Keyword: precolumbian

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  • From Stone Darts to Dismembered Bodies... 5,000 Years of Violence in... California

    05/03/2014 9:37:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    Western Digs ^ | April 28, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    From shooting their enemies with darts and arrows to crushing their skulls and even harvesting body parts as trophies, the ancient foragers of central California engaged in sporadic, and sometimes severe, violence, according to a new archaeological study spanning 5,000 years. In an effort to understand life and death in one of the ancient West’s most populous regions, anthropologists conducted a landmark study of its dead, cataloging signs of violence found in burials between the Sierra Nevada and the San Francisco Bay, dating from historic times all the way back to 3000 BCE. After 13 years of mining the data,...
  • Mass Grave of ‘Prodigal Sons’ in California Poses Prehistoric Mystery

    10/19/2013 6:21:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Western Digs ^ | October 17,2013 | Blake de Pastino
    New research has turned up some perplexing clues in a prehistoric mystery: the fate of three men found in a mass grave in California, their bodies riddled with arrow points and dumped in a pit some 560 years ago. Their violent deaths came at a tumultuous time in Central California, archaeologists say, as bands were vying brutally for territory and resources. Indeed, the archaeological record from the period is rife with evidence of hand-to-hand combat: fractured skulls, broken arms, even body parts taken as trophies. But the new clues, uncovered by anthropologists at the University of California Davis, don’t have...
  • Native Native American dogs

    07/11/2013 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    Dienekes Anthropology Blog ^ | 11 July 2013 | Dienekes Anthropology Blog
    Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis Barbara van Asch et al. Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and...
  • D.N.A. Backs Lore on Pre-Columbian Dogs

    07/15/2013 8:45:18 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 15, 2013 | By Jack Hitt
    BISHOPVILLE, S.C. — Inside a fenced acre on the swampy Lynches River flood plain in central South Carolina, seven of Don Anderson’s primitive dogs spring into high alert at approaching strangers. Medium-sized, they fan out amid his junkyard of improvised habitat: a few large barrels to dig under, an abandoned camper shell from a pickup, segments of black plastic water pipe and backhoed dirt mounds overgrown with waist-high ragweed. These are Carolina dogs, and though they are friendly, one can instantly sense they are different from other dogs. Several rush to the gate, their whole bodies wagging eagerly. Others sprint...
  • Did Carolina Dogs Arrive With Ancient Americans?

    03/28/2006 11:00:20 AM PST · by RegulatorCountry · 46 replies · 793+ views
    National Geographic ^ | March 11, 2003 | Brian Handwerk
    Humans and dogs enjoy a prehistoric relationship, a longstanding bond with its origins in a time when dogs as we know them evolved from wild animals into our domesticated companions. Now, a canine living in a manner similar to that of dogs from those ancient days may have been discovered in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps in the American Southeast. The Carolina Dog, a familiar-looking animal long known in the rural South as the "yaller dog," may be more than the common mutt that immediately meets the eye. I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr., Senior Ecologist at the University...
  • Dog domestication likely started in N. Africa

    08/03/2009 6:19:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies · 944+ views
    Discovery ^ | Aug 3, 2009 | Jennifer Viegas
    A Basenji is a dog breed indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa. Humans might have first domesticated dogs from wolves in Africa, with Egypt being one possibility, since wolves are native to that region. Modern humans originated in Africa, and now it looks like man's best friend first emerged there too. An extensive genetic study on the ancestry of African village dogs points to a Eurasian — possibly North African — origin for the domestication of dogs. Prior research concluded that dogs likely originated in East Asia. However, this latest study, the most thorough investigation ever on the ancestry of African village...
  • The Dixie Dingo

    11/30/2001 1:40:40 PM PST · by blam · 120 replies · 15,672+ views
    Carolinadog.org ^ | U of Carolina
    "The Dixie Dingo" "The Native American Dog" "The American Dingo" " Southern Aboriginal Dog" "The Indian's Dog" Still living Wild in the bottom land swamps and forests of the Southeastern United States. Genetic (mitochondrial DNA) testing being performed at the University of South Carolina, College of Science and Mathematics, indicates that these dogs, related to the earliest domesticated dogs, are the remnant descendants of the feral pariah canids who came across the Bering land mass 8,000 to 11,000 years ago as hunting companions to the ancestors of the Native Americans. However, their future in the wild looks bleak. Loss ...
  • Kenosha Dig Points to Europe as Origin of First Americans

    03/04/2002 12:05:29 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 91 replies · 5,281+ views
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ^ | 3-4-02 | John Fauber
    A contentious theory that the first Americans came here from Europe - not Asia - is challenging a century-old consensus among archaeologists, and a dig in Kenosha County is part of the evidence. The two leading proponents of the Europe theory admit that many scientists reject their contention, instead holding fast to the long-established belief that the first Americans arrived from Siberia via a now-submerged land bridge across the Bering Sea to Alaska. The first of the Europe-to-North America treks probably took place at the height of the last Ice Age more than 18,000 years ago, said Dennis Stanford, ...
  • Dingoes originated in China 18,000 years ago

    09/13/2011 6:47:28 PM PDT · by Palter · 22 replies
    Australian Geographic ^ | 13 Sept 2011 | Natalie Muller
    The dingo came to Australia via southern China, and much earlier than previously thought, says new research. THE DINGO (Canis lupus dingo) first appeared in Australia's archaeological records in 3500-year-old rock paintings in the Pilbara region of WA, but the new evidence suggests they were roaming Australia long before that. DNA samples from domestic Asian dog species and the Australian dingo have shed light on how the iconic canine arrived on Australian soil. According to a study by an international research team, genetic data shows the dingo may have originated in southern China, travelling through mainland southeast Asia and Indonesia to...
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 32 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • America 'discovered by Stone Age hunters from Europe'

    02/28/2012 7:44:29 PM PST · by Theoria · 51 replies · 5+ views
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | 28 Feb 2012 | David Keys
    New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World. A remarkable series of several dozen European-style stone tools, dating back between 19,000 and 26,000 years, have been discovered at six locations along the US east coast. Three of the sites are on the Delmarva Peninsular in Maryland, discovered by archaeologist Dr Darrin Lowery of the University of Delaware. One is in Pennsylvania and another in Virginia. A sixth was discovered by scallop-dredging fishermen on the seabed 60...
  • Unsolved Mystery: Origin Of 800-Year-Old Artifacts Eludes Experts (Portland, Oregon)

    10/07/2002 5:12:26 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies · 722+ views
    Columbian.com ^ | 10-6-2002 | Dean Baker
    UNSOLVED MYSTERY: ORIGIN OF 800-YEAR-OLD ARTIFACTS ELUDES EXPERTS Sunday, October 6, 2002 By DEAN BAKER, Columbian staff writer With almond-shaped eyes and dreadlocked hair, the faces on the 800-year-old clay amulets have been a mystery since they were first discovered on the banks of the Columbia River more than 80 years ago. Who were these guys who lived around modern Ridgefield at the time Genghis Khan conquered Persia and King John of England signed the Magna Carta? "They were not Chinook Indians," said David Fenton, executive director of the Clark County Historical Museum. "Where they came from and where they...
  • First Americans May Have Been European

    02/19/2006 9:08:52 PM PST · by anymouse · 133 replies · 3,061+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 2/19/06 | Bjorn Carey
    ST. LOUIS—The first humans to spread across North America may have been seal hunters from France and Spain. This runs counter to the long-held belief that the first human entry into the Americas was a crossing of a land-ice bridge that spanned the Bering Strait about 13,500 years ago. The new thinking was outlined here Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The tools don’t match Recent studies have suggested that the glaciers that helped form the bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska began receding around 17,000 to 13,000 years ago, leaving very little...
  • Ancient American Skeleton Has European DNA Link

    05/11/2006 5:09:23 PM PDT · by blam · 111 replies · 6,030+ views
    ABC News.com ^ | 11-27-2000
    Ancient American Skeleton Has European DNA Link[Original headline: Sinkhole Skeleton Skeleton’s DNA Could Shed Light on American Migrations] Vanlue, Ohio [AP] — The discovery of prehistoric tools from an Ohio cave is one of several finds that has scientists questioning the identity of settlers thought to have moved in 11,000 years ago. A just completed excavation of Sheriden Cave in Wyandot County, 100 miles southwest of Cleveland, revealed tools made from flaked stone and bone. The items are scheduled to go on display next year at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. Kent State University archaeologist Kenneth Tankersley, who led...
  • Ancient Tools At High Desert Site Go Back 135,000 Years (California)

    11/24/2005 1:02:17 PM PST · by blam · 109 replies · 5,433+ views
    San Bernardino Sun ^ | 11-24-2005 | Chuck Mueller
    Ancient tools at High Desert site go back 135,000 years Chuck Mueller, Staff Writer BARSTOW - In the multicolored hills overlooking the Mojave River Valley, the excavation of stone tools and flakes reveals human activities from the distant past. A new system of geologic dating has confirmed that an alluvial deposit bearing the stone tools and flakes at the Calico archaeological site is about 135,000 years old. But the site could even be older. Calico project director Fred Budinger Jr. said a soil sample, taken at a depth of 17 1/2 feet in one of three master pits at the...
  • New Insight Into Horse Evolution

    07/03/2005 2:03:06 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 32 replies · 1,384+ views
    BBC ^ | Saturday, 2 July, 2005 | Helen Briggs
    Genetic evidence is shedding new light on the origins of horses in the New World, during a particularly hazy period in their evolution. As the Great Ice Age came to an end, some 11,000 years ago, North America was thought to be home to as many as 50 species and subspecies of horse. But studies of ancient DNA tell a rather different story, suggesting the horses belonged to just two species. These are the stilt-legged horses, now extinct, and the caballines. The caballines are thought to be the ancestors of today's domestic horse. "It looks like, as far as we...
  • Prehistoric rock art maps cosmological belief

    06/23/2013 4:52:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Phys.org ^ | June 19, 2013 | U of Tennessee at Knoxville
    It is likely some of the most widespread and oldest art in the United States. Pieces of rock art dot the Appalachian Mountains, and research by University of Tennessee, Knoxville, anthropology professor Jan Simek finds each engraving or drawing is strategically placed to reveal a cosmological puzzle. Recently, the discoveries of prehistoric rock art have become more common. With these discoveries comes a single giant one -- all these drawing and engravings map the prehistoric peoples' cosmological world. The research led by Simek, president emeritus of the UT system and a distinguished professor of science, is published in this month's...
  • Villagers discover ancient ball game statue in Mexico

    05/25/2013 5:50:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 21, 2013 | unattributed
    Villagers installing a water pipe in southwestern Mexico stumbled onto an ancient granite statue depicting a player from a pre-Hispanic ball game, the national anthropology institute said Monday. The stone had been sliced at the neck, like a decapitation, and buried in a ritual that was common at the time, the National Anthropology and History Institute said in a statement. There are indications that the 1.65-meter (5-foot-4) tall statue, which depicts a bow-legged ballplayer with his arms crossed, was built onto an I-shaped ball game field before it was buried and could be more than 1,000 years old. Mesoamericans would...
  • Oldest Temple in Mexican Valley Hints at Possible Human Sacrifice

    04/23/2013 4:06:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience via Yahoo ^ | Monday, April 22, 2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    A newly discovered temple complex in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, reveals hints of a specialized hierarchy of priests -- who may have committed human sacrifice... The temple dates back to 300 B.C. or so, when it was in use by the Zapotec civilization of what is now Oaxaca. Archaeologists have been excavating a site in the valley called El Palenque for years. The site is the center of what was once an independent mini-state. Between 1997 and 2000, the researchers found and studied the remains of a 9,150-square-foot (850 square meters) palace complex complete with a plaza on the...
  • Don't blame a comet for Clovis culture demise, scientists say

    03/10/2013 3:10:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    nbc ^ | Nola Taylor Redd
    comet crashing into the Earth some 13,000 years ago was thought to have spelled doom to a group of early North American people, and possibly the extinction of ice age beasts in the region. But the space rock was wrongly accused, according to a group of 16 scientists in fields ranging from archaeology to crystallography to physics, who have offered counterevidence to the existence of such a collision. Almost 13,000 years ago, a prehistoric Paleo-Indian group known as the Clovis culture suffered its demise at the same time the region underwent significant climate cooling known as the Younger Dryas. Animals...
  • Ancient Humans Brought Bottle Gourds To The Americas From Asia

    12/13/2005 11:12:17 AM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 902+ views
    Harvard University/Eureka Alert ^ | 12-13-2005 | Steve Brandt
    Contact: Steve Bradt steve_bradt@harvard.edu 617-496-8070 Harvard University Ancient humans brought bottle gourds to the Americas from AsiaPlants widely used as containers arrived, already domesticated, some 10,000 years ago CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 13, 2005 -- Thick-skinned bottle gourds widely used as containers by prehistoric peoples were likely brought to the Americas some 10,000 years ago by individuals who arrived from Asia, according to a new genetic comparison of modern bottle gourds with gourds found at archaeological sites in the Western Hemisphere. The finding solves a longstanding archaeological enigma by explaining how a domesticated variant of a species native to Africa ended...
  • An Asian origin for a 10,000-year-old domesticated plant in the Americas

    12/17/2005 7:56:15 AM PST · by Lessismore · 15 replies · 653+ views
    PNAS ^ | 2005-12-13 | David L. Erickson , Bruce D. Smith , Andrew C. Clarke, Daniel H. Sandweiss, and Noreen Tuross
    New genetic and archaeological approaches have substantially improved our understanding of the transition to agriculture, a major turning point in human history that began 10,000-5,000 years ago with the independent domestication of plants and animals in eight world regions. In the Americas, however, understanding the initial domestication of New World species has long been complicated by the early presence of an African enigma, the bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria). Indigenous to Africa, it reached East Asia by 9,000-8,000 before present (B.P.) and had a broad New World distribution by 8,000 B.P. Here we integrate genetic and archaeological approaches to address a...
  • When People Fled Hyenas

    11/20/2002 6:43:45 PM PST · by VadeRetro · 52 replies · 1,373+ views
    ABC News ^ | By Lee Dye
    When People Fled Hyenas By Lee Dye Special to ABCNEWS.com Nov. 20 — Deep inside a cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains, Christy Turner and his Russian colleagues may have found an answer to a question that has hounded him for more than three decades. As a young anthropologist, Turner spent time in Alaska's Aleutian Islands in the 1970s, working at several archaeological sites and occasionally gazing westward toward Siberia. "I thought, 'That's the place that Native Americans came from,' " he says now from his laboratory at Arizona State University in Tempe. But why, he wondered then as he still...
  • Old dog, new tricks: Study IDs 9,400-year-old mutt

    01/19/2011 5:59:52 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 58 replies
    palmbeachpost ^ | Jan. 19, 2011 | CLARKE CANFIELD
    PORTLAND, Maine — Nearly 10,000 years ago, man's best friend provided protection and companionship — and an occasional meal. That's what researchers are saying after finding a bone fragment from what they are calling the earliest confirmed domesticated dog in the Americas. University of Maine graduate student Samuel Belknap III came across the fragment while analyzing a dried-out sample of human waste unearthed in southwest Texas in the 1970s. A carbon-dating test put the age of the bone at 9,400 years, and a DNA analysis confirmed it came from a dog — not a wolf, coyote or fox, Belknap said....
  • Ancient migration: Coming to America

    05/02/2012 10:12:27 PM PDT · by Theoria · 92 replies
    Nature ^ | 02 May 2012 | Adam Curry
    For decades, scientists thought that the Clovis hunters were the first to cross the Arctic to America. They were wrong — and now they need a better theory The mastodon was old, its teeth worn to nubs. It was perfect prey for a band of hunters, wielding spears tipped with needle-sharp points made from bone. Sensing an easy target, they closed in for the kill. Almost 14,000 years later, there is no way to tell how many hits it took to bring the beast to the ground near the coast of present-day Washington state. But at least one struck home,...
  • Evidence of the earliest human activity found in Chile’s south

    04/28/2012 8:46:32 AM PDT · by Theoria · 20 replies
    The Santiago Times ^ | 22 April 2012 | Jason Suder
    University archaeologists found 14,000-year-old knives while studying elephant ancestors. Archaeologists and anthropologists excavating a site in the south of Chile have uncovered stones that are believed to have been used as tools by humans 14,000 years ago. Scientists from Universidad Católica de Temuco and Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh) were able to determine these were tools because they exhibit the marking congruent with ancient knives and cutting utensils. The Volcano of Osorno nearby the site where scientists uncovered 14,000-year-old tools. (Photo by Claudio Sepúlveda Geoffroy/Flickr) “There are rock detachments from a simple, intentional blow that demonstrate that they were doctored,...
  • Bones of early American disappear from underwater cave

    04/28/2012 7:49:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Wednesday, April 25, 2012 | Frank Nowikowski
    One of the first humans to inhabit the Americas has been stolen -- and archaeologists want it back. The skeleton, which is probably at least 10,000 years old, has disappeared from a cenote, or underground water reservoir, in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In response, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) in Mexico City has placed "wanted" posters in supermarkets, bakeries and dive shops in and around the nearby town of Tulum. They are also considering legal action to recover the remains. The missing bones belong to a skeleton dubbed Young Man of Chan Hol II, discovered in 2010. The...
  • Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

    04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    The Tyee ^ | 03 April 2012 | Daniel Wood
    Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...
  • Sewer repairs reveal early visitors to Sitka? [Paleolithic Alaska?]

    08/02/2011 7:38:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    KCAW ^ | July 28, 2011 | Robert Woolsey
    An anthropologist has found what she believes are stone tools in a street excavation in downtown Sitka. The finds -- if they are confirmed -- could help shed light on Paleolithic humans who either lived in, or passed through, the region... "It's a simple tool where you have a certain kind of rock, and you drop that rock on another rock and a flake comes off. And if it's nice and sharp along there you'll use it for a while. You grip it like that -- use it as a skin scraper, or for whatever you're scraping. Then, when it...
  • The joke is on us: A new interpretation of bared teeth in archaeological artifacts

    05/22/2010 8:53:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 511+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | May 12, 2010 | Courtney Cecale
    Bared teeth are a prominent and eye-catching feature on many historical and archaeological artifacts, and are commonly interpreted as representing death, aggression and the shamanic trance. But a study in the forthcoming issue of Current Anthropology argues that the bared-teeth motif often expresses something a bit less sinister: the smile. Alice V. M. Samson, Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University, the Netherlands, and Bridget M. Waller, Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, examined the bared-teeth motif (BTM) of the Taíno, who lived in the Greater Antilles (the Caribbean) from AD 1000 to the early decades of European contact (1492-1550). Here...
  • Guatemala Mayan city may have ended in pyramid battle

    09/06/2009 10:00:03 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies · 911+ views
    Reuters ^ | Sep 3, 2009 | Sarah Grainger
    EL MIRADOR, Guatemala (Reuters) - One of Guatemala's greatest ancient Mayan cities may have died out in a bloody battle atop a huge pyramid between a royal family and invaders from hundreds of miles away, archaeologists say. Researchers are carrying out DNA tests on blood samples from hundreds of spear tips and arrowheads dug up with bone fragments and smashed pottery at the summit of the El Tigre pyramid in the Mayan city of El Mirador, buried beneath jungle vegetation 8 km from Guatemala's border with Mexico. Many of the excavated blades are made of obsidian which the archaeologists have...
  • Major Archaeological Find In Puerto Rico

    10/28/2007 2:01:40 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 216+ views
    At&T.Net ^ | 10-28-20073 | Laura N Perez Sanchez
    Major Archaeological Find in Puerto Rico Published: 10/28/07, 4:25 PM EDT By LAURA N. PEREZ SANCHEZSAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - U.S. and Puerto Rican archaeologists say they have found the best-preserved pre-Columbian site in the Caribbean, which could shed light on virtually every aspect of Indian life in the region, from sacred rituals to eating habits. The archaeologists believe the site in southern Puerto Rico may have belonged to the Taino or pre-Taino people that inhabited the island before European colonization, although other tribes are a possibility. It contains stones etched with ancient petroglyphs that form a large plaza...
  • Pre-Columbian Ruin Discovered In Peru

    01/17/2007 5:43:55 PM PST · by blam · 5 replies · 589+ views
    Eureka Alert ^ | 1-17-2007 | Joshua Weinberg
    Contact: Joshua Weinberg joshua_weinberg@discovery.com 240-328-3988 Discovery Channel Pre-Columbian ruin discovered in PeruFind to be featured in Discovery Channel's new series Chasing Mummies Silver Spring, Md. -- Explorer Keith Muscutt has announced the existence of a previously unknown pre-Columbian ruin in Peru: the Huaca La Penitenciaría de la Meseta, which will be featured in Discovery Channel's new series, CHASING MUMMIES, premiering January 2008. Located in the cloud-forested eastern slope of the Andes mountains, the ruin is believed to belong to the ancient Chachapoya -- a civilization that flourished in the upper Amazon, between its Huallaga and the Marañón tributaries, from about...
  • Gibson to speak ancient tongue at Oscars (preview of ancient language in "Apocalypto")

    03/04/2006 7:12:12 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 41 replies · 1,627+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 3/4/06 | AP
    NEW YORK (AP) -- Mel Gibson will give audiences a preview of the ancient language spoken in his upcoming movie, "Apocalypto." During a brief appearance on the Academy Awards on Sunday, Gibson will speak Maya, the only language in the film. His last movie, "The Passion of the Christ," was performed in Latin and Aramaic. "I wanted to shake up the stale action-adventure genre," Gibson told Time for a story on the magazine's Web site. "So I think we almost had to come up with something utterly different like this." "Apocalypto" is set in pre-Columbian Mexico and is being shot...
  • A fascinating new look at America before Columbus

    08/17/2005 11:43:12 AM PDT · by Between the Lines · 139 replies · 2,995+ views
    The Charlotte Observer ^ | Aug. 14, 2005 | CHARLES MATTHEWS
    1491: New Revelations Of The Americas Before Columbus By Charles C. Mann. Knopf. 480 pages. $30. Charles C. Mann's engagingly written, utterly absorbing "1491" tells us what scientists have recently learned about the American civilizations that vanished with the arrival of Columbus. Most of what we were taught about them may be wrong. For example, I thought of North America before Columbus as sparsely settled by people who had little impact on their environment: a place with great herds of buffalo like the ones that rumble through movies like "Dances With Wolves," where migrating flocks of passenger pigeons darkened the...
  • Underwater Arrowheads, Tools Dazzle Maritime Historians (Mi'kmaq - 8,000 YO)

    02/20/2005 11:24:20 AM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 1,250+ views
    CBC ^ | 2-17-2005
    Underwater arrowheads, tools dazzle Maritime historians Last Updated Thu, 17 Feb 2005 15:28:09 EST CBC News HALIFAX - Archaeologists are showing off a treasure trove they call one of the most significant discoveries of Mi'kmaq artifacts in Nova Scotia. Hundreds of arrowheads and tools, some 8,000 years old, were discovered last summer along the Mersey River, near Kejimkujik National Park in the southwest region of the province. Workers from Nova Scotia Power were doing repairs to generating stations on the river. As water levels dropped in some areas, the riverbed was exposed for the first time since dams were built...
  • Field Between Tecate, Ensenada Yields Tools (Ancient Hunters In Baja)

    02/16/2005 10:26:20 AM PST · by blam · 7 replies · 548+ views
    SignonSandiego.com ^ | 2-16-2005 | Sandra Dribble
    Field between Tecate, Ensenada yields tools By Sandra Dibble UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER February 16, 2005 TIJUANA – For the first time in Baja California, archaeologists have found significant evidence of hunters who settled the region between 7,000 and 10,000 years ago. Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, known as INAH, announced the recent recovery of more than 150 stone knives, spearheads, cutting utensils and other carved items from an open field between Tecate and Ensenada. The items are being linked to the San Dieguito people acknowledged as the earliest settlers of the region. San Dieguito sites have been amply...
  • Tribes Appeal Kennewick Man Ruling, Seek Role In Future Finds

    02/16/2005 10:58:59 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 818+ views
    Seattlepi.com ^ | 2-16-2005 | AP
    Wednesday, February 16, 2005 · Last updated 8:04 a.m. PT Tribes appeal Kennewick Man ruling, seek role in future finds THE ASSOCIATED PRESS KENNEWICK, Wash. -- Indian tribes that failed to block the scientific examination of the 9,400-year-old remains known as Kennewick Man are appealing a court ruling in hopes of gaining a role in future discoveries. The appeal of a ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was brought Monday by the Nez Perce Tribe, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation and Yakama Indian Nation, which claim Kennewick Man as an aboriginal ancestor. "It's a fundamental...
  • 12,000-Year-Old Bones Found in Kansas

    02/15/2005 4:44:02 PM PST · by Mr. Mojo · 46 replies · 1,603+ views
    AP (via Yahoo) ^ | Feb 15, 2002
    GOODLAND, Kan. - Scientists say mammoth and camel bones unearthed in northwest Kansas that date back 12,200 years could be part of "one of the most important archaeological sites in North America." The bones, found last June in Sherman County near the Colorado border, were alongside a piece of stone that archaeologists say was the kind used in tools that humans once used to butcher animals. Archaeological geologist Rolfe Mandel of the Kansas Geological Survey said carbon-14 dating completed last week shows the bones are between 12,200 and 12,300 years old, which could mean humans lived on the Great Plains...
  • Discovery Could Change Dates For Human Arrival On The Great Plains

    02/15/2005 12:14:05 PM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 1,620+ views
    News Wise ^ | 2-15-2005 | University Of Kansas
    Source: University of Kansas Released: Sat 12-Feb-2005, 09:00 ET Embargo expired: Tue 15-Feb-2005, 00:00 ET Discovery Could Change Dates for Human Arrival on the Great Plains Dated by carbon-14 methods at 12,200 years old, recently discovered bones could be the oldest evidence of human occupation in Kansas, and they may be the oldest evidence of humans on the Great Plains. For photos related to the story, go to http://www.kgs.ku.edu/General/News/2005/kanorado.html Newswise — Bones of now-extinct animals and a rock fragment discovered last summer in northwestern Kansas could rewrite the history of humans on the Great Plains. The bones, which appear to...
  • Aztecs Cooked, Skinned, Ate Humans (Barbequed long pig)

    01/27/2005 10:37:51 PM PST · by quidnunc · 110 replies · 3,210+ views
    Discovery News ^ | January 25, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    New finds from an archaeological site near Mexico City support certain written and pictorial evidence concerning Aztec human sacrifice that historians previously doubted because the accounts seemed too exaggerated to be true. The discovery adds to the growing collection of evidence supporting human sacrifice and cannibalism among the founders of the Mexican empire. It also suggests that researchers might now be able to verify some 16th century Spanish accounts on the subject. The Spanish and the Aztecs documented at least four observations of cannibalism in the 16th and 17th centuries. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés (1485-1547), whose men conquered the Aztecs...
  • Archaeologists Eagerly Home In On Parker Digs (Colorado - 5K YA)

    01/27/2005 2:54:35 PM PST · by blam · 7 replies · 1,015+ views
    Denver Post ^ | 1-27-2005 | Kathy Human
    Article Published: Thursday, January 27, 2005Archaeologists eagerly home in on Parker digs By Katy Human Denver Post Staff Writer Among the relics found at the Rueter-Hess Reservoir construction site in Parker are, from top to bottom, a Mallory point and McKean Complex points dating back about 4,500 years; a gorget preform, left, with the indication of being drilled; two 2,000-year- old arrowheads; and a bison bone that probably was cut or broken by humans. Parker - Five thousand years ago, a band of ancient people built homes on the edge of a stream in what is now Parker. It was...
  • Evidence May Back Human Sacrifice Claims

    01/23/2005 2:26:53 PM PST · by wagglebee · 90 replies · 11,210+ views
    My Way News ^ | 1/22/05 | MARK STEVENSON/AP
    MEXICO CITY (AP) - It has long been a matter of contention: Was the Aztec and Mayan practice of human sacrifice as widespread and horrifying as the history books say? Or did the Spanish conquerors overstate it to make the Indians look primitive? In recent years archaeologists have been uncovering mounting physical evidence that corroborates the Spanish accounts in substance, if not number. Using high-tech forensic tools, archaeologists are proving that pre-Hispanic sacrifices often involved children and a broad array of intentionally brutal killing methods. For decades, many researchers believed Spanish accounts from the 16th and 17th centuries were biased...
  • Bison Bone Discovery Turns B.C. History Upside-Down

    01/01/2005 9:22:55 PM PST · by blam · 50 replies · 2,846+ views
    My Telus ^ | 12-31-2004
    Friday, Dec 31, 2004 Bison bone discovery turns B.C. history upside-down PENTICTON (BC Newspaper Group) — The year 2004 ends with a major story in archaeology, revealed by the use of new DNA technology on ancient bison bones scattered around western North America. The findings profoundly affect our understanding of how North America was populated by humans, and could have an impact on aboriginal politics as well. The conventional wisdom, taught to generations in school, speaks of a land bridge connecting Asia with Alaska. This now-submerged bridge was created by lower sea levels in the last ice age, which ended...
  • Archaeologists push back beginning of civilization in Americas 400 years

    12/22/2004 6:09:11 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 48 replies · 1,812+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | Dec. 23, 2004 | Nic Fleming
    Archaeologists have unearthed evidence that the oldest civilisation in the Americas dates back 400 years earlier than previously thought, according to research published today. New radiocarbon dating of 95 samples taken from pyramid mounds and houses suggest that by 3100 BC there were complex societies and communal building of religious monuments across three valleys in Peru. This emerging civilisation was the first in the Americas to develop centralised decision-making, formalised religion, social hierarchies and a mixed economy based on agriculture and fishing. The newly uncovered sites in the Fortaleza and Pativilca valleys, along with the nearby previously reported sites in...
  • 5,000 Year-Old Artifacts (Found) Near Texas Coast

    11/14/2004 2:33:59 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 1,867+ views
    Washington Post ^ | 11-13-2004 | lynn Brezosky
    5,000-Year-Old Artifacts Near Texas Coast By LYNN BREZOSKY The Associated Press Saturday, November 13, 2004; 8:50 PM HARLINGEN, Texas - Archaeologists have discovered a cache of artifacts near South Padre Island that they say could be up to 5,000 years old, potentially providing new clues about early peoples of the Texas coast. Ricklis said the find is significant because so little is known about the ancient Rio Grande Valley. Most early manmade items would have been eroded by sand and sea air, or washed out by the ever-changing course of the waterways of the Rio Grande basin near the Mexican...
  • (Prince) Madoc In America

    07/10/2003 5:56:52 PM PDT · by blam · 74 replies · 7,275+ views
    Madoc In AmericaNative American Histories in the USA Is truth stranger than fiction? Of course it is; it always has been One subject that has been debated for the last four hundred years was whether or not a Khumric-Welsh Prince called Madoc discovered America. Queen Elizabeth I was persuaded by her advisors that this was so and the Khumric-Welsh discovery was put forward as somehow giving England a prior claim in the political wrangles over first rights in the New World of the Americas. No one ever thought to investigate the British records. Caradoc of Llancarfan wrote about it circa...
  • The Mandans

    11/06/2004 11:04:33 AM PST · by Ptarmigan · 15 replies · 881+ views
    The Mandans were an Indian tribe that lived in the Midwest, present day western North Dakota. The Mandans were different from other Indian tribes when White explorers encoutered them. Instead of the red skin and black hair, the Mandans had blonde or red hair, blue eyes, and light skin. Some spoke Welsh. The Mandans gladly welcomed the White explorers. It is believed they came from a Welsh settlement in the Ohio River Valley, which was first established in the mid 14th century, about 300 years before the first White settlers came to America. Madoc a Welsh prince is though to...
  • Ancient Amazon Settlements Uncovered

    09/18/2003 7:38:01 PM PDT · by aruanan · 8 replies · 1,324+ views
    Science--AP ^ | Thu Sep 18, 7:26 PM ET | PAUL RECER, AP Science Writer
    Ancient Amazon Settlements Uncovered Thu Sep 18, 7:26 PM ET Add Science - AP to My Yahoo! By PAUL RECER, AP Science Writer WASHINGTON - The Amazon River basin was not all a pristine, untouched wilderness before Columbus came to the Americas, as was once believed. Researchers have uncovered clusters of extensive settlements linked by wide roads with other communities and surrounded by agricultural developments. The researchers, including some descendants of pre-Columbian tribes that lived along the Amazon, have found evidence of densely settled, well-organized communities with roads, moats and bridges in the Upper Xingu part of the vast...
  • Vikings/Norse in Minnesota

    10/26/2004 10:23:31 AM PDT · by DoloresCobbPhifer · 12 replies · 890+ views
    Did the Vikings Stay... Vatican Files May Offer Clues. / How did the Swedes end up in Minnesota?