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Keyword: stonehenge

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  • Bronze Age burial near Stonehenge discovered by badger

    02/13/2016 12:59:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | February 9, 2016 | unattributed
    <p>A Bronze Age cremation burial has been discovered near Stonehenge after being accidentally dug up by a badger.</p>
  • Once a 'majestic roundhouse' - architect Sarah Ewbank believes she's solved Stonehenge's...

    01/30/2016 10:32:53 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    Sarah Ewbank spent the last year researching the ancient monument and applying her architectural background to the site to determine what its purpose and form once might have been. She has concluded, based on the layout of the stones, that they were used as support structures for a massive wooden frame that featured a second story for the site as well as an enormous round roof. Ewbank argues that a roof at the monument would allow for it to have been used throughout the year which, she believes, makes more sense that it simply being a religious site used on...
  • Great Riddles in Archaeology

    02/26/2012 2:37:08 PM PST · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Penn Museum ^ | Penn Museum
    Great Riddles in ArchaeologyWednesday Evenings, October 2011 through June 2012 From the knights of King Arthur’s roundtable to the deepest depths of Atlantis, some of the world’s greatest archaeological riddles have eluded us for centuries. Discover and explore these mind-boggling riddles in the next season of the Penn Museum’s popular monthly lecture series presented by current archaeologists and scholars. Mark your calendars for Great Riddles in Archaeology, offered the first Wednesday of every month, October 2011 through June 2012. General Admission is $5 per event in advance or $10 at the door. Subscriptions to all nine events are available for...
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 36 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso’s research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands – a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois – were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise — Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • Underwater Archaeologists Find Possible Mastodon Carving On Lake Michigan Rock

    09/05/2007 10:26:08 AM PDT · by blam · 85 replies · 1,937+ views
    AHN ^ | 9-4-2007 | Nidhi Sharma
    Underwater Archaeologists Find Possible Mastodon Carving On Lake Michigan Rock September 4, 2007 11:51 p.m. EST Nidhi Sharma - AHN News Writer Traverse City, MI (AHN) - Underwater archaeologists in Lake Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay are speculating a boulder they found in a June ship wreck to be engraved with a prehistoric carvings. Mark Holley, a scientist with the Grand Traverse Bay Underwater Preserve Council, believes that the granite rock, which was found hidden at a depth of about 12 metres, has markings that resemble a mastodon. A mastodon is an elephant-like creature that once inhabited parts of North America....
  • Origins of underwater stones a mystery

    02/09/2009 11:42:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 1,521+ views
    United Press International ^ | Monday, February 9, 2009 | unattributed
    An archaeologist says it remains a mystery how a circle of stones initially arrived at the floor of Michigan's Grand Traverse Bay. Underwater archeologist Mark Holley said while he first discovered the underwater stones in 2007, no one has been able to prove whether the rocks were placed there by nature or by mankind, the Chicago Tribune reported Sunday. "The first thing I said when I came out of the water was, 'Oh no, I wish we wouldn't have found this,'" Holley said of his discovery. "This is going to invite so much controversy that this is where we're going...
  • Significance of Megalithic Monuments in Atlantic Europe?

    09/15/2013 4:50:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | September 15, 2013 | Ashleigh Murszewski
    An archaeologists analysis on how the construction of megalithic monuments in Atlantic Europe are not restricted to a single purpose, nor how they reflect one aspect of the community that built them... well-rounded evidence for practical and symbolic components of the early agricultural lifestyle within the Neolithic. Depictions in the architecture of these structures explore complex symbolism and the socio-ritual interactions where monuments offer places for gatherings... Megalithic monuments of Atlantic Europe have long attracted attention from those who are interested in the early past of mankind. The word megalith originates from the Greek, meaning ‘great stone’ and is used...
  • Welsh people could be most ancient in UK, DNA suggests

    06/20/2012 5:01:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    BBC ^ | Tuesday, June 19, 2012 | unattributed
    Professor Peter Donnelly, of Oxford University, said the Welsh carry DNA which could be traced back to the last Ice Age, 10,000 years ago. The project surveyed 2,000 people in rural areas across Britain. Participants, as well as their parents and grandparents, had to be born in those areas to be included in the study. Prof Donnelly, a professor of statistical science at Oxford University and director of the Wellcome Trust centre for human genetics, said DNA samples were analysed at about 500,000 different points. After comparing statistics, a map was compiled which showed Wales and Cornwall stood out. Prof...
  • Archaeologist Claims 12,000-Year-Old Solstice Site in Clarke County[VA]

    10/23/2011 6:16:29 PM PDT · by FritzG · 13 replies
    Clarke Daily News ^ | 23 Oct 2011 | Edward Leonard
    Bear’s Den Rock has captured the attention of travelers in the northern Shenandoah Valley since colonial times and for thousands of years before by the indigenous people who hunted and fished in the region. Now, a local archaeologist believes that the prominent outcrop just south of Virginia’s Route 7 in Clarke County is a part of a larger 12,000 year old celestial calendar used by Native Americans to mark the changing of the seasons. Archaeologist Jack Hranicky believes that a 12,000-year-old solstice site has been discovered in Clarke County, Virginia“Although archaeological sites have been discovered across the United States, there’s...
  • The world’s first detailed prehistoric maps of Britain

    12/19/2013 5:05:23 PM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 12-8-2013 | TANN
    The ABC Publishing Group has announced the publication of the world’s first prehistoric maps of Britain. These maps are based on the recently published book by Robert John Langdon titled ‘The Stonehenge Enigma’ which proves that Britain suffered massive ‘Post Glacial Flooding’ directly after the last Ice Age ten thousand years ago, and that mankind placed their ancient sites on the shorelines of these raised waterways. Stonehenge - surrounded by water on three sides[Credit: ABC Publishing Group] The maps are presented on the old ordnance survey first edition that shows the natural ancient environment to a higher degree of detail...
  • Stonehenge First Built in Wales, Study Claims

    12/07/2015 1:02:37 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    The study, published in the current issue of the journal Antiquity, indicates that two quarries in the Preseli Hills of Pembrokeshire, in southwest Wales, are the source of Stonehenge’s bluestones. Carbon dating revealed such stones were dug out at least 500 years before Stonehenge was built — suggesting they were first used in a local monument that was later dismantled and dragged off to England. The very large standing stones at Stonehenge are sarsen, a local sandstone. The smaller ones, known as bluestones, consist of volcanic and igneous rocks, the most common of which are called dolerite and rhyolite. Geologists...
  • Rogem Hiri An Ancient, Mysterious Construction

    01/19/2008 3:41:43 AM PST · by Fred Nerks · 44 replies · 2,906+ views
    The megalithic complex of Rogem Hiri (Rujm al-Hiri in Arabic, meaning stone heap of the wild cat) is located in the central Golan, some 16 km. east of the Sea of Galilee, on a desolate plateau of basalt boulders. Since its discovery in a survey of the Golan in the late 1960s, this mysterious site has aroused the curiosity of archeologists. Between 1988 and 1991, archeological excavations and research were conducted in order to establish facts and determine the time of its construction and its function. Rogem Hiri is a monumental construction of local basalt fieldstones of various sizes. It...
  • Stonehenge II is found! Radar search reveals giant line of standing stones from 4,500 years ago

    09/07/2015 8:19:35 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 54 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Published: 18:01 EST, 6 September 2015 | Colin Fernandez
    <p>For centuries Stonehenge has mystified and enraptured archaeologists and visitors.</p> <p>So maybe it is not surprising that another monumental wonder from prehistory has been overlooked for so long – even though it is just a mile away.</p> <p>Experts have discovered an 'extraordinary' line of giant stones that dates back more than 4,500 years.</p>
  • Buried Megaliths Discovered At Stone Circle Site (Avebury)

    12/02/2003 5:34:50 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 1,157+ views
    Ananova ^ | 12-2-2003
    Buried megaliths discovered at stone circle site Archaeologists have discovered an arc of buried megaliths that once formed part of the great stone circle at Avebury in Wiltshire. The National Trust says the existence of these enormous stones, originally constructed more than 4,500 years ago, has remained a puzzle for the last 300 years. Visitors to Avebury will see most of the standing megaliths in the western half of the stone circle. The famous map of Avebury drawn up by William Stukely in the 1720s showed that many of the stones in the south east and north east quadrants of...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer

    10/28/2008 8:13:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 763+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Urmee Khan
    The pinhead-sized studs form an intricate pattern on the handle of a dagger, but archeologists failed to realise their significance when they excavated the burial mound in Wiltshire - known as Bush Barrow - in 1808. Now they are to be re-united with other priceless artefacts unearthed at the site and put on show at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes after Niall Sharples, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University turned out his predecessors' desk and discovered them in a film canister labelled Bush Barrow. In the 1960s, the gold was taken away for examination by Professor Richard Atkinson, a...
  • University of Reading archaeologists to excavate the biggest henge in the country (Marden Henge)

    06/29/2015 10:03:32 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    Trinity Mirror Southern - UK ^ | June 20, 2015 | Linda Fort
    Archaeologists from the University of Reading will start a three-year excavation on land between the prehistoric monuments of Stonehenge and Avenbury this summer. Exploring the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire is expected to reveal more about the lives of the people who worshipped at Stonehenge. The work will be done in collaboration with Historic England, the Arts and Humanities Research Council and Wiltshire Museum. The site is a barely explored archaeological region of huge international importance. The project will investigate Marden Henge. Built around 2400 BC Marden is the largest henge or Neolithic earthwork in the country and one of...
  • Gold Sun Disc from time of Stonehenge revealed to the public

    06/23/2015 11:48:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 19, 2015 | Wiltshire Museum
    Rare Bronze Age gold artifact found in burial mound in Wiltshire, U.K. For the first time, an early Bronze Age sun-disc from Monkton Farleigh in Wiltshire, U.K., is being exhibited for public view at the Wiltshire Museum, in time for this year's summer solstice. It is one of only 6 sun-disc finds and is one of the earliest metal objects found in Britain. Made in about 2,400 BC, soon after the sarsen stones were erected at Stonehenge, it is thought to represent the sun. The sun-disc was initially found in 1947 in a burial mound at Monkton Farleigh, just over...
  • Stonehenge Damaged with Chewing Gum and Graffiti During Winter Solstice

    Stonehenge was damaged during the Winter Solstice, with chewing gum stuck to the ancient monument, it has been disclosed. A report The Heritage Journal also revealed graffiti was sprayed on the stones, people tried to light fires on them and someone dripped a line of oil on several of them in December. Conservationists are calling for a ban to be put in place preventing people from walking among the stones on both the longest and shortest days of the year. It comes as it emerged volunteers and staff at the site were "left in tears" following the last summer solstice...
  • Cahokia's Woodhenge: a supprising implication [sic]

    11/29/2010 8:19:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Examiner.com ^ | Friday, November 26th, 2010 | Richard Thornton
    Today we travel to southern Illinois, where just across the Mississippi River is located the Cahokia Archaeological Zone. Cahokia was the largest known Native American city north of Mexico. At its peak population around 1250 AD, it was larger that London, England. Of course, Cahokia was not its real name. No one knows its real name. Unlike the ancient towns in the Southeast, where direct descendants of the original occupants still live, no one even knows yet what happened to the population of Cahokia, after it was abandoned. There was an indigenous village in the vicinity of Cahokia as early...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Stonehenge dig finds 6,000-year-old encampment

    12/20/2014 11:21:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    BBC ^ | December19, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists working on a site near Stonehenge say they have found an untouched 6,000-year-old encampment which "could rewrite British history". David Jacques, from the University of Buckingham, made the discovery at Blick Mead in October, and said the carbon dating results had just been confirmed. But he also raised concerns about possible damage to the site over plans to build a road tunnel past Stonehenge. The Department of Transport said it would "consult before any building". The Blick Mead site is about 1.5 miles (2.4km) from Stonehenge and archaeologists said "scientifically tested charcoal" dug up from the site had "revealed...
  • The Most Disappointing Travel Destinations on Earth

    12/07/2014 10:59:06 AM PST · by Bettyprob · 332 replies
    Yahoo ^ | December 07, 2014 | Fox News
    <p>We’ve all built up a trip in our minds, only to find it’s not remotely like the brochures.</p> <p>1. Los Angeles: ‘The whole city is a lie’</p> <p>LA was one of the biggest let-downs for holiday-makers.</p> <p>Travelers expecting Hollywood glitz and glamour were shocked to find what they called a run-down, dangerous and dirty urban sprawl.</p>
  • Underground map reveals mysteries of Stonehenge (+video)

    09/10/2014 2:54:42 PM PDT · by BBell · 50 replies
    http://www.csmonitor.com/A.P. ^ | September 10, 2014
    Using ground-penetrating radar and other high-tech devices, archaeologists at Stonehenge have discovered a complex of monuments buried beneath Britain's iconic paleolithic shrine.
  • Tick One Off the Bucket List: The Sun God Cometh

    09/07/2014 6:45:17 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 13 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 9-6-2014 | MOTUS
    I have to catch an early flight so I leave you to figure out on your own: why did Big Guy really go to Stonehenge yesterday? He said it was because it was on his bucket list.Butt it seems an odd bucket list item for a man of the modern world, if you know what I mean:Butt shoot, he was right around the corner so why not?Still, it made a rather odd photo op, what was he doing? Checking his celestial calendar? Calculating the incalculable pi? Wait, wait! I think I’ve it!Worshipping the sun god?Solstice worshipperYour guess is as good...
  • Stonehenge 'complete circle' evidence found

    09/06/2014 5:54:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | August 30, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists say the discovery adds weight to the theory that Stonehenge was once a complete circle. Evidence that the outer stone circle at Stonehenge was once complete has been found, because a hosepipe used to water the site was not long enough. Parch marks in the grass, in an area that had not been watered, have revealed places where two "missing" huge sarsen stones may once have stood. The marks were spotted by an English Heritage steward who alerted archaeologists to their existence. Previous scientific techniques such as geophysics failed to find any evidence. Historians have long debated whether Stonehenge...
  • 'Knocked that off the bucket list': Obama makes surprise visit to Stonehenge following NATO summit

    09/05/2014 2:15:09 PM PDT · by AT7Saluki · 50 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 9/5/14 | JChapman, DBloom
    It is one of the world's most famous ancient sites. And tonight it seemed Barack Obama could not resist a chance to see Stonehenge for himself - ordering his helicopter to make an unscheduled stop on his return home from the Nato summit. After flying out of Newport in south Wales, Marine One made an unannounced landing at Boscombe Down Airbase in Wiltshire.
  • Why was Stonehenge built? 'Groundbreaking' discovery of 15 new monuments suggests the answer...

    08/26/2014 10:21:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 51 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 13:41 EST, 22 August 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Archaeologist Vince Gaffney, of the University of Birmingham, is involved in the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project – a four-year collaboration with the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria. The team has conducted the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, covering around four square miles (6km), journalist Ed Caesar reported for Smithsonian. They discovered evidence of 15 unknown and poorly-understood late Neolithic monuments, including other henges, barrows, pits and ditches, which could all harbour valuable information about the prehistoric site. ... Historians are not sure what purpose the Curcus served and Professor Gaffney...
  • Archaeologists compare Neolithic Kent site to Stonehenge, find Bronze Age funerary monument

    08/17/2014 1:10:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 12 August 2014 | Ben Miller
    Archaeologists suspect a “sacred way” could have led to a henge 6,000 years ago at Iwade Meadows, to the west of the Kent industrial town of Sittingbourne. Positioned on a north-west slope, the 30-metre diameter structure is one of several prehistoric monuments on a north-west slope above the Ridham fleet stream running through the centre of the site. ...says Dr Paul Wilkinson, of... SWAT Archaeology... “The monuments are in a location that would have formerly had extensive views to the Swale Estuary and the Island of Sheppey beyond. “The archaeological evidence suggests that the outer ditch may have originated in...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Archaeologists Begin Dig on Buried Stone Circle TEN Times Bigger than Stonehenge

    07/01/2010 5:37:28 PM PDT · by GiovannaNicoletta · 51 replies
    DailyMail.co.uk ^ | 6/30/2010 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Archaeologists have begun a major dig to unearth the hidden mysteries of a buried ancient stone circle site that is ten times bigger than Stonehenge. The enormous 4,000 year old Marden Henge, in Wiltshire, is Britain's largest prehistoric structure stretching for 10.5 hectares, the equivalent of 10 football pitches. English Heritage is carrying out a six-week dig hoping to reveal the secrets behind the giant henge which has baffled historians for centuries.
  • Tomb found at Stonehenge quarry site (Wales)

    09/01/2011 9:08:44 AM PDT · by decimon · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | August 31, 2011 | Louise Ord
    The tomb for the original builders of Stonehenge could have been unearthed by an excavation at a site in Wales.The Carn Menyn site in the Preseli Hills is where the bluestones used to construct the first stone phase of the henge were quarried in 2300BC. Organic material from the site will be radiocarbon dated, but it is thought any remains have already been removed. Archaeologists believe this could prove a conclusive link between the site and Stonehenge. The remains of a ceremonial monument were found with a bank that appears to have a pair of standing stones embedded in it....
  • The Mystery of Stonehenge, Ancient Petroglyphs and Crop Circles

    03/11/2014 5:23:38 AM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | 3-6-2014 | G. L. Leale
    The Mystery of Stonehenge, Ancient Petroglyphs and Crop Circles There are many theories about the origins and functions of Stonehenge. Only through exploring the significance of the electromagnetic universe do we begin to understand the implications of this great stone megalith. Revelations have appeared via another great mystery, crop circles but in a formation so obtuse it was largely bypassed.In 2009 at Manton, Wiltshire, UK, a stand alone pattern appeared. A peculiar stark design, it attracted little in the way of analysis going largely unexplored.However it is a major key to much crop circle imagery and meaning; that Earth life...
  • Ancient grave discovered

    05/17/2002 12:33:42 PM PDT · by Clive · 27 replies · 187+ views
    A 4,000-year- old grave found near Stonehenge contains the remains of an archer and a trove of artifacts that make it one of the richest early Bronze Age sites in Europe, archeologists said Thursday. "It's a fantastically important discovery both for the number of artifacts found in that grave and the range of artifacts. It's absolutely unique," said Gillian Varndell, a curator of the British Museum's prehistory department. About 100 objects, including a pair of rare gold earrings, were found three miles east of Stonehenge with the bones of a man who died at about the time the monolithic stone...
  • MICHIGAN MAN MAY HAVE TAPPED SECRETS OF THE ANCIENTS

    03/24/2004 4:56:10 PM PST · by vannrox · 69 replies · 3,365+ views
    But then, the blocks that Wallace T. Wallington moves around near his home in a rural Flint area have weighed up to nearly 10 tons. And by himself, he moves these behemoth playthings, not with cranes and cables, but with wooden levers. "It's more technique than it is technology," Wallington says. "I think the ancient Egyptians and Britons knew this." Last October, a production crew from Discovery Channel in Canada came to Wallington's home to record him as he raised a 16-foot, rectangular, concrete block that weighed 19,200 pounds and set it into a hole. That taping was made into...
  • 6,000-year-old vegetation found [ Salisbury plain ]

    12/22/2013 5:36:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Salisbury Journal ^ | Sunday, December 15th, 2013 | Dr Helen Wickstead
    A sink hole discovered by archaeologists in Damerham may hold vital information about the plant species thriving there 6,000 years ago. An archaeology team led by a Kingston University academic has been working on the Neolithic site for six years. Four areas of the temple complex were excavated during the summer, and in the largest of the openings, which was about 40 metres long, careful extractions revealed a layer of uncharacteristic orange sand and clay. Usually the archaeological survey would involve mapping and cataloguing finds such as bone, pottery and tool-making waste fragments. Instead the team, led by Dr Helen...
  • Archaeologists Map Neolithic Monument Complex at Damerham, near Stonehenge

    12/03/2013 6:43:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | November 27, 2013 | staff
    A team of archaeologists from London’s Kingston University has mapped a prehistoric temple complex at a Neolithic site near the village of Damerham – located about 15 miles from the iconic Stonehenge – and discovered a sink hole of material that may hold information about plants that thrived there 6,000 years ago. “The site at Damerham is on chalk land, so we don’t often find materials like this that capture and preserve the plant remains – pollen or phytoliths – from a specific time period,” said Dr Helen Wickstead, head of the archaeological team. “It was evident that prehistoric people...
  • Archaeologists looking for Stonehenge origins 'are digging in wrong place'

    11/28/2013 5:42:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday, November 20, 2013 | Steven Morris
    One of the mysteries of Stonehenge is how some of its stones were brought from Pembrokeshire in Wales to Wiltshire. Photograph: I Capture Photography/Alamy For almost a century archaeologists have been braving the wind and rain on an exposed Welsh hillside in an attempt to solve one of the key mysteries of Stonehenge. But new research about to be published suggests that over the decades they may have been chipping away at the wrong rocky outcrop on the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire. The work in the hills is a crucial element in the understanding of Stonehenge because it is generally...
  • Stonehenge Was An Ancient Burial Ground For the Rich: Study

    04/27/2013 12:29:10 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on April 27, 2013 | Elizabeth Howell
    The site of Stonehenge — that mysterious collection of British rocks that could have served as a calendar using the stars — was also a graveyard for the elite, according to new research. A British group led by the University College London looked at 63 bodies surrounding the historical site. They determined these people were part of a group of elite families that brought their relatives to Stonehenge for burial over more than 200 years, starting from 2,900 BC. The bodies were buried long before the rocks visible today were erected, though. Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/101771/stonehenge-was-an-ancient-burial-ground-for-the-rich-study/#ixzz2Rh4d8FWJ
  • Why did European DNA suddenly change 4,000 years ago? (Shortened Title)

    04/24/2013 5:50:41 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 52 replies
    Mail Online ^ | April 23, 2013 | Staff
    The genetic makeup of Europe mysteriously transformed about 4,000-5,000 years ago, researchers have discovered. An Australian team found the unexplained change while analysing several skeletons unearthed in central Europe that were up to 7,500 years old. They say the rapid expansion of the Bell Beaker culture, which is believed to have been instrumental in building the monoliths at Stonehedge, could hold the key.
  • Wanted: Stonehenge general manager to meet with Druids

    04/22/2013 6:43:12 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 4-20-2013 | Melanie Hall
    Only the "brightest and the best" need apply for the £65,000-a-year job to manage the famous attraction, which draws Druids and daytrippers to the prehistoric monument each year. The tasks will involve meeting with Druid leaders and ensuring the solstice celebrations "aren't in some way compromising the mystery and integrity of the stones", English Heritage said. The successful candidate will be expected to manage the attraction, which is aligned with the solstice sun, muck in to help the site's one million visitors and lead the monument's 180 staff and volunteers. Tim Reeve, English Heritage's historic properties director, said: "You could...
  • Stonehenge 5,000 Years Older Than Thought

    04/20/2013 6:32:59 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 30 replies
    Discovery ^ | 4-19-2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Excavation near Stonehenge found evidence of a settlement dating back to 7,500 BC, revealing the site was occupied some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought. Working at Vespasian’s Camp in Amesbury, Wiltshire, less than a mile from the megalithic stones, a team led by archaeologist David Jacques of the Open University unearthed material which contradicted the general belief that no people settled there until as late as 2,500 BC. Indeed, carbon dating of the material revealed the existence of a semi-permanent settlement which was occupied from 7,500 to 4,700 BC. The dating showed that people were present during every millennium...
  • Ancient tomb found at 'Sweden's Stonehenge'

    10/17/2012 3:41:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    The Local (Sweden) ^ | October 15, 2012 | Rebecca Martin
    Swedish archaeologists have unearthed what is presumed to be a dolmen, or a portal tomb, that is believed to be over 5,000 years old near the megalithic monument Ale's stones in southern Sweden... Despite a few days of rain, the archaeologists have managed to uncover enough of the site to see that what they have found is like to be a dolmen, a type of megalithic tomb, most often consisting of three or more upright stones supporting a large flat horizontal capstone... According to reports, the archaeologists have found what they believe is an imprint of the tomb, which must...
  • Uncovered: Secrets of Ilkley Moor's rock art

    09/16/2012 7:38:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Yorkshire Post ^ | Friday, September 14, 2012 | Andrew Robinson
    It is a 4,000-year-old mystery just waiting to be solved... Are they way markers, religious symbols, star charts or just 'doodles' done by early farmers with a bit of time on their hands? ...There are more than 400 known rock carvings, known as 'cup and ring' stones, on Rombalds Moor, which includes Ilkley Moor, and they are thought to date back to before the Pyramids were built. Members of Friends of Ilkley Moor are busy mapping the exact locations of the stones, noting down their co-ordinates and taking photographs for posterity. And now the Friends have launched a Cup and...
  • Ancient Town Found Near Stonehenge

    01/30/2007 10:28:33 AM PST · by Froufrou · 16 replies · 552+ views
    woai.com ^ | 01/30/07 | Unknown
    Evidence of a large settlement full of houses dating back to 2,600 BC has been discovered near the ancient stone monument of Stonehenge in southwest England, scientists said on Tuesday. They suspect inhabitants of the houses, forming the largest Neolithic village ever found in Britain, built the stone circle at Stonehenge -- generally thought to have been a temple, burial ground or an astronomy site -- between 3,000 and 1,600 BC. "We found the remains of eight houses," Mike Parker Pearson, a professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, said in a teleconference to announce the discovery. "We think they are...
  • Research finds Stonehenge was monument marking unification of Britain

    06/22/2012 3:40:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    U of Sheffield ^ | Friday, June 22, 2012 | Amy Stone
    The teams, from the universities of Sheffield, Manchester, Southampton, Bournemouth and University College London, all working on the Stonehenge Riverside Project (SRP), explored not just Stonehenge and its landscape but also the wider social and economic context of the monument's main stages of construction around 3,000 BC and 2,500 BC... Previous theories have suggested the great stone circle was used as a prehistoric observatory, a sun temple, a place of healing, and a temple of the ancient druids. The Stonehenge Riverside Project's researchers have rejected all these possibilities after the largest programme of archaeological research ever mounted on this iconic...
  • Swedish Stonehenge? Ancient stone structure spurs debate

    04/19/2012 1:53:22 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 17 replies
    Fox News ^ | April 19, 2012 | Crystal Gammon
    Ancient Scandinavians dragged 59 boulders to a seaside cliff near what is now the Swedish fishing village of Kaseberga. They carefully arranged the massive stones — each weighing up to 4,000 pounds (1,800 kilograms) — in the outline of a 220-foot-long (67-meter) ship overlooking the Baltic Sea. Archaeologists generally agree this megalithic structure, known as Ales Stenar ("Ale's Stones"), was assembled about 1,000 years ago, near the end of the Iron Age, as a burial monument. But a team of researchers now argues it's really 2,500 years old, dating from the Scandinavian Bronze Age, and was built as an astronomical...
  • 'Discovery of a lifetime': Stone Age temple found in Orkney is 800 years older than Stonehenge...

    01/04/2012 6:00:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 2nd January 2012 | Ted Thornhill
    The site, known as the Ness of Brodgar, was investigated by BBC2 documentary A History of Ancient Britain, with presenter Neil Oliver describing it as 'the discovery of a lifetime'. So far the remains of 14 Stone Age buildings have been excavated, but thermal geophysics technology has revealed that there are 100 altogether, forming a kind of temple precinct. Until now Stonehenge was considered to have been the centre of Neolithic culture, but that title may now go to the Orkney site, which contains Britain's earliest known wall paintings. Oliver said: 'The excavation of a vast network of buildings on...