
    Called "arguably the greatest American in the 20th century," during his 95 years, Norman Borlaug probably saved more lives than any other person. He is one of just six people to win the Nobel Peace Prize, the Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. And yet Borlaug, who died three years ago today, is scarcely known in his own country. Born in Iowa in 1914, Borlaug spent most of his life in impoverished nations inventing, improving and teaching the "Green Revolution." His idea was simple: Make developing countries self sufficient in food by teaching them how to use...
  • The Man Who Defused the 'Population Bomb'

    05/03/2012 5:24:43 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | September 16, 2009, 5:35 a.m. ET | GREGG EASTERBROOK
    Norman Borlaug arguably the greatest American of the 20th century died late Saturday after 95 richly accomplished years. The very personification of human goodness, Borlaug saved more lives than anyone who has ever lived. He was America's Albert Schweitzer: a brilliant man who forsook privilege and riches in order to help the dispossessed of distant lands. That this great man and benefactor to humanity died little-known in his own country speaks volumes about the superficiality of modern American culture.
  • Billions Served (Norman Borlaug and the Green Revolution)

    07/03/2002 4:50:07 PM PDT · by TomB · 16 replies · 229+ views
    Reason Magazine ^ | April 2000 | Ronald Bailey
    REASON * April 2000 Billions Served Three decades after he launched the Green Revolution, agronomist Norman Borlaug is still fighting world hunger--and the doomsayers who say it's a lost cause. Interviewed by Ronald Bailey Who has saved more human lives than anyone else in history? Who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970? Who still teaches at Texas A&M at the age of 86? The answer is Norman Borlaug. Who? Norman Borlaug, the father of the "Green Revolution," the dramatic improvement in agricultural productivity that swept the globe in the 1960s. Borlaug grew up on a small farm in...
  • Iowan (Norman Borlaug)Receives Congressional Gold Medal

    07/19/2007 8:05:26 AM PDT · by E Rocc · 6 replies · 383+ views
    KETV (Des Moines, IA) ^ | July 17, 2007
    Iowan Receives Congressional Gold Medal Cresco Native Honored At Ceremony POSTED: 5:22 pm CDT July 17, 2007 UPDATED: 5:37 pm CDT July 17, 2007 DES MOINES, Iowa -- An Iowa native received the nation's highest civilian honor Tuesday morning. Cresco native Norman Borlaug received the Congressional Gold Medal. President George W. Bush was on hand to congratulate Borlaug for his lifetime work to fight hunger around the world. Borlaug created varieties of wheat that were resistant to disease and doubled and tripled yields in developing countries. "I speak for this whole team of hunger fighters that I have been privileged...
  • Norman Borlaug: The Man Who Saved More Human Lives Than Any Other Has Died

    09/13/2009 9:51:41 AM PDT · by Leisler · 32 replies · 1,403+ views
    Reason.com ^ | September 13, 2009 | Ronald Bailey
    Norman Borlaug, the man who saved more human lives than anyone else in history, has died at age 95. Borlaug was the Father of the Green Revolution, the dramatic improvement in agricultural productivity that swept the globe in the 1960s. For spearheading this achievement, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970. One of the great privileges of my life was meeting and talking with Borlaug many times over the past few years. In remembrance, I cite the introduction to Reason's 2000 interview with Borlaug below:
  • The Man Who Defused the 'Population Bomb'

    09/16/2009 9:00:55 AM PDT · by TChris · 20 replies · 1,007+ views
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | 9/16/2009 | Gregg Easterbrook
    Norman Borlaug arguably the greatest American of the 20th century died late Saturday after 95 richly accomplished years. The very personification of human goodness, Borlaug saved more lives than anyone who has ever lived. He was America's Albert Schweitzer: a brilliant man who forsook privilege and riches in order to help the dispossessed of distant lands. That this great man and benefactor to humanity died little-known in his own country speaks volumes about the superficiality of modern American culture. Born in 1914 in rural Cresco, Iowa, where he was educated in a one-room schoolhouse, Borlaug won the Nobel Peace Prize...
  • A Real Humanitarian

    09/14/2009 5:48:05 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 4 replies · 566+ views
    IBD Editorials ^ | September 14, 2009
    Science: Norman Borlaug has died at age 95. Most will respond to the news by saying "Who?" And that's a shame. Borlaug did more for humanity than all of the government programs ever devised put together.Borlaug was known as the father of the Green Revolution, but he was no environmentalist. Unlike the greens, he was actually concerned about the condition of man. While misanthropes and neo-Malthusians were predicting mass starvation, Borlaug developed technologies that dramatically increased the yields of food crops and made them more resistant to disease. Between 1960 and 1990, the agronomist's work was responsible for more than...
  • Norman Borlaug: An American Hero

    08/11/2010 8:13:45 AM PDT · by MichCapCon · 7 replies
    MCPP ^ | 7/12/2010 | Jarrett Skorup
    Called "arguably the greatest American in the 20th century," during his 95 years Norman Borlaug probably saved more lives than any other person. He is one of just six people to win the Nobel Peace Prize, the Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. And yet Dr. Borlaug, who died this past September, is scarcely known in his own country. Born in Iowa in 1914, Borlaug spent most of his life in impoverished nations inventing, improving and teaching the "Green Revolution." His idea was simple: Make developing countries self sufficient in food by teaching them how to use...
  • Tracking the Ancestry of Corn Back 9,000 Years

    05/25/2010 6:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies · 1,099+ views
    New York Times ^ | Monday, May 24, 2010 | Sean B. Carroll
    Many botanists did not see any connection between maize and other living plants. Some concluded that the crop plant arose through the domestication by early agriculturalists of a wild maize that was now extinct, or at least undiscovered. However, a few scientists working during the first part of the 20th century uncovered evidence that they believed linked maize to what, at first glance, would seem to be a very unlikely parent, a Mexican grass called teosinte... George W. Beadle, while a graduate student at Cornell University in the early 1930s, found that maize and teosinte had very similar chromosomes....
  • Iowahawk: Farm Boy (serious tribute to Norman Borlaug)

    09/18/2009 8:16:42 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 30 replies · 2,322+ views
    Iowahawk | September 17, 2009 | David Burge
    State Highway 9 is a two lane strip of asphalt that cuts across the northernmost tier of counties in Iowa, from Larchwood to Lansing. If you drive its 320 miles, as I have done many times, you will not be dissuaded from the stereotype of Iowa as a flat boring expanse of cornfields. The few points of interest include Lake Okoboji and the headquarters of Winnebago in Forest City. It takes you near Mason City, the model for "River City" in Meredith Willson's The Music Man, and the site of the plane crash that claimed Buddy Holly after a February...
  • 'Apostle of Wheat' (Norman)Borlaug had deep Minnesota roots (Won Nobel Peace Prize)

    09/14/2009 4:00:34 AM PDT · by MplsSteve · 3 replies · 318+ views
    Minneapolis StarTribune (aka The Red Star) ^ | 9/13/09 | Rochelle Olson/Sharon Schmickle - Staff Reporters
    In the final days of a nearly three-year battle with lymphoma, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Norman Borlaug was asked by his daughter if he needed anything. The 95-year-old responded: "Africa. Africa. I have not finished my mission in Africa," his daughter, Jeanie Borlaug Laube, said Sunday from Dallas. Norman Borlaug, an Iowa farmboy who graduated from the University of Minnesota, believed food was a moral right. He traveled the world as a scientist and humanitarian, becoming the Green Revolution's "Apostle of Wheat" for the high-yield grain he perfected. Borlaug, who most recently had been a distinguished professor at Texas A&M...
  • Nobel Prize winner Norman Borlaug dies at 95

    09/12/2009 10:24:34 PM PDT · by Jedidah · 16 replies · 992+ views
    Associated Press ^ | September 12, 2009 | Matt Curry and Betsy Blaney
    DALLAS – Agricultural scientist Norman Borlaug, the father of the "green revolution" who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his role in combating world hunger and saving hundreds of millions of lives, died Saturday in Texas, a Texas A&M University spokeswoman said. He was 95. . . . more at link
  • The Man Who Fed the World (Did you notice that Biotech is a Good Thing?)

    09/05/2006 5:16:29 AM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 42 replies · 1,058+ views
    Opinion Journal (Wall Street Journal) ^ | September 5, 2006 | RONALD BAILEY
    A poor Iowa farm boy became one of humanity's greatest benefactors. --- Who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970? You may be forgiven for not remembering, given some of the prize's dubious recipients over the years (e.g., Yasser Arafat). Well, then: Who has saved perhaps more lives than anyone else in history? The answer to both questions is, of course, Norman Borlaug. Who? Norman Borlaug, 92, is the father of the "Green Revolution," the dramatic improvement in agricultural productivity that swept the globe in the 1960s. He is now the subject of an admiring biography by Leon Hesser... "The...
  • Feeding the World Man behind ‘Green Revolution’ turns 90

    03/28/2004 8:18:26 PM PST · by SwinneySwitch · 10 replies · 470+ views
    The Monitor ^ | March 25,2004
    Four decades ago, scientific doomsayers painted a bleak picture of the future. They claimed the world would be wracked by famine because dwindling resources would not be enough to feed an exploding population. They said nothing could stave off the looming famine. Paul Ehrlich, author of The Population Bomb, predicted in the 1968 book that hundreds of millions of people would starve to death in the 1970s and ’80s. One man proved them wrong — Dr. Norman Borlaug. The Nobel Peace-Prize-winning agronomist, who turns 90 today, is the man behind the “Green Revolution” — the boom in crop productivity and...