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Keyword: phobos

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  • Fantastic Phobos

    04/06/2008 1:49:38 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 15 replies · 26+ views
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | 04/03/2008 | Stephen Smith
    Credit: NASA/Viking 1 Orbiter Apr 03, 2008Fantastic Phobos Conventional theory states that Phobos has been marred by repeated meteor impacts, but could electricity have played a significant role? Phobos is the largest of the two moons of Mars. Deimos is so small that studying its surface has been problematic for astronomers because it cannot be readily observed from Earth. Only the Viking 2 orbiter captured close up images. Phobos, on the other hand, has been examined by Earth stations and by satellites sent to Mars orbit. In the image above, Stickney crater is visible - a ten kilometer-wide excavation that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Asteroid Vesta Full Frame

    08/02/2011 3:01:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | August 02, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why is the northern half of asteroid Vesta more heavily cratered than the south? No one is yet sure. This unexpected mystery has come to light only in the past few weeks since the robotic Dawn mission became the first spacecraft to orbit the second largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. The northern half of Vesta, seen on the upper left of the above image, appears to show some of the densest cratering in the Solar System, while the southern half is unexpectedly smooth. Also unknown is the origin of grooves that circle the asteroid...
  • Martian Moon Phobos Got Its Strange Grooves from Rolling Boulders

    11/24/2018 6:35:38 AM PST · by ETL · 74 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Nov 22, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Phobos’ grooves, which are visible across most of the moon’s surface, were first glimpsed in the 1970s by NASA’s Mariner and Viking missions.Over the years, there has been no shortage of explanations put forward for how they formed.Some planetary researchers have posited that large impacts on Mars have showered the nearby moon with groove-carving debris. Others think that Mars’ gravity is slowly tearing Phobos apart, and the grooves are signs of structural failure.Still other scientists have made the case that there’s a connection between the grooves and the impact that created a large crater called Stickney.In the 1970s, University of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day

    11/07/2009 6:00:56 AM PST · by sig226 · 16 replies · 915+ views
    NASA ^ | 11/07/09 | HiRISE, MRO, LPL (U. Arizona), NASA
    Stickney Crater Credit: HiRISE, MRO, LPL (U. Arizona), NASA Explanation: Stickney Crater, the largest crater on the martian moon Phobos, is named for Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, mathematician and wife of astronomer Asaph Hall. Asaph Hall discovered both the Red Planet's moons in 1877. Over 9 kilometers across, Stickney is nearly half the diameter of Phobos itself, so large that the impact that blasted out the crater likely came close to shattering the tiny moon. This stunning, enhanced-color image of Stickney and surroundings was recorded by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as it passed within some...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day

    03/17/2010 11:33:08 AM PDT · by sig226 · 15 replies · 678+ views
    NASA ^ | 3/17/10 | G. Neukum (FU Berlin) et al., Mars Express, DLR, ESA
    Phobos from Mars Express Credit: G. Neukum (FU Berlin) et al., Mars Express, DLR, ESA Explanation: Why is this small object orbiting Mars? The origin of Phobos, the larger of the two moons orbiting Mars, remains unknown. Phobos and Deimos appear very similar to C-type asteroids, yet gravitationally capturing such asteroids, circularizing their orbits, and dragging them into Mars' equatorial plane seems unlikely. Pictured above is Phobos as it appeared during last week's flyby of ESA's Mars Express, a robotic spacecraft that began orbiting Mars in 2003. Visible in great detail is Phobos' irregular shape, strangely dark terrain, numerous...
  • New Japanese mission will be going to the Moons of Mars

    05/04/2017 4:35:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 05/04/2017 | Matt WIlliams
    Known as the Martian Moons Exploration (MMX) mission, the plan is to have a robotic spacecraft fly to Phobos and Deimos to explore their surfaces and return samples to Earth for analysis. The spacecraft would be deployed sometime in the 2020s, and would be tasked with two main objectives. The first would be to help scientists determine the origins of Phobos and Deimos, which has been a subject of debate for some time. Whereas some believe that these moons are capture asteroids, others have argued that they were created when fragments ejected from Mars (due to giant impacts on the...
  • A NASA Satellite Almost Collided Into a Martian Moon

    03/03/2017 6:24:22 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    popularmechanics.com ^ | 03/03/2017 | By David Grossman
    NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is coming up on its second year studying the Red Planet's atmosphere. But it had to make an unexpected maneuver this week as it came face to face with an unlikely foe—a Martian moon named Phobos. The larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos' defining feature is a giant crater on its surface, Stickney, and a smaller crater within that crater, Limtoc. It moves around Mars faster than Mars rotates, and it became clear last week that it was going to be on a course missing the MAVEN satellite by only seven seconds....
  • Monster volcano gave Mars extreme makeover: study

    03/03/2016 11:08:06 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | March 2, 2016 by | Laurence Coustal, Marlowe Hood
    A volcano on Mars half the size of France spewed so much lava 3.5 billion years ago that the weight displaced the Red Planet's outer layers, according to a study released Wednesday. Mars' original north and south poles, in other words, are no longer where they once were. The findings explain the unexpected location of dry river beds and underground reservoirs of water ice, as well as other Martian mysteries that have long perplexed scientists, the lead researcher told AFP. "If a similar shift happened on Earth, Paris would be in the Polar Circle," said Sylvain Bouley, a geomorphologist at...
  • Did A Giant Impact Create The Two Faces Of Mars?

    03/15/2007 2:14:24 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies · 855+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 3-15-2007 | David Shiga
    Did a giant impact create the two faces of Mars? 16:29 15 March 2007 NewScientist.com news service David Shiga, Houston Mars's northern hemisphere is lower in elevation – by about 5 kilometres – than its southern hemisphere (see image below). This coloured topographical map shows low elevations in blue and high elevations in yellow and red. The map is centred on a latitude of 55° north (Illustration: Mike Caplinger/MSSS) Mars's southern hemisphere is higher and more heavily cratered than the northern hemisphere, suggesting it is older terrain. The two low elevations (blue) in this map, which is centred on the...
  • Red Planet's Ancient Equator Located

    04/24/2005 8:18:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies · 2,163+ views
    Scientific American (online) ^ | April 20, 2005 | Sarah Graham
    Jafar Arkani-Hamed of McGill University discovered that five impact basins--dubbed Argyre, Hellas, Isidis, Thaumasia and Utopia--form an arclike pattern on the Martian surface. Three of the basins are well-preserved and remain visible today. The locations of the other two, in contrast, were inferred from measurements of anomalies in the planet's gravitational field... a single source--most likely an asteroid that was initially circling the sun in the same plane as Mars--created all five craters. At one point the asteroid passed close to the Red Planet... and was broken apart by the force of the planet's gravity. The resulting five pieces subsequently...
  • Long-Destroyed Fifth Planet May Have Caused Lunar Cataclysm, Researchers Say

    03/25/2002 2:42:10 PM PST · by vannrox · 155 replies · 4,757+ views
    SPACE dot COM ^ | 18 March 2002 ,posted: 03:00 pm ET | By Leonard David, Senior Space Writer
    Asteroid Vesta: The 10th Planet? Discovery Brightens Odds of Finding Another Pluto Nemesis: The Million Dollar Question HOUSTON, TEXAS -- Our solar system may have had a fifth terrestrial planet, one that was swallowed up by the Sun. But before it was destroyed, the now missing-in-action world made a mess of things. Space scientists John Chambers and Jack Lissauer of NASA's Ames Research Center hypothesize that along with Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars -- the terrestrial, rocky planets -- there was a fifth terrestrial world, likely just outside of Mars's orbit and before the inner asteroid belt. Moreover, Planet V...
  • Red Planet Impact: Huge Moons May Have Crashed Into Mars

    07/04/2016 6:40:49 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    Space.com ^ | July 4, 2016 11:01am ET | Charles Q. Choi
    Phobos and Deimos are both small for moons — about 14 and 7.7 miles (22.5 and 12.4 kilometers) wide, respectively — and sort of potato-shaped. Compared to other satellites in the solar system, they look more like asteroids. As a result, astronomers previously hypothesized that these moons were asteroids captured by Mars' gravitational pull. ...previous research suggested that Phobos and Deimos would have relatively irregular orbits. In reality, these moons have nearly circular orbits positioned near the Martian equator. ... huge impact that previous research suggested created the gigantic Borealis basin in the northern lowlands of Mars, which covers two-fifths...
  • Astrobiology Top 10: Earth's Moon May Not Be Critical to Life

    12/25/2015 12:03:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Astrobiology ^ | Wednesday, December 23, 2015 | Keith Cooper
    In 1993, French astronomer Jacques Laskar ran a series of calculations indicating that the gravity of the Moon is vital to stabilizing the tilt of our planet. Earth's obliquity, as this tilt is technically known as, has huge repercussions for climate. Laskar argued that should Earth's obliquity wander over hundreds of thousands of years, it would cause environmental chaos by creating a climate too variable for complex life to develop in relative peace. So his argument goes, we should feel remarkably lucky to have such a large moon on our doorstep, as no other terrestrial planet in our solar system...
  • Mars Will Become a Ringed Planet When Phobos Dies

    11/23/2015 7:09:44 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 27 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 23 Nov, 2015 | IRENE KLOTZ
    Phobos survived a giant impact early in its history, but damage from the crash left the moon weak, say Benjamin Black and Tushar Mittal, planetary scientists with University of California at Berkeley. Their study shows that in 20 million to 40 million years, Phobos will break apart, leaving a cloud of debris that will relatively quickly assembly into a ring around Mars. Initially, the ring will be as dense as Saturn's rings today, and it will last for up to 100 million years, the study shows.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Phobos: Doomed Moon of Mars

    11/22/2015 6:33:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    NASA ^ | November 22, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This moon is doomed. Mars, the red planet named for the Roman god of war, has two tiny moons, Phobos and Deimos, whose names are derived from the Greek for Fear and Panic. These martian moons may well be captured asteroids originating in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter or perhaps from even more distant reaches of the Solar System. The larger moon, Phobos, is indeed seen to be a cratered, asteroid-like object in this stunning color image from the robotic Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, recorded at a resolution of about seven meters per pixel. But Phobos orbits...
  • Mars’ Moon Phobos Undergoing ‘Structural Failure’

    11/10/2015 4:49:46 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 10, 2015 | Nancy Atkinson
    One of the most striking features we see on images of Phobos is the parallel sets of grooves on the moon’s surface. They were originally thought to be fractures caused by an impact long ago. But scientists now say the grooves are early signs of the structural failure that will ultimately destroy this moon. "We think that Phobos has already started to fail, and the first sign of this failure is the production of these grooves," said Terry Hurford, from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. ... Mars' gravity is pulling in Phobos closer by about 2 meters (6.6 feet) every...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Phobos 360

    12/24/2013 9:13:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 77 replies
    NASA ^ | December 25, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What does the Martian moon Phobos look like? To better visualize this unusual object, images from ESA's Mars Express orbiter have been combined into a virtual rotation movie. The rotation is actually a digital illusion -- tidally-locked Phobos always keeps the same face toward its home planet, as does Earth's moon. The above video highlights Phobos' chunky shape and an unusually dark surface covered with craters and grooves. What lies beneath the surface is a topic of research since the moon is not dense enough to be filled with solid rock. Phobos is losing about of centimeter of altitude...
  • Russia’s Second Shot at Phobos May Return Bits of Mars As Well

    11/11/2013 6:55:14 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    After the tragic failure of the first Phobos-Grunt mission to even make it out of low-Earth orbit, the Russian space agency (Roscosmos) is hoping to give it another go at Mars’ largest moon with the Phobos-Grunt 2 mission in 2020. This new-and-improved version of the spacecraft will also feature a lander and return stage, and, if successful, may not only end up sending back pieces of Phobos but of Mars as well. The origins of Phobos have long been a topic of planetary science debate. Did it form with Mars as a planet? Is it a wayward asteroid that ventured...
  • Discovery of 2 Monoliths,One On Mars,in 2009,& The One on Phobos,in 2007,As Revealed By Buzz Aldrin

    09/28/2013 1:04:40 PM PDT · by lbryce · 56 replies
    C-Span Video Library ^ | July 19, 2009 | Staff
    This post is a conglomeration of several articles, sources of information, on research that I've gathered, circumstances of which can be interpreted, lead to the conclusion of the seeming existence of two monoliths, uncovered in situations unrelated to each other. One of the so-called monolith-shaped objects was discovered by the Mars Global Surveyor in 2009 on the planet Mars, whereas the other so-called monolith-shaped object found located on the Martian moon of Phobos in 2007. I perused through many numerous articles to find the most straight-forward, scholarly, scientifically non-committal, links, sources of information, assiduously avoiding any histrionic, hysteria-driven conspiracy-type sources...
  • Moon Dance: Curiosity Rover Captures Movie of Phobos and Deimos Together

    08/15/2013 3:31:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 15, 2013 | Nancy Atkinson on
    Sol 351 for the Curiosity rover on Mars was a marvelous night for a moon dance. The Mars Science Laboratory rover caught sight of Mars’ two moons, Phobos and Deimos together in the sky. And not just one image was captured: the rover’s Mast Camera captured a series of 41 images to allow the MSL team to create this timelapse movie of the dance, where the smaller moon Diemos is occulted by Phobos. To our knowledge, this the first time the two moons have been seen together in any image from the surface of Mars, let alone this sequence of...