Keyword: precolumbian

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Mass Grave Found in California Reveals Prehistoric Violence Against ‘Outsiders’

    10/02/2015 11:34:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Western Digs ^ | September 28, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    ...Now, chemical analysis has revealed that the men were far from home when they were killed, up to several days’ journey from where they were born and raised. The discovery is only the most recent example of violence among prehistoric hunter-gatherers in the region, anthropologists say. But it bears important lessons about the nature of conflict and warfare in pre-contact California... The grave was unearthed in 2012 during the construction of a shopping center in the town of Pleasanton, in the Amador Valley just east of Oakland... One of the men suffered a severe blow above the left eye, causing...
  • New research unveils true origin of ancient turquoise

    06/18/2018 1:37:26 PM PDT · by BBell · 20 replies
    New research published today in the journal Science Advances overturns more than a century of thought about the source of turquoise used by ancient civilizations in Mesoamerica, the vast region that extends from Central Mexico to Central America. For more than 150 years, scholars have argued that the Aztec and Mixtec civilizations, which revered the precious, blue-green mineral, acquired it through import from the American Southwest. However, extensive geochemical analyses reveal that the true geologic source of Aztec and Mixtec turquoise lies within Mesoamerica. Geochemist Alyson Thibodeau, assistant professor of earth sciences at Dickinson College, and a team of researchers...
  • Archaeologists find new mass child sacrifice site in Peru

    06/09/2018 4:48:27 PM PDT · by BBell · 42 replies
    A group of archaeologists has discovered the remains of more than 50 children who were ritually sacrificed by the pre-Columbian Chimu culture on the northern coast of what is now Peru. The site is located a close to another where evidence of the biggest-ever sacrifice of children was found, with more than 140 youngsters were slain. But the most recent discovery may be even bigger. “So far we have found the remains of 56 children who were sacrificed by the Chimu culture,” archaeologist Gabriel Prieto told AFP. “At this new site, we can easily double the number of remains we...
  • Wealthy liberal plunders refuge to furnish estate

    05/25/2008 8:52:52 AM PDT · by docbnj · 24 replies · 1,424+ views
    Vineyard Gazette ^ | 23 May 2008 | Mike Seccombe
    [Martha's Vineyard] The Sheriff’s Meadow Foundation this week issued a public apology and launched an overhaul of its land management practices following the revelation that large numbers of trees and other plants had been dug up from two of its preserves and used to landscape an exclusive private property on the North Shore. *** The two foundation properties, the Caroline Tuthill Preserve in Edgartown and the Priscilla Hancock Meadow in Chilmark, were left damaged by heavy earth moving equipment brought in by contractors hired to landscape the 30-acre property of Dirk Ziff near Lambert’s Cove in West Tisbury.
  • Indiana Legend Says Welsh Settlers Arrived in the 12th Century

    05/01/2018 12:23:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | September 3, 1989 | Jodi Perras
    On a rugged bluff overlooking the Ohio River, known locally as "Devil's Backbone," centuries of overgrowth obscures a secret of history... In 1799, early settlers found six skeletons clad in breastplates bearing a Welsh coat of arms. Indian legends told of "yellow-haired giants" who settled in Kentucky, southern Indiana, southern Ohio and Tennessee -- a region they called "the Dark and Forbidden Land." Archeologists debunk the legend. They say that evidence indicates that the natives of the region once conducted a vigorous trading network nearby and buried their dead on the bluff... Upstream about 14 miles from Louisville, Ky., the...
  • Amazon Jungle Once Home to Millions More Than Previously Thought

    03/28/2018 6:20:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | By Erin Blakemore | By Erin Blakemore
    Forget small nomadic tribes and pristine jungle: the southern Amazon was likely covered in a network of large villages and ceremonial centers before Columbus. Geoglyphs in the southern Amazon are evidence of a once-thriving population. Photograph courtesy of University of Exeter ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Before Spanish invaders conquered South America, sparse groups of nomadic people clustered around the Amazon River, leaving the surrounding rain forest pristine and untouched. Or did they? New research suggests a very different story—an Amazonian region peppered with rain forest villages, ceremonial earthworks, and a much larger population than previously thought. The research, funded in part by the...
  • Interlocked Spiral of Ancient Skeletons Unearthed in Mexico City

    02/02/2018 12:38:43 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 35 replies
    livescience.com ^ | February 2, 2018 | Megan Gannon
    Modern-day Mexico City is built on top of centuries of previous settlements, so it's not unusual for ancient tombs to occasionally be uncovered beneath the city's streets. It is, however, strange to find 10 ancient skeletons arranged in a spiral with their bodies interlocked, as archaeologists recently did. The 2,400-year-old burial was discovered during salvage excavations of an ancient village beneath the campus of the Pontifical University of Mexico, in southern Mexico City, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) announced.
  • Asian Metal Found in Alaska Reveals Trade Centuries Before European Contact

    10/02/2016 2:15:35 PM PDT · by LouieFisk · 42 replies
    http://westerndigs.org/ ^ | September 29, 2016 | Blake de Pastino
    A bronze buckle and a cylindrical metal bead found in Alaska are the first hard evidence of trade between Asia and the indigenous peoples of the North American Arctic, centuries before contact with Europeans, archaeologists say. An analysis of the artifacts has shown that they were smelted in East Asia out of lead, copper, and tin, before finding their way to an indigenous village some 700 years ago.
  • Ancient Seafarers' Tool Sites, Up to 12,000 Years Old, Discovered on California Island

    06/19/2016 5:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Western Digs ^ | June 2, 2016 | Blake de Pastino
    On a rugged island just offshore from Ventura County, archaeologists have turned up evidence of some of the oldest human activity in coastal Southern California. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the Channel Islands, researchers have found three sites scattered with ancient tool-making debris and the shells of harvested shellfish. The youngest of the three sites has been dated to 6,600 BCE, but based on the types of tools found at the other two, archaeologists say they may be as much as 11,000 to 12,000 years old. The artifacts are traces of what's known as the Island Paleocoastal culture,...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso’s research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois – were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise — Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Scientists Trace an Ancient Connection Between Amazonians and Australasians

    07/22/2015 3:07:40 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 21, 2015 | James Gorman
    Some people in the Brazilian Amazon are very distant relations of indigenous Australians, New Guineans and other Australasians, two groups of scientists who conducted detailed genetic analyses reported Tuesday. But the researchers disagree on the source of that ancestry. The connection is ancient, all agree, and attributable to Eurasian migrants to the Americas who had some Australasian ancestry, the scientists said. But one group said the evidence is clear that two different populations came from Siberia to settle the Americas 15,000 or more years ago. The other scientific team says there was only one founding population from which all indigenous...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerđir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • Evidence of Pre-Columbus Trade Found in Alaska House

    04/17/2015 5:39:17 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 62 replies
    Live Science ^ | April 16, 2015 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists working at the Rising Whale site at Cape Espenberg, Alaska, have discovered several artifacts that were imported from East Asia. Bronze artifacts discovered in a 1,000-year-old house in Alaska suggest trade was occurring between East Asia and the New World centuries before the voyages of Columbus.
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • 'Civil War' skull from Gettysburg that was nearly auctioned off is actually more than 700 years old

    02/08/2015 12:56:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | Sunday, February 8, 2015 | Belinda Robinson
    A skull that was thought to have belonged to a Civil War soldier killed at Gettysburg is actually more than 700 years old and from the Southwest, say experts. The National Park Service has revealed that forensic anthropologists determined that the skull is from the late 1200s and belonged to a Native American man in his early-to-mid 20s. That's nearly 300 years before Christopher Columbus sailed to the New World and 400 years before the first settlement of English in the United States. The company that nearly auctioned the skull last year said notarized documents had showed it was discovered...
  • Indian DNA Links To 6 'Founding Mothers'

    03/13/2008 2:04:39 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies · 1,801+ views
    Yahoo News/AP ^ | 3-13-2008 | Malcom Ritter
    Indian DNA links to 6 'founding mothers' By MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer NEW YORK - Nearly all of today's Native Americans in North, Central and South America can trace part of their ancestry to six women whose descendants immigrated around 20,000 years ago, a DNA study suggests. Those women left a particular DNA legacy that persists to today in about 95 percent of Native Americans, researchers said. The finding does not mean that only these six women gave rise to the migrants who crossed into North America from Asia in the initial populating of the continent, said study co-author...
  • From Stone Darts to Dismembered Bodies... 5,000 Years of Violence in... California

    05/03/2014 9:37:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Western Digs ^ | April 28, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    From shooting their enemies with darts and arrows to crushing their skulls and even harvesting body parts as trophies, the ancient foragers of central California engaged in sporadic, and sometimes severe, violence, according to a new archaeological study spanning 5,000 years. In an effort to understand life and death in one of the ancient West’s most populous regions, anthropologists conducted a landmark study of its dead, cataloging signs of violence found in burials between the Sierra Nevada and the San Francisco Bay, dating from historic times all the way back to 3000 BCE. After 13 years of mining the data,...
  • Mass Grave of ‘Prodigal Sons’ in California Poses Prehistoric Mystery

    10/19/2013 6:21:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Western Digs ^ | October 17,2013 | Blake de Pastino
    New research has turned up some perplexing clues in a prehistoric mystery: the fate of three men found in a mass grave in California, their bodies riddled with arrow points and dumped in a pit some 560 years ago. Their violent deaths came at a tumultuous time in Central California, archaeologists say, as bands were vying brutally for territory and resources. Indeed, the archaeological record from the period is rife with evidence of hand-to-hand combat: fractured skulls, broken arms, even body parts taken as trophies. But the new clues, uncovered by anthropologists at the University of California Davis, don’t have...
  • Native Native American dogs

    07/11/2013 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    Dienekes Anthropology Blog ^ | 11 July 2013 | Dienekes Anthropology Blog
    Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis Barbara van Asch et al. Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and...