Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $54,779
62%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 62%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: renaissance

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Letters to the Crocodile God

    11/11/2007 10:47:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 114+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 6, November/December 2007 | Marco Merola
    The desert swallowed Tebtunis in the twelfth century A.D., so the town does not appear on any maps. We know its name, and a great deal more, from the tens of thousands of papyrus fragments found throughout the twentieth century by a succession of archaeologists, including those working at the site today. These records, which range from pieces found in ancient garbage dumps, to sheets recycled as wrappings for mummies, to five-yard-long scrolls, include literary texts and records of private contracts and public acts. "The papyri give us particular and historic information that cannot be found elsewhere," says Claudio Gallazzi,...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • A High-Tech Hunt for Lost Art

    10/06/2009 6:22:58 PM PDT · by BGHater · 10 replies · 780+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 06 Oct 2009 | JOHN TIERNEY
    If you believe, as Maurizio Seracini does, that Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting is hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, then there are two essential techniques for finding it. As usual, Leonardo anticipated both of them. First, concentrate on scientific gadgetry. After spotting what seemed to be a clue to Leonardo’s painting left by another 16th-century artist, Dr. Seracini led an international team of scientists in mapping every millimeter of the wall and surrounding room with lasers, radar, ultraviolet light and infrared cameras. Once they identified the likely hiding place, they developed devices to detect the painting by...
  • Engineers to search for Leonardo fresco [Battle of Anghiari]

    10/28/2007 11:45:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 428+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Monday October 22, 2007 | Frances D'Emilio
    The hunt for the "Battle of Anghiari," ...which Leonardo began in 1505 to commemorate the 15th-century Florentine victory over Milan at Anghiari, a medieval Tuscan town... unfinished when Leonardo left Florence in 1506... was given new impetus about 30 years ago, when Seracini noticed a cryptic message on a fresco in the hall by Giorgio Vasari, a 16th-century artist famed for chronicling Renaissance artists' labors. "Cerca, trova" -- "seek and you shall find" -- said the words on a tiny green flag in the "Battle of Marciano in the Chiana Valley." ...A few years ago, using radar and X-ray scans,...
  • Hunt for Da Vinci painting will resume[Missing "Battle of Anghiari"]

    01/14/2007 3:33:39 AM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 11 replies · 1,290+ views
    AP ^ | 13 Jan 2007 | ARIEL DAVID
    A real-life Da Vinci mystery, complete with tantalizing clues and sharp art sleuths, may soon be solved, as researchers resume the search for a lost Leonardo masterpiece believed to be hidden within a wall in a Florence palace. Culture Minister Francesco Rutelli and officials in the Tuscan city announced this week they had given approval for renewed exploration in the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of power for various Florence rulers, including the Medici family in the 16th century. There, some researchers believe, a cavity in a wall may have preserved Leonardo's unfinished painted mural of the "Battle of Anghiari" for...
  • On the trail of the lost Leonardo

    05/16/2006 10:40:00 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 13 replies · 635+ views
    The Times Online UK ^ | 5/16/06 | Mark Irving
    Forget the Da Vinci Code. Dr Seracini thinks he's cracked art's biggest mystery Step by patient step, one man is drawing ever closer to the real Da Vinci mystery: tracking down the master’s greatest painting, lost for four and a half centuries. And it is hidden, he believes, in a room at the heart of political power since the Middle Ages in Florence. For art historians, finding Leonardo’s lost Battle of Anghiari is in the same league as finding the Titanic or the still lost tomb of the Ancient Egyptian architect Imhotep — as big as you can get. The...
  • ART APPECIATION THREAD Is this the Da Vinci Clue? (Vasari fresco holds mystery)

    06/21/2005 3:11:06 PM PDT · by Liz · 16 replies · 1,603+ views
    ASSOCIATED PRESS | Tuesday, June 21, 2005 | ARIEL DAVID
    Maybe Vasari fresco refers to presence of greater art behind it ROME -- "Cerca trova" ("Seek and you shall find") is the tantalizing 5-century-old message painted on a fresco in the council hall of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio. Researchers now believe these cryptic words could be a clue to the location of a long-lost Leonardo da Vinci painting and are pressing local authorities to allow them to search for the masterpiece of Renaissance art. Maurizio Seracini, an Italian art researcher, first noticed the message during a survey of the hall 30 years ago, but his team lacked the technology then to...
  • Medieval Doodles Of A 7-Year Old Boy Hints At The ‘Universality’ Of Daydreaming

    05/02/2016 4:24:27 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 34 replies
    Realm Of History ^ | APRIL 30, 2016 | DATTATREYA MANDAL
    Novgorod or Veliky Novgorod, is one of the major historical cities of Russia, and it started out as a trading station for the Varangians who traveled from the Baltic region to Constantinople by (possibly) late 10th century AD. But as it turns out, this historically significant settlement of northern Russia is also home to around thousand personal ‘tomes’ that are inscribed on bark of birch trees and are almost preserved in perfect condition. In fact, historians hypothesize that there are 20,000 similar specimens still waiting to be salvaged from the conducive anaerobic clay soil layers of the city environs. And...
  • What Can the Middle Ages Teach Us About US Naval Strategy?

    03/12/2015 11:35:30 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    The Diplomat ^ | March 12, 2015 | Franz-Stefan Gady
    “To wage war, you need first of all money; second, you need money, and third, you also need money,” goes the famous saying of Raimondo Graf Montecúccoli, an Italian who served in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nations. Consequently, with the debate on the U.S. Navy’s budget for the next fiscal year raging on (see here and here), it is perhaps time to assess not how much money is spent on the American navy, but whether it is spent wisely. The discussion surrounding China’s anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) capabilities and the costs that these capabilities impose on...
  • Syphilis widespread in Central Europe even before Columbus' voyage to America

    11/23/2015 9:54:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology via Health Canal ^ | November 19, 2015 | Johanna Sophia Gaul, Karl Grossschmidt, Christian Gusenbauer and Fabian Kanz
    In 1495, a "new" disease spread throughout Europe: syphilis. Christopher Columbus was said to have brought this sexually transmitted disease back from his voyage to America. At least, that has been the accepted theory up until now. Using morphological and structural evidence, researchers from the Department of Forensic Medicine and the Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (bone laboratory) at MedUni Vienna have now identified several cases of congenital syphilis dating back to as early as 1320 AD in skeletons from excavations at the cathedral square of St. Polten, Austria... Congenital syphilis, which is passed from a pregnant mother to...
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • The Play Of Daniel (Part I of II) - A Twelfth Century Musical Drama

    11/07/2015 12:24:02 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1958 | Father Reinbert Weakland, O.S.B. , transcriber to modern music notation; Musical Director: Noah Gr
    This is Part 1 of 2 of the New York Pro Musica 1958 production of this Musical Drama. It's musical director was Noah Greenberg. Father Reinbert Weakland, O.S.B. transcribed the music into modern notation. It was presented at the Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, New York. The cast included: Russell Oberlin (Belshazzar's Prince) Betty Wilson (Belshazzar's Queen) Brayton Lewis (Belshazzar) Charles Bressler (Daniel) Sorry if the playback sounds a little slow at times. The record I used to record this video was slightly warped.
  • The Renaissance Series

    10/30/2015 3:22:36 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 23 replies
    Freddy Fabris Photographer, Huffington Post ^ | October 21, 2015 | Freddy Fabris Photographer and Author
    <p>If you want to pay a tribute to great artists of old, why not get help from mechanics?</p> <p>That's what Freddy Fabris did to get a unique twist on the works of Renaissance painters.</p> <p>The mechanics, clad in overalls and tools in hand, posed in an auto-shop.</p>
  • Chartres Cathedral: Sooty-Dark or Sparkling White, It’s Still Saving Souls

    10/24/2015 2:00:54 PM PDT · by NYer · 60 replies
    Aletelia ^ | October 24, 2015 | WILLIAM NEWTON
    If you have not been following the art and architecture comentariat of late—and after all, that’s what you read me for—then you may be unaware of a tempest brewing around the restoration of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Chartres, France. Universally considered to be one of the greatest works of architecture on the planet, the Medieval architecture of Chartres and its magnificent stained-glass windows have inspired writers, artists and composers, as well as many imitators. Beginning in 2008 the French government began to restore the building and in the process has removed much of the soot, dust and...
  • Hiker finds 1,200-yr-old Viking sword

    10/21/2015 2:09:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | unattributed
    A hiker travelling the ancient route between western and eastern Norway found a 1,200-year-old Viking sword after sitting down to rest after a short fishing trip. The sword, found at Haukeli in central southern Norway will be sent for conservation at the The University Museum of Bergen. Jostein Aksdal, an archeologist with Hordaland County said that the sword was in such good condition that if it was given a new grip and a polish, it could be used today. "The sword was found in very good condition. It is very special to get into a sword that is merely lacking...
  • Hiker taking a rest finds a 1,200-year-old Viking sword in great condition

    10/24/2015 5:33:35 PM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    FoxNews.Com ^ | October 23, 2015 | Jenn Gidman
    Goran Olsen was enjoying a leisurely hike recently in Norway when he stopped near the fishing village of Haukeli, about 150 miles west of Oslo. Under some rocks along a well-traversed path, he made a discovery that's now the envy of every detectorist in Scandinavia: a 30-inch wrought-iron Viking sword, estimated to be about 1,200 years old, CNN reports. One would think a sword that old would be so decrepit it could never be wielded again, but a Hordaland County archaeologist says it just needs a little polish and a new grip to be good to go. "The sword was...
  • Fiorina: Carson, Trump ‘sound a lot like politicians’

    10/16/2015 8:16:53 AM PDT · by jimbo123 · 36 replies
    The Hill ^ | 10/16/15 | Mark Hensch
    Carly Fiorina criticized fellow GOP presidential contenders Ben Carson and Donald Trump for threatening to boycott CNBC's debate. “Well, I think apparently they’re worried about answering questions for three hours,” she told host Megyn Kelly on Fox News’ “The Kelly File” on Thursday night. “For heaven sakes, we have ten candidates on stage,” Fiorina said. "I don’t think three hours is a long time. “They also apparently asked for prepared statements,” she added of Carson and Trump. "You know, prepared statements are what politicians do. “So, honestly, here are two outsiders supposedly. Donald Trump and Ben Carson – they sound...
  • Did King Harold II Die With an Arrow in His Eye?

    05/09/2015 9:08:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    NBC News ^ | October 13, 2014 | unattributed
    King Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, has long been thought to have been killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. But British archaeologists are to test a theory he survived on the anniversary of the famous battle this Tuesday. The battle, on Oct. 14, 1066, marked a turning point in British history as the Normans conquered medieval England. There are different accounts of how he was killed, one of them pictured in the Bayeux Tapestry, which appears to have him gripping an arrow that had pierced his eye. Another account has Harold being killed by knights...
  • A Renaissance of Liberty Is Coming

    America is reaching a critical mass of people who support liberty “But what do we mean by the American Revolution? Do we mean the American war? The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments of their duties and obligations.”
  • Men wielding power in hellish times(Wolf Hall's revisionism)

    05/02/2015 9:25:34 AM PDT · by NRx · 29 replies
    WaPo ^ | 04-30-2015 | Charles Krauthammer
    “Wolf Hall,” the Man Booker Prize-winning historical novel about the court of Henry VIII — and most dramatically, the conflict between Thomas Cromwell and Sir Thomas More — is now a TV series (presented on PBS). It is maddeningly good. Maddening because its history is tendentiously distorted, yet the drama is so brilliantly conceived and executed that you almost don’t care. Faced with an imaginative creation of such brooding, gripping, mordant intensity, you find yourself ready to pay for it in historical inaccuracy. And “Wolf Hall’s” revisionism is breathtaking. It inverts the conventional view of the saintly More being undone...
  • Anglo-Saxon cow bile and garlic potion kills MRSA

    03/30/2015 2:58:04 PM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 81 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 3/30/15 | Sarah Knapton
    A thousand-year-old medieval remedy for eye infections which was discovered in a manuscript in the British Library has been found to kill the superbug MRSA. Anglo-Saxon expert Dr Christina Lee, from the School of English, at Nottingham University, recreated the 10th century potion to see if it really worked as an antibacterial remedy. The 'eyesalve' recipe calls for two species of Allium (garlic and onion or leek), wine and oxgall (bile from a cow’s stomach). It describes a very specific method of making the topical solution including the use of a brass vessel to brew it, a strainer to purify...
  • Medieval Education and the University

    03/21/2015 10:07:12 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 5 replies
    The foundation of Education and the University during the Middle AgesAnti Catholic HistoryIt is the main point of this section to point out some of the contributions which the Catholic Church made specifically in regards to education and the University in the Middle Ages. Before I start this section I think it would be good to point out two simple facts regarding this time period. The first one is simply the fact that much of the history regarding this time period (at least until recent scholarship) was vehemently anti-Catholic which Hilaire Belloc points out in his book Europe and the...
  • The Not "So" Dark Ages

    03/21/2015 10:09:27 AM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 28 replies
    A Reassessment of the Medieval TimesThe Medieval era is perhaps one, if not the most misunderstood times in history. Ask people what they know of the medieval times, and most will tell you that they were a time of mere superstition, rampant barbarism and wars, oppression of women and minorities, scientific ignorance, totalitarianism, and a host of many other things.Nothing could be further from the truth, not in an era were reasonable thinking with scholasticism and Thomism were present, or the development of education, including that of the university system. An era were scientific development was starting out, and were...
  • Bavarian Archaeologists Find 250-Year-Old Pretzel

    03/12/2015 4:12:23 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies
    The Local ^ | 11 Mar 2015
    Archaeologists have made a remarkable - and delicious - discovery in Bavaria, where during an excavation they dug up a 250 year-old pretzel. Silvia Codreanau-Windauer from the Bavarian Bureau for the Conservation of Historic Monuments confirmed that: "this is definitely the oldest pretzel ever found" - although she would give no word on whether it was past its expiration date. Alongside the remains of the pretzel, archaeologists also found the charred remains of a bread roll and a croissant - suggesting that someone missed out on quite the historical breakfast buffet in the 18th century, the period the find has...
  • MUST READ-Needed: An American Renaissance

    02/21/2015 4:01:57 AM PST · by lbryce · 11 replies
    Western Journalism ^ | February 2, 2015 | Lawrence Sellin
    The Obama years will be forever known as the Dark Ages of US history, a time of political, cultural, and economic deterioration. We have yet to see if they will lead to the fall of the American republic. In the Obama years, the lie became not only a campaign strategy or a means to enact damaging policies, but an institution of government: the Presidency itself, a lie of monstrous proportions guarded by the complicit and the willingly ignorant. In the Obama years, the Congress finally clearly demonstrated that although we have elections, there is no longer a government representing its...
  • How Dark Were the Dark Ages? (Video)

    02/05/2015 10:40:09 PM PST · by Arthur McGowan · 61 replies
    Prager University ^ | 26 Jan 2015 | Anthony Esolen
    Were the Middle Ages, also known as the Dark Ages, characterized by oppression, ignorance, and backwardness in areas like human rights, science, health, and the arts? Or were they marked by progress and tolerance? Anthony Esolen, an English Literature professor at Providence College, explains.
  • Michelangelo's bronze panther-riders revealed after 'Renaissance whodunnit'

    02/02/2015 12:55:31 PM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    www.theguardian.com ^ | 02/01/2015 | Mark Brown
    Sculptures to be displayed at Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, thought to be the only surviving bronzes by the Renaissance artist Two handsome, virile naked men riding triumphantly on ferocious panthers will on Monday be unveiled as, probably, the only surviving bronze sculptures by the Renaissance giant Michelangelo. In art history terms, the attribution is sensational. Academics in Cambridge will suggest that a pair of mysterious metre-high sculptures known as the Rothschild Bronzes are by the master himself, made just after he completed David and as he was about to embark on the Sistine Chapel ceiling. If correct, they are the only...
  • Marriott hotels placing envelopes in rooms to guilt guests into leaving gratuity

    09/15/2014 10:19:02 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 175 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 15 September 2014 | By Associated Press
    Do you leave a tip in your hotel room for the maid? Marriott is launching a program with Maria Shriver to put envelopes in hotel rooms to encourage tipping. The campaign, called 'The Envelope Please,' begins this week. Envelopes will be placed in 160,000 rooms in the U.S. and Canada. Some 750 to 1,000 hotels will participate from Marriott brands like Courtyard, Residence Inn, J.W. Marriott, Ritz-Carlton and Renaissance hotels. The name of the person who cleans the room will be written on the envelope along with a message: 'Our caring room attendants enjoyed making your stay warm and comfortable....
  • Archaeologists find 'lost' medieval village... [Scotland]

    05/01/2014 12:13:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 28 April 2014 | Ben Miller
    German and Dutch pots, jugs and mugs, coins including an American cent, spindles, a sheep skull and horse teeth have been found by archaeologists digging in the Scottish Borders, where doors integrated into walls have revealed a “lost” Medieval village of families, farmyards and hearths. Between Edinburgh and the Northumberland National Park, the outskirts of Selkirk have previously been associated with the Battle of Philiphaugh, a 1645 victory for the Scottish Covenanter Army against their under-strength Royalist enemies... A pipeline-laying project by Scottish Water, though, has found stone brick structures including two pivot stones, used as hinges for doors between...
  • Medieval Graffiti in English Churches – The Case of John Lydgate, O.S.B.

    04/30/2014 6:42:03 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 4 replies
    Fra Angelico Institute for the Sacred Arts ^ | 4/2/14 | Deacon Paul O. Iacono
    A fascinating series of articles came to my attention today by Tatjana Jovanovic, a top contributor of a Linkedin group called Medieval and Renaissance Art, Antiques, Architecture, Archaeology, History and Music. Her article is entitled “Medieval Banksy: Confession of Medieval Graffiti Artist, Monk, and Writer.”Ms. Jovanovic is an aesthetician and artistic designer. She basis her article on two pieces that appeared in the US edition of The Guardian/The Observer. The first by Matt Champion provides a gallery of 13th and 14th century graffiti that is being collected by a British association known as the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2014/mar/29/medieval-graffiti-pictures-lydgateA second...
  • Preserving the Mary Rose

    03/28/2014 1:01:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 March 2014 | Jon Evans
    The Tudor battleship has been stabilised and is now on display in a new museum. Jon Evans explores the chemistry stopping those timbers shivering To avoid potentially damaging shrinkage, the hull was sprayed with water for about 12 years, then with PEG for 19 years © Peter Phipp / Travelshots.com / Alamy In many ways, the sea has not been particularly kind to the Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII’s navy when it faced an invading French fleet at the mouth of Portsmouth Harbour in July 1545. For a start, it engulfed the ship, with the loss of over 350...
  • ...Map of Europe 1000 AD to present with timeline [Borders Animated 1140-2011 in 3 minutes]

    03/17/2014 5:43:33 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 39 replies
    ...Since I didn't know how this video was made, I assumed that the timeline was linear and based the time calibration on Napoleon's Campaigns (apogee in 1812 at 02:33) and Hitler's invasion of Poland (1939 at 03:04).
  • Why Do 16th-Century Manuscripts Show Cats With Flaming Backpacks?

    03/16/2014 6:29:43 AM PDT · by Renfield · 41 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 3-10-2014 | Brad Scriber
    A series of 16th-century manuscripts that have been making waves on the Internet look like a Monty Python version of the Renaissance: They show cats outfitted with flaming backpacks, attacking castles and villages. But the illustrations are legit. They're intended to show how cats and birds could in theory be used to set fire to a besieged city, according to a University of Pennsylvania scholar. Mitch Fraas, scholar in residence at the University of Pennsylvania—the university digitized the manuscripts last year—says that the drawings are from artillery manuals and are accompanied by notes explaining how to use animals as incendiary...
  • Leonardo da Vinci painting lost for centuries found in Swiss bank vault

    10/04/2013 1:28:39 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 3:32PM BST 04 Oct 2013 | Nick Squires By Nick Squires, Rome
    It was lost for so long that it had assumed mythical status for art historians. Some doubted whether it even existed. But a 500-year-old mystery was apparently solved today after a painting attributed to Leonardo da Vinci was discovered in a Swiss bank vault. The painting, which depicts Isabella d’Este, a Renaissance noblewoman, was found in a private collection of 400 works kept in a Swiss bank by an Italian family who asked not to be identified. It appears to be a completed, painted version of a pencil sketch drawn by Leonardo da Vinci in Mantua in the Lombardy region...
  • Did the Medieval Catholic Church Have a Female Pope?

    03/17/2013 5:55:14 PM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 34 replies
    Christian Post ^ | March 14, 2013 | Michael Gryboski
    The election of Pope Francis as the 266th bishop of Rome held many milestones. Francis is the first Latin American pope in history and the first non-European pontiff in about 1,200 years. However, some have claimed that a Medieval pope might have reached a milestone considered impossible given the standards and rules of Vatican City for ordained clergy. Legend has it that in the ninth century the Roman Catholic Church was ruled briefly by a "Pope Joan," who disguised herself as a man, rising through the ranks of the male-dominated hierarchy. Many have hailed the legend as true, with two...
  • How To Restore the West

    01/02/2013 12:13:36 PM PST · by Little Ray · 21 replies
    The Daily Bell ^ | Monday, December 31, 2012 | Ron Holland
    By any political, cultural or economic measure the nations of the West are in total decline. The historic virtues of hard work, free-market thinking and a common cultural integrity as well as religious and historical principles are gone. They have been subverted and replaced by an emphasis on rampant materialism and a consumer driven society that exceeds 70 percent of GNP in addition to private and public debt. Furthermore, a kind of parasitism has laid claim to Western culture by which sports stars, politicians, media darlings and financial scam artists get recognition and exorbitant incomes while real workers find their...
  • Columbus debunker sets sights on Leonardo da Vinci

    07/28/2008 6:04:40 PM PDT · by decimon · 34 replies · 88+ views
    Reuters ^ | Jul 28, 2008 | Tim Castle
    LONDON (Reuters) - Leonardo da Vinci's drawings of machines are uncannily similar to Chinese originals and were undoubtedly derived from them, a British amateur historian says in a newly-published book. Gavin Menzies sparked headlines across the globe in 2002 with the claim that Chinese sailors reached America 70 years before Christopher Columbus. Now he says a Chinese fleet brought encyclopedias of technology undiscovered by the West to Italy in 1434, laying the foundation for the engineering marvels such as flying machines later drawn by Italian polymath Leonardo.
  • Caravaggio Discovery: to Find 100 New Works Is Simply Astonishing

    07/05/2012 6:41:55 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 05 Jul 2012 | Mark Hudson
    Telegraph critic Mark Hudson wonders at the possible discovery of 100 Caravaggio works in Italy and says if confirmed it could throw fresh light on the artist's reputationThe prospect of a hundred newly discovered works by any great artist of the past is little short of astonishing. The entire oeuvres of several of great figures – Vermeer and Giorgione for example – barely gets into double figures. When you think that 200 works is a pretty respectable total for the average, world-changing old master, then the prospect of an extra hundred constitutes a massive increase, that is likely to significantly...
  • Michele Bachmann is worried about the Renaissance (Multicolored Barf With Projectiles Alert)

    08/14/2011 1:41:41 PM PDT · by Do Not Make Fun Of His Ears · 44 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 8/9/11 | Too ashamed to sign their name
    It's the Renaissance, stupid. The economy is not what ails us today. No, what ails Americans is what Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and their artistic spawn have wrought in the culture, starting 500 years ago. The Renaissance has dragged us all down. Tea party queen and Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann is convinced that America is sinking into tyranny. Why? In a remarkable profile of the candidate appearing in the Aug. 15 issue of the New Yorker magazine, the artistic flowering of the Italian Renaissance takes a beating for having done away with the god-fearing Dark Ages. Bachmann "belongs to...
  • 49% See Romney As Qualified to Be President, Less Confident of Other GOP Candidates

    06/06/2011 10:21:51 AM PDT · by Hojczyk · 68 replies
    Rasmussen Reports ^ | June 6, 2011 | Scott Rasmussen
    Mitt Romney is the only Republican 2012 hopeful that a sizable number of voters considers qualified to be president. Sarah Palin is the one they view as least qualified, but, at this early stage, many voters are still in the dark about all the possible candidates. However, voters feel strongest that Palin, the Republican vice presidential nominee in 2008, is not qualified. Twenty-three percent (23%) say the former Alaska governor is qualified to serve as the nation’s chief executive, but 63% say she is not qualified. Palin is the best-known of the Republicans with just 15% undecided about her.
  • Church Bones 'Belong to Caravaggio', Researchers Say

    06/16/2010 3:43:21 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies · 262+ views
    BBC ^ | Wednesday, 16 June 2010
    Human remains found in a church in Tuscany almost certainly belong to Renaissance artist Caravaggio, Italian researchers said. The team said they were 85% sure that the set of bones of a man who died in about 1610, aged between 38 and 40, were that of the painter. The remains had been kept in an ossuary in a church crypt in Porto Ercole, after reportedly being exhumed in 1956. Caravaggio was known for his "chiaroscuro" painting technique. The method, in which light and shadow are sharply contrasted, revolutionised painting. Mystery The researchers, from four Italian universities, said they believed Michelangelo...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation

    06/13/2010 7:30:19 AM PDT · by FredJake · 13 replies · 304+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/13/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (my disclaimer)I do not wish to diminish the contributions of any of the many individuals or events that will be left out of my articles, but in order to be as concise as possible I will inevitably fail to give proper credit to the accomplishments some. I have settled upon the following six areas to cover which I put in five parts. Follow any link to read other parts. Part I -------- An Introduction and Overview of the Renaissance (Just part I is posted, follow the links to read the other four parts) Part II ------- Political and Social...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation (Part V)

    06/09/2010 11:10:26 AM PDT · by OneVike · 9 replies · 55+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/9/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (This is the fifth and final installment of a five part series on the Protestant Reformation) Part I ------ An Introduction and Overview of the RenaissancePart II ----- Political and Social ChangesPart III ---- LiteraturePart IV ---- Art, Inventions & ExplorationsPart V ----- Conclusion Conclusion The definition of the word Renaissance is "rebirth" and while it is true that the era was highlighted by man's awakening from a spell of stagnation known as the Dark Ages, the Renaissance helped give men the will that was needed to stand up to the church. It seems quite interesting that, prior to the...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation (Part IV)

    06/09/2010 11:00:51 AM PDT · by OneVike · 11 replies · 33+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/9/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (This is the fourth installment of a five part series on the Protestant Reformation) Part I ------ An Introduction and Overview of the RenaissancePart II ----- Political and Social ChangesPart III ---- LiteraturePart IV ---- Art, Inventions & ExplorationsPart V ----- Conclusion Art, Inventions, and Explorations Art It has been said that if a work of art dwells upon beauty, it will inspire the viewer to make that beauty a part of his life and their outlook on the world. In this sense the art of the Renaissance Age gave men a reason to reflect upon their place in the...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation (Part III)

    06/09/2010 10:55:44 AM PDT · by OneVike · 2 replies · 26+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/9/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (This is the third installment of a five part series on the Protestant Reformation) Part I ------ An Introduction and Overview of the RenaissancePart II ----- Political and Social ChangesPart III ---- LiteraturePart IV ---- Art, Inventions & ExplorationsPart V ----- Conclusion Literature Any discussion about literature of the Renaissance Age must include the Council of Ferrara. In 1439 a large delegation from the Eastern Church held discussions with the Western Church over the doctrinal differences of Christendom. While every agreement made at this council was eventually disregarded, the effect that it had on literature was profound and since the...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation (Part II)

    06/09/2010 10:50:31 AM PDT · by OneVike · 2 replies · 22+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/9/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (This is the second installment of a five part series on the Protestant Reformation) Part I ------ An Introduction and Overview of the RenaissancePart II ----- Political and Social ChangesPart III ---- LiteraturePart IV ---- Art, Inventions & ExplorationsPart V ----- Conclusion Political and Social Changes The Western European feudal system that was begun by the first Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne would eventually morph into a system that was quite different from other feudal systems around the world. Throughout most of the dark ages, the powers of the Church and state co-existed with constant tension between the two. This pluralistic...
  • How the Renaissance Led to the Reformation (Part I)

    06/09/2010 10:45:09 AM PDT · by OneVike · 20 replies · 40+ views
    ChicoER Gate ^ | 6/9/10 | Chuck Wolk
    (This is the first installment of a five part series on the Protestant Reformation) I am presenting you the first part in a series of five articles about the great Protestant Reformation. In this series I will present various historical aspects I believe worked together to create the atmosphere needed for the Reformation to take place. I do not mean to diminish the contributions of any of the many individuals or events that will be left out of my series, but in order to be as concise as possible I will inevitably fail to give proper credit to some. I...
  • Now there's a website for Renaissance Faires.

    05/06/2010 4:11:48 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies · 682+ views
    For those of you who enjoy them. Interesting articles, history, details of fairs & festivals, etc...
  • What does Christianity all mean? Renaissance Italy offers an idea!

    04/23/2010 12:41:55 PM PDT · by WesternCulture · 8 replies · 270+ views
    04/23/2010 | WesternCulture
    Pico della Mirandola was a thinker who lived in 15th century Florence. The notion of the world he nurtured was somewhat differing to the one we favor today. Not to speak of the ideas of the unforgiving clerics of that time. Despite this, Pico della Mirandola's ideas on the image of man are relevant. This is how educated inhabitants of Renaissance Florence interpreted God's one and only message to man: ``We have given you, O Adam, no visage proper to yourself, nor endowment properly your own, in order that whatever place, whatever form, whatever gifts you may, with premeditation, select,...
  • A Renaissance , Not a Revolution - Bringing Morality back to America

    07/24/2009 7:15:07 PM PDT · by AuntB · 10 replies · 1,388+ views
    TownCrierNews ^ | July 24, 2009 | TheTownCrier
    renaissance n. A rebirth or revival It’s amazing what goes on in the middle of the night when most of us are sound asleep. After a unfortunate encounter with a Brown Recluse Spider crawling over my bed, and my misguided attempts to kill it with a slipper and then chemicals, I had to abandon my bedroom. So I turned on the radio, unable to get but 3 stations, 2 of them in Spanish, and Coast to Coast Am. I ordinarily don’t listen to conspiracy theories and worries of boogymen I can do nothing about, because as our patriot friend, Terry...