Keyword: sirwalterraleigh

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  • Have We Found the Lost Colony of Roanoke Island?

    12/10/2013 4:32:10 PM PST · by Theoria · 60 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 06 Dec 2013 | Tanya Basu
    Remote-sensing techniques have unearthed clues to the fate of settlers who mysteriously disappeared. It's a mystery that has intrigued Americans for centuries: What happened to the lost colonists of North Carolina's Roanoke Island? (See "America's Lost Colony.") The settlers, who arrived in 1587, disappeared in 1590, leaving behind only two clues: the words "Croatoan" carved into a fort's gatepost and "Cro" etched into a tree.Theories about the disappearance have ranged from an annihilating disease to a violent rampage by local Native American tribes. Previous digs have turned up some information and artifacts from the original colonists but very little about...
  • The lost tribe of South Carolina

    07/05/2009 11:49:30 AM PDT · by BGHater · 15 replies · 1,131+ views
    The State ^ | 05 July 2009 | JOEY HOLLEMAN
    Cofitachequi: We can’t pronounce it, we don’t know exactly where it is, but the importance of this Native American mound city is clear. North Carolina has the Lost Colony, a 16th-century legend that draws the curious to the longest running outdoor theater production in North America. The desert Southwest has the Anasazi, the native culture that vanished in the 14th century and is celebrated at a dozen National Park Service sites. South Carolina has a combination of the two — Cofitachequi. Ever heard of it? Cofitachequi is mentioned in third-grade S.C. history books, and there’s a diorama about it at...
  • New named pipe found at Jamestown

    11/01/2015 11:04:00 PM PST · by Brad from Tennessee · 21 replies
    History Blog ^ | October 31, 2015
    Archaeologists at Historic Jamestown have discovered the tenth Virginia-made pipe with a name inscribed on the stem. It’s the first new named pipe found at the site since 2009, and in contrast to most of the earlier discoveries, the name is complete: William Faldo. The stockholders of the Virginia Company were expecting to make a quick profit from their investment in the Jamestown settlement, but the struggling colonists could barely keep themselves alive, never mind send back the riches in minerals and trade goods the company had envisioned. They weren’t even self-sufficient, having clashed with the Powhatan tribes weeks after...
  • The Roanoke Colonists: Lost, and Found?

    08/10/2015 10:44:17 AM PDT · by OddLane · 25 replies
    The New York Times ^ | August 10, 2015 | Theo Emery
    MERRY HILL, N.C. — Under a blistering sun, Nicholas M. Luccketti swatted at mosquitoes as he watched his archaeology team at work in a shallow pit on a hillside above the shimmering waters of Albemarle Sound. On a table in the shade, a pile of plastic bags filled with artifacts was growing. Fragments of earthenware and pottery. A mashed metal rivet. A piece of a hand-wrought nail. They call the spot Site X. Down a dusty road winding through soybean fields, the clearing lies between two cypress swamps teeming with venomous snakes. It is a suitably mysterious name for a...
  • Ancient Map Gives Clue to Fate of 'Lost Colony' (Britain's Roanoke Island in the Late 16th Century)

    05/05/2012 1:51:27 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 6 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 04 May 2012 | The Telegraph
    A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalising clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from Britain's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginia Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof that...
  • Long Live The Pig!

    05/29/2013 5:01:34 PM PDT · by Starman417 · 125 replies
    Flopping Aces ^ | 05-29-13 | Dave The Sage
    Domesticated swine and Western Civilization go back a long way together. The domestic pig was being raised in Europe by about 1500 BC. Rome improved pig breeding and spread them throughout their empire. The early Christians increasingly abandoned the Jewish ban on the eating of pork by about 50 AD and it’s been the celebrated ‘other white meat’ ever since. Pigs and the discovery of the New World went hand in hand. Christopher Columbus took eight pigs on his voyage to Cuba in 1493 at Queen Isabella’s insistence. Hernando de Soto brought America’s first thirteen pigs to Tampa Bay, Fla.,...
  • Scholars seek to spread word on Sir Walter Raleigh [History of the World vol I]

    02/24/2009 8:25:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 416+ views
    Virginian-Pilot ^ | February 1, 2009 | Catherine Kozak
    Robert Anthony, curator of the North Carolina collection at the Wilson Special Collections Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill... was one of the 24 scholars who holed up last month in the Tower of London, the dank quarters where Raleigh spent most of the last 15 years of his life working on Volume I of the "History of the World." When the academics emerged from the Tower after two days, it was agreed that a critical analysis of the writings and works of the man largely responsible for persuading the queen to launch the 1584-87 Roanoke...