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Keyword: scotlandyet

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  • BBC Scotland Video Says Holy Communion ‘Smells Like Hate’

    04/13/2018 6:17:23 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 16 replies
    The Catholic Herald (UK) ^ | 4/13/18 | Nick Hallett
    Bishop John Keenan of Paisley criticised the video for encouraging anti-Catholic prejudiceThe Bishop of Paisley has criticised BBC Scotland after a video said Holy Communion “tastes like cardboard and smells like hate”. The video was posted on the Facebook page of BBC The Social, a project aimed at young adults and managed by BBC Scotland, under the title “This is how homophobia feels in 2018”. At one point it depicts a priest holding a Mini Cheddar in a parody of the Host, and giving it to a woman who makes the sign of the cross. The narrator says Jesus “saved...
  • In Footprints on Scotland’s Isle of Skye, Signs of a Dinosaur Playground

    04/04/2018 8:15:38 PM PDT · by BBell · 20 replies
    https://www.nytimes.com/ ^ | 4/4/18 | NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR
    Gigantic dinosaurs frolicked and splashed some 170 million years ago in the lagoons of what is now Scotland. That’s what a team of paleontologists has determined after discovering dozens of jumbo-sized footprints belonging to long-necked sauropods on the Isle of Skye. Mixed with the herbivores’ tracks were a few clawed impressions left behind by two-legged meat-eaters known as theropods. The footprints present a snapshot of life during an important period in dinosaur history that has yielded relatively few fossil remains. In the mid-Jurassic, sauropods necks grew longer and the first birds were figuring out flight.Identifying two types of footprints in...
  • John Bolton Is Good for the U.S. and Bad for Iran

    04/02/2018 1:28:46 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 7 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 2, 2018 | Adam Ereli
    Judging by the rhetoric coming out of Tehran, John Bolton’s appointment as America’s National Security Advisor is the worst thing that ever happened. The Secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council labeled Bolton’s appointment “a matter of shame.”  The Chairman of the Iranian Parliament's Committee on National Security and Foreign Policy declared,  "The use of hardline elements against the Islamic Republic of Iran shows that the Americans seek to exert more pressure on Iran.”First Vice President Eshaq Jahangiri opined, “They (US officials) are wrong to assume that the Iranian nation will give in to their threats against the Islamic Republic.”  ...
  • The hidden history of the UK's highest peak

    03/27/2018 8:28:06 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 13 replies
    BBC "News" ^ | March 26, 2018 | By David Cox
    Each year, 150,000 people hike Scotland’s Ben Nevis – a former volcano and Britain’s highest mountain, at 4,400ft above sea level. Many opt to take the so-called tourist trail, the rocky path which winds and zigzags its way to the summit. Few realise that this path was initially carved out in 1883 for a very unique scientific expedition. Even fewer know that now, more than a century later, this site is providing UK scientists with insights into climate change. Today, we have advanced weather forecast models – which are capable of using the kind of data taken at Ben Nevis...
  • Archaeologists return to site of 'lost Pictish monastery'

    03/22/2018 4:35:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    The Scotsman, tall and handsome built ^ | Monday 19 March 2018 | Alison Campsie
    Archaeologists are to return to the potential site of a lost Pictish monastery where Scottish Gaelic was written down for the first time. Archaeologist Alison Cameron and her team could be on the brink of making a discovery of national importance at land close to Old Deer in Aberdeenshire... For 10 years, a search has been made for the monastery that dates from the sixth century but disappeared around 1,000 years ago. Some believe the Book of Deer, a richly decorated pocket-sized book of gospels was created here with Gaelic notes on local life later written in the margins by...
  • Literacy in the Time of Jesus - Could His Words Have Been Recorded in His Lifetime?

    02/07/2006 10:41:13 AM PST · by Between the Lines · 27 replies · 1,140+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Society ^ | Jul/Aug 2003 | Alan Millard
    Literacy in the Time of Jesus Could His Words Have Been Recorded in His Lifetime? Sidebar: Writing Tablets Sidebar: Priceless Garbage How likely is it that someone would have written down and collected Jesus’ sayings into a book in Jesus’ lifetime? Several lines of evidence converge to suggest it is quite probable. The first factor to consider is how prevalent literacy was in Jesus’ time. Full literacy means being able to read and write proficiently, but degrees of literacy vary; people who can read, for example, may not be able to write. A common view is that of W.H....
  • Ancient footprint discovery leaves lasting impression at Vindolanda

    07/01/2015 4:25:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Vindolanda Trust ^ | Tuesday, June 30, 2015 | Sonya Galloway
    Nowhere gets you closer to the Romans on Hadrian's Wall than the fort and settlement of Vindolanda, the extraordinary hoard of personal artefacts gives you a unique insight into the lives of people living here 2000 years ago. The latest addition to the collection of artefacts from the current excavation has certainly made an impression on everyone. Someone 2000 years ago quite literally put their foot in it and as a result a volunteer digging at the site has unearthed a tile with a clear imprint of a human foot that accidentally, or perhaps mischievously stood on the freshly made...
  • Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes

    10/11/2016 3:09:01 PM PDT · by fishtank · 15 replies
    Archeology ^ | Tuesday, October 11, 2016 | Chronicle Live
    Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes Tuesday, October 11, 2016 NORTHUMBERLAND, ENGLAND—Chronicle Live reports that more than 400 shoes sized for men, women, and children, were recovered at the Roman fort of Vindolanda over the summer, bringing the total of shoes from the site to more than 7,000. The 1,800-year-old shoes included ones made solely for indoor wear, boots, sandals, and bath clogs. The footwear was found in a defensive ditch, along with pottery and the remains of cats and dogs. Andrew Birley, director of Vindolanda’s excavations, thinks the contents of the ditches may have been discarded when the...
  • Rare Roman boxing gloves found near Hadrian's Wall

    03/13/2018 12:29:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Guardian ^ | Last modified on Wed 21 Feb 2018 | Dalya Alberge
    Roman boxing gloves have been discovered near Hadrian's Wall, thought to be the only known surviving examples, even though the sport was well- documented on Roman wall paintings, mosaics and sculptures. With a protective guard designed to fit snugly over the knuckles, the gloves were packed with natural material which acted as shock absorbers. They date from around AD120 and were certainly made to last: they still fit comfortably on a modern hand. One of them even retains the impression of the knuckles of its ancient wearer. They are among the latest discoveries at a pre-Hadrianic Roman cavalry barrack, which...
  • Iron-masters of the Caledonians

    11/01/2007 9:45:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 85+ views
    Current Archaeology ^ | Ross Murray (and editor)
    The Roman writer Tacitus says that 30,000 Caledonians massed to stop the Roman invasion under Agricola in AD 84. The bloody battle of Mons Graupius may have been fought near Inverness. Now a major site of the period has been uncovered in the area -- complete with two huge residences, a cluster of smaller houses, and the biggest industrial complex ever found in Iron Age Scotland... In June 2005 we began excavating a palisaded enclosure at Culduthel Farm on the southern outskirts of Inverness in advance of a housing development... we uncovered part of an astonishingly wellpreserved Iron Age settlement...
  • Hadrian's Wall Had A Bigger And Older Scottish Brother [tr]

    02/26/2018 7:46:10 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | April 27, 2013 | James Rush
    Archaeologists have been carrying out research into a huge late fist century AD defence system, which stretches 120 miles across Scotland. A total of 14 forts and several fortlets, which formed part of a defensive network built in the AD 70s, have so far been investigated over the past decade by the team, led by Dr Birgitta Hoffmann and Dr David Wolliscroft, both of the University of Liverpool. The network, which is thought to have run from Montrose or Stonehaven, south of Aberdeen, on the North Sea coast to the Firth or Clyde, was built some 50 years before Hadrian's...
  • Wreck Claim Triggers Treasure Conflict Dispute Over Sunken Ship

    02/21/2018 7:20:20 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Herald (Scotland) ^ | January 30, 1999 | unattributed
    Exclusive reports of the discovery of King Charles I's coronation riches last night triggered a transatlantic treasure war involving two independent expeditions. The group which claims to have found the wreck described the odds that it was the king's ferry as better than even. However, San Diego-based diver Bill Warren, who heads a rival team, said: ''We have really done our homework on this and I am absolutely not convinced.'' Mr Warren, who formed a Scottish company, Golden Quest, for the project, said he had spent seven months dealing with various authorities, including the Crown Estates Commissioners, to secure permission...
  • 'Secret of Kells' comes to life with bright, imaginative spirit

    04/04/2010 3:32:28 PM PDT · by thecodont · 20 replies · 435+ views
    Los Angeles Times / latimes.com ^ | April 2, 2010 | By KENNETH TURAN Film Critic
    "The Secret of Kells" is an anachronism many times over, and what a good thing that turned out to be. A ravishing, continually surprising example of largely hand-drawn animation in the heyday of computer-generated imagery, an inexpensive and sophisticated European production in an age of broad-stroke studio films, even a spirited defense of books and bookishness while Kindles walk the earth, "Kells" fights the tide every way it can. Yet this longshot that began as a college project for Irish director Tomm Moore edged Hayao Miyazaki's "Ponyo" for one of five feature animation Oscar nominations, and in a year without...
  • UFO in near miss with airbus plane over Glasgow with 200 passengers onboard

    09/02/2017 12:05:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    The Scottish Sun ^ | Mike Merrit
    “The light passed about 100-200ft above their aircraft. They assumed it to be a drone and reported it to air traffic control. There was no time to take avoiding action,” said the report on the incident, which happened on May 26. ... In 2013 another A320 also had a narrow miss with an unidentified object over Glasgow. The A320 was flying with its landing lights on, in clear conditions and at an altitude of about 4,000ft above the Baillieston area of Glasgow, when the pilot and non-flying pilot saw an object “loom ahead” at a range of about 100m. The...
  • 60-Million-Year-Old Meteorite Strike Discovered In Scotland

    12/15/2017 12:06:59 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    ndtv ^ | 12/15/2017
    Geologists exploring volcanic rocks on Scotland's Isle of Skye have found ejecta from a previously unknown, 60 million-year-old meteorite impact. The discovery, the first meteorite impact described within the British Paleogene Igneous Province (BPIP), raises questions about the impact and its possible connection to Paleogene volcanic activity across the North Atlantic. Simon Drake, an associate lecturer in geology at Birkbeck University of London, zeroed in on a meter-thick layer at the base of a 60.0 million-year-old lava flow. "We thought it was an ignimbrite (a volcanic flow deposit)," said Drake. However, when researchers analysed the rock using an electron microprobe,...
  • Digital exploration of the Sculptor's Cave [Moray, Scotland]

    11/26/2017 3:36:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Archaeology UK ^ | November 24, 2017 | Kathryn Krakowka
    During the late Bronze Age, the cave appears to have been a repository for precious objects, with finds ranging from bronze bracelets via pottery to a swan's neck pin. Large quantities of human remains have also been discovered - especially those of children - suggesting that the cave may have been a centre for funerary rites. Intriguingly, on the frontal bone of one child, there is evidence suggestive of deliberate defleshing. Some of the cave's most important features, however, are the Pictish symbols that can be found on the walls of its entrance passages. Problematically, the cave is only accessible...
  • The Italian highlanders who may have Scottish roots

    08/11/2017 8:54:38 AM PDT · by Theoria · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 11 Aug 2017 | Dany Mitzman
    Thousands of Italians emigrated to Scotland in the 20th Century, but it seems that 400 years earlier a group of Scots may have settled in a village in the Italian Alps. So local legend has it… And there are plenty of signs to suggest that maybe, just maybe, it's true. High up in the mountains of northern Italy, just a few kilometres from the Swiss border, the people of the tiny village of Gurro speak a strange dialect, incomprehensible even to the other villages in the same valley. They have peculiar surnames, and the women's traditional costume features a patterned...
  • Witch Prison Found in 15th Century Scottish Church: Medieval Chapel Was Used to Hold Suspects

    07/22/2016 11:51:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 22 July 2016 | Richard Gray
    Witch prison found in 15th century Scottish church: Medieval chapel was used to hold suspects before they were killed and burnedIn the years before the Reformation, a small chapel in a church on the outskirts of Aberdeen had provided a quiet place for Catholic women to pray in peace. But within 30 years of the switch from Catholicism to the Protestant faith, St Mary's Chapel at the Kirk of St Nicholas in Aberdeen took on a far darker and sinister role. Historians have uncovered evidence that the chapel, built during the 15th century, served as a prison for suspected witches...
  • Roman bullets tell story of 1,800-year-old attack on Scottish fort

    10/07/2016 10:27:03 AM PDT · by sparklite2 · 15 replies
    Fox News ^ | October 07, 2016 | Tom Metcalfe
    Several different types of sling bullets have been found at the site, from small lead bullets drilled with holes that the researchers think were designed to make a whistling noise in flight and terrorize their targets, to the largest lemon-shaped sling bullets, which weigh up to 2 ounces. "The interesting thing is that all the whistling sling bullets are from the Roman camp on the south face of the hill fort, so clearly they are using different sling bullets for different purposes," Nicholson told Live Science.
  • The Legend of Ludgar the War Wolf, King of the Trebuchets

    05/01/2017 11:45:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 12 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | May 1, 2017 | William Gurstelle
    Let's get this out of the way: England's King Edward I was an ass. You may remember Longshanks from his villainous turn in Braveheart. Tall, forbidding, and bad-tempered, the 14th century monarch stomped his Welsh neighbors in submission, taxed the Irish into poverty, and stole money from his Jewish subjects, killing many of them and expelling the rest. When he was done with that he engineered a takeover of Scotland using tactics that would make Machiavelli blanch, including inflicting an unbelievably cruel death upon the leader of the Scots, William Wallace, that's familiar to movie fans.