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Keyword: renaissance

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  • Da Vinci’s ‘male Mona Lisa’ expected to sell for $100M — Salvatori Mundi (video)

    10/10/2017 7:33:40 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 23 replies
    The New York Post ^ | October 10, 2017 | 3:19pm | By Tamar Lapin
    It’s the passion of the painting. Leonardo da Vinci’s haunting last work, depicting Jesus Christ, is coming to New York this month and is expected to fetch an estimated $100 million at a November Christie’s auction, a spokesperson said. “Salvator Mundi is a painting of the most iconic figure in the world by the most important artist of all time,” Loic Gouzer, chairman of post-war and contemporary art for Christie’s New York, said in a statement released by the auction house.
  • Russian Hacking and Collusion: Put the Cards on the Table

    05/14/2017 10:37:50 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 37 replies
    American Thinker.com ^ | May 14, 2017 | Clarice Feldman
    The notion that Russia interfered in the election to help Donald Trump was a John Brennan/James Clapper confection created in an unorthodox way, and defied logic, given that Hillary and her associates had far closer connections to Russia than Trump or his associates did. John Merline writes at Investor's Business Daily: THE CLINTON FAMILY BUSINESS [snip] Bill Clinton received half a million dollars in 2010 for a speech he gave in Moscow, paid by a Russian firm, Renaissance Capital, that has ties to Russian intelligence. The Clinton Foundation took money from Russian officials and oligarchs, including Victor Kekselberg, a Putin...
  • How did ISLAM lead to the DARK AGES, then RENAISSANCE & REFORMATION?

    03/04/2017 9:57:23 AM PST · by Perseverando · 31 replies
    American Minute ^ | Undated | William Federer
    Caliph Umar fought alongside of Mohammed in nearly all his battles. Umar's daughter Hafsa was one of Mohammed's wives. Waging jihad, Umar conquered enormous areas, including: -Eastern Roman Empire -Mesopotamia, -parts of Persia, -Egypt, -Palestine, -Syria, -North Africa, -Armenia, -Anatolia -Damascus, and -Jerusalem. Muslim pirates terrorized the Mediterranean, blockading trade. This caused an economic disaster in Roman Europe by diminishing products moving from North Africa and the Middle East to Rome. An important item no longer shipped was papyrus -- reeds from the Nile delta which were used for paper in Europe. The sudden shortage of paper resulted in a...
  • Letters to the Crocodile God

    11/11/2007 10:47:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 114+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 6, November/December 2007 | Marco Merola
    The desert swallowed Tebtunis in the twelfth century A.D., so the town does not appear on any maps. We know its name, and a great deal more, from the tens of thousands of papyrus fragments found throughout the twentieth century by a succession of archaeologists, including those working at the site today. These records, which range from pieces found in ancient garbage dumps, to sheets recycled as wrappings for mummies, to five-yard-long scrolls, include literary texts and records of private contracts and public acts. "The papyri give us particular and historic information that cannot be found elsewhere," says Claudio Gallazzi,...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • A High-Tech Hunt for Lost Art

    10/06/2009 6:22:58 PM PDT · by BGHater · 10 replies · 780+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 06 Oct 2009 | JOHN TIERNEY
    If you believe, as Maurizio Seracini does, that Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting is hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, then there are two essential techniques for finding it. As usual, Leonardo anticipated both of them. First, concentrate on scientific gadgetry. After spotting what seemed to be a clue to Leonardo’s painting left by another 16th-century artist, Dr. Seracini led an international team of scientists in mapping every millimeter of the wall and surrounding room with lasers, radar, ultraviolet light and infrared cameras. Once they identified the likely hiding place, they developed devices to detect the painting by...
  • Engineers to search for Leonardo fresco [Battle of Anghiari]

    10/28/2007 11:45:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 428+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Monday October 22, 2007 | Frances D'Emilio
    The hunt for the "Battle of Anghiari," ...which Leonardo began in 1505 to commemorate the 15th-century Florentine victory over Milan at Anghiari, a medieval Tuscan town... unfinished when Leonardo left Florence in 1506... was given new impetus about 30 years ago, when Seracini noticed a cryptic message on a fresco in the hall by Giorgio Vasari, a 16th-century artist famed for chronicling Renaissance artists' labors. "Cerca, trova" -- "seek and you shall find" -- said the words on a tiny green flag in the "Battle of Marciano in the Chiana Valley." ...A few years ago, using radar and X-ray scans,...
  • Hunt for Da Vinci painting will resume[Missing "Battle of Anghiari"]

    01/14/2007 3:33:39 AM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 11 replies · 1,290+ views
    AP ^ | 13 Jan 2007 | ARIEL DAVID
    A real-life Da Vinci mystery, complete with tantalizing clues and sharp art sleuths, may soon be solved, as researchers resume the search for a lost Leonardo masterpiece believed to be hidden within a wall in a Florence palace. Culture Minister Francesco Rutelli and officials in the Tuscan city announced this week they had given approval for renewed exploration in the Palazzo Vecchio, the seat of power for various Florence rulers, including the Medici family in the 16th century. There, some researchers believe, a cavity in a wall may have preserved Leonardo's unfinished painted mural of the "Battle of Anghiari" for...
  • On the trail of the lost Leonardo

    05/16/2006 10:40:00 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 13 replies · 635+ views
    The Times Online UK ^ | 5/16/06 | Mark Irving
    Forget the Da Vinci Code. Dr Seracini thinks he's cracked art's biggest mystery Step by patient step, one man is drawing ever closer to the real Da Vinci mystery: tracking down the master’s greatest painting, lost for four and a half centuries. And it is hidden, he believes, in a room at the heart of political power since the Middle Ages in Florence. For art historians, finding Leonardo’s lost Battle of Anghiari is in the same league as finding the Titanic or the still lost tomb of the Ancient Egyptian architect Imhotep — as big as you can get. The...
  • ART APPECIATION THREAD Is this the Da Vinci Clue? (Vasari fresco holds mystery)

    06/21/2005 3:11:06 PM PDT · by Liz · 16 replies · 1,603+ views
    ASSOCIATED PRESS | Tuesday, June 21, 2005 | ARIEL DAVID
    Maybe Vasari fresco refers to presence of greater art behind it ROME -- "Cerca trova" ("Seek and you shall find") is the tantalizing 5-century-old message painted on a fresco in the council hall of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio. Researchers now believe these cryptic words could be a clue to the location of a long-lost Leonardo da Vinci painting and are pressing local authorities to allow them to search for the masterpiece of Renaissance art. Maurizio Seracini, an Italian art researcher, first noticed the message during a survey of the hall 30 years ago, but his team lacked the technology then to...
  • Medieval Doodles Of A 7-Year Old Boy Hints At The ‘Universality’ Of Daydreaming

    05/02/2016 4:24:27 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 34 replies
    Realm Of History ^ | APRIL 30, 2016 | DATTATREYA MANDAL
    Novgorod or Veliky Novgorod, is one of the major historical cities of Russia, and it started out as a trading station for the Varangians who traveled from the Baltic region to Constantinople by (possibly) late 10th century AD. But as it turns out, this historically significant settlement of northern Russia is also home to around thousand personal ‘tomes’ that are inscribed on bark of birch trees and are almost preserved in perfect condition. In fact, historians hypothesize that there are 20,000 similar specimens still waiting to be salvaged from the conducive anaerobic clay soil layers of the city environs. And...
  • What Can the Middle Ages Teach Us About US Naval Strategy?

    03/12/2015 11:35:30 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    The Diplomat ^ | March 12, 2015 | Franz-Stefan Gady
    “To wage war, you need first of all money; second, you need money, and third, you also need money,” goes the famous saying of Raimondo Graf Montecúccoli, an Italian who served in the armies of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nations. Consequently, with the debate on the U.S. Navy’s budget for the next fiscal year raging on (see here and here), it is perhaps time to assess not how much money is spent on the American navy, but whether it is spent wisely. The discussion surrounding China’s anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) capabilities and the costs that these capabilities impose on...
  • Syphilis widespread in Central Europe even before Columbus' voyage to America

    11/23/2015 9:54:22 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Journal of Biological and Clinical Anthropology via Health Canal ^ | November 19, 2015 | Johanna Sophia Gaul, Karl Grossschmidt, Christian Gusenbauer and Fabian Kanz
    In 1495, a "new" disease spread throughout Europe: syphilis. Christopher Columbus was said to have brought this sexually transmitted disease back from his voyage to America. At least, that has been the accepted theory up until now. Using morphological and structural evidence, researchers from the Department of Forensic Medicine and the Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology (bone laboratory) at MedUni Vienna have now identified several cases of congenital syphilis dating back to as early as 1320 AD in skeletons from excavations at the cathedral square of St. Polten, Austria... Congenital syphilis, which is passed from a pregnant mother to...
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • The Play Of Daniel (Part I of II) - A Twelfth Century Musical Drama

    11/07/2015 12:24:02 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1958 | Father Reinbert Weakland, O.S.B. , transcriber to modern music notation; Musical Director: Noah Gr
    This is Part 1 of 2 of the New York Pro Musica 1958 production of this Musical Drama. It's musical director was Noah Greenberg. Father Reinbert Weakland, O.S.B. transcribed the music into modern notation. It was presented at the Cloisters, The Metropolitan Museum Of Art, New York. The cast included: Russell Oberlin (Belshazzar's Prince) Betty Wilson (Belshazzar's Queen) Brayton Lewis (Belshazzar) Charles Bressler (Daniel) Sorry if the playback sounds a little slow at times. The record I used to record this video was slightly warped.
  • The Renaissance Series

    10/30/2015 3:22:36 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 23 replies
    Freddy Fabris Photographer, Huffington Post ^ | October 21, 2015 | Freddy Fabris Photographer and Author
    <p>If you want to pay a tribute to great artists of old, why not get help from mechanics?</p> <p>That's what Freddy Fabris did to get a unique twist on the works of Renaissance painters.</p> <p>The mechanics, clad in overalls and tools in hand, posed in an auto-shop.</p>
  • Chartres Cathedral: Sooty-Dark or Sparkling White, It’s Still Saving Souls

    10/24/2015 2:00:54 PM PDT · by NYer · 60 replies
    Aletelia ^ | October 24, 2015 | WILLIAM NEWTON
    If you have not been following the art and architecture comentariat of late—and after all, that’s what you read me for—then you may be unaware of a tempest brewing around the restoration of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Chartres, France. Universally considered to be one of the greatest works of architecture on the planet, the Medieval architecture of Chartres and its magnificent stained-glass windows have inspired writers, artists and composers, as well as many imitators. Beginning in 2008 the French government began to restore the building and in the process has removed much of the soot, dust and...
  • Hiker finds 1,200-yr-old Viking sword

    10/21/2015 2:09:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | unattributed
    A hiker travelling the ancient route between western and eastern Norway found a 1,200-year-old Viking sword after sitting down to rest after a short fishing trip. The sword, found at Haukeli in central southern Norway will be sent for conservation at the The University Museum of Bergen. Jostein Aksdal, an archeologist with Hordaland County said that the sword was in such good condition that if it was given a new grip and a polish, it could be used today. "The sword was found in very good condition. It is very special to get into a sword that is merely lacking...
  • Hiker taking a rest finds a 1,200-year-old Viking sword in great condition

    10/24/2015 5:33:35 PM PDT · by ETL · 31 replies
    FoxNews.Com ^ | October 23, 2015 | Jenn Gidman
    Goran Olsen was enjoying a leisurely hike recently in Norway when he stopped near the fishing village of Haukeli, about 150 miles west of Oslo. Under some rocks along a well-traversed path, he made a discovery that's now the envy of every detectorist in Scandinavia: a 30-inch wrought-iron Viking sword, estimated to be about 1,200 years old, CNN reports. One would think a sword that old would be so decrepit it could never be wielded again, but a Hordaland County archaeologist says it just needs a little polish and a new grip to be good to go. "The sword was...
  • Fiorina: Carson, Trump ‘sound a lot like politicians’

    10/16/2015 8:16:53 AM PDT · by jimbo123 · 36 replies
    The Hill ^ | 10/16/15 | Mark Hensch
    Carly Fiorina criticized fellow GOP presidential contenders Ben Carson and Donald Trump for threatening to boycott CNBC's debate. “Well, I think apparently they’re worried about answering questions for three hours,” she told host Megyn Kelly on Fox News’ “The Kelly File” on Thursday night. “For heaven sakes, we have ten candidates on stage,” Fiorina said. "I don’t think three hours is a long time. “They also apparently asked for prepared statements,” she added of Carson and Trump. "You know, prepared statements are what politicians do. “So, honestly, here are two outsiders supposedly. Donald Trump and Ben Carson – they sound...