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Keyword: romanempire

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  • Curiae Veteres Sanctuary in Rome Attracts the Curious

    08/13/2015 8:54:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 11, 2015 | Elisabetta Povoledo
    Archaeologists working on the Palatine Hill here this summer excavated parts of sixth-century B.C. foundations connected to a sanctuary of a cult that ancient sources trace back to Romulus, Romeís mythic founder ó a rare find from such an early period. The discovery, archaeologists say, will probably lead to further exploration for even more ancient elements of the sanctuary, called the Curiae Veteres. The remains came to light during a continuing dig of the northeast slope of the hill. The most recent phase of the dig ended last month... The Curiae Veteres was among the most important buildings of that...
  • A scholar in the desert {Hagarism: the origins of Islam} - Patricia Crone

    08/07/2015 12:18:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 23 replies
    The Economist ^ | 1 August 2015 | the Economist
    ISLAM arose with remarkable speed and mystery. Patricia Croneís well-stocked mind, clear prose and unflinching intellectual honesty were devoted to explaining why. She had little time for Islamís own accounts of its origins: ďdebrisĒ as far as historians were concerned, and hopelessly inconsistent. Far better, she reckoned, to fill the gap with contemporary sources and knowledge of other cultures, from messianic Maoris to Icelanders. That required both personal and intellectual bravery. The central beliefs of Islam, such as the way the Koran took shape, the life of Muhammad and Islamís relations with other religions, are sensitive subjects. Outside scrutiny can...
  • What if the Persian Empire of King Xerxes had conquered Greece?

    04/07/2011 5:34:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 90 replies · 3+ views
    hub pages ^ | 2009 | Asp52
    ...With Greece a Persian province what would have happened next? Forward into the Balkans and be met by Eastern Europe's barbaric tribes. It is likely on the evidence of the Romans occupation of that area that the Persians would struggle so far away from their own lands to subdue the Balkan and Italian areas even with the support of its Macedonian allies. But their incursion into this area of Europe would have stopped the formation of the Roman Empire as we know it, The Germanic tribes may have spread further and the migration of the peoples of the Steppes( Maygars...
  • Behold the Newly-Discovered Painting in Rome's Catacomb of Callixtus

    07/27/2015 9:41:13 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 5 replies
    Rome, Italy, Jul 21, 2015 / 12:03 am (CNA/EWTN News).- A recent discovery in the Catacomb of Saint Callixtus, an early Christian series of tombs beneath Rome which once held the bodies of 16 Popes, has been christened the ďOrpheus cubicleĒ after the figure from Greek mythology. The small room, located in front of the Crypt of the Popes, was poorly conserved until a recent excavation by the Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archeology. The ďOrpheus cubicleĒ is named for its painting of Orpheus with a lyre, surrounded by birds, sea monsters, and flowers, representing the whole of creation. Orpheus was...
  • Two engraved reliefs unearthed on Red Sea coastline [12th Dynasty]

    07/24/2015 11:55:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Wednesday, July, 22, 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty told Ahram Online that studies carried out revealed that the first relief belongs to the Middle Kindom because it bears the cartouche of the seventh king of the 12th Dynasty, King Amenemhat IV, whose reign was characterised by exploration for precious turquoise and amethyst on Punt Island. Meanwhile the second relief, which is in a bad conservation condition, can be dated to the Second Intermediate Period. After restoration, Eldamaty said, more information on the relief would be revealed. Three Roman burials and parts of Berenice Temple's faÁade were also uncovered as well as a number...
  • The black stone of Elagabal {maybe now of allah?}

    07/23/2015 1:09:56 AM PDT · by Cronos · 14 replies
    "Elagabalus Aureus Sol Invictus" by Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. ¬†http://www.cngcoins.com. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons The reverse of the imperial coin depicts horses pulling a wagon on which there is the sacred black stone from the temple of god Elagabalus in Emesa, modern Homs in Syria. The stone was associated in Rome with the cult of Sol Invictus by Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (c. 203 ‚Äď March 11, 222). ¬†After his death he is commonly known as Caesar Elagabalus according to this his favorite god. The name is the Latinized form of the Syrian IlńĀh...
  • Pro-gay activists react to gay Ďmarriageí resistance: ĎToo many Christians, not enough lionsí

    07/14/2015 6:13:11 PM PDT · by Morgana · 32 replies
    lifesitenews.com ^ | Jul 14, 2015 - | Lisa Bourne
    July 14, 2015 (LifeSiteNews) -- There has been no shortage of anti-Christian rhetoric from various media outlets in the fallout from the Supreme Court decision decreeing homosexual "marriage" across the country. "Too many Christians, not enough lions," a derisive reference capitalizing on the Christians martyred in ancient Rome, was also how one LGBT activist responded to Catholic Vote's (CV) pro-marriage "Not Alone" video, according to CV President Brian Burch. Released the day of the Obergefell v. Hodges decision, the CV video logged more than 1.3 million views in the first 10 days. "Seeing the power of our message, LGBT activists...
  • Why Halley's Comet May Be Linked to Famine 1,500 Years Ago

    12/20/2013 6:21:32 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    livescience.com ^ | December 18, 2013 07:53am ET | Mike Wall, Senior Writer |
    A piece of the famous Halley's comet likely slammed into Earth in A.D. 536, blasting so much dust into the atmosphere that the planet cooled considerably, a new study suggests. This dramatic climate shift is linked to drought and famine around the world, which may have made humanity more susceptible to "Justinian's plague" in A.D. 541-542 ó the first recorded emergence of the Black Death in Europe. The new results come from an analysis of Greenland ice that was laid down between A.D. 533 and 540. The ice cores record large amounts of atmospheric dust during this seven-year period, not...
  • Roman Legionary Camp Uncovered in Israel

    07/13/2015 1:26:16 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | July 10, 2015
    Archaeologists from the Jezreel Valley Regional Project say they have unearthed the remains of a 1,900-year-old camp of Legio VI Ferrata (Sixth Ironclad Legion) near the archaeological site of Tel Megiddo.During the past three excavation seasons (2013-2015), the archaeologists have made a number of significant finds at the site. They uncovered defensive trenching earthworks next to the foundations of a great wall about 20 feet (6 m) wide. They also found numerous ceramic roof tiles with the legionís mark, Roman coins and the fragments of scale armor, and exposed rooms likely belonging to one of the barracks areas. ďDuring the...
  • Israeli Rabbis Hope to Search Vatican

    01/15/2004 5:26:25 PM PST · by Alouette · 151 replies · 16,415+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Jan. 15, 2004 | Gavin Rabinowitz
    JERUSALEM - Israel's chief rabbis, who will meet the pope Friday, said they hope to get permission to search Vatican storerooms for artifacts such as the huge golden menorah that stood in the Jewish Temple in Jerusalem 2,000 years ago. Vatican officials confirmed the meeting would take place but declined comment on the rabbis' request. Yehuda Metzger and Shlomo Amar are to have an audience with Pope John Paul II, the first by Israel's chief rabbis in the Vatican. The pope met Israel's previous chief rabbis in the Holy Land during his visit in 2000. Amar, spiritual leader of Israel's...
  • 6 Most Powerful Armies of All Time

    07/08/2015 6:41:27 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    National Interest ^ | July 8, 2015 | Zachary Keck and Akhilesh Pillalamarri
    In an anarchical system like international relations, military power is the ultimate form of currency. A state may have all the culture, art, philosophy, and glitter and glory in the world, but itís all for naught if the country doesnít have a powerful military to defend itself. Mao Zedong put it bluntly when he stated: ďpower grows out of the barrel of a gun.Ē Of all the types of military power, armies are arguably the most important for the simple fact that people live on land, and are likely to continue doing so in the future. As the famous political...
  • In first, imperial Roman legionary camp uncovered near Megiddo

    07/08/2015 7:22:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | July 7, 2015 | Ilan Ben Zion
    The remains of an imperial Roman legionary camp -- the only one of its kind ever to be excavated in Israel or in the entirety of the Eastern Empire from the second and third centuries CE -- have come to light at a dig near Megiddo, archaeologists said this week. Legio, a Roman site situated next to Tel Megiddo in northern Israel, served as the headquarters of the Sixth Legion Ferrata -- the Ironclad -- in the years following the Jewish Revolt, and would have helped keep order in the Galilee during the Bar Kochba Revolt in 132-135 CE... In...
  • Remains Of Food Shed Light On Ancient Ways

    11/20/2004 3:16:00 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 1,593+ views
    The Bath Chronicle ^ | 11-20-2004 | Ben Murch
    REMAINS OF FOOD SHED LIGHT ON ANCIENT WAYS BY BEN MURCH 11:00 - 20 November 2004 Exotic spices unearthed beneath the Bath Spa show military administrators lived in the lap of luxury in the city's early days. Food and architectural remains found preserved beneath the remains of Roman buildings provide new evidence of the high living enjoyed by the military rulers of what was then Aquae Sulis in the first century AD. The remains were discovered in 1999, but have only just finished being analysed. The ancient grapes, figs, coriander and a peppercorn - along with highly decorative architectural fragments...
  • [from January 3, 2014] Giraffe Was on Menu in Pompeii Restaurants

    07/02/2015 8:13:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | January 3, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Giraffe was on the menu in Pompeii's standard restaurants, says a new research into a non-elite section of the ancient Roman city buried by Mount Vesuvius' eruption in 79 A.D. The study, which will be presented on Jan. 4 at the Archaeological Institute of America and American Philological Association Joint Annual Meeting in Chicago, draws on a multi-year excavation in a forgotten area inside one of the busiest gates of Pompeii, the Porta Stabia. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, said his team has spent more than a decade researching the life of the middle and...
  • Roman Villa Reopens on Wild Tuscan Island

    07/02/2015 11:34:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Thursday, July 2, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of one of the most prestigious maritime villas from Roman times are set to reopen July 2 in a small, almost uninhabited island off the Tuscan coast after been locked for 15 years. Commonly known as "Villa Domitia," the imperial complex stood magnificently 2,000 years ago on the island of Giannutri, a rocky crescent about 3 miles long with thick areas of Mediterranean vegetation... The majestic complex marks Giannutri's most glorious time. Today the southernmost island of the Tuscan archipelago is almost empty -- populated by a huge colony of seagulls and, in summer, by a group of...
  • Gold coin may be key to solve Sweden's 'Pompeii'

    07/02/2015 9:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    The Local ^ | August 18, 2014 | Solveig Rundquist/Oliver Gee
    A small team of archaeologists at Kalmar County museum, in collaboration with Lund University, has been digging at the site for the past three years. The team is studying the Migration Period in Scandinavian history, from about 400 to 550 AD... While the team has found several hundred of the coin already, Monday's discovery was a big one, said archaeologist and project manager Helena Victor. "This is the first one found in an archaeological context," she told The Local. "Normally we find them while we're plowing the field. But we found this one inside a house where we found people...
  • Pompeii Find Shows Secrets Of The Samnites

    07/04/2004 5:44:51 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 2,987+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7-5-2004 | Bruce Johnston
    Pompeii find shows secrets of the Samnites By Bruce Johnston in Rome (Filed: 05/07/2004) The discovery in Pompeii of a pre-Roman temple is being hailed as evidence that the city was sophisticated and thriving 300 years before Vesuvius erupted. The temple is said to be of Mephitis, a female deity worshipped by the Samnites, a mysterious ancient people who preceded the Romans in Pompeii. The temple complex includes a sanctuary where it is thought girls from good families worked briefly in "sacred prostitution" as a rite of passage to full womanhood. The Samnites were previously thought of as mountain warriors,...
  • Pompeii Family's Final Hours Reconstructed

    12/15/2008 7:31:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1,546+ views
    Discovery News ^ | December 11, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    At around 1:00 p.m. on Aug. 24, 79 A.D., Pompeii residents saw a pine tree-shaped column of smoke bursting from Vesuvius. Reaching nine miles into the sky, the column began spewing a thick pumice rain. Many residents rushed in the streets, trying to leave the city. "At that moment, Polybius' house was inhabited by 12 people, including a young woman in advanced pregnancy. They decided to remain in the house, most likely because it was safer for the pregnant woman. Given the circumstances, it was the right strategy," Scarpati said... At around 7:00 p.m., by which time the front part...
  • The Destruction of PompeiióGodís Revenge?

    06/24/2010 9:58:14 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 46 replies
    Biblical Archeological Review ^ | Jul/Aug 2010 | Hershel Shanks
    Nine years, almost to the day, after Roman legionaries destroyed Godís house in Jerusalem, God destroyed the luxurious watering holes of the Roman elite. Was this Godís revenge? Thatís not exactly the question I want to raise, however. Rather, did anyone at the time see it that way? Did anyone connect the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E. with the Roman destruction of Jerusalem in 70? First the dates: The Romans destroyed the Second Temple (Herodís Temple) on the same date that the Babylonians had destroyed the First Temple (Solomonís Temple) in 586 B.C.E. But the exact date of...
  • First Pompeii Uncovered (3rd Century BC)

    02/04/2007 2:34:35 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 1,075+ views
    Ansa ^ | 2-1-2007
    First Pompeii uncoveredSamnites founded city in Third Century BC (ANSA) - Rome, February 1 - The origins of the famed buried city of Pompeii have emerged from years of excavations, an international conference in Rome was told Thursday. The first Pompeii was not built by the Romans or even by the Greeks who preceded them, but by an ancient people called the Samnites, Pompeii heritage Superintendent Piero Guzzo told a packed audience of archaeologists and scholars. Wielding photos of inscriptions, votive offerings and even entire buildings, Guzzo said "a new season of studies has begun". "For the first time we...
  • The Fall and Rise and Fall of Pompeii

    07/01/2015 5:37:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | July 2015 | Joshua Hammer
    ...The two towns remained largely undisturbed, lost to history, through the rise of Byzantium, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In 1738, Maria Amalia Christine, a nobleman's daughter from Saxony, wed Charles of Bourbon, the King of Naples, and became entranced by classical sculptures displayed in the garden of the royal palace in Naples. A French prince digging in the vicinity of his villa on Mount Vesuvius had discovered the antiquities nearly 30 years earlier, but had never conducted a systematic excavation. So Charles dispatched teams of laborers and engineers equipped with tools and blasting powder to the site of...
  • Ancient footprint discovery leaves lasting impression at Vindolanda

    07/01/2015 4:25:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Vindolanda Trust ^ | Tuesday, June 30, 2015 | Sonya Galloway
    Nowhere gets you closer to the Romans on Hadrian's Wall than the fort and settlement of Vindolanda, the extraordinary hoard of personal artefacts gives you a unique insight into the lives of people living here 2000 years ago. The latest addition to the collection of artefacts from the current excavation has certainly made an impression on everyone. Someone 2000 years ago quite literally put their foot in it and as a result a volunteer digging at the site has unearthed a tile with a clear imprint of a human foot that accidentally, or perhaps mischievously stood on the freshly made...
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • Mysterious 2,000-year-old marble dolphin surfaces near Gaza

    06/28/2015 11:11:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | June 25, 2015 | Ilan Ben Zion
    You would think that 12 miles inland from the Mediterranean Sea is the last place to find a dolphin clutching a fish between its jaws. Hewn from marble, the 2,000-or-so-year-old statuette surfaced during archaeological excavations near Kibbutz Magen, bordering the Gaza Strip, in March of this year. The discovery of the dolphin statue amid the ruins of a late Byzantine and early Islamic site in the northern Negev was only announced this week by Israel's Antiquities Authority. Alexander Fraiberg, head archaeologist with the IAA team, said he believes the sculpture dates to the Roman era, but was incorporated into a...
  • Dundee experts recreate face of Saxon man at Lincoln Castle

    06/28/2015 11:04:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    University of Dundee ^ | Wednesday, June 3, 2015 | Roddy Isles
    The work has been carried out by specialists in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) at the University of Dundee, one of the world's leading centres for facial reconstruction. Caroline Erolin, Lecturer in Forensic and Medical Art at CAHID, said, "His grave lay slightly under an important sarcophagus burial, which had resulted in excellent preservation of his skull making it the best candidate among the skeletons for facial reconstruction." ... "The burial of this man was one of eight burials which were interred inside a small stone church or chapel which predates Lincoln Castle and was previously unknown,"...
  • Syria: Where war hides history

    09/14/2009 7:46:21 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 13 replies · 632+ views
    csmonitor.com ^ | 08.26.09 | Frederick Deknate
    The Euphrates River, as seen from the Greco-Roman fortress of Dura-Europos. (Frederick Deknatel) Syria: Where war hides history By Frederick Deknatel | Contributor 08.26.09 DURA-EUROPOS, SYRIA Ė Syria is Damascus to the growing number of Western tourists here. A short trip to the Greek desert city of Palmyra, about halfway to the Euphrates from the capital, is often as far east as visitors go. Down the highway, however, where the Euphrates greens a strip of the rocky landscape, is a corner of the country less known for historical sights than for its proximity to war-torn Iraq. It is from here...
  • 1,782 Years Old: Inside the Oldest Church in the World

    06/26/2015 2:38:43 PM PDT · by NYer · 13 replies
    Church Pop ^ | June 25, 2015
    Marsyas, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons / ChurchPOP The Church is the mystical body of Christ. In Scripture, Jesus says ‚Äúwhere two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.‚ÄĚ (Mt 18.20)So the Church doesn‚Äôt strictly need special buildings, because the Church is the people. Nonetheless, from early on, Christians dedicated buildings for their communal worship to¬†God. Most of these early churches are long lost to history, yet a few from the first few centuries still remain, at least in some condition. Here is a picture of the oldest known church that‚Äôs still standing (at least partially): Wikimedia...
  • Well-preserved ancient Roman ship found in waters off Sardinia coast

    06/24/2015 8:48:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | June 23, 2015 | Nick Squires
    A remarkably well-preserved ancient Roman ship has been discovered on the seabed off the coast of Sardinia. The 2,000-year-old wreck was found at a depth of 150ft by a specialised diving unit of the Italian police, working in collaboration with archaeologists, in the strait that separates Sardinia from Corsica. The ship was carrying a load of terracotta tiles, which are also in a good state of preservation. The roof tiles, believed to have been produced in or around Rome, were packed into the hold of the vessel, which is 60ft long and 23ft wide. They were probably going to be...
  • Like being there: Walking through an ancient Roman town

    06/23/2015 12:17:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sunday, June 21, 2015 | editors
    ...for the archaeologist of 20 years ago, might have been the stuff of science fiction. Who would have known then that scientists would resurrect in startling detail an entire ancient Roman town after only fractional excavation? And who would have known that thousands of people from nearly every corner of the world would be able to 'walk' through that town without ever physically setting foot within?  This, however, is exactly what has happened for an obscure archaeological site located in Portugal -- a relatively small ancient Roman town whose few visible remains have attracted comparatively few visitors -- at least...
  • First Pisa, now Rome's Colosseum - it's leaning

    07/29/2012 1:44:45 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 27 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 7/29/12 | Catherine Hornby
    ROME (Reuters) - The ancient Colosseum of Rome, where gladiators fought for their lives, is slanting about 40 cm (16 inches) lower on the south side than on the north, and authorities are investigating whether it needs urgent repairs. Experts first noticed the incline about a year ago and have been monitoring it for the past few months, ... Tests have also started to observe the effects that traffic on nearby busy roads may have on the monument. Professor Giorgio Monti, from La Sapienza's construction technology department, warned there may be a crack in the base below the amphitheatre. "The...
  • Italy: Colosseum to be restored this year

    06/02/2010 5:07:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 474+ views
    Adnkronos International ^ | March 5, 2010 | AKI
    One of Italy's most popular landmarks, the Colosseum will undergo restoration this year as part of a 40-million euro revamp of historic sites in the capital Rome. The city's mayor Gianni Alemanno announced the restoration on Friday after presenting plans for Rome's latest bid to host the 2020 Olympic Games. "The restoration is part of a larger strategic development plan," Alemanno told reporters in Rome. Rome previously hosted the Olympic Games, officially known as the games of the XVII Olympiad in 1960. Alemanno last year promised to conduct restoration work on the Colosseum beginning in April 2010 to mark the...
  • American Family Vacation Italy - Rome, Venice, Milan Spring 2006

    06/19/2006 2:32:40 PM PDT · by schwing_wifey · 20 replies · 4,458+ views
    Personal letters home to US friends and family | Monday June 19th, 2006 | schwing_wifey
    Here we go yet again. This time we were off for a week in Italy - Rome, Venice, and Milan with our Rick Steve's Travel Guides in hand. Of all the places we've been so far, the books paid off handsomely in Italy. And next to the Swedes up in Kiruna, the Italians are some of the nicest Europeans we've met to date. No wonder so many Americans were there at the same time as we were. We land in Rome in the evening and catch a cab to the hotel. What can you say about Italian cab drivers? After...
  • Why is the Coliseum, with its lift for introducing wild animals, being rebuilt now?

    06/08/2015 2:03:42 PM PDT · by cleghornboy · 20 replies
    La Salette Journey ^ | June 8, 2015 | Paul Melanson
    The Termite Nations have dispensed with God and His Commandments in their quest for unbridled hedonism. We are being prepared for the Reign of Antichrist. The Rev. P. Huchede, in his work entitled "History of Antichrist," explains the religious preparation, both intellectual and moral, for the Reign of Antichrist which will arrive after economic collapse: "But how shall he deprive the world of Christianity and have himself adored as God? Alas, it is only too true that the minds and hearts of men are admirably disposed for revolution and consequently ready to accept and bear the cruel yoke of such...
  • Headless statues unearthed in Aphrodisias excavations

    09/03/2012 7:00:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Anatolia News Agency
    The two big headless statues have been found at the ancient city of Aphrodisias. The ongoing excavation works at one of Turkey's most important archaeological sites, the Karacasu Aphrodisias Ancient City, have revealed two headless statues. According to information provided by the Culture and Tourism Ministry, one of the statues is in 1.76 meters in height and the other is 1.68 meters. One of the statues holds a roll in its left hand and its right hand is on its chest. There is a pack of documents behind its left foot, but the fingers and head are broken. The second...
  • Gladiator Fights Revealed in Ancient Graffiti

    06/20/2015 5:58:55 PM PDT · by lbryce · 19 replies
    Fox News ^ | June 19,2015 | Owen Jarus
    <p>Hundreds of graffiti messages engraved into stone in the ancient city of Aphrodisias, in modern-day Turkey, have been discovered and deciphered, revealing what life was like there over 1,500 years ago, researchers say.</p> <p>The graffiti touches on many aspects of the city's life, including gladiator combat, chariot racing, religious fighting and sex. The markings date to a time when the Roman and Byzantine empires ruled over the city.</p>
  • Sea Level Was Higher During The Medieval Warm Period

    06/20/2015 2:20:29 PM PDT · by rottndog · 33 replies
    Real Science ^ | 6-18-2015 | stevengoddard
    The Norman castle at Pevensey Bay is one of the most historic sites in Britain. It is built inside of a Roman wall, and was William the Conquerorís headquarters. It was also used as a defense outpost by Brits and Americans in WWII It is currently several miles from the sea, but at the time when the Romans and Normans built the structures, the water lapped right up to the edge of the stone. The map below shows the bay 900 years ago, and the current seashore as a dashed line.
  • A Second Triumphal Arch of Titus Discovered

    06/19/2015 5:28:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | June 11, 2015 | Estelle Reed
    Archaeologists in Rome have discovered the foundations of a second triumphal arch of Roman Emperor Titus, which was thought to be lost to history, the Telegraph reports. The arch once stood at the entrance to ancient Rome's chariot-racing stadium, the Circus Maximus. A member of the Flavian dynasty, Titus was emperor of Rome from 79 to 81 A.D. Even though he responded quickly with aid when Vesuvius erupted barely two months into his reign in 79 and is credited with completing the Colosseum in 80, it is the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem and his victory against the Jews...
  • Award-winning Maryport Roman Temples Project begins its final dig at Hadrian's Wall

    06/19/2015 12:21:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Culture24 ^ | June 18, 2015 | Edward Lowton
    The final opportunity to visit the award-winning annual dig at the Maryport Roman Temples Project and learn about the excavation directly from lectures by the archaeologists involved has begun in Cumbria. The eight-week dig aims to explore Roman Maryportís complex religious landscape and to learn more about the famous altars found at the site, on display in nearby Senhouse Roman Museum... The majority of the altars, dedicated annually by the commanders of the Roman fort, were found in an 1870 excavation by Humphrey Senhouse. Since then, the five year project, commissioned by the Senhouse Museum Trust and supported by Newcastle...
  • Arsonists torch storerooms with 4,000-year-old artifacts [koranimals]

    06/17/2015 10:01:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | June 16, 2015 | Ilan ben Zion
    Arsonists in northern Israel torched two storerooms filled with artifacts found at a nearby salvage excavation at Tel Kishon on Monday. Some of the antiquities were over 4,000 years old. The blaze inflicted irreparable damage to the antiquities, the Israel Antiquities Authority said in a statement Tuesday morning. The authority lodged a report with the police, who opened an investigation into the incident. The excavations at Tel Kishon were being conducted to prevent damage to artifacts during roadwork on Route 65, near Mount Tabor in the Galilee. Among the antiquities found, and damaged in the blaze, were Bronze Age pottery...
  • I Stood Here for Rome [Roman soldier shoeprints, Galilee]

    06/17/2015 9:57:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | June 17, 2015 | editors
    The archaeological sites of the ancient Roman Empire constitute without rival the most prolific array of ancient architecture and artifacts that can be attributed to any single civilization or culture. Its remains pockmark the Old World landscape from North Africa and Egypt to Hadrianís Wall in Britain. The artifacts populate museums the world over. But comparatively rarely does one find the preserved footprint of an ancient Roman citizen. That is why excavators and archaeologists got excited when, while digging at the site of Hippos-Sussita (an ancient Hellenistic-Roman site just east of the Sea of Galilee in Israel), they came across...
  • Tree Grown From 2,000-Year-Old Seed Has Reproduced

    03/29/2015 5:41:32 PM PDT · by EBH · 44 replies
    Smithsonianmag.com ^ | 3/26/2015 | Laura Clark
    et out the cigarsóMethuselah, a Judean date palm tree that was grown from a 2,000 year old seed, has become a papa plant. Elaine Solowey, of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies at Kibbutz Ketura in Israel, recently broke the good news to National Geographic: ďHe is over three meters [ten feet] tall, he's got a few offshoots, he has flowers, and his pollen is good," she says. "We pollinated a female with his pollen, a wild [modern] female, and yeah, he can make dates." Methuselah sprouted back in 2005, when agriculture expert Solowey germinated his antique seed. It had...
  • Tree From 2,000-Year-Old Seed Doing Well (Methuselah)

    06/12/2008 5:51:19 PM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 103+ views
    Physorg ^ | 6-12-2008 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    Tree from 2,000-year-old seed is doing well By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID , AP Science WriterJune 12, 2008 (AP) -- Just over three years old and about four-feet tall, Methuselah is growing well. "It's lovely," Dr. Sarah Sallon said of the date palm, whose parents may have provided food for the besieged Jews at Masada some 2,000 years ago. The little tree was sprouted in 2005 from a seed recovered from Masada, where rebelling Jews committed suicide rather than surrender to Roman attackers. Radiocarbon dating of seed fragments clinging to its root, as well as other seeds found with it that...
  • 2,000-Year-Old Judean Date Seed Growing Successfully

    02/07/2006 3:18:12 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 17 replies · 630+ views
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 11:03 Feb 06, '06 / 8 Shevat 5766 | By Ezra HaLevi
    A 2,000-year-old date seed planted last Tu BíShvat has sprouted and is over a foot tall. Being grown at Kibbutz Ketura in the Arava, it is the oldest seed to ever produce a viable young sapling. The Judean date seed was found, together with a large number of other seeds, during archaeological excavations carried out close to Massada near the southern end of the Dead Sea. Massada was the last Jewish stronghold following the Roman destruction of the Holy Temple over 1,930 years ago. The age of the seeds was determined using carbon dating, but has a margin of error...
  • 2,000-Year-Old Judean Date Seed Growing Successfully

    01/30/2006 5:46:16 PM PST · by SJackson · 40 replies · 1,246+ views
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 1-30-06 | Ezra HaLevi
    A 2,000 year old date seed planted last Tu BíShvat has sprouted and is over a foot tall. Being grown at Kibbutz Ketura in the Negev, it is the oldest seed to ever produce a viable young sapling. The Judean date seed was found, together with a large number of other seeds, during archaeological excavations carried out close to Massada near the southern end of the Dead Sea, the last Jewish stronghold following the Roman destruction of the Holy Temple. The age of the seeds was determined using carbon dating, but has a margin of error of 50 years Ė...
  • 2,000-Year-Old Seed Sprouts, Sapling Is Thriving

    11/23/2005 9:23:40 AM PST · by Red Badger · 40 replies · 1,421+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 11/22/2005 | John Roach
    A sapling germinated earlier this year from a 2,000-year-old date palm seed is thriving, according to Israeli researchers who are cultivating the historic plant. "It's 80 centimeters [3 feet] high with nine leaves, and it looks great," said Sarah Sallon, director of the Hadassah Medical Organization's Louis L. Borick Natural Medicine Research Center (NMRC) in Jerusalem. Sallon's program is dedicated to the study of complementary and alternative medicines. The center is also interested in conserving the heritage of Middle Eastern plants that have been used for thousands of years. Sallon wants to see if the ancient tree, nicknamed Methuselah after...
  • BBC: Date palm buds after 2,000 years

    06/12/2005 9:59:05 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 18 replies · 883+ views
    BBC ^ | Monday, 13 June, 2005, 01:21 GMT 02:21 UK | staff
    Date palm buds after 2,000 years Dates have symbolic importance in the Middle East Israeli researchers say they have succeeded in growing a date palm from a 2,000-year-old seed. The seed was one of several found during an excavation of the ancient mountain fortress of Masada. Scientists working on the project believe it is the oldest seed ever germinated. Researchers in Jerusalem have nicknamed the sapling Methuselah, after the biblical figure said to have lived for nearly 1,000 years. Future medicine? The palm is from a variety that became extinct in the Middle Ages and was reputed to have...
  • After a 2,000-Year Rest, a Seed Sprouts in Jerusalem

    06/11/2005 7:29:53 PM PDT · by TheOtherOne · 66 replies · 2,134+ views
    NY TIMES ^ | JERUSALEM, June 11
    JERUSALEM, June 11 - Israeli doctors and scientists have succeeded in germinating a date seed nearly 2,000 years old. The seed, nicknamed Methuselah, was taken from an excavation at Masada, the cliff fortress where, in A.D. 73, 960 Jewish zealots died by their own hand, rather than surrender to a Roman assault. The point is to find out what was so exceptional about the original date palm of Judea, much praised in the Bible and the Koran for its shade, food, beauty and medicinal qualities, but long ago destroyed by the crusaders.
  • Byzantine-Era Church Discovered During Tel Aviv-Jerusalem Road Construction

    06/11/2015 4:06:23 AM PDT · by SJackson · 9 replies
    Algemeiner ^ | June 10, 2015
    JNS.org Ė Road workers doing construction on a highway leading from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem have unearthed a large Byzantine-era road station and church. According to the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), the archaeological find was discovered outside of the town of Abu Gosh and is thought to be approximately 1,500 years old. The uncovered church is about 52 feet long, with a side chapel measuring 21 feet long and 11.5 feet wide that has a mosaic floor. ďFragments of red-colored plaster found in the rubble strewn throughout the building showed that the church walls had been decorated with frescoes,Ē the...
  • Near Army construction site in Germany, a trove of ancient Roman artifacts

    09/24/2009 10:15:27 PM PDT · by Jet Jaguar · 13 replies · 828+ views
    Stars and Stripes ^ | September 24, 2009 | By Mark Patton
    WIESBADEN, Germany ó A team of archaeology students and experts believe they have unearthed remnants of a Roman settlement from the second or third century near the construction site of an Army housing project, but the discovery isnít expected to affect the project. The team, from nearby Mainz University, discovered a Roman coin, pieces of pottery, roof tiles, decorated bricks and 23 pieces of raw lead. The students also believe they have found the wall outlines of a building. "We think itís from the first to third century after Christ," said Dr. Guntram Schwitalla, a district archaeologist in Hessen. "If...
  • Roman rubbish dump reveals secrets of ancient trading networks

    06/07/2015 9:12:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | June 4, 2015 | Nick Squires
    The world's largest ancient Roman rubbish dump is revealing intriguing details about the extent and sophistication of trade in the Mediterranean 2,000 years ago. Monte Testaccio is an artificial hill in the centre of Rome that is made up of an estimated 25 million shards of broken amphorae, many from as far afield as Spain and North Africa. The amphorae, containing wine and olive oil, were broken up and dumped on the spoil heap after being unloaded from a nearby port on the River Tiber. They could not be reused because wine and oil residue seeped into the clay, turning...