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Keyword: supernova

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  • "Similar Event Within 100 Light Years of Earth Would Be Catastrophic" --Astronomers...

    07/28/2016 7:54:07 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 68 replies
    For most of 2016, astronomers have been viewing a ball of hot gas billions of light years away that is radiating the energy of hundreds of billions of suns. At its heart is an object a little larger than 10 miles across. And astronomers are not entirely sure what it is. If, as they suspect, the gas ball is the result of a supernova, then itís the most powerful supernova ever seen. Most astronomers today believe that one of the plausible reasons we have yet to detect intelligent life in the universe is due to the deadly effects of local...
  • Did a supernova two million years ago brighten the night sky and give our ancestors cancer?

    06/17/2016 4:22:29 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | June 17, 2016 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    Millions of years ago, a series of nearby supernovae sent radiation and debris raining down to Earth. The events left traces of radioactive iron-60 embedded in the sea floor and even on the Moon, and now, researchers are saying they may have had life-altering effects on the early inhabitants of our planet. At just hundreds of light-years away, two major stellar explosions may have spurred changes to the environment, and even increased the rates of cancer and mutation.
  • Supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

    04/06/2016 3:50:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/6/2016 | Australian National University
    An international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered Earth with radioactive debris. The scientists found radioactive iron-60 in sediment and crust samples taken from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The iron-60 was concentrated in a period between 3.2 and 1.7 million years ago, which is relatively recent in astronomical terms, said research leader Dr Anton Wallner from The Australian National University (ANU). "We were very surprised that there was debris clearly spread across 1.5 million years," said Dr Wallner, a nuclear physicist in the ANU Research...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Rise and Fall of Supernova 2015F

    02/09/2016 3:12:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | February 09, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sit back and watch a star explode. The actual supernova occurred back when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, but images of the spectacular event began arriving last year. Supernova 2015F was discovered in nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2442 by Berto Monard in 2015 March and was unusually bright -- enough to be seen with only a small telescope. The pattern of brightness variation indicated a Type Ia supernova -- a type of stellar explosion that results when an Earth-size white dwarf gains so much mass that its core crosses the threshold of nuclear fusion, possibly caused by a lower mass...
  • The Incomprehensible Power of a Supernova

    01/23/2016 7:15:45 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 28 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 23 Jan, 2016 | Tom Hartsfield
    That supernova at bottom left is not sitting in front of the galaxy NGC 4526. It's in the outer edge of that galaxy, 55 million light years away. Last summer, astronomers found the most powerful supernova they had ever seen, an event called ASSASN-15lh. Their report published in the journal Science last week contained a measurement of the total power of this explosion: (2.2+/-0.2) x 1045 Ergs per second. That's an esoteric number phrased in unfamiliar units. What's the real meaning of this much power? Astronomers look at a stellar object and measure its luminosity: the amount of energy it...
  • SCIENTISTS SPOT BRIGHTEST SUPERNOVA YET, OUTSHINES MILKY WAY

    01/15/2016 2:13:28 PM PST · by NYer · 26 replies
    AP ^ | January 15, 2016 | MARCIA DUNN
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -- Astronomers have discovered the brightest star explosion ever, a super supernova that easily outshines our entire Milky Way. An international team revealed "the most powerful supernova observed in human history" Thursday in the latest Science journal. The astronomers used a network of telescopes around the world to spot the record-breaking supernova last year.Super luminous supernovas - extra bright stellar explosions - are believed to be rare. The newly discovered supernova is especially rare: It is more than twice as luminous as any supernova observed to date, including the previous record-holders.At its peak intensity, it is...
  • Former boxing champ O'Neil ‚ÄėSuperNova‚Äô Bell shot and killed in Atlanta robbery

    11/26/2015 6:36:15 AM PST · by ConservativeStatement · 35 replies
    Examiner.com ^ | November 26, 2015 | Richard Webster
    Former boxing champion O'Neil ‚ÄúSuperNova‚ÄĚ Bell, 41, was shot to death during a robbery just after midnight on November 25 when he exited a MARTA bus in southwest Atlanta. Another robbery suspect victim getting off the same bus was also shot in the hip but is alive, according to 11 Alive in Atlanta. When police arrived on the scene, they found both gunshot victims lying in the street. Bell, a cruiserweight world boxing champion from Jamaica who fought professionally from 1998 through 2011, was pronounced dead at the scene. The surviving male victim, 28, was taken to Grady Hospital with...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Puppis A Supernova Remnant

    08/29/2015 11:13:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | August 28, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Driven by the explosion of a massive star, supernova remnant Puppis A is blasting into the surrounding interstellar medium about 7,000 light-years away. At that distance, this colorful telescopic field based on broadband and narrowband optical image data is about 60 light-years across. As the supernova remnant expands into its clumpy, non-uniform surroundings, shocked filaments of oxygen atoms glow in green-blue hues. Hydrogen and nitrogen are in red. Light from the initial supernova itself, triggered by the collapse of the massive star's core, would have reached Earth about 3,700 years ago. The Puppis A remnant is actually seen through...
  • Milky Way's center unveils supernova 'dust factory'

    03/20/2015 3:05:24 AM PDT · by samtheman · 20 replies
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/ ^ | Cornell University
    Sifting through the center of the Milky Way galaxy, astronomers have made the first direct observations -- using an infrared telescope aboard a modified Boeing 747 -- of cosmic building-block dust resulting from an ancient supernova.
  • Astronomers saw the same star explode four times in four places because of a rare cosmic phenomenon

    03/05/2015 2:29:23 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Rachel Feltman
    Because of the lensing effect of a massive galaxy located between this supernova and the telescope imaging it, the same explosion showed up four times around the galaxy. This formation is called an Einstein Cross. Einstein first predicted the phenomenon of gravitational lensing (a result of his theory of relativity) about a century ago. Astronomers have seen Einstein Crosses made by galaxies and black holes before, but this is the first time they've seen a supernova jump into the shot. In this case, the supernova -- which is 9 billion light years away -- would be too faint to be...
  • Astroquizzical: What happens when Betelgeuse explodes?

    02/25/2015 6:57:23 AM PST · by C19fan · 31 replies
    Starts with a Bang! ^ | February 24, 2015 | Jillian Scudder
    Question: If Betelgeuse explodes right now, could we see it with naked eye? It is over 400 light years away, so you might think that people would see it long after it actually happens? Betelgeuse is already one of the brightest stars in the night sky, sitting somewhere around the 8th or 9th brightest star in the night sky. (These lists donít include the Sun, which is somewhat obviously always the brightest object in the sky.) It sits in the constellation Orion, along with a number of other bright stars, and makes up the left hand shoulder of the warrior....
  • ĎLopsidedí Supernova Could Be Responsible for Rogue Hypervelocity Stars

    02/10/2015 9:15:24 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Dan Majaess
    Hypervelocity stars have been observed traversing the Galaxy at extreme velocities (700 km/s), but the mechanisms that give rise to such phenomena are still debated. Astronomer Thomas M. Tauris argues that lopsided supernova explosions can eject lower-mass Solar stars from the Galaxy at speeds up to 1280 km/s. ď[This mechanism] can account for the majority (if not all) of the detected G/K-dwarf hypervelocity candidates,Ē he said. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the source for hypervelocity stars, and the hypotheses can vary as a function of stellar type. A simplified summary of the hypothesis Tauris favors begins with a higher-mass...
  • The massive supernova that could annihilate life on Earth (but don't panic- experts say luckily

    12/19/2014 7:00:13 AM PST · by C19fan · 28 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 19, 2014 | Mark Prigg
    It contains one of the biggest and brightest stars in our galaxy, weighing at least 90 times the mass of the sun. The Eta Carinae star system, however, also has a dark side - it could bring the end of life on Earth. However, the good news is that experts say this is 'extremely' unlikely - but cannot rule it out.
  • Weak supernova might have left zombie star

    08/07/2014 10:32:03 AM PDT · by ConservingFreedom · 13 replies
    EarthSky ^ | Aug 07, 2014 | Science Wire, Space
    Astronomers are scrutinizing a star system in a distant galaxy that exploded, possibly leaving behind a zombie star. They say their study of this system will help them understand supernova explosions, which are an important piece of the cosmic puzzle, used to help measure distances in vast space and the expansion of the universe. Standard Type Ia supernovae occur when a white dwarf draws enough material from a companion star onto itself to raise its own core temperature, ultimately creating a runaway nuclear reaction that causes the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. In such cases, the explosion typically...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- SN 1006 Supernova Remnant

    07/12/2014 4:20:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | July 12, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth's sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a...
  • Alien Species Living In The Inner Milky Way Could Be In Danger

    06/26/2012 12:27:17 AM PDT · by Windflier · 58 replies
    Message To Eagle ^ | 23 March 2012 | Staff
    Few people doubt there is intelligent alien life in the Milky Way galaxy, but where can we expect to find it? Astronomers think that the inner sector of the Milky Way Galaxy may be the most likely to support habitable worlds. Unfortunately some of these places are also most dangerous to all life-forms. According to Michael Gowanlock of NASA's Astrobiology Institute, and his Trent University colleagues David Patton and Sabine McConnel, habitability in the Milky Way can be based on three factors: supernova rates, metallicity (the abundance of heavy elements, used as a proxy for planet formation) and the time...
  • Bright New Supernova Blows Up in Nearby M82, the Cigar Galaxy

    01/22/2014 8:03:47 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    .universetoday ^ | January 22, 2014 | Bob King on
    Now hereís a supernova bright enough for even small telescope observers to see. And itís in a bright galaxy in Ursa Major well placed for viewing during evening hours in the northern hemisphere. Doesnít get much better than that! ... M81 is a bright, striking edge-on spiral galaxy bright enough to see in binoculars. Known as the Cigar or Starburst Galaxy because of its shape and a large, active starburst region in its core, itís only 12 million light years from Earth and home to two previous supernovae in 2004 and 2008. Neither of those came anywhere close to the...
  • Scientists witness massive gamma-ray burst, don't understand it

    11/22/2013 7:53:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | November 21, 2013 | By Pete Spotts, Staff writer
    An exploded star some 3.8 billion light-years away is forcing scientists to overhaul much of what they thought they knew about gamma-ray bursts Ė intense blasts of radiation triggered, in this case, by a star tens of times more massive than the sun that exhausted its nuclear fuel, exploded, then collapsed to form a black hole. Last April, gamma rays from the blast struck detectors in gamma-ray observatories orbiting Earth, triggering a frenzy of space- and ground-based observations. Many of them fly in the face of explanations researchers have developed during the past 30 years for the processes driving the...
  • Violent Past: Young sun withstood a supernova blast

    10/27/2013 6:03:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Science News ^ | May 23, 2007 | Ron Cowen
    Martin Bizzarro of the University of Copenhagen and his colleagues set out to determine the amount of iron in the early solar system. To do so, they measured nickel-60, a decay product of iron-60, in eight meteorites known to have formed at different times during the first 3 million years of the solar system. The meteorites that formed more than about a million years after the start of the solar system contain significantly more nickel-60 than do those that formed earlier, the team found. In a neighborhood of young stars, only a supernova could have produced iron-60, the parent of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6960: The Witch's Broom Nebula

    05/28/2013 9:16:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | May 29, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Ten thousand years ago, before the dawn of recorded human history, a new light would have suddenly have appeared in the night sky and faded after a few weeks. Today we know this light was from a supernova, or exploding star, and record the expanding debris cloud as the Veil Nebula, a supernova remnant. This sharp telescopic view is centered on a western segment of the Veil Nebula cataloged as NGC 6960 but less formally known as the Witch's Broom Nebula. Blasted out in the cataclysmic explosion, the interstellar shock wave plows through space sweeping up and exciting interstellar...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Kepler's Supernova Remnant in X-Rays

    05/15/2013 3:48:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | May 15, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What caused this mess? Some type of star exploded to create the unusually shaped nebula known as Kepler's supernova remnant, but which type? Light from the stellar explosion that created this energized cosmic cloud was first seen on planet Earth in October 1604, a mere four hundred years ago. The supernova produced a bright new star in early 17th century skies within the constellation Ophiuchus. It was studied by astronomer Johannes Kepler and his contemporaries, without the benefit of a telescope, as they searched for an explanation of the heavenly apparition. Armed with a modern understanding of stellar evolution,...
  • Supernova Dust Fell to Earth in Antarctic Meteorites

    04/28/2013 10:19:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | April 24, 2013 | John Matson
    In the new study (pdf), Pierre Haenecour of Washington University in St. Louis and his colleagues analyzed two meteorites collected in Antarctica in 2003, each named for a geographic feature near the spot where the meteorite fell. (Antarctica makes an ideal hunting ground for dark-colored meteorites, which stand out clearly against the ice fields.) Grove Mountains 021710, found by a Chinese expedition, and LaPaz Icefield 031117, collected by U.S. searchers, each harbor presolar grains of silica (SiO2), the researchers found, as evidenced by the grainsí enrichment in a heavy isotope of oxygen known as oxygen 18. That signature points to...
  • Hubble boffins: Incredibly old supernova could explain EVERYTHING

    04/05/2013 6:16:40 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    The Register UK ^ | 5th April 2013 12:17 GMT | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Might also answer poser: 'If supernovae were popcorn...' NASA's Hubble telescope has spotted the most distant massive star explosion of its kind ever, one which could help boffins understand the very fabric of the universe. Hubble view of supernova SN Wilson The telescope picked out Supernova UDS10Wil, also known as SN Wilson, in the night sky. The star apparently blew up over 10 billion years ago, and the resulting light from the explosion took that long to reach Earth. Wilson is in the special class of Type Ia supernovae, which give astroboffins a consistent level of brightness that can be...
  • Astronomers discover new kind of supernova

    03/26/2013 3:17:46 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 3/26/13
    Astronomers discover new kind of supernova March 26, 2013 EnlargeThis artist's conception shows the suspected progenitor of a new kind of supernova called Type Iax. Material from a hot, blue helium star at right is funneling toward a carbon/oxygen white dwarf star at left, which is embedded in an accretion disk. In many cases the white dwarf survives the subsequent explosion. Credit: Christine Pulliam (CfA) (Phys.org) óSupernovae were always thought to occur in two main varieties. But a team of astronomers including Carnegie's Wendy Freedman, Mark Phillips and Eric Persson is reporting the discovery of a new type of supernova...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 2736: The Pencil Nebula

    03/21/2013 3:48:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | March 21, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Moving left to right near the center of this beautifully detailed color composite, the thin, bright, braided filaments are actually long ripples in a sheet of glowing gas seen almost edge on. The interstellar shock wave plows through space at over 500,000 kilometers per hour. Cataloged as NGC 2736, its elongated appearance suggests its popular name, the Pencil Nebula. The Pencil Nebula is about 5 light-years long and 800 light-years away, but represents only a small part of the Vela supernova remnant. The Vela remnant itself is around 100 light-years in diameter, the expanding debris cloud of a star...
  • Source of High-Energy Cosmic Rays Nailed at Last

    02/14/2013 5:06:17 PM PST · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 14 February 2013 | Daniel Clery
    Enlarge Image Ray maker. The "Jellyfish nebula" (IC 443) and another supernova remnant gave researchers firm evidence that cosmic rays come from exploding stars. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA For the past century, physicists have puzzled over cosmic rays, particles (mostly protons) that hurtle through space at high speed and seem to come from all directions equally. What's the source of these galactic projectiles? And how do they come to be traveling so fast? Today, an international team announced a major step toward answering those questions: conclusive evidence that at least some of the cosmic rays come from supernova remnants‚ÄĒexpanding shells of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Cas A: Optical and X-ray

    01/17/2013 4:28:40 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | January 17, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The aftermath of a cosmic cataclysm, supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) is a comfortable 11,000 light-years away. Light from the Cas A supernova, the death explosion of a massive star, first reached Earth just 330 years ago. Still expanding, the explosion's debris cloud spans about 15 light-years near the center of this composite image. The scene combines color data of the starry field and fainter filaments of material at optical energies with image data from the orbiting NuSTAR X-ray telescope. Mapped to false colors, the X-ray data in blue hues trace the fragmented outer ring of the expanding...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Elusive Jellyfish Nebula

    01/09/2013 4:51:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | January 09, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Normally faint and elusive, the Jellyfish Nebula is caught in this alluring telescopic view. Drifting near bright star Eta Geminorum, at the foot of a celestial twin, the Jellyfish Nebula is seen dangling tentacles from the bright arcing ridge of emission left of center. In fact, the cosmic jellyfish is part of bubble-shaped supernova remnant IC 443, the expanding debris cloud from a massive star that exploded. Light from the explosion first reached planet Earth over 30,000 years ago. Like its cousin in astrophysical waters the Crab Nebula supernova remnant, IC 443 is known to harbor a neutron star,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Grand Spiral Galaxy NGC 7424

    01/08/2013 6:47:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | January 08, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The grand, winding arms are almost mesmerizing in this face-on view of NGC 7424, a spiral galaxy with a prominent central bar. About 40 million light-years distant in the headlong constellation Grus, this island universe is also about 100,000 light-years across making it remarkably similar to our own Milky Way. Following along the winding arms, many bright clusters of massive young stars can be found. The star clusters themselves are several hundred light-years in diameter. And while massive stars are born in the arms of NGC 7424, they also die there. Notably, this galaxy was home to a powerful...
  • Hubble Sees Stars and a Stripe in Celestial Fireworks (Happy 4th of July!)

    07/01/2008 8:32:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies · 115+ views
    www.newswise.com ^ | 01 July 2008 | NASA
    This image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, is a very thin section of a supernova remnant caused by a stellar explosion that occurred more than 1,000 years ago. Newswise ó A delicate ribbon of gas floats eerily in our galaxy. A contrail from an alien spaceship? A jet from a black-hole? Actually this image, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, is a very thin section of a supernova remnant caused by a stellar explosion that occurred more than 1,000 years ago. On or around May 1, 1006 A.D., observers from Africa to Europe to the Far East witnessed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day

    07/04/2008 5:46:20 AM PDT · by sig226 · 16 replies · 3,011+ views
    NASA ^ | 7/4/08 | Everybody
    SN 1006 Supernova Remnant Credit: X-ray - NASA/CXC/Rutgers/G.Cassam-Chenai, J.Hughes et al.; Radio - NRAO/AUI/NSF/GBT/VLA/ Dyer, Maddalena & Cornwell; Optical - Middlebury College/F.Winkler, NOAO/AURA/NSF/CTIO Schmidt & DSS Explanation: A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth's sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red....
  • Astronomy Picture Of The Day

    08/01/2009 8:25:48 AM PDT · by paul in cape · 10 replies · 902+ views
    NASA ^ | 8/1/09 | Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)
    SN 1006 Supernova Remnant Explanation: A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth's sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent...
  • Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times

    07/24/2006 12:03:03 AM PDT · by ForGod'sSake · 276 replies · 7,633+ views
    Mammoth Trumpet ^ | March 2001 | Firestone/Topping
    Terrestrial Evidence of a Nuclear Catastrophe in Paleoindian Times by Richard B. Firestone & William Topping The Paleoindian occupation of North America, theoretically the point of entry of the first people to the Americas, is traditionally assumed to have occurred within a short time span beginning at about 12,000 yr B.P. This is inconsistent with much older South American dates of around 32,000 yr B.P.1 and the similarity of the Paleoindian toolkit to Mousterian traditions that disappeared about 30,000 years ago.2. A pattern of unusually young radiocarbon dates in the Northeast has been noted by Bonnichsen and Will.3,4 Our research...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day

    09/15/2008 3:54:48 AM PDT · by sig226 · 7 replies · 310+ views
    NASA ^ | 9/15/08 | NASA
    SN 1006: A Supernova Ribbon from Hubble Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgement: W. Blair et al. (JHU) Explanation: What created this unusual space ribbon? Most assuredly, one of the most violent explosions ever witnessed by ancient humans. Back in the year 1006 AD, light reached Earth from a stellar explosion in the constellation of the Wolf (Lupus), creating a "guest star" in the sky that appeared brighter than Venus and lasted for over two years. The supernova, now cataloged at SN 1006, occurred about 7,000 light years away and has left a large remnant that continues to expand...
  • Did The Ancient Greeks And Native Americans Swap Starcharts?

    06/11/2006 6:18:49 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 1,235+ views
    Live Science ^ | 6-12-2005 | Ker Than
    Did the Ancient Greeks and Native Americans Swap Starcharts? Author Ker Than I had a story on SPACE.com yesterday about a very cool discovery: a one-thousand year old petroglyph, or rock carving, that was found in Arizona and which might depict the supernova of 1006, or SN 1006. The carving is presumed to have been made an ancient group of Native Americans called the Hohokam. The researcher who made the discovery argues that symbols of a scorpion and stars on the petroglyph match the relative positions of SN 1006 to the constellation Scorpius when the star first exploded. Well, after...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant

    10/09/2012 3:52:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | October 09, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It's easy to get lost following the intricate filaments in this detailed mosaic image of faint supernova remnant Simeis 147 (S147). Also cataloged as Sh2-240, it covers nearly 3 degrees or 6 full moons on the sky. That's about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. Anchoring the frame at the right, bright star Elnath (Beta Tauri) is seen towards the boundary of the constellations Taurus and Auriga, almost exactly opposite the galactic center in planet Earth's sky. This sharp composite includes image data taken through a narrow-band filter to highlight emission from hydrogen...
  • Sky 'Crucifix' in Ancient Text May Be Mystery-Solving Supernova

    07/01/2012 9:22:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Livescience ^ | Friday, June 29, 2012 | Life's Little Mysteries Staff
    According to an Old English manuscript chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons, a mysterious "red crucifix" appeared in the "heavens" over Britain one evening in A.D. 774. Now astronomers say it may have been the supernova explosion that sprinkled unexplained traces of carbon-14 in tree rings that year, halfway around the world in Japan. Jonathon Allen, an undergraduate student at the University of California, Santa Cruz, made the connection this week after listening to a Nature podcast. He heard a team of Japanese scientists discussing new research in which they measured an odd spike in carbon-14 levels in tree rings...
  • New Link From Supernova to Life on Earth?

    05/02/2012 10:21:22 AM PDT · by Twotone · 36 replies
    54į40í Or Fight! ^ | May 2, 2012 | Devon Watkins
    Through the Royal Astronomical Society in London the Danish scientist Henrik Svensmark released new scientific evidence in the last week that has not yet hit the mass media. This new examination could revolutionize the way that we view our worldís climate and even the history of life on Earth. Professor Svensmark examined the history of how supernovaís close to our solar system occurred over the last 500 million years. He compared this supernova history to our well known history of the number of different species on Earth over that same time period and found a remarkable correlation.
  • A star explodes and turns inside out

    04/04/2012 10:34:51 PM PDT · by U-238 · 10 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 3/4/2012 | Chandra X-ray Center
    A new X-ray study of the remains of an exploded star indicates that the supernova that disrupted the massive star may have turned it inside out in the process. Using long observations of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), a team of scientists has mapped the distribution elements in the supernova remnant in unprecedented detail. This information shows where the different layers of the pre-supernova star are located 300 years after the explosion, and provides insight into the nature of the supernova. The artistís illustration shows a simplified picture of the inner layers of the star that formed Cas A just before...
  • Pulsars: The universe's gift to physics

    03/28/2012 8:26:40 PM PDT · by U-238 · 13 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 2/20/2012 | NRAO
    Pulsars, superdense neutron stars, are perhaps the most extraordinary physics laboratories in the universe. Research on these extreme and exotic objects already has produced two Nobel Prizes. Pulsar researchers now are poised to learn otherwise-unavailable details of nuclear physics to test general relativity in conditions of extremely strong gravity, and to directly detect gravitational waves with a ďtelescopeĒ nearly the size of our galaxy. Neutron stars are the remnants of massive stars that exploded as supernovae. They pack more than the mass of the Sun into a sphere no larger than a medium-sized city, making them the densest objects in...
  • Diet of a dying star

    03/06/2012 1:06:23 AM PST · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Science News ^ | 2/11/2012 | Nadia Drake
    Scientists are beginning to sort out the stellar ingredients that produce a type 1a supernova, a type of cosmic explosion that has been used to measure the universeís accelerating expansion. Two teams of researchers presented new data about these supernovas at the American Astronomical Society meeting on January 11. One team confirmed a long-held suspicion about the kind of star that explodes, and the second provided new evidence for what feeds that star until it bursts. ďThis is a confirmation of a decades-old belief, namely that a type 1a supernova comes from the explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf,Ē said...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Case of the Missing Supernova Companion

    01/11/2012 9:39:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | January 12, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Where's the other star? At the center of this supernova remnant should be the companion star to the star that blew up. Identifying this star is important for understanding just how Type Ia supernova detonate, which in turn could lead to a better understanding of why the brightness of such explosions are so predictable, which in turn is key to calibrating the entire nature of our universe. The trouble is that even a careful inspection of the center of SNR 0509-67.5 has not found any star at all. This indicates that the companion is intrinsically very faint -- much...
  • Gingrich 'prepared to take the heat' with talk of amnesty ("Let's be humane in enforcing the law")

    11/22/2011 7:54:13 PM PST · by rabscuttle385 · 660 replies · 1+ views
    The Los Angeles Times ^ | 2011-11-22 | Kim Geiger
    <p>ďI do not believe that the people of the United States are going to take people whoíve been here for a quarter of a century Ö [and] separate them from their families and expel them,Ē Gingrich said during a discussion about illegal immigration and border security. ďI do believe we should control the border. I do believe we should have very severe penalties.Ē</p>
  • AstroAlert: Type Ia supernova in M101!

    08/27/2011 10:30:34 AM PDT · by bkopto · 15 replies
    Bad Astronomy/Discover Magazine ^ | August 25, 2011 | Phil Plait
    Attention all astronomers! There is a new Type Ia supernova that has been seen in the nearby spiral galaxy M101, and itís very young ó currently only about a day old! This is very exciting news; getting as much data on this event as possible is critical. Most likely professional astronomers are already aware of the supernova, since observations have already been taken by Swift (no X-rays have yet been seen, but itís early yet) and Hubble observations have been scheduled. Still, I would urge amateur astronomers to take careful observations of the galaxy. [As an aside, I'll note that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Another Nearby Supernova in the Whirlpool Galaxy

    06/04/2011 9:47:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | June 05, 2011 | (see photo credit)
    [Credit & Copyright: Stephane Lamotte Bailey, Marc Deldem, & Jean-Luc Dauvergne] Explanation: One of the brightest supernovas in recent years has just been recorded in the nearby Whirlpool galaxy (M51). Surprisingly, a seemingly similar supernova was recorded in M51 during 2005, following yet another one that occurred in 1994. Three supernovas in 17 years is a lot for single galaxy, and reasons for the supernova surge in M51 are being debated. Pictured above are two images of M51 taken with a small telescope: one taken on May 30 that does not show the supernova, and one taken on June 2...
  • Supernova found by 10-year-old Canadian girl

    01/05/2011 1:12:29 PM PST · by Pyro7480 · 10 replies
    BBC News ^ | 01/05/2011 | n/a
    A 10-year-old Canadian girl has become the youngest person in the world to find a supernova, the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada has confirmed. Kathryn Gray was studying images taken at an amateur observatory when she spotted the magnitude 17 supernova in the galaxy UGC 3378, in the constellation of Camelopardalis. Her father, Paul Gray - also a keen amateur astronomer - helped her confirm the find by taking steps to rule out asteroids and checking the list of current known supernovas....
  • New *Supernova* Lights Up Leo...

    11/07/2010 5:54:06 PM PST · by TaraP · 62 replies · 2+ views
    Universe Today | Nov 7th, 2010
    A new supernova? Darn right. Lighting up Leo? Well¬Ö not without some serious visual aid, but the fact that someone out there is watching and has invited us along for the ride is mighty important. And just who might that someone be? None other than Tim Puckett. Less than 24 hours ago, the American Association of Variable Star Observer¬ís Report #222 stated: ¬ďBright Supernova in UGC 5189A: SN 2010jl November 5, 2010 We have been informed by Tim Puckett and by the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBET 2532, Daniel W. E. Green, Ed.) of the discovery of a bright...
  • Discovery of Most Recent Supernova in Our Galaxy

    09/05/2010 11:12:21 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 17 replies
    chandra.harvard.edu ^ | May 14, 2008
    The most recent supernova in our Galaxy has been discovered by tracking the rapid expansion of its remains. This result, using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and NRAO's Very Large Array (VLA), has implications for understanding how often supernovas explode in the Milky Way galaxy. The supernova explosion occurred about 140 years ago, making it the most recent supernova in the Milky Way as measured in Earth's time frame. Previously, the last known galactic supernova occurred around 1680, based on studying the expansion of its remnant Cassiopeia A. The recent supernova explosion was not seen in optical light about 140 years...
  • Is Betelgeuse about to blow? (going supernova in weeks or just another breathless rumor?)

    06/01/2010 6:09:32 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 103 replies · 2,158+ views
    DiscoverMagazine ^ | 6/01/10 | Phil Plait
    I was going to wait to write about this, but Iím getting a lot of emails about it, so Iíll say something now, and followup when I get more information. The story: BABloggee Alereon (and many others) sent me to an interesting site: Life After the Oil Crash Forum ó a forum that apparently has a lot of doomsday-type scuttlebutt posted to it. An anonymous poster there says he has heard that the star Betelgeuse is about to go supernova, maybe as soon as a few weeks: I was talking to my son last week (he works on Mauna Kea),...
  • T Pyxidis Soon To Be A Type Ia Supernova

    01/05/2010 4:39:06 AM PST · by PeaceBeWithYou · 30 replies · 1,472+ views
    Space Daily ^ | Jan 05, 2010 | Staff
    Astronomers have uncovered evidence that a massive, explosive white dwarf star in a binary star system with a Sun-like star in our Milky Way Galaxy is growing in mass and is much closer to our solar system than previously thought. The report is being presented by Drs. Edward M. Sion, Patrick Godon and student Timothy McClain of Villanova University at the 215th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. This result is of special interest because it may shed light on the still unidentified type of stellar objects that explode as Type Ia supernovae, the kind of supernova...